Upcoming Events and Opportunities: November 27, 2012

This week: Public Seminar on Gender, Violence and Immigration, The Boxing Girls of Kabul & MORE!

                                   
                                     CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH
                                      www.yorku.ca/cfr - cfr@yorku.ca
                                     Upcoming Events and Opportunities
                                                  November 27, 2012
EVENTS
[1] "South Asian Mothering: Negotiating Culture, Family and Selfhood" Book Launch (November 27, 2012)
[2] Launch of Lydia Perovic's novel: Incidental Music (November 27, 2012)
[3] Public Seminar on Gender, Violence, and Immigration (November 28, 2012)
[4] The Boxing Girls of Kabul (November 28, 2012)
[5] Truth and Justice: Problematizing truth commissions and transitional justice: Guatemala, Kenya and Iran (November 29, 2012)
[6] Lecture by Nandini Sundar: "Tenuous Sovereignties, Precarious Citizenship: Civil War in Central India." (November 29, 2012)
[7] Bonita Lawrence Talk (November 29, 2012)
[8] Human Trafficking: What's Going On? (November 30, 2012)
[9] Defending Human Rights in Mexico: A View from the Ground With Ben Leather (December 4, 2012)
[10] Unbearable Blackness, a lecture by Jared Sexton (December 5, 2012)
[11] Sounds of Solidarity: Rally at Toronto Immigration Holding Centre (December 9, 2012)
[12] Director’s Cut (December 12 & 14, 2012)
[13] Launch for Feminist Dialogues, a special issue of Canadian Woman Studies (December 13, 2012)
[14] Critical Race Theory: From the Academy (February 8, 2013)
[15] Is the 'Early' in 'Early Modern' the Same as the 'Early' in 'Early Colonial'? (February 14, 2013)

CALLS FOR PAPERS
[1] Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture & Social Justice (January 20, 2013)
[2] Holistic Learning (February 15, 2013)
[3] Keep History Going with Feminist Journeys

OPPORTUNITIES
[1] Assistant / Associate Professor – Social and Cultural Theory and Philosophy of Education (December 31, 2012)
[2] Assistant Professor Position at Ryerson University in Community Services (January 11, 2013)
[3] Sessional Faculty Position at McMaster University 

EVENTS
[1] "South Asian Mothering: Negotiating Culture, Family and Selfhood" Book Launch (November 27, 2012)

The Asian Canadian Studies Works in Progress Series Presents: Jasjit Sangha, a visiting scholar in the Centre for Women Studies at OISE/UT, will be providing a presentation about her recently published co-edited volume with Tahira Gonsalves, titled "South Asian Mothering: Negotiating Culture, Family and Selfhood" (2012) on November 27th, in room 12-274, from 2 to 4 p.m. All are welcome to attend.

[2] Launch of Lydia Perovic's novel: Incidental Music (November 27, 2012)
Please join us for the launch of Lydia Perovic's novel, Incidental Music, on Tuesday November 27th, 2012. The inspiration behind the book comes to life in two acts - La Musica & Le Parole – the Music and the Words. TINARS and INANNA PUBLICATIONS invite you to join in the celebration: Tuesday, November 27th, 2012 – 7:00pm at The Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen St West, Toronto.Admission: $5 or FREE with book purchase. Perović is a Toronto writer and journalist who blogs about opera, voice, and politics of art on Definitely the Opera. This evening opens with the magic and madness of the mezzo and soprano liaisons, which have a long and colourful history going back to the very origins of opera. Act One - La Musica (the Music) - Seasoned concert and opera soprano Erin Bardua, whose singing highlights include Vancouver Opera (Macbeth) and Pamina (Die Zauberflöte) with Arcady Baroque Ensemble and Handel’s Alcina with Essential Opera, and mezzo Margaret Bardos, whose contemporary and classical repertoire includes R. Murray Schafer’s The Children’s Crusade, Karl Jenkins’ Stabat Mater, Rossini’s Petite Messe and Vivaldi’s Gloria, will perform an idiosyncratic history of the mezzo-with-soprano involving different composers and eras. They will be accompanied by accomplished Toronto pianist Christina M. Faye. Act Two - Le Parole (the Words) - In conversation with Toronto author and critic Jim Bartley, Perović takes us behind the scenes of Incidental Music, a novel that captures the allure of opera and city life. Set in contemporary Toronto it looks at the way we live now -- and try to make art, write, work, find a purpose, respond to a call from the public sphere, pay our bills... and love. At its centre are two doomed love affairs, one set in the present, the other in the restless Budapest of 1956. Like Incidental Music, this evening will have your heart by way of your mind. About the Author: Lydia Perovic has written for many Canadian, U.S. and UK media since 2001, including The Awl, n + 1, Xtra!, C Magazine, Steel Bananas, One Hour Empire, Corriere Canadese, Toronto Standard and openDemocracy.org. Her short fiction appeared in Joyland and Matrix Magazine. She grew up in the Communist Yugoslavia and moved to Nova Scotia in 1999 to complete an MA in Political Science, then to Toronto in 2005. For information please contact: Publisher Contact: Luciana Ricciutelli, Inanna Publications and Education Inc., Tel: 416.736.5356, luciana@xplornet.ca This is not a reading series contact: Alexandra Leggat – alexandraleggat@sympatico.ca THIS IS NOT A READING SERIES (TINARS) offers a ground-breaking theatrical dimension to the appreciation of fine writing. Employing music, comedy, psychodrama, dance, multimedia performance, lectures, dialogue—everything but reading—TINARS investigates the creative process behind literary works. For more information visit www.tinars.ca

[3] Public Seminar on Gender, Violence, and Immigration (November 28, 2012)
CERIS-The Ontario Metropolis Centre presents a public seminar on: "Gender, Violence, and Immigration". Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 12:00- 2:30pm. 1) Presenters: Anna Korteweg, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto, Salina Abji, PhD candidate, Department of Sociology, Research Assistant and Project Coordinator, University of Toronto. "Citizenship, Culture, and Violence Against Women: Mapping Service Provision among South Asian communities of the GTA" The presentation discusses preliminary findings from an ongoing research project that analyses how service providers understand the intersections of culture and violence against women, particularly familial or partner violence.  We focus on gaps in service provision and suggest that these in part result from problematic conceptions of culture. 2) Janice Du Mont, Scientist, Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, Ilene Hyman, Assistant Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto "Abuse by former partners by immigration status and length of residence in Canada" This research explores abuse by a former partner among Canadian-born and immigrant women at different stages of settlement.3) Rupaleem Bhuyan, Assistant Professor, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, Maria Vicki, Counselor, Multicultural Women Against Rape, Fernanda Villanueva, MSW candidate, University of Toronto "Unsafe Passages: Latina Women's Search for Rights, Safety and Belonging in Canada" The Migrant Mothers Project explores how women with precarious immigration status negotiate rights, safety and belonging in the face of violence and migration. We will present our narrative analysis of interviews with twenty-five Latina women in Toronto. We will also share insights learned from  organizing a solidarity group for and by Latina women with precarious status. Location: Room 548, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, 246 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V4 , Canada. This seminar is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. Seminar presentations are posted on our website after the event,to view please visit: http://ceris.metropolis.net<http://ceris.metropolis.net/> *This event is co-sponsored by Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement, and the Centre for Refugee Studies and Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto

[4] The Boxing Girls of Kabul (November 28, 2012)
The Conscious Activism Documentary Film Series at Hart House presents The Boxing Girls of Kabul directed by Ariel Nasr. Wednesday, November 28, 6.30 pm in the Hart House Library, FREE. A group of young Afghan women strive to become world-class boxers, training without the benefit of even the most basic facilities at the national stadium, where only recently women were executed by the Taliban. They are loyal to their country, yet dare to defy its traditions. Inspired by their tenacious coach, these courageous boxers openly dream of their future, and even a shot at the 2012 Olympics. Committed to a challenging regime and enduring family and societal pressures to abandon their training, the women are determined to fight their way onto an international stage. The film shadows them closely over the course of a year, and we come to know them both as individuals and as a team of competitors punching well above their weight. The Boxing Girls of Kabul reveals a compelling journey of both personal and political transformation, and illustrates the power of fighting for what you believe in. Screening to be followed by a discussion and Q & A with Jonathon Power, former World No. 1 ranked squash champion who is currently working with Pakistan's top ranked female squash player, Dr. Cathy Van Ingen of Brock University and Shape Your Life Toronto,  a boxing project for survivors of violence, and Dr. Subha Ramanathan of U of T whose research addresses how culture influences physical activity interests and levels among South Asian adolescent girls in Canada. This is a co-presentation of Hart House and the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education in celebration of 40 years of women's participation at Hart House. Sponsored by the National Film Board of Canada. www.harthouse.ca/docfest

[5] Truth and Justice: Problematizing truth commissions and transitional justice: Guatemala, Kenya and Iran (November 29, 2012)
Thursday, November 29th 2012 7:00-9:00 pm OISE/UT ● 252 Bloor Street W. ● 12th floor, NEXUS Lounge. Speakers: Alison Crosby ◦ Patricia Nyaundi ◦ Shekoufe Sakhi Alison Crosby is an Associate Professor, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, and Fellow, Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC), York University. Dr. Crosby’s research focuses on anti-racist feminist contestations of ongoing histories of militarized, colonial, and imperial violence, and in particular, how we understand survivors’ multifaceted struggles for agency and subjectivity, and the claiming, narration and performance of memory that challenges the hegemonic. She is currently working on a book manuscript with her colleague Dr. M. Brinton Lykes entitled Reparation Struggles: Mayan women’s protagonism in transitional justice processes in Guatemala, which is based on four years of feminist participatory action research with Mayan women survivors of violence during the armed conflict in Guatemala. With her colleague Dr. Malathi de Alwis, she is currently developing a new comparative project on memorialization struggles by ‘communities of the sorrowing’ in Guatemala and Sri Lanka. Patricia Nyaundi holds a Bachelor of Laws Degree from the University of Nairobi and a Master of Law Degree in Human Rights from the University of Cape Town. She is an advocate of the High Court of Kenya with 17 years of experience. She has vast experience in Women's Rights and has litigated and conducted numerous trainings to create awareness. She has experience in providing trainings with a special focus on gender based violence and harmful traditional practices. She has experience in training individuals in rural communities, police officers and governmental officials. She has actively involved in the drafting of a reproductive health rights bill. Currently, she is CEO/Secretary at the Truth, Justice and Reconciliation  Commission, Nairobi, Kenya. Shekoufe Sakhi is a Ph.D. candidate (ABD) in political science at York University, Canada, with a specialization in political theory and philosophy. Her dissertation, “Resistance and Capitulation: The Self in Totalizing Systems”, is focused on the distinction between ‘ethical’ and ‘survival’ objectives, a distinction through which resistance and capitulation may be elucidated. She has contributed to literary, political and philosophical debates—in English and Persian—on the subjects of prison and of resistance, among others. She has presented at dozens of academic and community events. Most recently, Ms. Sakhi participated as a witness in the Iran Tribunal, Hague (2012); she contributed to the “The Tree That Remembers”, a documentary film on experiences of Iranian political prisoners in the first decade after the 1979 revolution. Ms. Sakhi came to Canada as a political refugee in 1992, two years after her release from Evin prison in Tehran. She was a student and a political activist during and after the 1979 revolution. She spent eight years in several prisons in Iran as a prisoner of conscience. Currently, her theoretical and practical work continues to aim at elucidating the possibilities for a fundamentally human resistance to subjugation in any of its forms.SPONSORS SHAHRZAD MOJAB’S MEMORY, MEMOIRS, AND THE ARTS: WOMEN POLITICAL PRISONERS PROJECT ADULT EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OF THE LEADERSHIP, HIGHER AND ADULT EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, OISE/UT CENTRE FOR WOMENS’ STUDIES IN EDUCATION, OISE/UT Organized by Shahrzad Mojab and Bethany J.. Osborne

[6] Lecture by Nandini Sundar: "Tenuous Sovereignties, Precarious Citizenship: Civil War in Central India." (November 29, 2012)
The Centre for South Asian Studies at the University of Toronto will be hosting Nandini Sundar, Professor of Sociology at the Delhi School of Economics, Delhi University for a lecture on Friday November 30 entitled "Tenuous Sovereignties, Precarious Citizenship: Civil War in Central India." A scholar in legal studies, Professor Sundar was, with other influential public intellectuals like herself, a petitioner in Nandini Sundar and Ors. v. State of Chattisgarh, an influential 2011 Indian Supreme Court case addressing the state transgression of civil liberties and human rights (for a summary see http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-opinion/article2222834.ece). On the day before the public lecture, The Centre for South Asian Studies would like to hold a special invited seminar with Professor Sundar. The invited seminar will be held on Thursday, November 29 from 4-6pm at Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto M5S 3K7. If you would like to attend, please RSVP as soon as possible to Aga Baranowska, the Events Coordinator at CSAS at asian.institute@utoronto.ca. Space is limited, so we will have to take the rsvp's on a first come, first serve basis.

[7] Bonita Lawrence Talk (November 29, 2012)
Bonita Lawrence will lecture on the Algonquin Land Claim In Ontario from her new book “Fractured Homeland” on November 29th at 2pm. For further information, please contact Jennifer Murrin at 416 978 2233 or aboriginal.studies@uotoronto.ca

[8] Human Trafficking: What's Going On? (November 30, 2012)
Friday, November 30th @ 7pm. Ryerson University Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas St W., 7th floor. Please join us for an exciting public panel that explores the international and Canadian trends in “human trafficking.” The panellists ask: Why has human trafficking become a legal and policy priority in Canada, and with what effects? How have international dialogues shaped Canadian public policy? Why does migration for the purposes of engaging in sexual labour capture the public imagination, while other forms of labour-related migration disappear from discussions of criminal exploitation? Presenters: Melissa Ditmore (Sex Workers Project – New York City) Annalee Lepp (Global Alliance Against Trafficking in Women and the University of Victoria) Nandita Sharma (University of Hawai’i – Manoa). Harsha Walia (Anticolonial migrant justice activist and author – Vancouver) This is a FREE event, held in a wheelchair accessible space. Co-sponsored by: Law Research Centre (Ryerson University), Centre for Feminist Research (York University) Generously supported by: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Ryerson University, Office of the Dean of Arts, Ryerson University, Office of the Vice President, Research and Innovation, Ryerson University, Ryerson Student Union, Graduate Program in Socio-Legal Studies, York University, Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women's Studies, York University, Department of Social Science, York University. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/events/297512677020410/ Media Requests: HT.workshop@ryerson.ca

[9] Defending Human Rights in Mexico: A View from the Ground With Ben Leather (December 4, 2012)
CERLAC & PBI-Canada present Defending Human Rights in Mexico: A View from the Ground With Ben Leather, Advocacy Coordinator, Peace Brigades International-Mexico. Tues Dec 4, 2012 at 2 – 3:30 pm at 280 N York Lanes, York University. Human Rights Defenders (HRDs) in Mexico are at risk.  Amnesty International describes Mexico as a "dangerous place to defend human rights."  The UN High Commission for Human Rights has documented murders, attacks, death threats, harassment, surveillance and criminalization of those who defend human rights, as well as a 90% rate of impunity for these crimes.  In a recent Peace Brigades International-Mexico report called "Undermining the Land", several Canadian mining companies were linked to contexts flagged by Mexican HRDs. Come and learn about the situation Mexican human rights defenders face after almost two decades of NAFTA, what PBI is doing there, and how you can become involved.

[10] Unbearable Blackness, a lecture by Jared Sexton (December 5, 2012)
December 5, 2012,  2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., YRT 519. The lecture will be followed by a reception at 4:00 p.m. The heading of this talk addresses itself broadly to the psychic life of black freedom struggle in the political culture and cultural politics of the post-emancipation United States. The myriad figures of racial blackness at work across the spectrum of practical-theoretical activity – from claims to emergent mixed race identities to calls for progressive multiracial coalition to "pro-life" pronouncements of the Christian Right – raise questions about the material-symbolic persistence of modern slavery in and as the discourse of terror in the contemporary milieu. This persistence is obscure in a profound sense and its obscurity is inflected by but not accounted for in the recent ascendance of neoliberalism and its attendant pieties of racial justice under capital. It involves, rather, a more fundamental misrecognition of the political ontology enabling modern slavery, requiring of us at once a more thorough analysis of structural conditions and a deeper historical sense commensurate with the longue durée. Please note: Graduate Student seminar with Jared Sexton on December 10, 2012,  1:00 p.m. -3:00 p.m., at YRT 626. Space is limited for the Graduate Seminar, so please RSVP to cfr@yorku.ca Professor Jared Sexton is visiting York this fall as a Fulbright Distinguished Lecturing Chair. He comes to us from the University of California, Irvine, where he is Associate Professor and Director of the Program in African American Studies and teaches in the Department of Film and Media Studies and the Ph.D. programs in Visual Studies and Culture and Theory. He also holds affiliations at UCI with the Critical Theory Institute and the Center for Law, Culture and Society. Professor Sexton's research examines the political culture and cultural politics of the post-civil rights era United States, focusing on matters of race and sexuality, policing and prisons, multiracial coalition, and contemporary film. While in residence at York, Professor Sexton is teaching an undergraduate course on black feminist thought for the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies and continues work on the manuscript for his next book, The Shadow of a Color Line: Racial Politics beyond Coalition.

[11] Sounds of Solidarity: Rally at Toronto Immigration Holding Centre (December 9, 2012)
Sounds of Solidarity Rally. Toronto Immigration Holding Centre, December 9, 2012 at 4pm. Meet at 2:30pm at Federal Court House, 180 Queen West, to get on the buses to the Toronto Immigration Holding Centre. FREE THE THREE! FREEDOM FOR MIGRANTS! END DETENTIONS!  On December 9th, join us from across Southern Ontarion for a family friendly demonstration outside the Toronto immigration detention centre in solidarity with security certificate detainees Mohammad Mahjoub, Mohamed Harkat and Mahmoud Jaballah and all those locked up in immigration detention. RSVP FOR BUSES: http://bit.ly/BusesDec9 We will be a noisy, musical presence to express our support for those locked up inside. We will have live performances, drummers and hot chocolate! Please bring whistles, pots, pans and other noise makers, dress warm and bring a flashlight. Speakers and performers to be announced shortly. December 10th marks the 10th year anniversary of Mohamed Harkat’s arrest under a security certificate. Mahjoub will be in court in Toronto for a detention review, once again calling on the judge to free him from over twelve years of arbitrary, indefinite detention. And it is International Human Rights Day. For over a decade now, Mohammad Mahjoub, Mohamed Harkat and Mahmoud Jaballah have lived in arbitrary and inhumane detention as a result of security certificates. Mahjoub was imprisoned for 8 years (including 2.5 years in solitary) and over 4.5 years under continuing house arrest and conditions; Harkat was imprisoned for 3.5 years (including 1 year in solitary) and 6.5 years under house arrest and conditions; Jaballah was imprisoned for over six years prison (including 1.5 years in solitary) and 5.5 years under continuing house and conditions… yet, none of them has ever been charged. Mahjoub, Harkat and Jaballah are three of the thousands of migrants in Canada who spend more time in worse jails simply because they don’t have full immigration status. With the full implementation of Bill C-31 in December, and with Bill C-43 looming in Parliament, increasing numbers of migrants will find themselves behind bars. Since the Harper government came in to power in 2006, over 72,000 people have been locked up in immigration detention. This includes families and children as well as those jailed in maximum security prisons without access to service or programs. On December 9th and 10th, insist Free the Three! Freedom for Migrants! End Detentions! Attend an action near you or organize a workshop, info-picket or action in your community. Email justiceformahjoub@gmail.com: we can provide flyers, media release, and other support. Please also take a moment to sign the statement against security certificates at www.harkatstatement.com/

[12] Director’s Cut (December 12 & 14, 2012)
Join us for an evening of live theatre at York University's Glendon Campus. Director's Cut will feature a series of student-directed, student-acted 10-minute scenes from various plays. SXST major Peter SanFilippo will play the rabbi in a scene from Tony Kushner's gay-themed *Angels in America*. Glendon Theatre on Wednesday, 12 December and Friday, 14 December 7:00 p.m. Tickets $10 at the door Parking is prohibitively expensive on Glendon Campus. Take the 124 or 162 bus from the Lawrence Avenue subway station. York University/Glendon Campus has its own stop at Lawrence and Bayview. If you are coming from Keele Campus, you can also catch the Glendon shuttle in front of Vari Hall: the departure schedule is posted curbside. Once inside, ask any student for directions to the theatre.

[13] Launch for Feminist Dialogues, a special issue of Canadian Woman Studies (December 13, 2012)
December 13, 2012,  2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Founders Senior Common Room.Edited by Susan Braedley, Jacinthe Michaud and Leah Vosko. Canadian Woman Studies is a feminist quarterly which was founded with the goal of making current writing and research on a wide variety of feminist topics accessible to the largest possible community of  women. Susan Braedley is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work, Carleton University; Jacinthe Michaud is an Associate Professor in the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University; Leah Vosko is a Professor of Political Science and Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy of Gender & Work, York University.

[14] Critical Race Theory: From the Academy (February 8, 2013)
Following the success of the last critical race theory conference held at Yale in 2009, Yale Law School is proud to host the Critical Race Theory: From the Academy to the Community conference on Friday, February 8, 2013 and Saturday, February 9, 2013. The conference is sponsored by the Zelia & Oscar Ruebhausen and Debevoise & Plimpton Student Fund at Yale Law School, the American Studies Department, the Public Humanities Initiative, and La Casa Cultural at Yale College. The conference will convene scholars, legal practitioners, and community leaders to examine the ways in which critical race theory can be applied to scholarly work, legal practice, social justice advocacy and community based movements. Confirmed speakers include Devon Carbado, Sumi Cho, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Lani Guinier, Cheryl Harris, Tanya Hernandez, Charles Lawrence, Gary Peller, and Gerald Torres. In 2009, Yale Law School hosted a highly successful conference that explored the insights of critical race theory, as applied to immigration law. We look forward to continuing these conversations and exploring the role of CRT in other contexts at this February’s conference. For more information about programming, travel, accommodations, and more, please visit our website at:
http://www.law.yale.edu/news/crt2013.htm

[15] Is the 'Early' in 'Early Modern' the Same as the 'Early' in 'Early Colonial'? (February 14, 2013)
Master Class with Ania Loomba. Ania Loomba is Catherine Bryson Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania, and will present the 2013 Alexander Lecture on Thursday 14 February in UC140 at 4:30 p.m.  The lecture is titled:Is the 'Early' in 'Early Modern' the Same as the 'Early' in 'Early Colonial'? This lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required. Professor Loomba will also present a master class titled "Is Gender a Useful Category of Global Analysis" to a select group of graduate students and faculty members. You are here to register for this master class.  Readings will be pre-circulated to all participants. Registered participants are expected to print, read, and prepare these for discussion in the master class. If the class has reached capacity, you may register to be on the waiting list.  You will be contacted if a seat becomes available. Biographical information: Ania Loomba received her BA (Hons.), M. A., and M. Phil. degrees from the University of Delhi, India, and her Ph. D. from the University of Sussex, UK. She researches and teaches early modern literature, histories of race and colonialism, postcolonial studies, feminist theory, and contemporary Indian literature and culture. She currently holds the Catherine Bryson Chair in the English department at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also faculty in Comparative Literature, South Asian Studies, and Women's Studies, and her courses are regularly cross-listed with these programs. Her writings include Gender, Race, Renaissance Drama (Manchester University Press; 1989; Oxford University Press, 1992) Colonialism/ Postcolonialism (Routledge, 1998; second edition, 2005; with Italian, Turkish, Japanese, Swedish and Indonesian editions) and Shakespeare, Race, and Colonialism (Oxford University Press, 2002). She has co-edited Post-colonial Shakespeares (Routledge, 1998); Postcolonial Studies and Beyond (Duke University Press, 2005), and Race in Early Modern England: A Documentary Companion (Palgrave, 2007). She is series editor (with David Johnson of the Open University, UK) of Postcolonial Literary Studies (Edinburgh University Press). Her latest publications are a collection of essays South Asian Feminisms (co-edited with Ritty A. Lukose, Duke University Press, 2012) [http://southasianfeminisms.wordpress.com/] and a critical edition of Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra (Norton, 2011) [http://books.wwnorton.com/books/Antony-and-Cleopatra/] She is currently working on the lives of left-wing Indian women of the 1940s and 1950s, and co-editing (with Melissa Sanchez) Rethinking Feminism: Gender, Race and Sexuality in the Early Modern World

CALLS FOR PAPERS
[1] Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture & Social Justice (January 20, 2013)

Deadline: January 20, 2013, Mission Statement: Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture & Social Justice/Études critiques sur le genre, la culture, et la justice sociale, formerly Atlantis: A Women's Studies Journal / Revue d'etudes sur les femmes is a scholarly research journal devoted to critical work in a variety of formats that reflects current scholarship and approaches to the discipline of Women's and Gender Studies. It incorporates a diversity of feminist, anti-racist and critical identity, intersectional, transnational, and cultural studies approaches to a wide range of contemporary issues, topics, and knowledges. Atlantis is dedicated to the ongoing growth of knowledge in the field of Women's and Gender Studies, as well as to critical reflections on the field itself. Atlantis is published twice a year and only considers previously unpublished materials (i.e.not currently in the public domain, either in print or electronic form). It accepts submissions in both English and French. Submission should not exceed 7,000 words (including references). Authors should use Chicago author-date style for all citations and references (see http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html). All submissions should be made through the Atlantis website at: msvu.ca/atlantis. Questions can be emailed to Atlantis.Journal@msvu.ca. Cluster #1: In/Visibility: Absences/Presence in Feminist Theorizing. Editors: Ilya Parkins and Eva Karpinski. Feminist theory has long been preoccupied with reflecting and even producing the presence of marginalized subjects, making them visible, against their perceived absence from the historical record and the traditional disciplines. Indeed, Women’s Studies was born of the impulse to make women heard, visible, present. While highlighting the centrality of women is crucial political work, are there moments when the work of redressing absence and invisibility potentially undermines feminist and anti-oppressive aims? Does the dichotomy of absence/presence accurately capture the complexities of embodied experience, gendered representations, and the locations of multiply gendered and racialized subjects? When does absence articulate with or facilitate agency? When is invisibility strategically enabling? Can the academic work of recovery, redress, and remembering constitute a form of symbolic violence against those for whom it ostensibly guarantees presence? How is this violence invisibilized? And what about feminist theory’s own in/visibility in the present neoliberal moment? Can it still be productive in absentia in different social, political, cultural, and academic sites such as occupy movements or queer, indigenous, and disability studies theories? Inspired by work across a variety of disciplines that considers the complexity of presence and the potentials of absence, we seek contributions that put pressure on the various dichotomies that cluster around this one. We invite work that engages with concepts and practices of silence, concealment, invisibility, and secret-keeping to interrogate the feminist denigration of absence. We also welcome articles on the productive possibilities of haunting as a paradigm that highlights the presence of those who are ostensibly absent. Contributions that integrate theoretical rigour with examples from texts, archives or empirical studies are warmly welcomed. Cluster #2: Social Media, Cultural Politics. Editors: Ann Braithwaite and Annalee Lepp. Much is made these days about the role that social media plays in social and political life. From laments about how Facebook, texting, tweeting, etc. diminish person to person “live” communication and lead to more isolation, to celebrations of their openness, immediacy, and new ways of communicating, social media of all kinds have come under increasing scrutiny from a variety of sectors. This thematic cluster aims to explore the role(s) that social media play—and can play—in cultural politics, especially for disenfranchised populations. Some questions that papers could address include: Do these new forms of communicating open up possibilities for local, national, and transnational networking and community building, resistance, and action? How, for whom, and under what circumstances? What is gained, and what is lost, in these forms of communication? How have various groups of people used these media to respond to local and global events, i.e, through satire, mockery, humour, drama, etc.? How do we evaluate the effects of instant contact and the ability of “everyone” to participate in an event, i.e., via cell phone cameras and video, blogs, texting, tweeting, etc? What are the ramifications of what seems to be these more democratic possibilities for participation and for responding to power, at the same time as “the state” everywhere seems to be less accessible and accountable, and more invested in security and surveillance? Cluster #3: Open Call. Editors: Ann Braithwaite and Annalee Lepp.  Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture & Social Justice/Études critiques sur le genre, la culture, et la justice sociale also welcomes submissions on topics and themes other than those identified in the above thematic clusters that fit with the journal’s mission statement, as stated above.

[2] Holistic Learning (February 15, 2013)
These have been held on alternate years and so this is our 18th year of holding conferences which focus on all aspects of holistic education, for instance, mindful pedagogy, contemplative traditions, indigenous knowledges and many others. Our presentations range across the disciplines and from kindergarten to higher education. We will meet at Geneva Park Conference Center on Lake Couchiching, just outside of Orillia. Click on to our website to learn more! Our submission form has moved online.Initial Login: surveys.oise.utoronto.ca/surveyviewer2/index.php?surveyID=WCTAV Access to this form closes on February 15, 2013, the deadline for submissions. Notification of acceptance will be by April 2, 2013. Feel free to pass this website link on to others who may be interested. CRITICAL Directions: You will be asked to use an email to login. After your initial login (first time only) using the link above, you will receive a return email with an individualized link allowing you to return to YOUR completed (or partially completed) submission form. KEEP THIS EMAIL. This link is generated randomly. There is no retrieval method, and therefore you will not be able to access your submission form to revise/update your information at a later date. There is no technical help. You may use this form (and your individualized link to the form) until Feb 15, 2013, at which time access will end. If you have questions, please use the conference email: holisticlearning2013@ryerson.ca

[3] Keep History Going with Feminist Journeys
In her essay, A Room of One’s Own, published more than 80 years ago, Virginia Woolf brilliantly argued that the apparent absence of women writers and artists throughout history was not evidence of the lack of talent, but rather the want of time and space. As a consequence, so many of women’s ideas and significant accomplishments – across cultures and throughout centuries – have been lost. The Feminist History Society exists in order to ensure that this doesn’t happen to the past 50 years of activism and achievement realized by the vibrant “second wave” of the women’s movement in Canada. You have the capacity to sustain that wave. Our mission is to publish books written by the movement’s very participants, and reflecting its diversity and dynamism, strength and spirit. Supported by hundreds of members who share our belief in the importance of this task, the Feminist History Society has already produced three handsome hardcover books in a planned series of 20 or more. In Feminist Journeys more than 90 women share their rich and varied feminist “click” stories, exploring the circumstances and insights that connected them with feminism. In Writing the Revolution, longtime respected columnist Michele Landsberg reflects on the characteristics, successes and failures of the Canadian women’s movement over the past 50 years. And in the just published English translation of Feminism à la Québécoise, illustrious historian Micheline Dumont chronicles the Quebec feminist movement in a personal and accessible narrative, as a grandmother relating stories to her granddaughter. But many stories remain. In future volumes we aim to cover histories of feminist organizations, biographies of significant individuals, and explorations of feminism’s intersection with business, unions and the professions; sports, arts and education; religion, politics and the media. By supporting the FHS, you make it possible for us to: Record the compelling changes that women created in all aspects of Canadian society; Tell the untold stories behind those changes; and Celebrate the activists who made them happen. In doing so, you realize the following benefits. You get to: Play a critical role in sustaining the second wave (no marching necessary!); Receive a copy of one or more of the above books; Realize a $30 tax benefit for every year of membership purchased; Help to inspire others to continue working for more equitable institutions and opportunities for all women in Canada. It’s easy: you can either:1. Take advantage of the on-line credit card transaction available at www.FeministHistories.ca 2. Mail your $100 annual membership fee (made out to Women’s Education and Research Foundation) to: Feminist History Society, 44 Woodside Ave, Toronto, ON
 M6P 1L 83.  Call us at 905-510-4287 to pay by credit card over the phone.Your support for this initiative is an assertion that – despite centuries of relative invisibility – women’s stories matter. Thank you for helping women to keep making history! Beth Atcheson, Constance Backhouse, Lorraine Greaves, Diana Majury, Beth Symes

OPPORTUNITIES
[1] Assistant / Associate Professor – Social and Cultural Theory and Philosophy of Education (December 31, 2012)

 1201531. Job Field: Tenure Stream. Faculty / Division: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Department: Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Education. Campus:  St. George (downtown Toronto). Job Posting: Nov 2, 2012, 12:00:00 AM. Job Closing: Dec 31, 2012 Open until Filled. Description: The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto invites applications for a tenure-stream position in Social and Cultural Theory and Philosophy of Education at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Education. The appointment is to commence July 1, 2013. We seek candidates with a doctoral degree and expertise in some or all of the following areas: political philosophy, political theory, epistemology, and/or continental philosophy, with close attention to race and colonial contexts. The successful candidate will provide leadership to high school philosophy teaching and research, and supervise students in the areas of political philosophy, epistemology, continental philosophy and related areas of educational theory. Evidence of excellence in teaching and research is required. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All qualified candidates are invited to apply by clicking the link below. Applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teaching dossier, and a statement outlining current and future research interests. If you have any questions about this position, please contact the department at:c.sinclair@utoronto.ca All application materials should be submitted on line. The UofT application system can accommodate up to five attachments (10MB) per candidate profile; please combine attachments into one or two files in PDF/MS Word format. Submission guidelines can be found at: http://uoft.me/how-to-apply. Applicants should also ask three referees to send letters directly to Professor Rinaldo Walcott, Chair via email to: c.sinclair@utoronto.ca  by the closing date, December 31, 2012. Established in 1827, the University of Toronto is Canada's largest and most research-intensive university and the only Canadian university to be named in the top 25 in the Times Higher Education World Rankings. Located in and around Toronto, one of the world's most diverse regions, the University of Toronto's vibrant academic life is defined by the cultural diversity in its community. The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) has, for more than a century, made a major contribution to advancing education, human development and professional practice around the world. With more than 72,000 alumni, close to 3,000 students and 20 research centres, ours is an intellectually rich and supportive community, guided by the highest standards of scholarship and a commitment to equity and social justice. For more information please visit the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education homepage or the Department's website at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/hsssje

[2] Assistant Professor Position at Ryerson University in Community Services (January 11, 2013)
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK. FACULTY OF COMMUNITY SERVICES. TENURE TRACK POSITION – ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. The School of Social Work at Ryerson University (www.ryerson.ca/socialwork) invites applications for a tenure-stream appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor, effective August 1, 2013, subject to final budgetary approval. The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to the teaching and research agenda of the School as well as the mandate of the Faculty of Community Service and Ryerson University.  The successful candidate will be expected to teach a variety of Social Work courses at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, and contribute to the ongoing development of the School.  The School of Social Work invites applications from candidates who  hold a social work degree (BSW,  MSW, or PhD/DSW) and an earned doctorate in social work or a related field, or be ABD with a defense date set. Applicants are asked to demonstrate evidence of high-quality teaching, a strong research profile and an emerging scholarly record, capacity for collegial service, and a record of community engagement and social work practice. As a leader in transformative, anti-oppressive social work education, the School is strongly committed to preparing graduates for critically engaged social work practice with marginalized populations and communities.  The area of specialization we are particularly interested in must include practice and scholarship in Anti-Black Racism and/or Black Scholarship. The School of Social Work, with a student body in excess of 800 each academic year, prides itself both on the quality of its teaching and the breadth and excellence of its research.  Currently, the school offers a four year BSW program, an advanced standing BSW program to students with prior education and experience, a BSW program for Aboriginal students offered in collaboration with First Nations Technical Institute, and a Master of Social Work program. The School is located within the Faculty of Community Services, along with a range of programs that provide rich opportunities for collaborative and international initiatives in teaching and research and the potential for a future PhD program. Located in the heart of Toronto, the largest and most culturally diverse city in Canada, Ryerson University is committed to diversity, equity and inclusion. The university is known for innovative programs built on the integration of theoretical and practically oriented learning. Our undergraduate and graduate programs are distinguished by a professionally focused curriculum and strong emphasis on excellence in teaching, research and creative activities. Ryerson is also a leader in adult learning, with the largest university-based continuing education school in Canada.Applicants should include a letter of application describing their teaching, research, social work practice, and community engagement and discuss how these will contribute to the ongoing success of the school and its mission. Applications should include a curriculum vitae, two recent writing samples, and results of teaching surveys (or equivalent evidence such as a teaching dossier).  Please also include the names of three people who could be contacted for references (only referees of shortlisted candidates will be contacted). Please note that applications by fax or e-mail will not be accepted. Confidential inquiries can be directed to Dr. Lisa Barnoff, the School Director (lbarnoff@ryerson.ca). The deadline for submission of applications to be given first consideration is Friday January 11, 2013.  The position will remain open until filled. Please send applications in care of: Ms. Suzana Milosevic, Administrative Assistant, School of Social Work, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5B 2K3.

[3] Sessional Faculty Position at McMaster University 
McMaster University. School of Labour Studies. Sessional Faculty Position Available. The School of Labour Studies, McMaster University, invites applications for the following position to be offered in the Fall/Winter 2012/2013 session. Course Number, Name & Description. Labour Studies 1C03 – Voices of Work, Resistance & Change: An examination of how work is shaped by gender, race, class and culture in a global world; how workplace cultures of community and resistance are built and their effect on our experience of work. Location, Beginning and End of Classes: On Campus, Term 2 – Monday, January 7, 2013 – Wednesday, April 10, 2013. Teaching Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:30 am-12:20 pm [2 x 50 min lectures per week and 1 x 50 min tutorial run by teaching assistants (tutorials scheduled throughout week)] Projected TA support: 5-6 TAs (130 hours each) Projected Enrolment: 300 (capped at 300). Wages: As per Schedule A of the current Collective Agreement: $6514.75 per three unit course $6901.00 per three unit course with 18 units of Aggregate Seniority. Qualifications required: A PhD or ABD is preferred, although applicants with MA’s and teaching experience (either in post-secondary institutions or in the labour movement) will be considered. Applicants should have an interdisciplinary approach to labour issues. Applicants must provide the following information: 1. Curriculum Vitae (please include your email address) 2. Two letters of reference, including details of relevant teaching experience, sent directly to Ms. Delia Hutchinson, Administrative Coordinator, School of Labour Studies, email <hutchin@mcmaster.ca>. Applicants must also include information necessary to determine their seniority as defined in Article 20 of the CUPE Local 3906 (Unit 2) Collective Agreement. Submit your application to: Ms. Delia Hutchinson, Administrative Coordinator, School of Labour Studies, McMaster University, Room 717 Kenneth Taylor Hall, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M4, email <hutchin@mcmaster.ca>. Application deadline: Thursday, November 15, 2012 at 12 noon (Short-listed candidates will be contacted and asked to submit a two page proposed syllabus including lecture topics, readings and grade breakdown.) Posting period: Thursday, November 1 – Thursday, November 15, 2012 at 12 noon. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply. However, those legally able to work in Canada and at McMaster University will be given priority. McMaster University is strongly committed to employment equity within its community, and to recruiting a diverse faculty and staff. Accordingly, the University especially encourages applications from women, members of visible minorities, Aboriginal persons, members of sexual minorities and persons with disabilities. Further information on Labour Studies can be found on the Labour Studies home page at http://www.labourstudies.mcmaster.ca.