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Upcoming Events and Opportunities: April 8, 2013

This week service learning students' symposium, lauch of MATADORA and more………………

CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH
www.yorku.ca/cfr - cfr@yorku.ca
Upcoming Events and Opportunities
April 8, 2013

EVENTS
[1] Revolution Came, Revolution Went: Women (Re)Making History Across the Middle East and North Africa
(April 8, 2013)
[2] Connecting Classroom, Campus & Community: A Service Learning Students’ Symposium (April 9, 2013)

[3] Help Make Pride Happen at U of T (April 9, 2013)
[4] MATADORA: Launch of Elizabeth Ruth’s third novel (April 10, 2013)
[5] Inanna Publications, Spring 2013 Book Launch (April 18, 2013)
[6] Challenging the Neoliberal Development Paradigm: Women’s Experiences and Narratives in Guyana and Guatemala (April 18, 2013)
[7] 4th Annual International Conference on the Study of Islamophobia: From Theorizing Islamophobia to Systematic Documentation (April 19-20, 2013)

[8] 4th Annual Conference of Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS), University of Notre Dame: Public Intellectualism in Comparative Context- Different Countries, Different Disciplines (April 22-24, 2013)
[9] International Conference on "Social Media: Implications for the University" (May 3-5, 2013)
[10] Book Luanch: Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada edited by Luin Goldring & Particia Landolt (May 9, 2013)
[11] Body-Image and Self-Esteem Conference (May 9-10, 2013)
[12] Encounters in Canada: Contrasting Indigenous and Immigrant Perspectives (May 15, 2013)
[13] TECHNOLOGIES Libération ou exploitation des femmes?, UNIVERSITÉ FÉMINISTE D’ÉTÉ, Université Laval, Québec (Mai 19-24, 2013)
[14] Nationalism and Globalisation: New Settings, New Challenges: International Symposium (May 23-24, 2013)
[15] 2013 International Symposium on Cultural Diplomacy and Human Rights: Towards a Global Human Rights Culture- The Need for a Collective Alliance in the Protection and Promotion of Human Rights (May 27- June 1, 2013)
[16] Women’s Rights are Human Rights! CEDAW for Change: ONE WEEK intensive session (June 3 – 7, 2013)
[17] 19th Annual Colleges and University Work-Life-Family Association Conference (June 5-7, 2013)

[18] Institutional Ethnography Workshops with Dorothy E. Smith & Susan Turner (June 14-28, 2013)

CALLS FOR PAPERS
[1] TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 1.4: Trans Cultural Production (April 15, 2013)
[2] The Black Jacobins Revisited: Rewriting History: International conference at the International Slavery Museum and the Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool (April 15, 2013)

[3] Common Ground: Postgraduate Cultural Studies Conference, Centre for Cultural Studies, University of London (April 26, 2013)
[4] Call for Submissions: Local and Global Indigeneity (April 26, 2013)

[5] The Cosmopolitan Ideal: Challenges and Opportunities- International Conference (April 30, 2013)
[6] In the Balance: Indigeneity, Performance, Globalization – International Conference (April 30, 2013)
[7] Masculinities: A Journal of Identity and Culture (May 1, 2013)
[8]
The Point is to Change It: Media Democracy and Democratic Media in Action (June 1, 2013)
[9] “Brown Bag Lectures” in Honour of Roxana Ng (July 8, 2013)
[10] RFR Call for Papers: New Feminist Research (Ongoing)

OPPORTUNITIES
[1] Tier II Canada Research Chair in Social Innovation and Community Engagement, Mount Saint Vincent University (April 15, 2013)
[2] Call for Submissions to Mad Pride Toronto 2013 (April 26, 2013)
[3] Annual Mayor Andrée Boucher Memorial Scholarship (April 30, 2013)
[4] Limited Term Position in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Winnipeg (April 30,2013)
[5] SSHRC – Canada Research Chair (CRC) Tier 2 in Indigenous Studies (April 30, 2013)

[6] Teaching Assistant Position in University of Toronto at Mississauga (May 3, 2013)
[7] Job opportunity: Four PhD positions at the Department of journalism, media and communication, University of Gothenburg (May 6, 2013)
[8] 2013-14 TA position for the Concurrent Teacher Education Program (CTEP) at U of T Mississauga (May 8, 2013)
[9] Visiting Professorship in Sexuality Studies, York University, 2013-2014 (June1, 2013)
[10] The Fran Trust, Supporting Feminist Scholarship (August 31, 2013)
[11] Shameless_ Magazine, Canada’s Independent, Feminist Voice For Young Women And Trans Youth, Is Looking For A Publisher, Fundraising. (Open until filled)
[12] Postdoctoral Research Fellowship(s) at The Martin Prosperity Institute, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto (Open until filled)
 
[13] Funded MA or PhD Research Positions in Feminist Perspectives on Diversity and Local Governance (open until filled)

 


EVENTS
[1] Revolution Came, Revolution Went: Women (Re)Making History Across the Middle East and North Africa (April 8, 2013)
In celebration of the Women & Gender Studies Institute’s 40th Anniversary, Shahrzad Mojab and the students from “Women and Revolution in the Middle East” present: Revolution Came, Revolution Went: Women (Re)Making History Across the Middle East and North Africa. Speakers: Haideh Moghissi- The Arab Uprisings: Social Consequences and New Possibilities for Women; Nasser Mohajer- The Rediscovery of a Movement: Iranian Women's Uprising in 1979; Afiya Shehrbano Zia- End of a Romance: Islamist Womens' 'Alternative' Agency. Keynote Address: Zakia Salime-The New Subject of Rights: A Story of a Revolution from its Margins. When: April 8, 2013, 5-8pm, Where: OISE Library, main floor, 252 Bloor St. W. Organizers: Shahrzad Mojab, with students in "Women and Revolution in Middle East" class. Co-sponsored by the CWSE. This promises to be a dynamic discussion looking at the contradictions and challenges facing women in the "Arab world" in contemporary societies. It will also provide a much deeper understanding and context within which to situate the region's current events. Check out the Facebook event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/129364227247826/

[2] Connecting Classroom, Campus & Community: A Service Learning Students’ Symposium (April 9, 2013)
New Collecge and University of Toroto is presenting the Service Learning Students’ Symposium on April 9, 2013, 9:30 am-2:30 pm at Wilson Hall Lounge, 40 Willcocks Street, New College. Keynote by Janet Doner, University of Guelph:  The “Now what?” of Community-Engaged Learning:  Moving ahead with Heart, Hope and Humility. Panel Discussions: Students from Equity Studies, Human biology, African Studies and other academic fields will reflect on their learning with community organizations and campus-based initiatives. Lunch time poster session: presentations on service learning. Learn more about opportunities for community engaged learning at New College and at U of T. For program details, please visit on.fb.me/13Rf4U9. Register at tinyrul.com/atcd2ne for lunch and a chance to win a door prize. For more information, contact nc.servicelearning@utoronto.ca

[3] Help Make Pride Happen at U of T (April 9, 2013)
Join in the First U of T Pride Planning Meeting on Tuesday April 9, 2013 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm at Hart House South Dining Lounge. Students, staff and faculty across all three University of Toronto campuses are invited to join the Sexual & Gender Diversity Office to help plan Pride 2013 at U of T!   Toronto Pride is an important time of year for the LGBTQ community to celebrate and work together with our allies to build change and raise awareness.  U of T has a long history of recognizing Pride on campus, and in the community.  We hope you can join us this year to help make Pride happen at U of T.  U of T’S annual Pride activities involve celebrating with a BBQ and dancing under the stars at the Pride Pub in the Hart House Quad and marching in the Pride Parade.  At our planning meeting we will discuss these two marquee events, and other opportunities for Pride involvement.  We want to discuss: How will the U of T community participate in Pride activities? How can your student group, organization or department recognize Pride? What will be involved in the U of T 2013 Pride contingent at the Toronto Pride Parade? 2013 Pride Dates to Remember: April 9: First U of T Pride Planning Meeting; June 20: U of T Pride Pub, Hart House Quad; June 28: Toronto Pride Trans March; June 29: Toronto Pride Dyke March; June 30:  Toronto Pride Parade; * more dates and activities to be announced. We look forward to seeing you on April 9! If you have any questions, or would like to be involved but cannot attend the meeting, please contact Scott Clarke, Program Coordinator at the Sexual & Gender Diversity Office.

[4] MATADORA: Launch of Elizabeth Ruth’s third novel (April 10, 2013)
This is not a reading series and Cormorant books are pleased to invite you to join acclaimed author Elizabeth Ruth for the launch of her third novel MATADORA on Wednesday, April 10th, @7pm, Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen St. W, Toronto. Featuring Flamenco dancing, singing and guitar with La Mari, Maria Assunta and Juan Dino Toledo. Paintings by Alex Flores (alexarte.com). Elizabeth will be interviewed by Kerry Clare (www.picklemethis.com) followed by an audience Q&A and book signing. RSVP to eruth100@hotmail.com

[5] Inanna Publications, Spring 2013 Book Launch (April 18, 2013)
Please join for the launch of DARK WATER SONGS poems by Mary Lou Soutar-Hynes GLITTERING CHAOS, a novel by Lisa de Nikolits AND NEITHER HAVE I WINGS TO FLY: LABELLED AND LOCKED UP IN CANADA'S OLDEST INSTITUTION, by Thelma Wheatley on Thursday, April 18, 2013, from 6:00-9:00pm in the Dignam gallery, Women’s Art Association of Canada 23 Prince Arthur Avenue, Toronto (at St. George subway, Bedford exit) Refreshments will be served. Please note that premises are perfume free. No parking on premises. Parking available on the street and in the lot behind the building. Dark Water Songs is a startlingly good new collection. The overall sense is one of colour, landscape and texture; of the nuances of nature and man’s emotion as something echoing and fleeting, blundering, humanly aching to be one but made clumsy by the mind, by knowledge, by the self-consciousness that condemns us to recognize beauty and synchronicity without ever being able to be more than an uncomfortable part of it all. It is that humanness of difference that makes this collection a wonder. —Rachel Manley, author of Drumblair: Memories of a Jamaican Childhood, Slipstream: A Daughter Remembers and Horses in Her Hair: A Granddaughter’s Story. A Glittering Chaos is wonderful, dark, witty and wild. Here is a writer who is willing to explore the darkest corners of the human psyche and expose life for all its beauty and depravity. Lisa de Nikolits is a master storyteller who takes the reader on an unforgettable ride that begins with Melusine and her husband, Hans, whose trip to Las Vegas unravels their lives in ways they never would have thought possible. Stories within stories. Poetry. Madness. Illicit love. A city’s power to unleash forgotten selves. The real dangers of trying to get to the truth. A Glittering Chaos has it all. A completely riveting read that will engage the mind, body and spirit. —Lisa young, author of When the Earth. Thelma Wheatley has pulled off a rare piece of writing telling the tragic story of Daisy Lumsden and her family within the framework of a meticulously researched study of one of Ontario’s most destructive eras.  The book reveals the social biases and misguided benevolence that created Orillia and the human and systemic failures that contributed to the extraordinary abuses that occurred there. Still, at its center, the book reveals a human story and the humanity is always present even when lurking in some very dark places. It is a compelling read; I could not put it down. —Gordon Kyle, Director of Social Policy, Community Living Ontario. The publisher acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council for our publishing program, and the financial support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation.

[6] Challenging the Neoliberal Development Paradigm: Women’s Experiences and Narratives in Guyana and Guatemala (April 18, 2013)
The rhetoric of development is often deployed as a means of legitimizing neoliberal projects. This event to be held on Thursday, April 18 – 6-8pm @ Room 5-280, 5th floor of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto examines the ways that neoliberalism, as a set of policies and a governing logic, has differential impacts on the lives of women in the global South, examining two specific cases. Michelle Bobala- (MA Candidate Development Studies, York University) will address the disjuncture between the Millennium Development Goals’ (MDG) rhetoric of gender equality, implementation on the ground and the lived realities of urban Guyanese women. The MDG’s are significant, as the global framework international donor community adhere to, underpinned by a neoliberalizing logic. Stacey Gomez- (MA Candidate Development Studies, York University) will share the struggle of Maya women in defense of territory in San Juan Sacatepéquez, Guatemala. Since 2006, the Movement of the 12 Communities has been contesting a project entailing resource extraction and cement production, the initiative of Guatemalan company Cementos Progreso, allied with transnational capital. She will discuss the ways Maya women’s lives have changed since 2006, as well as their participation in resistance efforts. In Guatemala, mining, as well as other megaprojects are touted as forms of development, often meeting resistance from communities who contest this vision. Their presentations will highlight alternative understandings of development, different conceptions of solidarity, and transformation of research into change. After brief presentations, there will be time for a question and answer period, as well as a discussion. See: http://www.facebook.com/events/420783838014433/?ref=ts&fref=ts  This event is part of the Latin America and Caribbean Solidarity (LACSN) Month. For the full calendar of events see: http://lacsn.weebly.com/month-of-solidarity—april-2013.html

[7] 4th Annual International Conference on the Study of Islamophobia: From Theorizing Islamophobia to Systematic Documentation (April 19-20, 2013)
Join us for the Fourth Annual International Islamophobia Conference on the legendary Berkeley campus, the location with a reputation for activism and for challenging ideas and authority at the University of California-Berkeley Boalt School of Law (Booth Auditorium), 2778 Bancroft Way/College Ave, Berkeley, CA 94710, Web site: 
http://www.islamophobiacon.com/index.html You can also join us live April 19-20 via UStream from anywhere in the world! To watch live via UStream see the schedule at: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/conference-on-islamophobia-at-uc-berkeley-2011The focus of the conference will be Islamophobia: a contrived fear or prejudice fomented by the existing Eurocentric and Orientalist global power structure which rationalizes the necessity to deploy violence as a tool to achieve "civilizational rehab" of the target communities (Muslim or otherwise). The concept of Islamophobia reintroduces and reaffirms a global racial structure through which resource distribution disparities are maintained and extended. The conference will also highlight research and projects that explore the maintenance and extension of existing power paradigms by bringing together academics, thinkers, practitioners and researchers from around the globe who engage, question and challenge the existing disparities in economic, political, social and cultural relations.  Conference speakers and topics list: Dr.Hatem Bazian, Conference Chair and Convener, Editorial Members of the Islamophobia Studies Journal, Professor Munir Jiwa, Professor Ramon Grosfoguel Professor Rabab Abdul Hadi, and Professor Maxwell Leung , Youssef Chouhoud : To Hell with Islamophobia: Framing Soteriological Discourse in Muslim Context- University of Southern California-Los Angeles, Faeza Abdurazak: Nationalism and Islamophobia in Post-Colonial Southeast Asian Nation States -Assistant Program Director for the Middle East-National University of Singapore, Maha Hilal: Institutionalizing Islamophobia: The “War on Terror” and the Muslim American Experience- American University-Washington, DC, Darakshan Raja: The Role of Islamophobia in Shaping Responses to Crime Victimization in the American Muslim Community- Urban Institute Research Associate –California, Balbir K. Singh: Racial Logics: Sikhs and Muslims at the Limits of Violence”-Department of English, University of Washington –Seattle, Zara Zimbardo: Cultural Politics of Humor in (De)normalizing Islamophobic Stereotypes -California Institute of Integral Studies -San Francisco, Corinne Torrekens: Rising Islamophobia in Belgium: How Muslims (Counter-)React ? -Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB). Belgium – Bruxelles, Keith Feldman: How (Anti)Terrorism Went Viral -University of California, Berkeley –Berkeley, Itrath Syed : Muslim Social Media Memes -Simon Fraser University Canada – Burnaby, Tamirace Fakhoury: Debunking Islamophobia?: the discourse of Arab and Muslim student associations at University of California, Berkeley”-Lebanese American University-Visiting lecturer for summer 2012 and 2013, University of California, Berkeley Lebanon – Beirut, Rosemary Henze: Just a Piece of Cloth- A documentary film directed and produced by Rosemary Henze- San Jose State University -San Jose, Eduardo Jose Hernandez: Divorcing the Other: The foundations of White Supremacy in the Morisco expulsion from Spain -Temple University- Pennsylvania, Jasmin Zine, Ph.D: Constructing the “Enemies Within”: Muslim Youth, Islamophobia and the Racial Politics of Canada’s ‘Home Grown’ War on Terror -Program Wilfrid Laurier University Canada- West Waterloo, Maseeh Haseeb: A Contemporary Applicability of Orientalism within the Unfolding Discourse of National Security- Carleton University Canada – Ottawa, Esra Ozyurek: Between Islamophobia and Islamophilia: German Converts to Islam and their Relations to Born Muslims -University of California San Diego – San Diego, Randa Elbih: Pedagogy of Post 9/11 United States: Muslim American Students’ Experiences, Teachers’ Pedagogies, and Textbooks Analysis-University of New Mexico – New Mexico, Arun Rasiah: Communalization of the State and Islamophobia in Post-Civil War Sri Lanka -Holy Names University-Oakland, Suleyman Elik: The Rise and Fall of Political Islam: An Assessment for Islamism and Islamophobia – Istanbul Medeniyet University Turkey – Istanbul, Varsha Basheer: The Secular, the Radical and the ’practicing‘ terrorist Muslim: Ruminations on Media-ted Muslim Identity and creation of Islamophobia in India- University of Kerala India – Kerala, Sajid Suleman: The Institutionalization of Islamophobia in the Legal Systems of Europe International State Crime Initiative,-King’s College London England – London, Rochelle Terman: Muslim Women’s Rights in an Age of Islamophobia- University of California- Berkeley, Oishee Alam: "Islam is a whitefella religion, whatchya tryna prove?”: Islamophobia and the Racialization of Muslims in Australia -University of Western Sydney- Australia, Susanne Leuenberger: “Mr. Blancho, are you the Bin Laden of Biel? Swiss converts to Islam trigger public arbitrations of the “integratedness” of Switzerland’s Muslim population. A media analysis.- University of Berne Switzerland – Berne, Anaïd Lindemann: Use of Islam in the Definition of Foreign Otherness in Switzerland: A Comparative Analysis of Media Discourses Between 1970 and 2004- University of Lausanne, Switzerland- Lausanne, Anwar Milbes Hijaz: The Affect of Media Exposure and Group Familiarity on Tolerance of American Muslims – University of California Riverside- Riverside, Rajeesh Kumar: From Love Jihad to Fifth Minister Controversy: Some Reflections growing Islamophobia School of International Studies – New Delhi, India, Hakan Tosuner: Discrimination of Highly Educated Muslim Men in Germany -European University Viadrina Frankfurt Oder, Germany -Frankfurt, Arzu Merali: France and the Hated Society: Muslim Experiences IHRC (Islamic Human Rights Council) England – London , Serdar Kaya: Anti-Muslim Sentiments in the West: A Comparative, Multilevel Analysis- Simon Fraser University-Canada , Junaid S. Ahmad and Husnul Amin: Native Informants and Neo-Orientalist Islamophobia in the ‘War on Terror’ Discourse in Pakistan- Lahore University of Management and IIUI Pakistan-Lahore and Islamabad, Dr. Farzana Haniffa: Minorities in the post war context : Islamophobia in Sri Lanka- University of Colombo- Sirlanka – Colombo , Rabab Abdul-Hadi: To Be Announced- San Francisco State University – San Francisco , Houria Bouteldja: Islamophobia : When Whites lose their triple A rating- Mouvement des Indigènes de la République (MIR) -Paris , Houda Asal: Debates around Islamophobia in France- Centre Maurice Halbwachs France – Paris, Karina Eileraas: Sex(t)ing the Revolution?: Sexuality, Cyberspace, Neo-Orientalism, & the “Arab Spring” – Pitzer College – University of California Los Angeles and Berkeley, Daniel Tutt: Deconstructing Anti-Islamophobia Activism in America – Unity Productions Foundation and Institute of Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU)-Washington, DC, Saeed A. Khan: The Connection Between Islamophobia and Other Anti-Progressive Campaigns in the Midst of America’s Demographic Shift-Wayne State University and Institute of Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU)

[8] 4th Annual Conference of Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS), University of Notre Dame: Public Intellectualism in Comparative Context- Different Countries, Different Disciplines (April 22-24, 2013)
This international conference, hosted by the NDIAS in McKenna Hall at the University of Notre Dame, will focus on the roles played by public intellectuals—persons who exert a large influence in the contemporary society of their countries by virtue of their thought, writing, or speaking—in various countries around the world and in their different professional roles. Leading experts from multiple disciplines will come together to approach this elusive topic of public intellectualism from different perspectives. The conference will include interdisciplinary discussion of ideas presented as well as less formal opportunities for scholarly discourse and interaction. Each session includes a 40-minute presentation, a 20-minute commentary from another scholar in the field, followed by 40 minutes of questions and discussion of the presentation. This engaging and interdisciplinary approach differs from conferences in some disciplines, offering a unique opportunity to engage other scholars in ways that transcend disciplinary boundaries and providing participants new perspectives and ideas. Conference Schedule: Monday, April 22 – Morning Session/ 8:00 — Continental Breakfast (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 8:30 — Introductions and Welcome/ 8:45 — “Caveat Lector: Intellectuals and the Public”/ Mark Lilla, Professor of Humanities and Religion, Columbia University/ 9:30 – Commentary: Michael Zuckert, Nancy Reeves Dreux Chair in Political Science, University of Notre Dame/ 9:50 – Discussion/ 10:30 — Coffee Break (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 10:45 —  “The Public Intellectual in China” Willy Lam, Associate Professor of China and Global Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong, and Senior Fellow, Jamestown Foundation, Washington, DC/ 11:30 – Commentary: Lionel Jensen, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Notre Dame/ 11:50 – Discussion/ 12:30 — Lunch/ Monday, April 22 – Afternoon Session/ 14:00 — “The Public Intellectual in Latin America” Enrique Krauze, President of Editorial Clío and Director of Letras Libres/ 14:45 – Commentary: Paolo Carozza, Director of the Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies and Professor of Law, University of Notre Dame/ 15:05 – Discussion/ 15:45 — Coffee Break (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 16:00 — “The Artist as Public Intellectual” Maxim Kantor, Russian artist, novelist, and essayist/ 16:45 – Commentary: Peter Holland, Associate Dean for the Arts in the College of Arts and Letters, McMeel Chair of Shakespeare Studies, University of Notre Dame/ 17:05 – Discussion/ 17:45 — Dinner/ Monday, April 22 – Evening Session/ 19:15 — “The Religious Leader as Public Intellectual” Sr. Joan Chittister, O.S.B., Benedictine Sisters of Erie, author, Co-Chair of the Global Peace Initiative of Women, and Founder of “Benetvision” / 20:00 – Commentary: Ann Astell, Professor of Theology, University of Notre Dame/ 20:25 – Discussion/ Tuesday, April 23 – Morning Session/ 8:00 — Continental Breakfast (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 8:45 — “Islam and the Public Intellectual” (via Webex) Ahmad Moussalli, Professor of Political Studies and Public Administration, American University of Beirut/  9:30 – Commentary: Rashied Omar, Research Scholar of Islamic Studies and Peacebuilding, Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame/ 9:50 – Discussion/ 10:30 — Coffee Break (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 10:45 — “The Blogger as Public Intellectual” Paul Horwitz, Gordon Rosen Professor of Law, University of Alabama/ 11:30 – Commentary: Rick Garnett, Associate Dean for Faculty Research and Professor of Law, University of Notre Dame/ 11:50 – Discussion/ 12:30 — Lunch/ Tuesday, April 23 – Afternoon Session/ 14:00 — “Science in the Crosshairs: The Public Role of Science and Scientists” Kenneth Miller, Professor of Biology and Royce Family Professor for Teaching Excellence, Brown University/ 14:45 – Commentary: Jessica Hellmann, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, NDIAS Alumni Fellow (2011-2012), University of Notre Dame/  15:05 – Discussion/ 15:45 —  Coffee Break (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 16:00 —  “The Economist as Public Intellectual” Bradford DeLong, Professor of Economics, University of California Berkeley, Research Associate of the NBER, and Visiting Researcher (2012-2013) at the Kauffman Foundation/ 16:45 – Commentary/ 17:05 – Discussion/ 17:45 — Dinner/ Tuesday, April 23 – Evening Session/ 19:15 — “The Former Diplomat as Public Intellectual” Gilles Andréani, Associate Professor, Panthéon-Assas University in Paris, and Former Director of the Centre d’Analyse et de Prevision (CAP) of the French Foreign Affairs ministry/ 20:00 – Commentary: George Lopez, Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., Chair in Peace Studies and Professor of Political Science, University of Notre Dame/ 20:25 – Discussion/ Wednesday, April 24 – Morning Session/ 8:00 — Continental Breakfast (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 8:45 — “The Philosopher as Public Intellectual” Patrick Baert, Reader in Social Theory and Director of Undergraduate Education for Sociology, University of Cambridge, and Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society/ 9:30 – Commentary: Katherine Brading, William J. and Dorothy K. O’Neill Collegiate Professor of Philosophy and Director of the History and Philosophy of Science Graduate Program, University of Notre Dame/ 9:50 – Discussion/ 10:30 — Coffee Break (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 10:45 — “The American Public Intellectual as Cold Warrior” Andrew Bacevich, Professor of International Relations and History, Boston University/ 11:30 – Commentary: J. Daniel Philpott, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Notre Dame/ 11:50 – Discussion/ 12:30 — Lunch/ Wednesday, April 24 – Afternoon Session/ 14:00 —  “The Historian as Public Intellectual: The Case of George Kennan” Jeremi Suri, Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs and Professor of History, University of Texas at Austin/ 14:45 – Commentary: Fr. Wilson Miscamble, C.S.C., Professor of History, University of Notre Dame/ 15:05 – Discussion/ 15:45 — Coffee Break (McKenna Hall Atrium)/ 16:00 — “Politics and Science as a Vocation: The Ethical Imperative of Public Intellectualism for Scholars” Michael Desch, Professor and Chairperson (on leave 2012-2013), Department of Political Science, and NDIAS Alumni Fellow (Fall 2012), University of Notre Dame/ 16:45 – Commentary: Don Howard, Director of the John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, and Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame/ 17:05 – Discussion/ 17:45 — Concluding Thoughts: Vittorio Hösle, Director of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, Paul G. Kimball Chair of Arts and Letters, University of Notre Dame/ 18:30 — Dinner. Contact: Grant Osborn, Institute for Advanced Study, University of Notre Dame, 1124 Flanner Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA, Phone: +1 574 631-1305 Email: ndias@nd.edu, Web: http://ndias.nd.edu/annual-conferences/

[9] International Conference on "Social Media: Implications for the University" (May 3-5, 2013)
1st Annual International Conference on "Social Media: Implications for the University" is to be held at York University from May 3-5, 2013.  The conference features 4 keynote speakers: Professor Mark Bauerlein, Emory University, "The real revolution of Web 2.0" Professor Susan Herring, Indiana University, "Teaching about social media through social media" Professor Sidneyeve Matrix, Queen's University, "Social and mobile technology for next generation teaching and learning" Professor Raffaele Simone, University of Rome (Tre), "The shape of knowledge in the mediasphere" Along with the keynotes, there are over 30 national and international speakers. Everyone is encouraged to take advantage of early bird savings (before April 2, 2013) and register online.  Please note:  There are no conference fees for graduate and undergraduate students but they must register online in order to participate. Visit the conference website for more details and information http://socmed13.info.yorku.ca/

[10] Book Luanch: Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada edited by Luin Goldring & Particia Landolt (May 9, 2013)
UTP, York University & University of Toronto Scarborough cordially invite you to a celebration of Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship: Precarious Legal Status in Canada edited by Luin Goldring & Particia Landolt on Thursday, May 9, 2013, 4-6 pm at NEXUS Lounge, OISE, 12th Floor, Room 12-130, 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto. Join the co-editors and contributors for an afternoon of lively conversation, featuring guest commentators: Manavi Handa, Ryerson University; Audrey Macklin, University of Toronto and Leslie Seidle, Institute of Research on Public Policy. Please RSVP to University of Toronto Press at creed@utpress.utoronto.ca by Monday May 6th.

[11] Body-Image and Self-Esteem Conference (May 9-10, 2013)
National Eating Disorder Information Centre presents Body-Image and Self-Esteem Conference. Registration is now open! Full 2 day conference rates: Early bird $295 Regular $325. Student and one-day rates available http://conference.nedic.ca/ Keynote speakers: Dr Susie Orbach- Navigating our culture’s body anxiety and finding ways to fight back; Dr Joanne Dolhanty & Dr Adele Lafrance Robinson- Mothers and daughters: attachment emotions and food and weight preoccupation; Anita Sarkeesian- I’ll make a man out of you: redefining strong female characters and Jenni Schaefer- Almost anorexic: does everyone have an eating disorder? Topics include: Males and body-image issue, appearance-based bullying, support groups on campus, eating disorders and obesity, social inequities and weight and shape issues, media literacy: critical thinking, and families and disordered eating. See the whole program at http://conference.nedic.ca/

[12] Encounters in Canada: Contrasting Indigenous and Immigrant Perspectives (May 15, 2013)
Indigenous peoples are the original caretakers of Canada, but their encounters with settlers have been marred by assimilation and territorial dispossession over hundreds of years. Immigrants to Canada, which for the purposes of this conference include early colonists, recent immigrants, refugees and displaced persons, have often viewed the country as a haven or land of opportunity. While the specific experiences of Indigenous peoples, immigrant communities, refugees and Canadian-born citizens are very different on many levels, connections can be developed through dialogue and reciprocity. Indigenous peoples as well as immigrant and refugee communities experience discrimination, racism, stigmatization and marginalization. These encounters represent a wider systemic problem in Canadian political, legal, sociocultural and historical contexts. Efforts to overcome exclusion can be built through increased awareness and knowledge-building, with support from allies. The primary objective of this conference is to build bridges – cultural, political, intellectual and social connections – between those who share the lands of what is now Canada. These communities encounter Canada in very different ways based on racial identity, ancestral heritage, cultural background, community belonging, language and spiritual practice. Bridging the chasm that exists between Indigenous peoples and all newcomers, whether early or contemporary immigrants or refugees, is urgently needed in order to end discrimination and achieve equitable quality of life for all who live in this country.  Opening Reception with Joseph Boyden, 2008 Giller Prize Winner on May 15, 2013 @ 4:30pm-6:00pm. Free of Charge to Registered Attendees (plus Cash Bar). Mr. Boyden will read from his book Through Black Spruce. Opening Dinner and Keynote Presentation with The Right Honourable Paul Martin on May 15, 2013 @ 6:00pm-8:00pm. $40 for Registered Attendees. The Right Honourable Paul Martin will speak about the Martin Aboriginal Education Initiative, followed by a moderated Question & Answer session with attendees. Keynote presentations, plenary sessions and concurrent panels with over 85 speakers will take place May 16 and May 17. The program will take place at Chestnut Residence Conference Centre, University of Toronto. Complete conference information and registration is available at http://crs.yorku.ca/encounters/ or http://refugeeresearch.net/ms/encounters/ CONFERENCE ORGANIZING COMMITTEE: Jennifer Dalton, Principal Academic Organizer (jedalton@yorku.ca); David Mcnab (dtmcnab@yorku.ca); James Simeon (jcsimeon@yorku.ca); h. Tom Wilson (htwilson@osgoode.yorku.ca); Michele Millard, Centre for Refugee Studies Coordinator (mmillard@yorku.ca).  

[13] TECHNOLOGIES Libération ou exploitation des femmes?, UNIVERSITÉ FÉMINISTE D’ÉTÉ, Université Laval, Québec (Mai 19-24, 2013)
Les développements technologiques considérables des dernières décennies influencent profondément les représentations de soi et du monde, les conditions de vie et le changement social. Si personne, aujourd’hui, ne voudrait se priver des avantages qui en découlent, force est de constater que, en matière de technologies, des inégalités particulièrement marquées existent entre les hommes et les femmes ainsi qu’entre différentes régions dans le monde. De plus, l’ampleur, la rapidité et la complexité des transformations qui nous touchent directement et indirectement font en sorte qu’il est difficile de se tenir à jour et de conserver une distance critique. Pour sa 11e édition, l’Université féministe d’été vous convie à Québec, du 19 au 24 mai 2013, pour une semaine intensive et conviviale d’échanges, de ressourcement et de réseautage en compagnie de spécialistes œuvrant dans différents domaines et disciplines. Voir le programme ci-dessous et sur notre site web: http://universitefeministedete.fss.ulaval.ca. PROGRAMME: DIMANCHE 19 MAI, 14h : Accueil, 15h : Rencontre pédagogique pour les étudiant-e-s de FEM-2000,  FEM-6003 et FEM-7003; LUNDI 20 MAI, 9h-12h – OUVERTURE DU COLLOQUE, Mots de bienvenue : Sophie D’Amour (vice-rectrice à la recherche) ; François Blais (doyen de la Faculté des sciences sociales), Introduction : Huguette Dagenais (Anthropologie, responsable de l’Université féministe d’été), Conférence d’ouverture prononcée par Louise Vandelac (Institut des sciences de l’environnement, UQAM) : Technosciences, femmes et féminismes: de l'impensé à l'impensable, des illusions aux désillusions, des contributions aux alternatives? Séance présidée par Louise Langevin (Droit, Université Laval), 12h-14h : REPAS ET ACTIVITE LIBRE, 14h-17h – TIC, IMAGES ET DIVERTISSEMENT- Francine Lavoie (Psychologie, Université Laval): Dénudé/e sur internet : la nouvelle lettre d’amour? L’usage de sextos chez les 18-30 ans, Estelle Lebel (Information et communication, Université Laval) : Médias et publicité : formatage du regard et culte des apparences genrées Frédéric Clément (Cinéma, Université de Montréal): Femmes et jeux vidéo : quatre controverses Séance présidée par Manon Niquette (Information et communication, Université Laval); MARDI 21 MAI, 9h-12h – TIC ET VIOLENCE, Myriam Dubé (Travail social, UQAM) : Les nouvelles technologies: une voie empruntée pour le harcèlement criminel dans la relation conjugale Claude Roy (Police de Québec) : Quand la cybercriminalité cible les femmes Guitté Hartog (Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexique) : Le machisme au-delà du Mexique et de la violence symbolique, Séance présidée par Geneviève Lessard (CRI-VIFF, Université Laval), 12h-14h : REPAS ET ACTIVITE LIBRE – Visionnement du film Prostitution : les mafias du net, suivi d’une période de discussion. Commentatrice : Sandrine Ricci (IREF, UQAM), co-auteure du rapport La traite des femmes à des fins d’exploitation sexuelle : entre le déni et l’invisibilité, 2012.  Modératrice : Johanne Jutras (La Maison de Marthe, Québec), DKN-1B, 14h-17h – TECHNOLOGIE ET TRAVAIL – Christine Gauthier (Sciences de l’éducation, Université Laval) : L’hypertravail dans les secteurs du multimédia et des services informatiques Anne Chartier (Systèmes d’information organisationnels, Université Laval) : Femmes et TIC : y a-t-il un chainon manquant?  Séance présidée par Anne-Marie Laflamme (Droit, Université Laval); MERCREDI 22 MAI 9h-12h – DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE : LE CAS DU NORD QUÉBÉCOIS- Julie Miville-Dechêne (Conseil du statut de la femme, Québec) : Les femmes et le Plan Nord : pour un développement nordique égalitaire Viviane Michel (Femmes autochtones du Québec) : Les femmes autochtones dans le développement du Nord, Diane Lemieux (Commission de la Construction du Québec) : Le développement du Nord : un levier d’intégration des femmes dans la construction, Séance présidée par Caroline Desbiens (Chaire de recherche du Canada en géographie historique du Nord), 12h-14h : REPAS ET ACTIVITÉ LIBRE, 14h-17h – TECHNOLOGIES DE LA REPRODUCTION- Vardit Ravitsky (Médecine sociale et préventive, Université de Montréal) : Les technologies de procréation: empowerment ou défi pour l’autonomie procréative des femmes? Louise Langevin (Droit, Université Laval): Tolérer la “mère porteuse” en attendant l’utérus «portable»? Séance présidée par Edith Deleury (Droit, Université Laval); MERCREDI 22 MAI 19h30-21h – CONFÉRENCE PUBLIQUE- Catherine Vidal (Institut Pasteur, Paris) : Le sexe du cerveau : de la science à l'idéologie, Séance présidée par Huguette Dagenais, responsable de l’Université féministe d’été, et organisée en collaboration avec : la revue Recherches féministes, la Gazette des femmes, la Centrale des Syndicats du Québec (CSQ), la Chaire CRSNG-Industrielle Alliance pour les femmes en sciences et génie ainsi que le Centre de recherche et d'intervention pour l'éducation et la vie au travail (CRIEVAT). JEUDI 23 MAI, 9h-12h – BESOINS ESSENTIELS ET ACCÈS AUX TECHNOLOGIES Annie Bronsard (Santé Canada) : Avancées technologiques, chirurgie de la cataracte et prévention de la cécité évitable en Tanzanie: barrières et promesses, Marie Fall (Géographie, UQAC) et Salmata Ouedraogo (Sciences administratives, UQAC) : Les femmes et les NTIC en Afrique de l’Ouest : intégrées ou marginalisées ? Confirmation attendue pour la troisième conférencière Séance présidée par Marie France Labrecque (Anthropologie, Université Laval),  12h-14h : REPAS ET ACTIVITE LIBRE LES RÉSEAUX FÉMINISTES DANS INTERNET Présentatrices : Catherine Plouffe-Jetté (Administration et évaluation en éducation, Université Laval) et Caroline Roy-Blais (Anthropologie, Université Laval), Modératrice : Hélène Charron (Chaire Claire-Bonenfant – Femmes, Savoirs et Sociétés, Université Laval), 14h-16h15 – TECHNOLOGIES, ÉDUCATION ET ÉMANCIPATION- Renée Fountain (Sciences de l’éducation, Université Laval) : Les femmes, les filles, leur pouvoir d'agir librement et les TIC Michel Umbriaco (Télé-université, Université du Québec) : La formation à distance (elearning) un dispositif unique d’émancipation Anne Pelletier (Alliance des femmes handicapées du Québec – AFHQ) : L’accessibilité numérique: un facteur essentiel à l’intégration des femmes handicapées Séance présidée par Renée Cloutier (Fondements et pratiques en éducation, Université Laval); JEUDI 23 MAI 17h-19h – Lancement par la revue Recherches feminists; and  VENDREDI 24 MAI , 9h-12h – CLÔTURE DU COLLOQUE Claire Deschênes (Génie mécanique, Université Laval) : Femmes et technologie, pour changer le monde Une deuxième confirmation est attendee, Séance présidée par Hélène Lee-Gosselin (Chaire Claire-Bonenfant – Femmes, Savoirs et Sociétés), 13h30 : Rencontre pédagogique pour les étudiant-e-s de FEM-2000,  FEM-6003 et FEM-7003 Pour les modalités d’inscription http://universitefeministedete.fss.ulaval.ca/ Téléphone : (418) 656-2131 poste 8930 universite-feministe-ete@fss.ulaval.ca

[14] Nationalism and Globalisation: New Settings, New Challenges: International Symposium (May 23-24, 2013)
The Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law will host an international symposium over two days, 23-24 May 2013, bringing together research on the interface between nationalism and multiculturalism on the one hand, and the evolving dynamics of transnational constitutionalism on the other. A group of leading scholars in the area will present on current developments in, and challenges for, the theory and practice of constitutionalism within culturally diverse polities in light of on-going constitutional changes at the global level. A key note lecture will be delivered by Professor Michael Ignatieff. The Symposium will be inter-disciplinary, bringing together constitutional theorists, international lawyers, political theorists and political scientists in order that insights might be shared across these three strands of recent work. The Symposium will begin with a number of papers scoping the terrain from a range of disciplines and delivering an assessment of ‘where we are now’ both in terms of the existing literature but also in relation to constitutional challenges ahead. There will be time on the first day for a full discussion of these papers and the drawing out of key principles. This will lead to a more detailed consideration of new settings for national pluralism on day two. Here we will consider the challenges posed by the changing normative environment for the nation in four contexts: – international law; – the revival of the ‘strong state’ in some parts of the world; – the particular case of divided societies; – the evolution of supranational legal orders, most specifically that of the European Union. Draft Program: Confirmed speakers include: Professor Michael Ignatieff, University of Toronto; John Breuilly, London School of Economics: ‘Theorising Nationalism in a Globalizing Age’; Neil Walker, University of Edinburgh: ‘The Global Constitutional Mosaic: Situating “the Nation”; Stephen Tierney, University of Edinburgh: ‘Sub-state Nations and Strong States: the accommodation impasse?’; Richard Bellamy, University College London: ‘The political constitution of an international association of democratic states'; Sujit Choudhry, New York University. ‘Constitutionalism, Globalisation and Divided Societies: the story so far’; Brendan O’Leary, University of Pennsylvania. ‘Re-Theorising National Pluralism: problem cases’: (title subject to change); Michael Keating, Professor Emeritus, European University Institute, ‘Nationalism After the State?”; Zoran Oklopcic, Carleton University: ‘‘Lilliputian Travels: Rethinking Sovereign Equality as Popular Sovereignty”; Christine Bell, University of Edinburgh: ‘Constitutional Building and International Norm-Setting and the Challenge of Globalisation’; Alexander Schwartz, Queens University, Canada: ‘The Plurinational Constitutional Model and Divided Societies’; Cormac Mac Amlaigh, University of Edinburgh: 'The Evolving European Union'; and Ailsa Henderson, University of Edinburgh: ‘Beyond the Nation: Globalisation and the New Regionalism’. Contact: Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law, School of Law, University of Edinburgh, Old College, South Bridge, Edinburgh EH8 9YL, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)131 650 2008 Fax: +44 (0)131 650 6317 Email: law.events@ed.ac.uk Web: http://www.epay.ed.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&prodid=935

[15] 2013 International Symposium on Cultural Diplomacy and Human Rights: Towards a Global Human Rights Culture- The Need for a Collective Alliance in the Protection and Promotion of Human Rights (May 27- June 1, 2013)
The Institute for Cultural Diplomacy, Germany, Berlin presents 2013 International Symposium on Cultural Diplomacy and Human Rights on the theme ‘ Towards a Global Human Rights Culture – The Need for a Collective Alliance in the Protection and Promotion of Human Rights Since its earliest inception, Human Rights have increasingly been considered to form part of what is now seen as universal law. The creation of the United Nations in 1945 subsequently provided an international regulatory framework for dialogue on Human Rights in the global sphere. Despite a global governing set of laws set forth by the formation of the UN, the international community still lacks a cohesive implementation and engagement strategy in the enforcement of Human Rights. The conference will therefore provide the platform for activists, experts, academics and world leaders involved in the field of Human Rights to come together, create alliances, and better coordinate their activities, thus promoting better implementation and enforcement of Human Rights in a more effective nature. The conference will furthermore engage Cultural Diplomacy as a means of uniting the varying sectors of society in order to create a joint collaboration for the protection and support of Human Rights activities, as well as recognize the capabilities of Cultural Diplomacy in enabling governments to fulfill Human Rights obligations towards their citizens. Symposium Participants- Participation in the conference is open to governmental & diplomatic officials, academics, artists, journalists, civil society practitioners, private sector representatives, young professionals and students as well as other interested individuals from across the world. Symposium Agenda- The conference will bring civil society and academics practitioners together with world leaders with the intention of creating global alliances and platforms for dialogue. This major assembly of Human Rights activists and experts will create a cohesive coalition of supporters with the aim of strengthening current policies while initiating new proposals in the Human Rights arena. The simultaneous sessions of the Congress will provide a unique opportunity for those involved in the field to come together and discuss contemporary obstacles and needed revisions, work collectively as a single entity, and ultimately propose alternative solutions to current impediments. Participant Papers-The Institute for Cultural Diplomacy encourages academic research and analysis of issues related to the goals of the Conference. The ICD would therefore like to welcome the participants of the conference to submit a paper they would like to be considered for presentation at the Conference as well as being included in the proposal document that will be issued following the Conference and will be sent to all governments and leaders of the international community worldwide. Contact: Institute for Cultural Diplomacy, Ku'damm Karree (Third Floor – Hochhaus) Kurfürstendamm 207-208# D-10719 Berlin Germany Tel:
+49 (0)30 2360 7680 Fax: +49 (0)30 2360 76811 Email: info@culturaldiplomacy.org Web: http://www.culturaldiplomacy.org/academy/index.php?en_bihrc-2013

[16] Women’s Rights are Human Rights! CEDAW for Change: ONE WEEK intensive session (June 3 – 7, 2013)
Are you a women’s human rights defender?  Do you want to increase your understanding of women’s human rights, and learn how to use the UN Human Rights system to support your activism? Join other international activists, scholars, community workers, NGO representatives, lawyers and educators in learning about women’s human rights education and activism at the Women’s Human Rights Education Institute (WHRI) at the Centre for Women’s Studies in Education, University of Toronto, offered in collaboration with the Fundación Justicia y Géneroof Costa Rica, WOMEN’S RIGHTS ARE HUMAN RIGHTS! CEDAW for Change: ONE WEEK intensive session (June 3 – 7, 2013). Directed by Costa Rican feminist jurist and activist Alda Facio, LLP,with  Martha Morgan, JD, and Angela Lytle, Med Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE), Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT). Synopsis follows—for full information and the online application form, see our website at: www.learnwhr.org For inquiries, contact WHRI Executive Director Angela Lytle at info@learnwhr.org The CEDAW for Change one-week institute is designed to cultivate a better understanding of the principles of nondiscrimination and equality as enshrined in CEDAW (Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women) and each State’s obligation to respect, protect and fulfill women’s human rights. Participants will be helped to frame whatever issues they are working on within a human rights framework from a gender perspective. This session stresses the multiplicity of forms of discrimination women from diverse situations experience. During the week we will learn through activities focused around identity and interconnectedness, the complex nature of discrimination, the impact of culture and religion on women’s rights, and activism against discrimination. We will examine case studies that have come before the CEDAW committee and will explore ways in which CEDAW can be used to support local and national level activism through the submission of Shadow Reports by NGOs and through the CEDAW Optional Protocol. For full details, including costs and the online application form, see our website at: www.learnwhr.org <http://www.learnwhr.org/> For inquiries, contact WHRI Executive Director Angela Lytle or WHRI Communications Officer Hala Zabaneh at info@learnwhr.org

[17] 19th Annual Colleges and University Work-Life-Family Association Conference (June 5-7, 2013)
Building Bridges: Sharing Pathways to Work/Life Progress acknowledges that the 19th Annual CUWFA Conference will be held in Canada for the first time and highlights a renewed focus on progress that can be made when using a collaborative and shared approach to some of the most pressing issues and future opportunities we wrestle with in the field of work/life. Continued progress towards work-life integration through tough times requires new work structures, more creative pathways to follow, and stronger networks. More complex challenges face us now as issues such as mass retirement, diversity; technology and globalization change the work-life landscape again. This conference aims to help us revise our vision for work/life as we consider structural changes, new partnerships, and best practices in unpredictable times. Work-life professionals' strengths in sharing knowledge, strategies, experiences, and best practices, combined with the best researchers and thought leaders will continue to propel us forward despite all the challenges. CUWFA 2013 in Toronto will showcase the best and the brightest minds and research in work-life offering new ideas for upcoming challenges. Keynote Speakers: The opening keynote speaker will be Linda Duxbury who is a Professor at the Sprott School of Business, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Within the past decade she has completed major studies on balancing work and family in the public, private and not for profit sectors; as well as HR and work-family issues in the small business sector; management support; career development in the public sector; and generational differences in work values. The closing keynote speaker will be Lisa Wolf-Wendel who is a Professor of Higher Education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Kansas. Her research focuses on faculty issues including studies of the academic labor market, the needs of international faculty and faculty from historically underrepresented groups, and several recent research projects pertaining to the policy response of academic institutions in the wake of demands for dual career couple accommodations and work/family balance. Full details of the Conference Streams, the Call for Proposals and information on the submission of conference presentations can be found at www.cuwfa.org. Registration and further program details can be found at www.cuwfa.org. Early Bird registration rates are available until March 22, 2013. The conference hotel is the Metropolitan Hotel (www.metropolitan.com/toronto), 1 800 668 6600, reservations@tor.metropolitan.com quoting the CUWFA conference.

[18] Institutional Ethnography Workshops with Dorothy E. Smith & Susan Turner (June 14-28, 2013)
Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE) presents June 2013 Institutional Ethnography Workshops with Dorothy E. Smith & Susan Turner. Weekend Workshop, June 14 & 15, 2013: Working with Texts in Institutional Ethnography (Friday evening & full Saturday) $450 CDN + HST (13%). Weeklong Workshop Intensive I, June 16—21, 2013 $850 CDN + HST, plus $450 + HST for weekend prerequisite (afternoon meeting on Sunday, 9am-5pm Mon-Fri). Weekend Workshop II, June 21 & 22, 2013: Working with Texts in Institutional Ethnography (Friday evening & full Saturday) $450 CDN + HST. Weeklong Workshop Intensive II, June 23—28, 2013 $850 CDN + HST, plus $450 + HST for weekend prerequisite (afternoon meeting on Sunday, 9am-5pm Mon-Fri). All workshops are co-taught by Dorothy Smith & Susan Turner and are hosted downtown Toronto. Information about Institutional Ethnography and the instructors: www.oise.utoronto.ca/cwse/Institutional_Ethnography_Programs/index.html

CALLS FOR PAPERS

[1] TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 1.4: Trans Cultural Production (April 15, 2013)
The arts have served as a cultural arena for imagining, creating, and proliferating transgender experiences and communities around the world. As part of its inaugural year TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly will feature a special issue examining trans* cultural production in art, film, dance, design, architecture, literature, and music. We seek papers that critically analyze the current state, history, and significance of these expressive forms as they address, depict, and are mobilized by trans* subjects broadly defined, including people whose gender/sex expression is not informed primarily by contemporary Western constructions and conventions. The issue will feature trans* makers and communities alongside essays exploring cultural production by non-trans* makers as such production impacts trans* lives, trans* politics, and/or trans* theory. We invite submissions exploring the repercussions and resonances of trans* representation in non-trans* contexts as well as work developing trans* interpretations of creative work not originally intended to engage specifically trans* people or concerns. Rather than a survey of best practices or major figures, the issue aims to offer a forum to examine the wider issues attending to the representation of trans* in the arts and to demonstrate the value of trans* as a heuristic lens for interpreting creative work more generally. While the focus of the issue is scholarly research, we also hope to include a small selection of shorter, less formal essays that engage with critical issues in trans* cultural production from curatorial, marketing, and practitioner perspectives. Possible areas of inquiry include but are not limited to: the history of transgender/transsexual//gender-nonconforming representations in the arts and their varying receptions; trans* living as aesthetic practice; transnational receptions and interpretations of gender and sexual representations; the dominance of autobiography and portraiture in the history of trans* representations in the West; new directions for cultural production; the image(in)ing of new bodily morphologies; bioarts; trans* performance/trans* performers; examinations of trans* cultural production that do not rely on the representation of human bodies; the history of transgender/transsexual/ gender-nonconforming representation in the arts and its varying receptions; the imaging of trans* communities, both real and utopian; the effects of the global circulation of trans* cultural production; the mainstreaming of particular trans* visibilities; distinctions and convergences between trans* and queer interpretative approaches to the arts; the marketing and circulation of trans* fiction, self-help literature, and other print media; curating trans* community; trans* as remix and appropriation (e.g. in relation to mainstream film, advertising imagery, fashion and/or music); trans* embodiment as/in relation to artistic form; case studies of specific locales or sites that have supported trans* artistic communities. To be considered, please send submissions by April 15, 2013, to tsqjournal@gmail.com along with a brief bio including name, postal address, and any institutional affiliation.  Completed texts are encouraged, but an abstract may also be submitted in lieu of a full paper.  Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and should include a brief statement of work completed on or relevant to the submission. Illustrations should be included with both completed submissions and abstracts. Accepted authors will be contacted in May, with the full text of all submissions due October 1, 2013.  The expected range for scholarly articles is 5000 to 7000 words and 1000 to 2000 words for shorter critical essays and descriptive accounts.  Any questions should be addressed by e-mail sent to all guest editors for the issue: Julian Carter (California College of the Arts, juliancarter@cca.edu), David Getsy (School of the Art Institute of Chicago, dgetsy@saic.edu), and Trish Salah (University of Toronto, trish.salah@utoronto.ca).

[2] The Black Jacobins Revisited: Rewriting History: International conference at the International Slavery Museum and the Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool (April 15, 2013)
International conference to be held at the International Slavery Museum and the Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool, 27–28 October 2013 on The Black Jacobins Revisited: Rewriting History. To mark seventy-five years of pioneering anticolonial and historiography-shifting work, C.L.R. James’s The Black Jacobins, we are organizing a major international two-day conference at the International Slavery Museum and Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool. Ever since The Black Jacobins transformed the way colonial history was written, this single work has for seventy-five years dominated all studies of the Haitian Revolution and decolonization. Yet, uncharted areas of this standard reference work still remain. Key aims of the conference are to break new ground and explore new approaches where this classic history is concerned. Papers will be considered on any aspect relating to The Black Jacobins and its legacies, but possible topics could include:  *   Discussion of The Black Jacobins in relation to James’s own evolving political practice and activism, including his collaborations as political organizer.  *   The making and remaking of The Black Jacobins as the famous work morphs through major generic transformations, both beginning and ending life as a play.  *   Contributions made by The Black Jacobins to problems of writing Caribbean history: gaps and perspectives in official historical records housed in metropolitan archives.  *   Processes of rewriting history throughout the work’s evolution: revolutionizing previous historical interpretations of the Haitian Revolution; provincializing the French Revolution; engaging with processes of silencing and un-silencing stories of the Haitian Revolution, and of slavery-generated wealth in French and British cities.  *   James’s rethinking of key relationship between leaders and masses; the progressive refiguration of Haitian Revolutionary Toussaint Louverture, and foregrounding of alternative protagonists.  *   Caribbean identity as evolving theme of The Black Jacobins, and the related question of representation, e.g. James’s contributions to representations of slaves as principal actors of revolution in their own right.  *   Progressive reframing and historicizing of the work through a range of prefaces, appendices, epilogues *   James’s evolving use of source materials and alternative historical models *   Assessments of the work’s afterlives as founding text and key point of reference for all interpretations of the Haitian Revolution; issues of key editions, translation and mistranslation; and the work’s centrality to a range of political situations across Africa, the Caribbean and North America. *   Links between The Black Jacobins and other key Marxist, Caribbean, African works, including those of James’s own wider corpus. Abstracts of 250 words should be sent to Dr Rachel Douglas, Rachel.Douglas@glasgow.ac.uk by 15 April, 2013. Keynote speakers will include: Professor Robert A. Hill (UCLA and C.L.R. James’s Literary Executor), Professor Nick Nesbitt (Princeton) and Dr Matthew J. Smith (University of the West Indies). Further keynote speakers to be announced. This event is organized in partnership with the International Slavery Museum and the Bluecoat, Liverpool, and supported by the University of Glasgow Knowledge Exchange Fund, the Society for the Study of French History, and the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Dr Rachel Douglas, Lecturer in French, University of Glasgow School of Modern Languages and Cultures, Room 313, Hetherington Building, Bute Gardens Glasgow, G12 8RS, tel: 0141 330 3660, email: Rachel.Douglas@glasgow.ac.uk

[3] Common Ground: Postgraduate Cultural Studies Conference, Centre for Cultural Studies, University of London (April 26, 2013)
Postgraduates in the Centre for Cultural Studies are pleased to announce their annual conference. This year’s theme is Common Ground and we would like to invite papers, artistic presentations, workshops and panel proposals on all aspects of this topic. This conference comes out of a shared frustration with the framing of canonical discourses. For every subject and object in the world, there is a linear story of its explanation – a forward-projecting narration of origins, development, transformation and signification. What is accomplished in this expository process is a reductivism that not only privileges particular modes of explanation, of knowing, but in doing so also neutralizes the grounds of subversive potential. How can we explode these centralizing rationalities and reconfigure the conceptual space of knowing? How can we think critically about literal and metaphorical spaces and the accompanying temporalities which claim to bring individuals together and form alternative modes of collective being but simply end up privileging dominant, homogenizing discourses of social control and organization? Possible topics could include but are by no means limited to: – Privileging narratives – Writing and rewriting history – Time, history and asynchronicity – Dissenting Voices – Homogeneity and hegemony – Interiority/exteriority – Discourses of inclusion/exclusion – The collective vs. the individual – Who are the 99%? – Nationalism and identity – Digital technologies and post humanism – Crossing borders and limits – Institutional critique – Spaces of convergence – the street, the square – Public vs. private spaces – Encounters, confrontations, conflicts – The production of difference – Subversive spaces and temporalities. Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words and emailed to: ccscommonground2013@gmail.com.

[4] Call for Submissions: Local and Global Indigeneity (April 26, 2013)
Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society is calling for submissions that speak to conditions of indigeneity in local contexts, especially in regards to how these local contexts relate and interact with larger global decolonization movements. We recognize and affirm that the Indigenous disrupts the universalistic and homogenizing flows of globalization and reveal globalization for what it is and always has been: colonial. As always, we are interested in papers that seek to further decolonizing discussions and promote active decolonization work, engaging with the intersections between theory and practice. We encourage submissions that draw from personal, experiential, and subjective locations. Below are guiding questions; they are not exhaustive and we encourage submissions that approach topic from other entry points. –How do we understand increased global movement and displacement in relation to indigenous conceptions of land rootedness? How can we connect discussions across borders and boundaries in ways that reconfigure these borders? How does increased global movement, physically and ideologically, threaten or strengthen Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities? How are the ways that various communities can connect localized struggles for sustained resistance of colonial practices on a global scale? As an example, how does the #IdleNoMore movement further or provide a starting point for global solidarities and alliance? How has increased globalization created the commodification of identities? How in the face of global forces, are the borders of communities policed both from within and from without? What are the results of this? How does the local inform the global and vice versa, how does the global inform the local? Articles are to be submitted at www.decolonization.org no later than April 26, 2013. Articles submitted after this date will not be accepted. Selected articles will be published in our September 2013 issue. Articles should follow our journal style guidelines. Scholarly articles are subject to a double blind review. We also encourage other submissions, such as poetry, video and visual art that speak to these subjects. Decolonizing also at this time, is putting out a call and accepting general submissions beyond this specific call for papers. If you have a submission that fits our general goals and guidelines submit it for review. If you have any further questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us at editors@declonization.org

[5] The Cosmopolitan Ideal: Challenges and Opportunities- International Conference (April 30, 2013)
Global Studies Association (GSA), Roehampton University, London (United Kingdom) invites proposals for papers for the coming international conference on The Cosmopolitan Ideal: Challenges and Opportunities to be held on 10-12 July, 2013. The conference aims to critically interrogate the idea of cosmopolitanism. Whereas previously cosmopolitanism was associated with (abstract) ideas of world citizenship and universal brotherhood, more recent constructions emphasize the multiplicity of identities, belongings, and memberships that are possible across a plurality of communities. In addition to a rejection of a narrow nationalistic outlook cosmopolitanism can claim a new political content: the idea of world citizenship has been given substance through notions of environmental responsibility, the universality of human and personhood rights, and the drive for worldwide human development. For these and many other reasons cosmopolitanism provides an important perspective on processes of globalization and the interconnectedness of the world. The conference organizers invite proposals for papers which address themes of relevance to the conference, including: – The politics of cosmopolitanism; Cosmopolitanism, global civil society and human rights; Cosmopolitanism and identity; The cosmopolitan city; Cosmopolitan business practices and cross-cultural management; Critical cosmopolitanism; Cosmopolitan theory in global studies; and Cosmopolitanism and the media. Proposals for papers should take the form of a 300 word abstract and may be submitted on any aspect of the conference theme. The organizers will allocate papers to an appropriate panel. The deadline for submission of abstracts is April 30 2013. Please send to conference organizer Darren O’Byrne at:
D.OByrne@roehampton.ac.uk Registration includes automatic GSA membership. Confirmed keynote speakers: Gerard Delanty (University of Sussex) and Kate Nash (Goldsmith’s College, University of London). Conference website: http://estore.roehampton.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&prodid=126&deptid=164&catid=92

[6] In the Balance: Indigeneity, Performance, Globalization – International Conference (April 30, 2013)
Royal Holloway, University of London, London (United Kingdom) is holding the conference on October 24-27, 2013. It will be held in central London in conjunction with two international events: the Origins Festival of First Nations and a performance-­based exhibition, Ecocentrix: Indigenous Arts, Sustainable Acts. An extensive film programme is also included. Expected participants in these events include Marrugeku, Peter Morin, Marie Clements, Rosanna Raymond, Fiona Foley, Charles Te Ahukaramū Royal, and Coordinadora Latinoamericana de Cine y Comunicación de los Pueblos Indígenas. Proposals might bring indigeneity, performance and globalization into dialogue in reference to any of the following topics: indigenous diasporas or cosmopolitanisms, (inter)cultural contact zones, sovereignty, cultural diplomacy, citizenship, protests and activism, advocacy, collaboration, networks, democracy and the public sphere, mobility, locality and geopolitics, digital performance, hybrid arts praxis, local/global platforms, branding, tourism, touring circuits, belonging, affect and the senses, mega-­events and spectacle, languages, epistemologies, resources, ecologies, environments, margins and mainstreams, reconciliation/reparation movements, heritage, transmission, repatriation, and curating and mediating events. Presentations are invited from, but not limited to, the disciplines of indigenous studies, film, dance, theatre, music, postcolonial studies, anthropology, cultural studies, politics, geography, history, sociology, and philosophy. We are especially interested in contributions that explore the participatory, phenomenological thickness of performance as a means of communication and the material processes involved in its making. While the focus is on indigenous cultures in or from the Americas, Australia, the Pacific and South Africa, outstanding proposals on topics outside this scope will be considered. Performative presentations are welcome. Send 250-­word abstracts for 20-­minute presentations and a short biography to Helen Gilbert and Dani Phillipson at <
dani.phillipson@rhul.ac.uk> by 30 April 2013. The main language of the conference is English though we welcome proposals in other languages and will facilitate translation for those wanting to speak in Spanish, French or Portuguese. For more information please visit: http://www.indigeneity.net

[7] Masculinities: A Journal of Identity and Culture (May 1, 2013)
It's been almost 20 years now since R.W. Connell published her groundbreaking and inspiring work, Masculinities, and masculinity studies has become a major field of study, a conceptual domain ready to come out of the closet, and a central critical point of reference in gender, identity, power and trans-anything discussions. The debate over the public visibility and hierarchy of gendered identities has manifested itself as a complicated conflict area more strongly than ever. It has often been reassured that it is of utmost importance to define and redefine the scope of masculinity studies, to establish its basic methodology, and maintain a balance between the ambiguity of interdisciplinary studies and objectivity of a scientific field. We have been working on a peer reviewed online journal that will be published biannually in English and that will serve to provide an independent forum for issues of gender, identity and culture, with a particular emphasis on masculinity studies. Masculinities hosts a group of scholars from various disciplines in its editorial board mostly based in Turkey as well as distinguished experts from different parts of the world and it offers a joint ground for the interdisciplinary and pioneering research in the field of gender and masculinity so as to enable researchers to share their work, discuss prospective projects, learn from each other, and inspire young scholars. Masculinities also reflects a particular interest in (but not necessarily confined to) "non-Western" constructions and representations of masculinity and seeks to explore the terra incognita of manhood in different cultures, different geographies, and different worlds. We invite scholarly and critical contributions, including articles, book and film reviews, reviews of the published articles as well as announcements of forthcoming events, conference reports, and information on other matters of interest to gender studies and/or masculinity studies for the inaugural issue to be published in June 2013. The contributions to the journal should be sent to the email address given below as of May 1, 2013 and they may be related (but not limited) to the topics listed below. You can visit our website for the submission guidelines and further details and you can join our email group that provides updates and recent news as well as announcements and call for papers for the symposiums and journals on masculinity and gender studies. Murat Goc, PhD; Sexism and masculinity; Morality and masculinity; Ideology and masculinity; Philosophy and masculinity; Medicine and masculinity; Aesthetics and masculinity; Disability and masculinity; Fatherhood and masculinity; Buddy relations and masculinity; Orientalism and masculinity; Occidentalism and masculinity; Music and masculinity Alcohol and masculinity; Space and masculinity; Sports and masculinity; Gastronomy and masculinity; Racism and masculinity; Mass media and masculinity; Film studies and masculinity Television and masculinity; Law and masculinity; Bureaucracy and masculinity; Technology and masculinity; Politics and masculinity; Crime and masculinity; Violence and masculinity; mythology and masculinity; Evil and masculinity; Mobility and masculinity; Service industry and masculinity; Internet and masculinity; Pornography and masculinity; Transgression and masculinity; Performance arts and masculinity; Body and masculinity; Death and masculinity; Sexuality and masculinity; Aging and masculinity; Queer theory and masculinity; Feminism and masculinity; History and masculinity; Power and masculinity; Publishing and masculinity; Sea and masculinity; Monstrosity and masculinity; Military and masculinity; Humor and masculinity; Graphic arts and masculinity; Photography and masculinity; Gaze and masculinity; Design and masculinity; Cyber culture and masculinity. website: http://masculinitiesjournal.wordpress.com mail: masculinitiesjournal@gmail.com <mailto:masculinitiesjournal@gmail.com> mail group: https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en&fromgroups=#!forum/masculinitiesjournal

[8] The Point is to Change It: Media Democracy and Democratic Media in Action (June 1, 2013)
Your submissions are invited for the Union for Democratic Communication and Project Censored conference November 1-3, 2013 at the University of San Francisco, where we have found affordable accommodations for your stay.  The conference is sponsored in part by the Media Studies Department of USF. Submission deadline is June 1, 2013. With increasingly precarious employment, accelerating ecological degradation, a widening gulf between the 1% and the 99%, as well as dramatic booms and busts, we need a global media responsive to the 99%.  We need rigorous critique of corporate medias commodification of social life. We need critique of all forms of censorship, systematic information exclusion, and propaganda.  We need grounded ideas for democratizing media in all formats and genres.  We need media justice. To revitalize and retool media democracy in today's media landscape, the Union for Democratic Communications (UDC) and Project Censored are teaming up for our 2013 conference.  UDC, which held its first conference in 1981, has worked to overcome concentrated political-economic power in order to contribute to a world based on economic justice, equality, and peace.  Project Censored, founded in 1976, has made its mission to expose and counteract modern-day censorship.  Together, UDC and Project Censored hope to contribute to a more democratic society and world by sharing our scholarly and activist projects. We invite research, activist and artistic proposals from critical perspectives interrogating media institutions and technologies, political/economic structures, media practices, cultural practices and audiences; we invite studies in critical pedagogy and research on media activism.  Proposals that address pro-democratic media reform or outline efforts to expand citizen access to media are particularly welcome. We welcome the following proposals emailed to udcpc2013@gmail.com by June 1, 2013: 1. 500-word abstracts that describe the purpose and significance of your research and/or activist projects, especially those that address the issues outlined in the call.  2. Full papers (up to 25 pages including references) from graduate and undergraduate students.  The top student paper will be considered for the Top Student Paper Award. Student papers should be indicated as such and also contain a 500-word abstract. Students may apply for funding to cover some of their travel expenses through the Jeanne Hall Memorial Fund. To be considered for such funding, please include a one-line request for consideration of such funding on the top of your proposal. 3. Presentations of Media Literacy projects, including films and multimedia related to the call. 4. Finally, we welcome proposals for pre-constituted panels.  Please include 500-word abstracts for each participant (4-5 participants) and one panel rationale of 200-350 words that articulates the connections between the projects and the overall significance of the panel. For more information about the Union for Democratic Communications, see: http://www.democraticcommunications.net/ For more information about Project Censored, see: http://www.projectcensored.org/

[9] “Brown Bag Lectures” in Honour of Roxana Ng (July 8, 2013)
The Centre for Women's Studies in Education (CWSE) is a feminist research center at OISE, University of Toronto. Established in 1983 and designed to foster feminist scholarship, teaching, and activism relevant to education, broadly defined, CWSE consists of faculty, staff, students, researchers and educators in the larger feminist community within and outside of the university. The Brown Bag series at the CWSE is a semi-formal space to present complete research or work-in-progress for discussion and feedback. Brown Bag seminars are held on weekday afternoons in the CWSE’s seminar room 2-227, at OISE, 252 Bloor St W. For examples of CWSE Brown Bags and other events, go to www.oise.utoronto.ca/cwse/Events/index.html. We are looking for submissions for presentations in a series of Brown Bag events related to the work of Roxana Ng, Head of the CWSE, who passed away January 2013. Her work focused on: Qi Gong and alternative and holistic health and healing; Globalization, migration, and labor relations; Immigrant women and Canadian institutions; Institutional Ethnography; Critical Feminist Pedagogy; Anti-Racism; and Embodied Learning. If your work falls under these topics or was influenced by Roxana, we encourage you to submit to present in this series. Please submit- a one-page overview of the work you wish to present, including relevant websites; a one-paragraph summary of your intended presentation structure (lecture? screening? etc.); a one-paragraph biography of yourself as related to your work and your preferred time frame for presentation (possibilities are September to early December 2013, and January to early March 2014).  Submit your materials to cwse@utoronto.ca by July 8, 2013.  The series will commence September 2013 and run through March 2014.

[10] RFR Call for Papers: New Feminist Research (Ongoing)
This is an ongoing call for papers for the journal Resources for Feminist Research (RFR), one of Canada’s oldest feminist academic journals. See the call below, and author guidelines attached. You can also check out RFR on Facebook at www.facebook.com/rfr.drf. Resources for Feminist Research (RFR/DRF) is a Canadian, peer reviewed, academic journal that publishes research articles from scholars in a variety of disciplinary settings and from a wide range of critical feminist perspectives. We represent an important forum for the dissemination of feminist work both in Canada and internationally. RFR/DRF is now accepting submissions to our New Feminist Issues. We are looking for contributions that address current issues, approaches and debates within feminist scholarship and politics. We are interested in original and engaging research articles that consider from a variety of feminist perspectives, issues of gender and its connections and interactions with class, culture, race, sexuality, nation and disability. Articles on these and other appropriate topics are welcome submissions to our journal. RFR/DRF accepts manuscript submissions that are original and not previously published in any format. Submissions under review elsewhere are not accepted. Manuscripts should not exceed 10,000 words and should be submitted as a .doc or, .docx document (do not submit as .pdf). Submit, via email, a cover letter and your full contact information in the body of the email. Attach to email an electronic copy of your manuscript, without any identifying information in it, along with an abstract in a separate document. Email to: Editor, RFR/DRF rfr@utoronto.ca For further information email us at rfr@utoronto.ca.

OPPORTUNITIES

[1] Tier II Canada Research Chair in Social Innovation and Community Engagement, Mount Saint Vincent University (April 15, 2013)
Mount Saint Vincent University invites applications or nominations for a Tier II Canada Research Chair in Social Innovation and Community Engagement. Further information on the CRC Program is available at http://www.chairs.gc.ca. Inspired by a strong tradition of social responsibility and an enduring commitment to the advancement of women, Mount Saint Vincent University promotes academic excellence and the pursuit of knowledge through scholarship and teaching of the highest quality. Recognized as a leader in flexible education, applied research, and a personalized approach to education, Mount Saint Vincent University is located on Canada’s east coast in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Please visit www.msvu.ca. The successful candidate will provide leadership in one or more areas of social innovation, social change, citizen and community engagement, and social policy within a context of facilitating policy change. Applicants should have a commitment to interdisciplinary research and a passion for facilitating linkages and capacity building within and external to the university community. A specific interest in participatory leadership, community-engaged scholarship, and knowledge mobilization are assets. The successful candidate will have evidence of and potential for a dynamic and imaginative research program, a strong record of publication and funding success, as well as evidence of and a commitment to teaching excellence, in an area of relevance to social innovation and community engagement. Teaching expectations include undergraduate and graduate education and mentoring of students. This appointment will be at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor, depending on qualifications. Workload, salary, and benefits are in accordance with the CRC appointment and the faculty Collective Agreement. This position is subject to approval by the CRC Secretariat and final University budgetary approval.  Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, a brief outline of a research plan, a statement (not to exceed 500 words) relating the applicant’s background, experience, and research accomplishments to this position, and the names and contact information of three references. The Selection Committee will begin considering applications on April 15, 2013. Send applications by mail or email to: Dr. Elizabeth Church, Vice-President (Academic), Mount Saint Vincent University, 166 Bedford Highway, Halifax, NS B3M 2J6, vpacademic@msvu.ca

[2] Call for Submissions to Mad Pride Toronto 2013 (April 26, 2013)
Mad Pride is an arts, culture, and heritage festival created by psychiatric survivors, consumers, mad people, folks the world has labeled “mentally ill”, and those in solidarity with us. Mad Pride is about: • remembering and participating in mad history • challenging discrimination • advocating for rights • affirming mad identities • developing and empowering mad communities • having fun! Our lives and contributions are valuable and need celebration! Mad Pride Toronto 2013 will run from Monday, July 8th to Sunday, July 14th. Mad Pride is looking for consumer/survivor-driven events, performances, talks, presentations, films, and panel discussions as well as two dimensional, sculptural, and time-based art submissions. We are also planning to bring back the Mad Market so that consumer/survivors can display and sell our art, crafts, buttons, t-shirts, knitting, zines, books, music, baked goods, etc. and promote our blogs, websites, groups, networks, and ideas. Do you want to host a consumer/survivor-driven event, performance, talk, presentation, film, or panel discussion at Mad Pride Toronto 2013? Please let us know via our event submission form – which will be available on our website at www.madprideto.com or by calling Tina at 416 926-9762 x 245. Contact: events@madprideto.com Do you want to submit to our second juried Art Exhibition? We invite two dimensional, sculptural, or time-based art submissions from psychiatric survivors, consumers, and mad people. Contact: Martine at martinematthews@soundtimes.com If you are a consumer/survivor and would like to display/sell your art, crafts, buttons, t-shirts, knitting, zines, books, music, baked goods or promote your blog, website, group, network, idea, consider requesting a table at the Mad Market. Contact: outreach@madprideto.com Deadline: Friday, April 26th, 2013. Do you want to get involved in making Mad Pride Toronto 2013 happen? Check out www.madprideto.com for more information on joining the Mad Pride Toronto 2013 Organizing Committee and to complete a Statement of Interest.

[3] Annual Mayor Andrée Boucher Memorial Scholarship (April 30, 2013)
The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) is pleased to call for applications for its annual Mayor Andrée Boucher Memorial Scholarship. The scholarship is in the amount of $2,000 and will be presented in the winner's municipality. The application deadline is April 30, 2013. Please note: The scholarship is open only to women students enrolled in a Canadian college or university; The student can be in any year of study as an undergraduate or graduate student; Applicants should be considering making a contribution to or entering the political realm. Submissions: In a cover letter, tell us how you have been involved in campus or community activities related to women's issues; Submit a research paper you presented on issues related to women in politics, in any order of government; Special consideration will be given if there is a focus on municipal government; The research essay must be a minimum of 1,000 words; Applications will be kept on file and considered for up to three years, depending on eligibility; Two written references are required: one from a personal friend or relative, and one from a school instructor. For more information, please visit www.fcm.ca/home/awards/mayor-andrée-boucher-memorial-scholarship.htm<http://www.fcm.ca/home/awards/mayor-andrée-boucher-memorial-scholarship.htm>

[4] Limited Term Position in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Winnipeg (April 30,2013)
The Department of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Winnipeg invites applications for a limited term position (one year appointment, potentially renewable) at the rank of Assistant Professor, effective August 1, 2013. This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Salary will commensurate with qualifications and experience. Applicants should have a Ph.D. completed, or near completion. The successful candidate will have experience working in Canadian universities, and a strong commitment to undergraduate teaching in the interdisciplinary context of Women’s and Gender Studies. Community service is also an asset. Preference will be given to candidates with a demonstrated record of excellence in teaching, a willingness to engage in academic service, and a research and teaching focus in one or more of the following areas: critical race theories, indigenous feminisms, postcolonial and diaspora studies, cultural studies. Courses to be taught in 2013-14 may include: Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies; Gender, Race and Nation in Canada; Food Cultures, Sex and Gender; Gender and Organizations; Boys, Men and Popular Culture; Sex, Sexuality, Gender and Audiovisual Media. The University of Winnipeg is committed to employment equity, welcomes diversity in the workplace, and encourages applications from all qualified individuals including women, members of visible minorities, Aboriginal persons, and persons with disabilities. In accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, this advertisement is initially directed to Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada. A letter of application, curriculum vitae, sample syllabi and/or teaching dossier, together with three letters of reference, should be sent electronically (email) and in hardcopy by April 30, 2013 to: Dr. Angela Failler, Chair Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9, E-mail: a.failler@uwinnipeg.ca, Phone: 204-786-9028 Any questions about the application process should be directed to Ms.Liyana Fauzi l.fauzi@uwinnipeg.ca. Academic questions should be addressed to Dr. Angela Failler a.failler@uwinnipeg.ca.

[5] SSHRC – Canada Research Chair (CRC) Tier 2 in Indigenous Studies (April 30, 2013)
The Faculty of Arts and Science at QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY invites applications for a CRC Tier 2. The Faculty is seeking an exceptional scholar and committed teacher who will enhance and complement an active interdisciplinary program in the field of Indigenous Studies at Queen's. Candidates may apply from any disciplinary background and pursue any research focus within the field of Indigenous Studies. Given that the well-being of on- and off-reserve Indigenous communities is central to Indigenous Studies, the successful candidate will be expected to have established connections with social movements dealing with relevant issues, such as cultural resurgence, decolonization, gender/sexuality, land reclamation, and Settler-Indigenous solidarity. Moreover, in keeping with the strong ties between identity, culture, and land that are assumed in this field, the successful candidate will be expected to build strong connections with local Indigenous nations and Indigenous students on campus. This is a tenured or tenure-track position and salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. The Canada Research Chair program was established by the Canadian Federal Government with the purpose of attracting outstanding researchers to the Canadian university system. The program’s Terms of Reference for qualifications are online at www.chairs.gc.ca. The Canada Research Chairs program expects Tier 2 nominees: to be within 10 years of receiving their PhD; to be excellent emerging researchers who have demonstrated particular research creativity; to have demonstrated the potential to achieve international recognition in their fields in the next five to ten years; to be proposing an original, innovative research program of high quality; and, as a chair holder, to have the potential to attract excellent trainees, students and future researchers. Appointment to this Canada Research Chair position is subject to review and final approval by the Canada Research Chair Secretariat. Review of applications will begin May 1, 2013 and will continue until the position is filled. Applicants are asked to submit: a letter of application describing their research and teaching interests; a teaching portfolio; curriculum vitae; three samples of the candidate’s published work; and letters from three referees. Applicants are encouraged to send all documents in their application package electronically (either as PDFs or MSWord files). They may be sent by email to Gordon E. Smith, Associate Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science, Queen’s University, at gordon.smith@queensu.ca Applicants who are unable to submit their materials electronically may send hard copies by regular mail to: Dr. Gordon E. Smith, Associate Dean, Faculty of Arts and Science, Mackintosh-Corry Hall, F300, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6. Tel (613) 533-2448; Fax: (613) 533-2067. The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the Queen’s University Faculty Association and the University which is posted at: http://www.queensu.ca/provost/faculty/facultyrelations/qufa/collectiveagreement.html

[6] Teaching Assistant Position in University of Toronto at Mississauga (May 3, 2013)
Women and Gender Studies Program, Department of Historical Studies, University of Toronto at Mississauga is looking for Teaching Assistants for the following courses- WGS250H55 Women in Families and WGS365H55 Gender Justice and the Law for 50 and 10 appointment hours respectively  for the period July 1, 2013 to August 31, 2013. Full descriptions of these courses can be found on the departmental website: http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/historicalstudies/ Successful applicants will be in a MA or PhD. Program; an ability to communicate information clearly, previous teaching and marking experience preferred. Duties will include the grading of assignments, term tests/papers and invigilating final exam. May also include consulting with supervisor/ students. Salary: According to the present agreement the rate of pay for (a, an) SGS I and II is $41.23 per hour. The hiring criteria are those set out in section 16:03 of the collective agreement with local 3902 of the CUPE. NOTES: 1. Departmental Standards and Policies are available in the Departmental Office and in the CUPE Local 3902 office. 2. The positions posted are tentative, pending final course determinations and enrolments. Applications should be submitted via e-mail to: Sharon Marjadsingh, Academic Counselor, Department of Historical Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga: hsjobs@utoronto.ca

[7] Job opportunity: Four PhD positions at the Department of journalism, media and communication, University of Gothenburg (May 6, 2013)
The Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMG) at University of Gothenburg is seeking PhD candidates. The application period for the doctoral program has just started and four doctoral studentship positions are currently open for application. One of the positions is specifically announced for Crisis Communication. JMG is a nationally leading center for journalism and media research and education in Sweden. Established in 1990 through a merger between the School of journalism and the Section for Mass Communication at the Department of Political Science at University of Gothenburg, JMG pursues a broad research agenda with journalism research at its core. The doctoral program bridges the department’s top-ranked undergraduate programs in journalism and media studies and its ongoing research activities and programs. The current research agenda at JMG focuses on journalism, audience studies, crisis communication and political communication, gender and journalism, media discourse, media organizations and cultural industries, and media history. Candidates who are interested in any of the above-mentioned areas of research are particularly encouraged to apply for the doctoral program. The application period for the doctoral program started on 1 April 2013. The final date for submitting an application is May 6, 2013. The final decision on admissions is made in June, and the new doctoral candidates start the program on September 1. The PhD position is a four year fixed-term employment and the successful candidate is expected to devote their time primarily to the completion of obligatory course work and the writing of a doctoral dissertation. The candidate may however undertake a limited amount of teaching, administration or research not directly connected to their dissertation topic.

[8] 2013-14 TA position for the Concurrent Teacher Education Program (CTEP) at U of T Mississauga (May 8, 2013)
The Concurrent Teacher Education Program (CTEP) at the University of Toronto Mississauga, in conjunction with the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), seeks one Teaching Assistant/Grader for the following courses: CTE100H5Y – Child and Adolescent Development in Education. Qualifications: A background in Child and Adolescent Development in Education is required. This posting is open to fulltime Ph.D. students at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), or within the University of Toronto’s Department of Psychology. CTE200H5S – Equity and Diversity in Education. Qualifications: A background in Equity and Diversity and/or Social Justice in Education is required. This posting is open to full-time Ph.D. students at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), the University of Toronto’s Department of Sociology, or Women and Gender Studies. CTE250H5F – Communication and Conflict resolution. Qualifications: A background in communication and conflict resolution is recommended. This posting is open to full-time Ph.D. students at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), the University of Toronto’s Department of Psychology, the Department of Sociology, or Faculty of Law. Experience as a Teaching Assistant for this course as well as teaching within an elementary or high school setting is an asset. Duties:  Mark field observations, reflections, and mind maps with course instructor’s assistance  Hold office hours at U of T Mississauga and provide email communication to assist students  May be required to travel to U of T Mississauga campus 1-2 times per week. Hours of Work: Approximately 140 hours (average of 6 hours per week) Estimated Course Enrollment: 70 students. Rate of Pay: SGS I/II – $42.05 per hour + vacation pay. Final availability of the position is contingent upon enrolment, budgetary consideration and the determination of appointments as governed by the collective agreement. Application Process: Applicants should submit a cover letter, C.V., and two letters of reference by May 8, 2013. Applications should be sent to: John Smith, CTEP Program and Internship Coordinator Concurrent Teacher Education Program, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, NB 227D, Mississauga, ON, L5L 1C6 Email: john.smith@utoronto.ca This job is posted in accordance with the CUPE 3902 Unit 1 Collective Agreement. The Department Hiring Policy is available in the Department office and in the CUPE Local 3902 office. Please note that should rates stipulated in the collective agreement vary from rates stated in this posting, the rates stated in the collective agreement shall prevail. In accordance with the Employment Equity Policy, the University of Toronto encourages applications from qualified women and men, members of visible minorities, aboriginal peoples, and persons with disabilities.

[9] Visiting Professorship in Sexuality Studies, York University, 2013-2014 (June1, 2013)
The Sexuality Studies Program is pleased to announce a new Visiting Professorship in partnership with the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR) at York University.  We invite applicants who have acquired a doctorate in sexuality studies and/or transgender studies by July 2013 to submit their applications.  Junior and senior scholars are both welcome to apply.  The Visiting Professorship is intended to provide an institutional base for junior scholars doing postdoctoral research along with senior scholars on sabbatical or research leave. The CFR will offer a work space, a computer, library card,  limited administrative support, an opportunity to present your research in the Program and in undergraduate and graduate classrooms, contact with other scholars within York University doing sexuality studies and in the Centre for Feminist Research.  Visiting scholars will be expected to present their research at a seminar or public lecture organized by the Sexuality Studies Program and the CFR, and to actively participate in activities organized by the Sexuality Studies Program and the CFR. Applications will be accepted until June 1, 2013. Please send a 2-3 page proposal outlining the research project you plan to undertake while in residence at York University, two recent publications, an up-to-date curriculum vitae and the names and contact information of two references to: Sheila Cavanagh, Sexuality Studies Program Coordinator & Associate Professor, York University, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, 206 Founders College, 4600 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M3J 1P3, Phone: (416) 650-8144, FAX: (416) 650-3900, E-mail: Sheila@yorku.ca

[10] The Fran Trust, Supporting Feminist Scholarship (August 31, 2013)
The newly-established Fran Trust has been set up to provide grants of up to £500, for postgraduate students studying at UK universities, allowing them to attend and present papers on a gender-related topic at academic conferences in the UK. The Trust welcomes entries from across a range of disciplines: the only requirement is that the paper has a gender focus. The award can be used to cover travel, subsistence and conference fees. This fund is administered by Foundation Scotland. To apply, students must have confirmation that their paper has been accepted. We also require a brief letter of support from an academic supervisor. Once the conference has taken place, successful candidates will be asked to submit a copy of the conference paper to the Foundation. Closing date for applications is 31st August 2013. Application forms are available from Foundation Scotland at
http://www.foundationscotland.org.uk/programmes/fran-trust.aspx

[11] Shameless_ Magazine, Canada’s Independent, Feminist Voice For Young Women And Trans Youth, Is Looking For A Publisher, Fundraising. (Open until filled)
Are you devoted to grassroots publishing? Do you have a commitment to anti-oppression and inclusive feminist politics? Do you have some time to volunteer and a vision to take _Shameless _financially sustainable? Then we need you! We are looking for a smart, sassy, shameless person to take on this position. The Publisher, Fundraising will work with the Publisher, Operations, to ensure that the business side of Shameless is running smoothly and strategically. JOB DESCRIPTION: ALL TASKS ARE DONE IN COLLABORATION WITH THE PUBLISHER, OPERATIONS AND THE SHAMELESS TEAM: * Collaborates with the Publisher, Operations and the Editorial Director on strategic planning for Shameless * Develops fundraising plans and works with the team to implement them  * Oversees the implementation of fundraising plans, including: drafting fundraising asks/packages for potential donors; approaching potential donors; researching foundations or other funders to approach; working with our amazing network of supporters to raise our profile; coordinating the Hall of Shameless, our sustainers program; supporting the planning of fundraising events; and researching grants. * Represents the website and/or the magazine at profile raising and fundraising events THE IDEAL CANDIDATE WILL: * Have an understanding of and commitment to Shameless’s mandate * Have excellent communication skills * Be super organized * Be comfortable with talking to people about money and supporting Shameless! * Be comfortable keeping people motivated and on-track with fundraising * Be available for monthly business meetings * Work well with a team * Previous experience in fundraising is desirable, but not necessary * Previous experience with grant writing desirable, but not necessary We are looking for people who work well collaboratively, who have a  good sense of Shameless’s editorial vision, who are committed to anti-racist feminist politics, and who are excellent communicators and work well over email. (Shameless has no office.) All positions at shameless are part-time, requiring 5-10 hours per week. Most people who work on the magazine do so outside of regular business hours, and meetings will likely be held during evenings and weekends. Like all roles at this volunteer-run magazine, this position is unpaid. (One role of the Co-Publisher, Fundraising is to generate income for Shameless so that we are able to pay staff and contributors in the future.) We strongly encourage applications from women and trans people of colour and Indigenous women and trans people, queer and gender-queer folks, and those with experience with anti-racist feminist politics and/or anti-racist feminist organizations. A strong preference will be given to residents of the Greater Toronto Area to facilitate face-to-face meetings with magazine staff. Please email a resume and a cover letter addressing your suitability for the position, and no more than three writing samples-something relevant to the position, like a newsletter or fundraising letter, would be ideal – to 
wire@shamelessmag.com. Feel free to email with any questions! WE WILL SCHEDULE INTERVIEWS STARTING IN LATE MARCH, but continue accepting applications until the position is filled.

[12] Postdoctoral Research Fellowship(s) at The Martin Prosperity Institute, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto (Open until filled) 
Ranked as one of the top 15 business schools in North America by The Financial Times, the Joseph L. Rotman School of Management has set out to redesign business education for the 21st century through an innovative approach to management education, built around Integrative Thinking™ and Business Design™. The mission of the Martin Prosperity Institute is to be the world’s leading think-tank on the understanding and enhancement of jurisdictional advantage and regional prosperity. It is becoming clearer that the sources of economic growth and prosperity in the world are increasingly placed-based and regional in nature. Where previous theories of growth have been based upon the nation-state, the MPI develops new theories, research and metrics for both the global location of economic activity and the role of global mega-regions in economic prosperity.  The primary focus is on helping regions achieve the advantage and prosperity potential they hold by thinking and acting systematically regarding jurisdictional advantage. It conducts consequential and relevant research, which shapes the ongoing debate over economic prosperity and informs private, public and civic decision-making at the highest levels.  Many of the individual pieces of the prosperity puzzle have been and continue to be studied intensively.  However there is a striking lack of integration between the various independently-studied dimensions of prosperity and the factors that increase regional prosperity and this lack of integration create significant theoretical and practical problems. Post-Doctoral Positions: One or more positions are available. Positions will be filled based on candidate qualifications and research interests.  Preference will be given to outstanding candidates whose research interests best complement the current research of the Institute. Responsibilities include but are not limited to: Day to day management of a limited number of research projects; Preparation of articles for consideration in referred journals; Participation in proposal grant-writing activities, including identifying funding sources and RFPs, conducting literature reviews, developing research questions, and designing research methods and data collection procedures; Preparation and delivery of presentations at relevant conferences and to policy-making bodies and professional organizations; Work with graduate and undergraduate assistants, full-time research staff and faculty on various research projects; Analyzing data using appropriate statistical, GIS, and other software; Preparing reports, timelines, and other documents as needed for the efficient operation of the research; Preparation and deliver of policy-maker focused “white papers” based on own research or related research completed by others; Other duties as assigned.  Qualifications: Applicants should have relevant research experience, and hold, or obtain shortly, a PhD in business, economics, geography or a related field.  Demonstrable ability with research project management is desirable.  Suitable qualified applicants who have achieved the PhD degree within five years and who have not yet held any permanent professional post, specifically as an academic, are especially encouraged to apply.  (Existing faculty, who are interested, are encouraged to contact the Martin Prosperity Institute and discuss other options.)  This position will be filled for a one-year term (either academic or calendar is negotiable) and holds the possibility for renewal for one additional year.  Additional renewal could be subject to the applicant obtaining appropriate funding. We invite applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds with appropriate experience and skills.  Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience.  Applicants must comply with the University’s approved policies, procedures and practices for postdoctoral positions.  Apply to:  
jobs@rotman.utoronto.ca Applicants interested in interviewing at the AAG Conference in Los Angeles, should follow the application process described above, and also contact Kevin Stolarick, Research Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute, kms@rotman.utoronto.ca to schedule an interview.

[13] Funded MA or PhD Research Positions in Feminist Perspectives on Diversity and Local Governance (open until filled)
Dr. Fran Klodawsky (Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University) is recruiting 1-2 MA and/or PhD students beginning September 2013 to work on research related to a SSHRC-funded Partnership Development Grant titled "Intersectionality in Practice: Feminist Theory and Local Govenance". The Co-investigators for this project are Dr. Janet Siltanen (Sociology, Carleton) and Dr. Caroline Andrew (Centre on Governance, University of Ottawa). The partners are The City of Ottawa, a community based organization called City for All Women Initiative, and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. This project is an in-depth case study of how the City of Ottawa has been addressing issues of diversity with regard to both employees and other Ottawa residents since about 2000. A particular focus of this study is the City of Ottawa's implementation of the Equity and Inclusion Lens, a staff training and education tool developed by the City of Ottawa in partnership with the City for All Women Initiative. The research position includes up to 4-5 semesters of funding to work on the project in addition to the student's own related research topic. This support will also enable opportunities for joint publications and conference presentations. Applicants must have an appropriate background in human geography or a related field. Previous experience is welcome but not required. Interested applicants should send a letter of interest to Fran Klodawsky (fran_klodawsky@carleton.ca<mailto:fran_klodawsky@carleton.ca>) at your earliest possible convenience. The Department of Geography and Environmental Studies continues to accept applications for admission from qualified students to our graduate programs. More information on the Department can be found at: http://www.carleton.ca/geography/geography/graduate/