CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, March 20th, 2017

-----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1. CFR 2017-2018 Visiting Scholar position in Sexuality Studies, York University:

EVENTS:

1. CFR Co-Sponsored: Empowering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique. Talk by Terezinha da Silva. (March 20th/17)

2. CFR Presents: Queer Ethnography?: Theory, Practice and Ethics Graduate Student Workshop with Drs. Dai Kojima and David K. Seitz: (March 21st/17)

3. CFR Co-Sponsored: 100 Years After Indenture- Transnational Reflections with Poet- Scholars Ramabai Espinet and Khal Torabully: (March 22nd/17)

4. CFR Presents: Gender Differences in Unpaid Work, Paid Work And Discretionary Time In Turkey Talk by CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Burca Kizilirmak: (March 27th/17)

5. CFR 2017 Council of Associates Meeting: (April 12th/17)

6. CFR Presents: CFR Trans Studies Conference Preliminary Meet and Greet: (April 12th/17)

-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1. Seeking a Punjabi-speaking researcher (faculty or post-doc) for a SSHRC-funded project:

2. Academics for Peace-Toronto- Solidarity Message:

3. Undocumented: Architecture Of Migrant Detention - A Comic About The Lines Drawn To Divide Us:

4. Grassy Narrows Wins Provincial Commitment To Clean Up Mercury-Contaminated River!

5. From Women's Press: Iskwewak Kah' Ki Yaw Ni Wahkomakanak Book Release:

EVENTS:

1. The Return of the Social in the Contemporary Visual Culture in Korea: (March 20th/17)

2. Coming to Terms with Difficult Pasts: "Mending Cracks," New Work by Raghavendra Rao K.V., and allied work by the South Asian Canadian Histories Association (SACHA): (March 20th/17)

3. MIGRANT DREAMS: FILM SCREENING AND TEACH-IN: (March 20th/17)

4. The 2017 University of Toronto IDERD Campaign: What’s Anti-Racism Good For Now? IDERD CONFERENCE: (March 20th/17)

5. Talk and Discussion Series on Racism and Islamophobia: (March 20th/17)

6. Capoeira Feminista Workshop: (March 20th/17)

7. OPIRG at York Tools For Change Workshop: Understanding and Addressing Conflict in Groups: (March 21st/17)

8. The 2017 University of Toronto IDERD Campaign: What’s Anti-Racism Good For Now?

IDERD AWARD CEREMONY AND PANEL DISCUSSION: (March 21st/17)

9. Fight for $15 and Fairness at York AGM: (March 21st/17)

10. Arbitrary, Indefinite, Inhumane: A Panel Discussion: (March 21st/17)

11. Regenesis @ York University- Free Store Pop Up + Donation Drop-off: (March 22nd/17)

12. Violence on the Land, Violence on Our Bodies: Supporting Indigenous Feminist Land/Body Defenders: (March 22nd/17)

13. OPIRG York Board Nominations: (March 22nd/17)

14. RISE Symposium- Race, Inclusion and Supportive Environments @ 150: (March 22nd/17)

15. Dr Fiona Nicoll: Critical Race and Whiteness Studies in the Neo-Liberal University: Comparative Reflections: (March 23rd/17)

16. A Mickey Full of Mouse at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre: (March 25th/17-April 8th/17)

17. Palestine’s Right to Education: The Politics of the Academic Boycott: (March 27th/17)

18. Asian Pathways Research Lab Information Session: (March 28th/17)

19. NEWSGIRLS Book Launch by Donna Jean MacKinnon: (March 29th/17)

20. Geography Distinguished Guest Lecture: "Black Music in Minneapolis: Prince and the Geography of the Minneapolis Sound”: (March 29th/17)

21. Another Story Bookshop presents the Toronto launch for Azadi: Sexual Politics and Post-Colonial Worlds by Tara Atluri: (March 30th/17)

22. Africentric and Indigenous Schooling Philosophies: (March 31st/17)

23. Towards the Unknown: Refugee Journeys Through Syria, Greece and Germany: (March 31st/17- April 2nd/17)

24. Public Talk: Fifty Years ‘Beyond Vietnam’: Dr. King’s Revolutionary Dream Against Our Neoliberal/Neofascist Nightmare by Robin D.G. Kelley: (April 1st/17)

25. Fifth Annual Toronto Mapuche Solidarity Film Festival: (April 1st/17-April 2nd/17)

26. OPIRG at York Tools for Change Workshop: Preparing to Address Conflict: Techniques and Tips: (April 5th/17)

27. Celebrate Refugee Rights Day Event with Amnesty International, Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture, CultureLink and Sojourn House! (April 8th/17)

28. OPIRG Toronto- Tools for Change Winter Training Series- How to Host A Great Workshop: (April 9th/17)

29. Marx’s Capital after 150 Years: Critique and Alternative to Capitalism Conference: (May 24th/17-May 26th/17)

30. OPIRG Toronto- Tools for Change Winter Training Series- Scouting for Events and Actions: (June 4th/17)

CALLS:

1. Call for Abstracts: 2017 GDPP      Conference: CANADA 150: Inclusion in a changing world: (Deadline: March 22nd/17)

2.    Call for Applications: DIRECTOR, Centre for Research on Language and Culture Contact   (CRLCC): (Deadline: April 5th/17)

3. Call for Papers: Violence Against University and College Women: (Deadline: April 30th/17)

OPPORTUNITIES:

1. 2016 competition for the Ontario Graduate Policy Research Challenge: (Deadline: April 21st/17)

2. IPEE Summer School at York University with Nancy Peluso- Violent Political Ecologies- Resources, Labour, Transformation:

3. Regent Park Film Festival Opportunities: (Deadline: February 24th /17, April 21st/17, May 12th/17)


---CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH---

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. CFR 2017-2018 Visiting Scholar position in Sexuality Studies, York University:

     Visiting Scholar position in Sexuality Studies, York University, 2017-2018:

The Sexuality Studies Program is pleased to announce a Visiting Scholar position in partnership with the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR) at York University for the 2017-2018 academic year. We invite applicants who have acquired a doctorate in sexuality studies and/or transgender studies by July 2017 to submit their applications. Junior and senior scholars are both welcome to apply. The Visiting Scholar position is intended to provide an institutional base for junior scholars doing postdoctoral research, along with senior scholars on sabbatical or research leave.

The CFR will offer a shared work space, a library card, limited administrative support, an opportunity to present your research in the Program and in undergraduate and graduate classrooms, and contact with other scholars within York University doing sexuality studies and in the Centre for Feminist Research. Unfortunately, we do not have funds for a stipend or honorarium. Visiting scholars will be expected to present their research at a seminar or public lecture organized by the Sexuality Studies Program and the CFR, and to actively participate in activities organized by the Sexuality Studies Program and the CFR.

Applications will be accepted until April 15, 2017.

Please send a 2-3 page proposal outlining the research project you plan to undertake while in residence at York University, two recent publications, an up-to-date curriculum vitae and the names and contact information of two references.

Applications should be sent electronically to:

Allyson Mitchell

Sexuality Studies Program Coordinator & Associate Professor

York University

School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies

E-mail: allysonm@yorku.ca

__________________________________________________________________________________

EVENTS

1. CFR Co-Sponsored: Empowering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique. Talk by Terezinha da Silva.

(March 20th/17)

Empowering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique.  Talk by Terezinha da Silva.

WHEN: Monday, March 20, 2017. 2:00pm – 4:30pm.

WHERE: Kaneff Tower 519, York University.

All are welcome!

The last decade has seen a coal mining boom in northern Mozambique with the arrival of Riversdale, Rio Tinto, Vale and Jindal. The Mozambican government has welcomed these investments as the guarantee of economic growth, jobs and poverty alleviation. Brazil has given strong backing to its corporations in Africa, within an upbeat narrative of South-South solidarity. For the mining communities, it has been a story of unfulfilled promises. There have been forced resettlements of traditional farmers without prior consultation or respect for land rights. Vale has relocated them in a rural area with houses, schools and a health post but no land or means of livelihood. The influx of miners has exacerbated already scarce social and infrastructure in the region, overcrowding roads, schools and hospitals and creating social problems. While there have been many general studies of impacted communities, WLSA’s research project is the first study looking specifically at the impact on women and girls from a gender perspective. The study analyses, in context of resettlements, how women and men produce their responses as a result of mining actions. Terezinha da Silva will talk about the community workshops based on the research and the challenges of taking up these issues in communities with patriarchal traditions still deeply embedded.

Speaker’s Bio: Terezinha da Silva (Mozambique) is currently the national coordinator of WLSA Mozambique (Women and Law in Southern Africa), a regional NGO  working on women human’s rights. She is also the board member of different NGO’s working on themes related to community development, social studies, children, gender and women issues and ageing. Her other professional experiences are related to management and institutional development.  She worked for many years at the Ministry of Health and Social Action.  She also has a wide range of experiences in teaching planning and management, including curriculum development of national courses. Her research experience include areas related to public policies, gender and development, integrity of the judiciary, unpaid care work, gender audit and ageing. She holds a Masters degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics.

Co-sponsors: The Harriet Tubman Institute, African Studies, Global Labour Research Centre, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Law and Society (LASO), The Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode (IFLS),Centre for Feminist Research.

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2. CFR Presents: Queer Ethnography?: Theory, Practice and Ethics Graduate Student Workshop with Drs. Dai Kojima and David K. Seitz:

(March 21st/17)

The Centre for Feminist Research and the Department of Anthropology Present: Queer Ethnography?: Theory, Practice And Ethics. Graduate Student Workshop with Drs. Dai Kojima & David K. Seitz.

WHEN: Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 12-2pm.

WHERE: 626 Kaneff Tower, York University.

Introduced by Dr. David AB Murray, Department of Anthropology. This dialogue-based workshop will consider the implications and possibilities of adding “queer” to “ethnography”:

-What do queer epistemology and sensibility do to ethnographic ways of documenting and representing others’ experiences and cultural practices? -How does such a methodological move change the ways in which we seek and understand the evidence of our theorizing? -What kinds of strategies does queer ethnography require? (Queer is, after all, about an insistence in finding pleasure and joy where they “should not” belong!).

We will discuss a few exemplary texts and case studies that will assist us in order to grapple with these questions and ethical challenges, followed by sharing our own field notes and experiences in order to consider practical implications and strategies as a group.

This workshop is open to everyone, but is best suited for MAs and PhDs at all stages of designing and conducting fieldwork or writing their theses. Participants are encouraged to bring their research/field notes. Suggested readings and case studies will be provided.

Dr. Dai Kojima is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Anthropology and a Research Associate for CFR and YCAR at York University. His work appears in Anthropologica, Reconstruction and most recently, Topia (forthcoming in Fall 2017).

Dr. David K. Seitz is the Visiting Scholar in Sexuality Studies and the Centre for Feminist Research at York University. His writing appears in Society and Space and the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.

Please RSVP at juliapyr@yorku.ca to receive the readings. Light refreshments provided.

This workshop counts towards GFWS seminar requirements. Co-Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology.

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3. CFR Co-Sponsored: 100 Years After Indenture- Transnational Reflections with Poet- Scholars Ramabai Espinet and Khal Torabully:

(March 22nd/17)

100 Years After Indenture- Transnational Reflections with Poet- Scholars Ramabai Espinet (The Swinging Bridge) and Khal Torabully (Coolitude):

WHEN: March 22nd/17 at 2:30 pm to 4 pm.

WHERE: HNES Main Lounge. York University.

Limited Seating.

Andil Gosine’s God’s On The Beach. Opening reception to follow, Crossroads Gallery.

Thank you Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, Department of Sociology, Global Labour Research Centre, Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Centre of Feminist Thought, (all York University), Caribbean Studies, (University of Toronto), and

Andil Gosine- Coolie Coolie Viens, March 29th/17-May 24th/17, Glenhyrst Gallery, Brantford.

Opening Reception 7 pm, March 29th/17. Organized with McIntosh Gallery, Western University.

Featuring Collaborations with Wendy Nanan and Kelly Sinnapah Mary.

The Gospel of Patrick. March 31st/17-April 27th/17. Whippersnapper Gallery, Toronto.

100 Years After Indenture. With Ramabai Espinet and Khal Torabully. 2:30 pm, March 22nd/17. York University.

Followed by the Opening Reception for God’s On the Beach at Crossroads Gallery.

With support from York University, Ontario Arts Council, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada.

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4. CFR Presents: Gender Differences in Unpaid Work, Paid Work And Discretionary Time In Turkey Talk by CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Burca Kizilirmak:

(March 27th/17)

The Centre for Feminist Research and Gender and Work Present:

Gender Differences in Unpaid Work, Paid Work And Discretionary Time In Turkey.

By: CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Burca Kizilirmak.

Introduced by: Dr. Meg Luxton, Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies.

Discussion Chaired by: Dr. Leah Vosko, Gender and Work Database.

Date: Monday, March 27, 2017. Time: 11.30-1.00pm. Location: 280A York Lanes.

Summary: Marked with low female labor market participation rates and strong patriarchal relations, Turkey ranks low in gender equality. In recent years, with more and more women entering the labor force, comes the question of ‘second shift’ and the problem of high total work load of women. How free are women in Turkey in using their time and what are the gender differences in temporal autonomy? These questions are addressed in this research by measuring and analyzing women’s and men’s ‘discretionary time’, that is the time left after the necessities of life (personal care, unpaid work, paid work) are met. This framework is also used to understand the effects of different policies on gender differences in discretionary time.

Bio: Dr. Burca Kizilirmak is a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Feminist Research at York University, and a Professor of Economics at Ankara University in Turkey. Her research focuses on gender economics, time use, international trade and income inequality. She has done research on women in labor markets, intra-household distribution of work time and the effects of global trade patterns on women's employment.

RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. Light refreshments provided. This talk counts towards GFWS seminar requirements.

Co-sponsored by: Gender and Work.

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5. CFR 2017 Council of Associates Meeting:

(April 12th/17)

The Centre for Feminist Research 2017 Council of Associates meeting is taking place on:

Wednesday, April 12, 2017, 2-4pm. 626 Kaneff Tower, York University.

The Council of Associates meeting is an opportunity to meet other CFR Associates, hear about our activities over the past year, and learn more about the research projects we currently house and others that are in development.

It is also an opportunity for the CFR community to have a conversation and a community consultation in anticipation of the re-chartering process that CFR will be embarking on in Fall 2017.The agenda will be distributed closer to the date of the event. Light refreshments served.

Please RSVP to Julia at juliapyr@yorku.ca to confirm your attendance.

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6. CFR Presents: CFR Trans Studies Conference Preliminary Meet and Greet:

(April 12th/17)

CFR Presents: Trans Studies Conference Preliminary Meet and Greet:

Wednesday, April 12, 2017. 11am-1.30pm. 626 Kaneff Tower, York University.

The CFR will be holding a Meet ‘n Greet on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 from 11-1:30pm, featuring a talk by Dr. reese simpkins, who was a 2014-2015 Visiting Scholar at the CFR. The event will also include brief presentations of current graduate students’ research. Further, this will serve as an opportunity for those interested in joining the committee to meet one another and begin a conversation on what we envision for the conference.

If you would like to give a 10 min presentation on your work at the Meet and Greet, please send an email to transgradconference@gmail.com, by Friday, March 3, 2017, introducing yourself and include an abstract or brief description of what you wish to present on. We welcome a range of topics that connect to trans studies, including, but not limited to: whiteness and racism, sex work, prisoners and the prison-industrial-complex, imperialism, (settler) colonialism, nationalism, citizenship, rights and the law, crip theory, sexualities, political economy, and cultural production.

All those interested in the 2018 conference are encouraged to attend the Meet and Greet!

Please note, anyone interested may apply, but preference will be given to trans-identified students, particularly trans people of colour, Two Spirit persons, disabled trans persons, trans sex workers, trans feminine persons, non-binary people, and others who are underrepresented and marginalized within the trans community.

This is not an exhaustive list. If you are interested in participating, please reach out.

If you have any questions, please contact the Conference Coordinator, Evan Vipond, at transgradconference@gmail.com.

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-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. Seeking a Punjabi-speaking researcher (faculty or post-doc) for a SSHRC-funded project:

Seeking a Punjabi-speaking Researcher (Faculty or post-doc) for a SSHRC-funded project.

I am writing on behalf of a York researcher who is seeking a Researcher for a SSHRC-funded project.

The individual should speak Punjabi and be familiar with the Punjabi community in the GTA. Knowledge of the older adult members of the community is an asset.

If you are interested, do please let me know at ycar@yorku.ca.  If you know of someone who may be interested, thank you in advance for circulating this request.

More detailed information upon request.

Thank you!

Alicia Filipowitz

Coordinator, York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR)

falicia@yorku.ca

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2. Academics for Peace-Toronto- Solidarity Message:

We, Academics for Peace-Toronto, are writing regarding a fundraising campaign to support academics in Turkey who have been removed from their university posts either after signing the peace petition or due to a general political oppositional stance.

As you may already know, there have been several crackdowns on academics in Turkey. Many have been detained, jailed, and dismissed from their posts through statutory decrees. Among those affected are the “Academics for Peace”, who signed a declaration calling on the Turkish government to end human rights violations in the Kurdish provinces.

As Academics for Peace-Toronto, we endorse the crowdfunding that has been initiated by the Research Institute on Turkey and Bostonbul, both 503(1)c non-profits, and  GIT-NA with the goal to raise an initial amount of $105,000 USD to support at least 35 academics for 6 months. The funds will be fully allocated to the financial support of the Academics for Peace through close collaboration with the Education and Science Workers’ Union, Egitim-Sen, and other associations which are actively assisting the purged Academics for Peace at the local and international level.

Here is how you can show your solidarity:

Donate at this link. There is no amount too small. https://www.youcaring.com/DismissedAFPTurkey

All contributions are fully tax deductible within legal limits. Your employer may match your donation -please use the name Research Institute on Turkey, Inc. with Tax ID # 81-4004031.

For more information please see here, talk to your HR Rep, or contact solidarity.afp.turkey@gmail.com.

Forward this email to your networks and encourage them to get involved in this campaign.

To get in touch with Academics for Peace-Toronto, please email us at torontoacademicsforpeace@gmail.com

For those who reside in Toronto, we have two upcoming public events:

1.  Panel, “From Academics for Peace to Everyday Resistance in Kurdistan” on March 23rd, 2017 at the University of Toronto Faculty of Arts & Science, Room 2108, organized by Historical Materialism Toronto in collaboration with Academics for Peace-Toronto. Here is the event link: https://www.facebook.com/events/414975815502486/?notif_t=plan_edited&notif_id=1489538439938910

2.  Movie Night in Solidarity with Academics in Turkey on March 24th, 2017 at Robert Gill Theater. Here is the event link:  https://www.facebook.com/events/387800378262394/

Following the screening of "Bûka Baranê", the screenplay writer of this documentary, İrfan Aktan, will join us via skype and one of the Academics for Peace from Turkey will give a short talk.

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3. UNDOCUMENTED: ARCHITECTURE OF MIGRANT DETENTION - A COMIC ABOUT THE LINES DRAWN TO DIVIDE US:

Contribute to get this amazing graphic novel by Tings Chak, published by Ad Astra Comix. All royalties go to support the End Immigration Detention Network.

"This work is grounded in collective grassroots organizing, primarily through No One Is Illegal - Toronto and the End Immigration Detention Network. Working in solidarity with immigration detainees and migrants, this book compels us to imagine a world without borders and prisons."

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/undocumented-architecture-of-migrant-detention-canada-art#/.

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4. GRASSY NARROWS WINS PROVINCIAL COMMITMENT TO CLEAN UP MERCURY-CONTAMINATED RIVER!

No One Is Illegal-Toronto is pleased to share this amazing news with you:

GRASSY NARROWS WINS PROVINCIAL COMMITMENT TO CLEAN UP MERCURY-CONTAMINATED RIVER!

After 40 years of mercury poisoning and government inaction, Grassy Narrows has won a commitment to clean up the mercury-contaminated river system that runs through their lands. This includes a rigorous investigation of the Dryden paper mill site initially responsible for dumping 10 tonnes of mercury into English-Wabigoon river. Justice may be on the horizon for Grassy Narrows.

This victory is the result of decades of struggle by members of the northern Ontario community, who have organized countless rallies, marches, direct actions, delegations, petitions, and scientific reports

to pressure the Ontario government to respond to this crisis. We should not celebrate the government for finally committed to action, but celebrate the decades of resistance and resilience of Grassy Narrows in sustaining their struggle for justice.

In February, Ontario Minister of the Environment Glen Murray said his government is now "completely committed" to identifying all contamination sites along the river and implementing a comprehensive remediation plan.

But we know better than to believe a Liberal promise. In this time of cautious optimism, we too must remain "completely committed" to ensuring that justice for Grassy Narrows turns from a promise to a reality.

Until the water is clean and the fish are safe to eat, the fight continues. As a first step, sign this pledge to hold the government to their word: http://bit.ly/GrassyPledge.

This is only the first step. Grassy Narrows continues to call for a dignified Mercury Home for survivors in their community, a fair mercury compensation system, quality health care, and a permanent Grassy Narrows environmental health monitoring station. Grassy Narrows is also calling for an end to planned clearcut-logging on their homeland, which would release more mercury into their lakes and rivers.

No One Is Illegal-Toronto has supported Grassy Narrows' demands for justice for years and is committed to making sure the government follows through on their word. We know there cannot be justice for precarious and non-status migrants in Canada without the re-assertion of Indigenous

nationhood over these lands. As migrants, refugees, workers, and allies we must continue to act on our responsibilities to supporting Indigenous struggles for decolonization.

SHARE THE NEWS!

Facebook: http://bit.ly/2lHXNJH. Twitter: http://bit.ly/2koAqDb.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE STRUGGLE AT GRASSY NARROWS:

-1962 - Dryden Chemical begins dumping 9,000+ kg of mercury poison into Grassy Narrows' river.

-1970 - Mercury spreads through water, animals, and community members. Commercial fishing banned, dumping controlled.

-1975 - Grassy Narrows protests in Dryden, Ontario.

-1985 - Grassy Narrows gains basic and limited mercury compensation.

-2002 - Japanese scientist and mercury expert Dr. Hanada returns to Grassy Narrows to document ongoing health impacts of contaminated river system.

-2010 - First of four River Run weeks of action led by Grassy Narrows in Toronto.

-2012 - Wynne commits to rebuild relationship with Grassy Narrows after community members organize a 'fish fry' on the lawn of Queens Park.

-2014 - Hunger strike by Steve Forbister Sr. forces Minister Zimmer to commit to review inadequate mercury compensation and look into a Mercury Home for survivors in Grassy Narrow.

-2016 - Over 1,000 people march with Grassy Narrows in Toronto. Former Dryden Mill worker reports burying additional mercury in a shallow pit behind the mill, contaminated soil found.

-2017 - Wynne promises to clean the river under Grassy Narrows' leadership.

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5.    From Women's Press: Iskwewak Kah' Ki Yaw Ni Wahkomakanak Book Release:

Iskwewak Kah' Ki Yaw Ni Wahkomakanak: Neither Indian Princesses nor Easy Squaws.

By Janice Acoose-Miswonigeesikokwe.

Now in its second edition, this groundbreaking work of literary and cultural criticism analyzes representations of Indigenous women in Canadian literature. By deconstructing stereotypical images of the “Indian princess” and “easy squaw,” Janice Acoose calls attention to the racist and sexist depictions of Indigenous women in popular literature. Blending personal narrative and literary criticism, this revised edition draws a strong connection between the persistent negative cultural attitudes fostered by those stereotypical representations and the missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada.

Acoose decolonizes written English by interweaving her own story with reflections on the self-determination of her female ancestors and by highlighting influential Indigenous female writers who have resisted cultural stereotypes and reclaimed the literary field as their own. This important text urges both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people to move beyond words to challenge the harmful attitudes that condone violence against Indigenous women.

Thoroughly updated and featuring new photographs, questions for critical thought, and a discussion of Indigenous women’s literary voices that have emerged in the past twenty years, the second edition of Iskwewak is an invaluable resource for students and teachers of Indigenous studies, women’s studies, and literature.

$44.95 | 9780889615762 | 120 pages | February 2016.

Janice Acoose holds a PhD from the University of Saskatchewan and is a Sessional Lecturer with the Northern Teacher Education Program, an activist-educator, and an internationally recognized Indigenous literary critic, writer, researcher, and consultant. Her roots stem from the Sakimay First Nation and the Marival Métis community.

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EVENTS

1. The Return of the Social in the Contemporary Visual Culture in Korea:

(March 20th/17)

The Return of the Social in the Contemporary Visual Culture in Korea:

WHEN: Monday, 20 March 2017, Noon to 3pm.

WHERE: York University.

With:

Woongi Min, Director of the Space Beam Community, Incheon, Korea. Su Young Choi, PhD candidate, University of Massachusetts Amherst. Vicki Sung-yeon Kwon, PhD Candidate, University of Alberta.

Saving the Baedari town: The Role of Alternative Cultural Space, Space Beam, in the Crisis of Urban Redevelopment in Incheon, South Korea: Min problematizes urban redevelopment projects by the Incheon Municipal government that promote “creativity” for urban-branding while destroying local history and identity. He discusses “creative” efforts of residents and citizen groups to build local communities and ecologies and to challenge speculative urban redevelopment. He focuses on a case of the ongoing battle of Baedari town in Incheon, South Korea.

Woongi Min is director of the alternative cultural space, Space Beam Community, located in Baedari, Incheon, South Korea. In collaboration with residents and urban activists, Min is committed to building community through community-engaged cultural activities, education programs, and protests against problematic urban redevelopment and gentrification. He concerns the crucial roles of art in coping with critical urban issues outside the mainstream art institutions.

Protesting Grandmother: Creativity, Energy Activism and the Visual Politics of Nostalgia in the Neo-Developmental South Korea: Su Young Choi presents the visual iconicity of the Miryang grandmother in the environmental struggle of the rural residents of Miryang against the Korea Electronic Power Corporation’s construction of 765kV transmission towers in South Korea.

The Statues of Korean “Comfort Women”: Public Art between Art and Politics: Vicki Sung-yeon Kwon presents the controversies surrounding a series of bronze statues of a barefoot girl representing the young women, referred to as “comfort women,” who were victims of sexual slavery by the Japanese military during the Pacific War.

Please RSVP to ycar@yorku.ca by 14 March 2017.This event is organized by Hong Kal (Visual Arts) with support from the York Centre for Asian Research.

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2.  Coming to Terms with Difficult Pasts: "Mending Cracks," New Work by Raghavendra Rao K.V., and allied work by the South Asian Canadian Histories Association (SACHA):

(March 20th /17)

Coming to Terms with Difficult Pasts: "Mending Cracks," New Work by Raghavendra Rao K.V., and allied work by the South Asian Canadian Histories Association (SACHA).

WHEN: Monday, 20 March 2017, 11:30am to 1:30pm.

WHERE: Room 626, Sixth Floor, Kaneff Tower, Keele Campus.

With:

Raghavendra Rao, K.V., Visual artist and Associate, Centre for India and South Asia Research, UBC.

Anne Murphy, Associate Professor, Asian Studies, University of British Columbia.

This presentation explores the representation and narration of individual and societal forms of trauma and remembrance. The central theme of the series ‘Mending Cracks’, by Raghavendra Rao K.V., is disability, trauma and the complex process of recovery. Rao was buried under rubble in the 2001 earthquake in Kutch, India, resulting in the partial paralysis and atrophy of his left arm. The works in this series represent his visualization of this experience and its enduring effects, through painting, installations and videos. This work has also inspired a new project by SACHA, "Trauma, Memory, and the Story of Canada," made possible with generous funding from the Canada 150 fund, which will in 2017 present a series of public art events and exhibitions to explore experiences of trauma as neglected and yet foundational parts of the story of Canada. The plan for this project will be presented.

Anne Murphy and Raghavendra Rao K.V. are founding Collective Members of the "South Asian Canadian Histories Association" (SACHA). Murphy specializes in Punjabi cultural representation in India, Pakistan and the Punjabi Diaspora; Rao is a visual artist who works in diverse media, including painting, installation, and video.

All are welcome!

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3.  MIGRANT DREAMS: FILM SCREENING AND TEACH-IN:

(March 20th/17)

MIGRANT DREAMS: FILM SCREENING AND TEACH-IN:

WHEN: March 20th, 6PM - 9PM.

WHERE: Nexus Lounge, OISE (12th floor - 252 Bloor St. West).

Join us for a film screening and discussion of Migrant Dreams, a locally produced documentary that tells the untold story of migrant agricultural workers who are struggling under Canada's Temporary Foreign Worker Program. Four panelists, including Dr. Eve Tuck and the filmmaker, Min Sook Lee, will discuss the politics of migrant labor on Indigenous land. What can be done to fight abuses faced by those who harvest our food? How can Indigenous theories of land help inform this fight?

Free buffet meal served at 6pm. Film starts at 6:30.

This is a wheelchair-accessible space. Captions and note-taking provided.

Register at: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/migrant-dreams-on-indigenous-land-film-screening-and-teach-in-tickets-32497640317.

Panelists:

Min Sook Lee, the film’s Director and Producer, will speak about temporary foreign work and the making of the film

Dr. Eve Tuck, Associate Professor at OISE, will speak on Indigenous relationships to land, migrant youth in the USA (particularly New York State), and educational policies

Tania Ruiz-Chapman, PhD student at OISE, will speak on connections between disability, productivity, and the migrant as always already disposable under these temporary foreign work programs

Gabriel Alladhua, farm worker and activist with Justicia for Migrant Workers, will speak on Canadian policies and what can be done

Moderator: Nisha Toomey, PhD student at OISE.

https://www.facebook.com/events/186186541873435/.

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4. The 2017 University of Toronto IDERD Campaign: What’s Anti-Racism Good For Now? IDERD CONFERENCE:

(March 20th/17)

The 2017 University of Toronto IDERD Campaign: Commemorating the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (IDERD)- What’s Anti-Racism Good For Now? IDERD CONFERENCE:

WHEN: March 20th/17, 8:45 am- 5:30 pm.

WHERE: Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle, St. George Campus, Toronto.

It’s 2017. Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary. Yet racism is still with us. We’ve taken steps against it, but it’s still rooted in our institutions. How are our postsecondary institutions – faculty, staff, students and administration - responding? What aren’t we doing right? This year’s IDERD Campaign, "What’s Anti-Racism Good for Now?", presents an opportunity to explore these troubling questions.

On March 20th, join us for a thought-provoking conference, with keynotes, panels and roundtable discussions.

Register for these free events at antiracism.utoronto.ca.

Anti-Racism & Cultural Diversity Office (ARCDO) in partnership with:

Hart House Rotman School of Management Office of the Vice Provost, Students Student Life Programs & Services, UTSG Department of Student Life, UTSC Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Department of Sociology, UTM Equity & Diversity Office UTM Multi-Faith Centre for Spiritual Study & Practice (MFC) Department of Social Justice Education, OISE University of Toronto Graduate Student Union (UTGSU) University of Toronto Student Union (UTSU).

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5. Talk and Discussion Series on Racism and Islamophobia:

(March 20th/17)

Talk and Discussion Series on Racism and Islamophobia:

Racism and Work: Organizing Against Canada's Economic Apartheid.

WHEN: Monday, March 20, 2017. 3:00-4:30 pm.

WHERE: Morrice Hall Room 017 (TNC). 3485 McTavish Street. McGill University.

Mostafa Henaway, Viviana Medina,Tess Tesalona.(Immigrant Workers' Centre).

Throughout Canada’s history, structural racism has manifested itself through the racialization of work. Various phases of migrant worker programs have allocated different rights to im/migrant workers and to “citizens”, resulting in a growing economic apartheid. Workers without regular status and those who are racialized are often denied access to state services, and their basic labour rights. This presentation will look at the efforts of the Immigrant Workers Centre to organize with im/migrant workers and to challenge the structural racism they face.

Mostafa Henaway and Viviana Medina are organizers at the Immigrant Workers Centre, and Tess Tesalona is one of its founders. See www.iwc-cti.ca

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6. Capoeira Feminista Workshop:

(March 20th/17)

WHEN: March 20th, 5-7PM.

WHERE: Student Centre room 430, York University.

Knowledge is power. Capoeira Feminista & Opirg York invite all to create culture and share knowledge.

Hilary Lagartixa will facilitate a participatory CAPOEIRA talking circle, movement, dance, storytelling, martial arts, music and cultural arts workshop.

The "roda de dialogo" (talking circle) honors diverse ethno-cultural spiritual beliefs and practices. Hilary invites participants to explore themes of gender, race, class, trauma, memory and post-colonialism that are embedded in Capoeira.

FREE (Snacks and TTC tokens will be provided).

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7. OPIRG at York Tools For Change Workshop: Understanding and Addressing Conflict in Groups: (March 21st/17)

Understanding and Addressing Conflict in Groups:

This workshop will discuss various issues in group conflict, including: how group conflict can start; how it can escalate; and how to resolve group conflict in lasting ways.

WHEN: Tues March 21, 2PM-5PM.

WHERE: York University.

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8. The 2017 University of Toronto IDERD Campaign: What’s Anti-Racism Good For Now?

IDERD AWARD CEREMONY AND PANEL DISCUSSION:

(March 21st/17)

The 2017 University of Toronto IDERD Campaign: Commemorating the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (IDERD)- What’s Anti-Racism Good For Now? IDERD AWARD CEREMONY AND PANEL DISCUSSION:

WHEN: March 21st/17, 1:00 pm- 5:00 pm.

WHERE: Rotman Desautels Hall, 2nd flr, South Building, 105 St. George Street, Toronto.

It’s 2017. Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary. Yet racism is still with us. We’ve taken steps against it, but it’s still rooted in our institutions. How are our postsecondary institutions – faculty, staff, students and administration - responding? What aren’t we doing right? This year’s IDERD Campaign, "What’s Anti-Racism Good for Now?", presents an opportunity to explore these troubling questions.

On March 21st we present our annual IDERD Awards Ceremony, at the St. George Campus, U of T.

Register for these free events at antiracism.utoronto.ca.

Anti-Racism & Cultural Diversity Office (ARCDO) in partnership with:

Hart House Rotman School of Management Office of the Vice Provost, Students Student Life Programs & Services, UTSG Department of Student Life, UTSC Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Department of Sociology, UTM Equity & Diversity Office UTM Multi-Faith Centre for Spiritual Study & Practice (MFC) Department of Social Justice Education, OISE University of Toronto Graduate Student Union (UTGSU) University of Toronto Student Union (UTSU).

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9. Fight for $15 and Fairness at York AGM:

(March 21st/17)

WHEN: March 21st, 1-2PM.

WHERE: Student Centre room 313, York University.

Meeting to review our constitution and budget and to discuss upcoming events.

https://www.facebook.com/events/209393402876017/.

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10. Arbitrary, Indefinite, Inhumane: A Panel Discussion:

(March 21st/17)

Arbitrary, Indefinite, Inhumane: A Panel Discussion.

WHEN: March 21st, 2:30 - 4:30PM.

WHERE: Ignat Kaneff Building Room 1003, York University.

Osgoode Hall Law Union presents a panel discussion on immigration detention in Canada. This event is designed to help you better understand this controversial dimension of the Canadian immigration system. Immigrant detention, especially when it is arbitrary, indefinite, and inhumane, raises significant concerns from human rights and humanitarian perspectives. We are pleased to present a panel on this timely subject that features academic and practitioner perspectives alongside those of former detainees.

Refreshments will be provided.

https://www.facebook.com/events/727888584047241/.

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11. Regenesis @ York University- Free Store Pop Up + Donation Drop-off:

(March 22nd/17)

WHEN: March 22nd, 10AM - 4PM.

WHERE: Vari Hall, York University.

FREE FREE FREE!

Everything is F-R-E-E.

Never heard of us before? We are an initiative run by Regenesis | York University and we're located inside HNES 109 every Wednesday. But for sustainability week, we will be hosting our Free Store pop-up style!

Get items like books, clothing, pens, accessories, cups, pillows, toys, bags, earphones... you name it!

DONATIONS are HIGHLY encouraged. It's how we sustain the Free Store. Spring is right around the corner so it's the perfect time to do that spring cleaning you've been avoiding, and to offer the items you don't need anymore to someone else.

See you in Vari Hall!

https://www.facebook.com/events/1124974897628821/.

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12. Violence on the Land, Violence on Our Bodies: Supporting Indigenous Feminist Land/Body Defenders:

(March 22nd/17)

WHEN: March 22nd, 1PM - 2:15PM.

WHERE: HNES 141.

The Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN) is an organization by and for Indigenous youth that works across issues of sexual and reproductive health, rights and justice throughout the United States and Canada. Representatives from NYSHN will join us on March 22nd to speak about the Violence on the Land, Violence on our Bodies report and toolkit, which centers the experiences and resistance efforts of Indigenous women and young people in order to expose and curtail the impact of extractive industries on their communities and lands.

Follow the link below to register:

http://fes.apps01.yorku.ca/machform/view.php?id=54077.

Light refreshments will be served.

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13. OPIRG York Board Nominations:

(March 22nd/17)

OPIRG York Board Nominations - Deadline extended to Wednesday March 22, 2017.

NOMINATION for the York Public Interest Research Group Board of Directors is open to any OPIRG member, as long as the nomination is supported by at least 15 member signatures. All York students who have paid their student fees and not opted out of OPIRG York’s levy fee are members of OPIRG YORK and eligible for nomination. Community members may run for the board as well; a community member is anyone who pays their dues ($3-20 sliding scale) and signs the community membership form.

Nomination Period:

- Wednesday, March 8th to Wednesday, March 22nd/17.

-Nomination forms are attached below, or can be picked up from the OPIRG office (Rm C449, Student Centre) starting at 10:00 a.m, on Monday, March 6th.

Election:

-The election of the board shall happen at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of OPIRG YORK, to be held on Wednesday, March 29th/17.- The polling station will be open for 1 hour during the AGM, and 1 hour after its completion.- Nominees will have an opportunity to provide a brief statement about themselves prior to the voting.

For more questions and inquiries please contact Hanan Jibril, OPIRG York Chief Returning Office (CRO) at opirgyorkcro2017@gmail.com. Copies of the nomination form and more information about OPIRG York are available in the OPIRG York office, room C449 Student Centre and online at http://opirgyork.ca/

Nomination form: http://opirgyork.ca/sites/opirgyork.ca/files/2017-2018%20Board%20of%20Directors%20Nomination%20Form.pdf.

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14. RISE Symposium- Race, Inclusion and Supportive Environments @ 150:

(March 22nd/17)

Hello,

The Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion along with the Race, Inclusion and Supportive Environments Working Group warmly invites you to the Race, Inclusion and Supportive Environments @ 150 Symposium.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 from 10:00am to 1:00pm. Registration opens at 9:30 am.

WHERE: 519 Kaneff Tower, Keele Campus, York University.

Lunch will be provided. This event is free of cost.

In honour of the Sesquicentennial and the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, as Canada turns 150, this symposium will be chance to reflect and bring attention to issues of racism and inclusion for racialized and Indigenous peoples who are part of post-secondary institutions, whether as staff, faculty, or students.

Morning Panel- 10:00 am- 12:00 pm. Race and Intersectionality- Past and Present Activism on Campus:

The objective of this panel discussion is to understand through an intersectional lens:

The voices, experiences and current activities of individuals who are currently identifying and challenging racism through group or individual activism.

The various racial barriers of the past and present- How much has changed? How much as remained the same?

The strategies/activities individuals and groups are employing to address racial inequalities.

Moderator:

Sam Tecle- PhD Candidate, Sociology.

Speakers:

Dr Bonita Lawrence- Associate Professor, Department of Equity Studies, York University.

Karissa John- President, Aboriginal Students Association, York University.

Roshni Raveenthiran- Chair, United South Asians at York, York University.

Dr. Lorne Foster- Associate Professor, School of Public Policy and Administration and Department of Equity Studies, York University.

Lunch Keynote Address- 12:00 pm- 1:00 pm. Islamophobia, Inclusion and Post-Secondary Institutions:

In light of the current political climate and the rise of Islamophobic incidents, the York Community continues to create spaces of learning that highlight current challenges and identify actions that can be taken to create respectful and inclusive learning and working environments.

Keynote Speaker:

Rabia Khedr- Commissioner, Ontario Human Rights Commission.

As well, more information about this event and how to register can be found at: http://rights.info.yorku.ca/race-inclusion-and-supportive-environments-150/.

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15. Dr Fiona Nicoll: Critical Race and Whiteness Studies in the Neo-Liberal University: Comparative Reflections:

(March 23rd/17)

"Critical Race and Whiteness Studies in the Neo-Liberal University: Comparative Reflections"

Dr Fiona Nicoll, University of Alberta.

WHEN: Thursday, 23 March, 2017, 3:30-5:00 pm.

WHERE: 10-4 H.M. Tory Building, University of Alberta.

Abstract: How is ignorance misrecognized in the neoliberal university? How do particular ways of doing gender shape everyday practices and institutional processes, which conflate being white with being right? How does this prevent universities from realizing commitments to access and equity even as we celebrate the ‘diversity’ of our campuses? To address these questions, I draw on critical scholars of race and whiteness, including Charles W Mills (2007), Cheryl Harris (1993) Aileen Moreton-Robinson (2015), Sara Ahmed (2012), Malinda Smith (2010), Annette Henry (2015) and George Yancy (2012) and present a series of case studies from Australia and North America.  These include policy debates about free speech, incidents in the author’s everyday life as a white woman academic, and the persona of Stefan Molyneaux, a popular philosopher of the Alt-Right and avowed apostle of 20th century public intellectual and novelist, Ayn Rand. After demonstrating how racialized and racializing concepts of virtue and ignorance are woven together in the national and transnational life of universities, I explore epistemological and political challenges to gendered formations of white academic subjectivity within settler-colonial states. My conclusion presents evidence to support the argument that that changes to the way we work in the neoliberal academy within these states are at least as important as transforming the way in which understand our different research fields and our positioning within them.

Bio: Dr. Fiona Nicoll is an Associate Professor Fiona Nicoll is Research Chair in Gambling Policy with the Alberta Gambling Research Institute and the Department of Political Science at the University of Alberta. A founding member of the Australian Critical Race and Whiteness Studies Association and co-editor of Transnational Whiteness Matters (Lexington Press, 2008) and Courting Blakness: Recalibrating Knowledge in the Sandstone University (University of Queensland Press, 2015), she has published numerous chapters and articles on reconciliation, Indigenous sovereignty and whiteness in the Australian context.  She has also worked with contemporary Indigenous artists and community leaders on public education and art projects. These include Aunty Nance, a social history exhibition on the life of a survivor of the stolen generations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who gave a speech to the New South Wales parliament on the occasion of its formal apology (2001-2) and an installation of art by Karla Dickens, Archie Moore, Christian Thompson, Michael Cook, Ryan Presley, r e a, Megan Cope and Natalie Harkin in the Great Court of the University of Queensland which was curated by Fiona Foley (2015).

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16. A Mickey Full of Mouse at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre:

(March 25th/17-April 8th/17)

Award winning playwright and actor Dawna Joy Wightman focuses a lens on poverty, alcoholism and special needs children. Her play, “A Mickey Full of Mouse", has its world premiere at Buddies in Bad Times and  features a love between girls of diverging life opportunities.

Memory's a tricky thing. We all have them. Some memories we hold tightly and cherish dearly. Other memories we would rather forget. We all have that one memory from childhood that we'd rather forget and we work our whole lives to block them out and move on. Either because they're painful or embarrassing or traumatic. Well, what if you were forced to re-live your worst childhood memory?

A "Mickey Full of Mouse" follows two grown women on a journey through their most horrible childhood memory. Will they make it out alive? If they do, how will this journey affect them?

There's only one way to find out!

"A Mickey Full of Mouse" at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre.

WHEN: March 25th /17 - April 8th/17.

Tickets $20 by calling 416-975-8555.

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17. Palestine’s Right to Education: The Politics of the Academic Boycott:

(March 27th/17)

Palestine’s Right to Education: The Politics of the Academic Boycott:

Featuring: Vijay Prashad.

Organizers: Students Against Israeli Apartheid (SAIA), Arts and Science Student Union (ASSU), Faculty for Palestine.

The call for an academic boycott of complicit Israeli academic institutions is a call for universities, academic associations, and student governments and unions to refuse to be complicit in and normalize Israel’s war crimes, ongoing occupation, oppression and apartheid. In this lecture, Vijay Prashad, Professor of South Asian History and International Studies at Trinity College, will speak to the case for the academic boycott of Israeli academic institutions that are complicit in such crimes.

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18. Asian Pathways Research Lab Information Session:

(March 28th/17)

Dear all Canadian and Asian Studies students,

You are invited to attend the inaugural information session for the Asian Pathways Research Lab, which is an initiative in the Asian Institute focusing on life histories and experiences of migration from Asian to Canada.

WHEN: Tuesday, March 28th, 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm.

In this session, Emily Hertzman, the coordinator of the Pathways Lab, will outline the goals of the lab, the research priorities, as well as our current and up and coming projects.

There are many opportunities for individuals to get involved as students volunteers, research assistants and project leads.

Regardless of your summer travel plans, please feel free to come to this session which will be held in the newly renovated student study space in the North House of the Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place (lower level, room 006-009N).

Please RSVP emily.hertzman@mail.utoronto.ca if you plan to attend.

Light refreshments will be served.

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19.   NEWSGIRLS Book Launch by Donna Jean MacKinnon:

(March 29th/17)

Leaping Lion Books would like to invite you to join us for an evening of strong drinks, good food, better company and a preview of untold Canadian history, as we celebrate Donna Jean MacKinnon's debut book, NEWSGIRLS: Gutsy Pioneers in Canada's Newsrooms.

WHEN: March 29, 2017, Time: 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

WHERE: Place: Women's Art Association of Canada, 23 Prince Arthur Ave. Toronto, ON M5R 1B2.

Email: newsgirls17@gmail.com to RSVP.

NEWSGIRLS will be available for purchase at book launch for a special price of $20.00. This is a cash only deal. Other methods of payment will be accepted for list price: $22.95.

If you are unable to attend and would like to purchase Newsgirls: Gutsy Pioneers in Canada's Newsrooms by Donna Jean Mackinnon, please contact the York University Bookstore at (416) 736-5024, or you can purchase it online at  bookstore.yorku.ca.

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20.   Geography Distinguished Guest Lecture: "Black Music in Minneapolis: Prince and the Geography of the Minneapolis Sound”:

(March 29th/17)

The Geography Department is excited to be hosting Dr. Rashad Shabazz, author of "Spatializing Blackness: Architectures of Confinement and Black Masculinity in Chicago", for our annual Distinguished Guest Lecture. He will be presenting his recent work, titled "Black Music in Minneapolis: Prince and the Geography of the Minneapolis Sound".

This talk will explore the links between music and geography, the history of Black migration to Minneapolis in the early 20th century, and the hidden world of Black musicians that gave rise to the sound that Prince popularized in the early 1980’s.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 29th/17 at 5pm.

WHERE: Ross North Room 940 (Senate Chamber).

All are welcome and encouraged to attend!

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21.   Another Story Bookshop presents the Toronto launch for Azadi: Sexual Politics and Post-Colonial Worlds by Tara Atluri:

(March 30th/17)

Another Story Bookshop presents the Toronto launch for Azadi: Sexual Politics and Post-Colonial Worlds by Tara Atluri:

Featuring talks by Dina Georgis & Tara Atluri.

WHEN: Thursday, March 30, 2017.

WHERE: Another Story Bookshop, 315 Roncesvalles, Toronto.

Free - all are welcome. Entrance is wheelchair accessible, but bathroom is not.

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22.   Africentric and Indigenous Schooling Philosophies:

(March 31st/17)

Seminar Intervention Series. Presented by Ciars and Equity Studies New College.

WHEN: March 31st/17. 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm.

WHERE: OISE Library, 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto/St. George Subway Station.

Africentric and Indigenous Schooling Philosophies:

This seminar is the first in a series that aims to engage in critical conversations around equity, race, Indigeneity, and decolonization as they relate to education and community broadly defined. These conversations will problematize and challenge dominant political structures and ideologies that shape schools, communities, and a global futurity as well as emphasize intervention strategies. Our first topic, “Africentric and Indigenous Schooling Philosophies”, will be discussing the impact that the Africentric school and Indigenous philosophies have had for Black and Indigenous education and the lessons regarding challenges, possibilities and future directions of counter-visions of schooling.

Featured Speakers:

-Monday Gala, CW Jefferys Collegiate Institute. –Yolisa Dalamba- Executive Director of FACE: Friends of Afrocentric Education. –Thando Hyman, Prinicipal TDSB. –Jonathan Hamilton, Director Aboriginal Student Center, U of Toronto. –Sandra Styres, OISE Associated Professor crossed appointed to Indigenous Education Framework. –Ann Lopez, Faculty Development Leadership and Higher Education, OISE, University of Toronto. –Grace-Edwards Galabuzi, Faculty, Ryerson University. Kwesi Yeboah, PHD Candidate, York University.

The roundtable will be held in OISE library on March 31st, from 4:00 pm- 6:00 pm. 252 Bloor Street, Toronto.

Faculty, students, and community members are all welcome! Light refreshments provided.

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23. Towards the Unknown: Refugee Journeys Through Syria, Greece and Germany:

(March 31st/17- April 2nd/17)

Towards the Unknown: Refugee Journeys Through Syria, Greece and Germany.

The Photography of Tanya Bindra and Ali Mustafa.

March 31 - April 2.

The Ali Mustafa Memorial Collective is pleased to announce an exhibition featuring the work of photojournalist Tanya Bindra, the first recipient of the annual Ali Mustafa Memorial Award for People’s Journalism.

The award was estalished in 2014 to honour Ali Mustafa, a Toronto-based photojournalist who was killed by a Syrian regime barrel bomb in 2014.

Since accepting the award in March 2016, Tanya has been documenting the lives of refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, Italy and Greece. 'Towards the Unknown' examines the processes of identity formation and belonging among refugees and asylum-seekers, and captures the ambiguities and contradictions of their varied experiences.

(You can read her full artist statement here:

https://rememberingalimustafa.org/towards-the-unknown/).

Please join us for an opening reception on Friday March 31st from 7-10 PM at the Gladstone Hotel, where we will exhibit Tanya's work along with some of Ali Mustafa's photography on Syria.

We will also announce the winner of the 2017 Ali Mustafa Memorial Award for People's Journalism at this opening.

The exhibition will continue to run on Saturday April 1st and Sunday April 2nd, from 12pm to 5pm.

There is no admission fee, but donations are appreciated.

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24.   Public Talk: Fifty Years ‘Beyond Vietnam’: Dr. King’s Revolutionary Dream Against Our Neoliberal/Neofascist Nightmare by Robin D.G. Kelley:

(April 1st/17)

Robin D.G. Kelley: Professor & Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History, UCLA.

“Fifty Years ‘Beyond Vietnam’: Dr. King’s Revolutionary Dream and our current Neoliberal/Neofascist Nightmare.”

Opening with:

Lee Maracle – author, instructor and traditional teacher & Faith Nolan – celebrated social justice activist and musician.

WHEN: Saturday, April 1, 2017, 5:00 pm.

WHERE: Bloor United Church, Toronto, Ontario.

All talks are wheelchair accessible with ASL provided.

SPONSORS: A Different Booklist; Caribbean Studies; Academic Initiatives Fund, New College; Women and Gender Studies; African Studies; Geography and Planning; Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs; Diaspora and Transnational

Studies; Equity Studies; History; MVS Proseminar; and the Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto.

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25. Fifth Annual Toronto Mapuche Solidarity Film Festival:

(April 1st/17-April 2nd/17)

Fifth Annual Toronto Mapuche Solidarity Film Festival:

In memory of our Mapuche WEICHAFE [WARRIORS] MATIAS CATRILEO & ALEX LEMUN, & the many others (indigenous and non-indigenous) who have been murdered by the repressive forces of the Chilean State.

WHEN: SATURDAY, APRIL 1st & SUNDAY APRIL 2nd.

WHERE: University of Toronto – Specific Location TBA.

*ALL NON-ENGLISH LANGUAGE FILMS WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES*

Donations Appreciated.

Speakers TBA!

Organized by: The Women’s Coordinating Committee for a Free Wallmapu [Toronto] An OPIRG Toronto Action Group.

For more information: https://wccctoronto.wordpress.com/.

OPENING NIGHT – SATURDAY, APRIL 1ST.

5PM – OPENING RECEPTION feat. the SubMedia Collective.

GUEST SPEAKERS: Frank @ SubMedia (Director of Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NoDAPL Struggle).

MORE TBA!

This year we are proud to present the director of Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NoDAPL Struggle, made by our friends at the SubMedia Collective on the ongoing struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

SubMedia.tv is a video production ensemble, which aims to promote anarchist and anti-capitalist ideas, and aid social struggles through the dissemination of radical films and videos. Founded in 1994, subMedia.tv has produced hundreds of videos on everything from anti-globalization protests to films about shoplifting. Their films have been screened around the world in social centers and movie theaters and have been watched by millions on the internet.

6PM – Trouble – Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NoDAPL Struggle, Turtle Island, 2017 (30 minutes)

Since December of 2016, the Submedia Collective have been developing “Trouble,” a new monthly show offering in-depth anarchist analysis on various topics, struggles and movement dynamics. Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NoDAPL Struggle, is the first to be published in the documentary series depicting the recent struggle to protect sacred indigenous lands and waters at Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The motivation in producing this film was to shed light on the important contributions made by indigenous warriors on the frontline to the broader struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

For other film descriptions and to watch trailers please check out the facebook event.

6:30PM – Üxüf Xipay: The Plunder, Wallmapu, 2003 (75 minutes).

***Winner of the Best Documentary Film for “Indigenous Peoples,” at the Voices against Silence Mexican Documentary Film Festival, 2004. Best Film for Testimonial Value, at the International Indigenous Film Festival in Santiago, Chile, 2004. Official Selection of the Toulouse Documentary Film Festival, 2006. ***

8PM – Embrace of the Serpent, Colombia/Abya Yala, 2016 (125 minutes).

*** Academy Awards Nomination for Best Foreign Language Film, 2016. Winner of the Ariel Award for Best Ibero-American Film, 2016. Winner of the Fénix Film Award for Best Direction, 2015.***

SUNDAY, APRIL 2nd.

1PM – Strawberry and Chocolate, Cuba, 1993 (110 min).

3PM – The Colony [“Colonia Dignidad”], Chile/England, 2015 (120 minutes).

5PM – The Baader-Meinhof Complex, Germany, 2008 (184 minutes).

8PM – In the Name of the Father, Ireland, 1993 (133 minutes).

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26. OPIRG at York Tools for Change Workshop: Preparing to Address Conflict: Techniques and Tips: (April 5th/17)

Preparing to Address Conflict: Techniques and Tips:

In activist groups and organizations we are often faced with conflict that can feel overwhelming to deal with. This workshop will explore ways to sit with the overwhelm in order to prepare for difficult conversations emotionally and strategically.

WHEN: Wednesday April 5th, 6:30PM - 9:30PM.

WHERE: University of Toronto.

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27. Celebrate Refugee Rights Day Event with Amnesty International, Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture, CultureLink and Sojourn House!

(April 8th/17)

Hello,

On behalf of Amnesty International Canada and its partners, Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture (CCVT), CultureLink and Sojourn House, it is my pleasure to invite you to join us in celebrating Refugee Rights Day on April 8, 2017, at Bloor Street United Church-McClure Hall (300 Bloor St. West), between 3.30-6.30pm.

Through art, music, and creative activism, this free family friendly event will offer participants the opportunity to learn about refugees’ success stories and their rich contributions to our communities. The event will also feature Amnesty International’s campaign “I Welcome Refugees” and offer guests the opportunity to get involved in it.

We hope that you will join us for this day of art and activism! Please mark the date on your calendar and check out the event’s Facebook page for more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/256302678160921/.

We will send you the event’s poster and a friendly reminder closer to the date. We would appreciate it if you would share this invitation widely within your circles.

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28. OPIRG Toronto- Tools for Change Winter Training Series- How to Host A Great Workshop:

(April 9th/17)

OPIRG Toronto- Tools for Change Winter Training Series- How to Host A Great Workshop:

WHEN: Sunday April 9, 2017 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM.

WHERE: University of Toronto.

This training will cover the principles of workshop design and delivery including how to create a comfortable learning environment, manage workshop logistics, and choose content and tools that caters to different learning styles and levels of participation. This workshop will specifically focus on methods and tools for active participation in trainings. This workshop will explore strategies to deal with common challenges workshop leaders face. Participants will have the opportunity to create a simple workshop design, practice delivering tools and get feedback.

Trainer: Sharmeen Khan has 15 years experience facilitating workshops on a variety of topics such as anti-oppression, media skills and grassroots financial management. She currently works for CUPE 3903 and the Media Action Research Group and edits Upping the Anti: A Journal of Theory and Action. She is also a 2015 fellow with a Training for Change Judith C. Jones Fellowship.

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29. Marx’s Capital after 150 Years: Critique and Alternative to Capitalism Conference:

(May 24th/17-May 26th/17)

Marx's Capital after 150 Years: Critique and Alternative to Capitalism. International Conference.

WHEN: May 24-26, 2017.

WHERE: The Marx Collegium, York University, Toronto.

Conference Participants: Immanuel Wallerstein, Saskia Sassen, Etienne Balibar, John Bellamy Foster, Bob Jessop, Silvia Federici, Richard Wolff, Moishe Postone, Kevin Anderson, Bertell Ollman, Leo Panitch, Ursula Huws, Michael Kraetke, Terrell Carver, Himani Bannerji, Ricardo Antunes, Seongjin Jeong, Alfonso Maurizio Iacono, Mauro Buccheri, Pietro Basso, George Comninel, Paresh Chattopadhyay, Gary Teeple, Kohei Saito, Paula Rauhala, Tomash Dabrowski, Babak Amini, and Marcello Musto.

Conference Program: http://www.marxcollegium.org.

After the eruption of the international financial crisis in 2008, Marx's Capital received renewed academic and popular attention. Leading newspapers throughout the world discussed again the contemporary relevance of its pages. Faced with a deep new crisis of capitalism, many are now looking to an author who in the past was often wrongly associated with the "actually existing socialism", and who was too hastily dismissed after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

For many scholars today, Marx's analyses are arguably resonating even more strongly than they did in his own time. This international conference will bring together several world-renowned sociologists, political theorists, economists, and philosophers, from diverse fields and more than 10 countries with the aim of offering diverse scholarly perspectives and critical insights into the principal contradictions of contemporary capitalism and, in so doing, point to alternative economic and social models.

The conference is structured in nine plenary sessions and around several major themes. Among them there are: new interpretations of Capital in light of ecology, non-European societies and gender; the contemporary relevance of Capital; re-reading Capital as an incomplete project after the new critical edition of Marx's complete work (MEGA²); and the global dissemination and reception of Capital. The presenters will critically reconsider Marx's magnum opus as a work that continues to provide an effective framework to understand the nature of capitalism and the transformations of our times.

ADMISSION TO THIS CONFERENCE IS FREE.

Conference Organizer: Marcello Musto, York University.

Info: marcello.musto at gmail.com -- b.amini86 at gmail.com.

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30. OPIRG Toronto- Tools for Change Winter Training Series- Scouting for Events and Actions:

(June 4th/17)

OPIRG Toronto- Tools for Change Winter Training Series- Scouting for Events and Actions:

WHEN: Sunday June 4, 2017 from 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM.

WHERE: Greenpeace Mobilization Hub.

Whether you are planning a march, a sit-down, a picket, a meeting disruption, a banner or a blockade, it is often important to check out the location in advance. Scouting the location well can help you plan an action that is safe, effective and less likely to be foiled. This workshop will introduce you to the basics of scouting for situations where you are trying to go unnoticed to maintain an element of surprise.

Trainer: Mark Calzavara has scouted and coordinated direct actions for the last twenty years. He is currently the Ontario-Quebec organizer for the Council of Canadians.

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CALLS

1. Call for Abstracts: 2017 GDPP Conference: CANADA 150: Inclusion in a changing world:

(Deadline: March 22nd/17)

GENDER, DIVERSITY AND PUBLIC POLICY INITIATIVE (GDPP):

2017 GDPP CONFERENCE: CALL FOR ABSTRACTS CANADA 150: INCLUSION IN A CHANGING WORLD:

The Gender, Diversity, and Public Policy Initiative (GDPP) promotes the adoption of an intersectional lens in policy analysis. GDPP is a graduate student-led  organization at the University of Toronto School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG) and encourages the discussion of gender and identity-based inequalities   in the realm of public policy in collaboration with SPPG student initiatives, faculty and administration, our alumni advisory   group, and other networks within the University of Toronto landscape.

The Gender, Diversity and Public Policy  Initiative (GDPP), is pleased to announce an exciting half-day conference. The event  will take place on Friday, April 7th 2017 from11:30-4:30pm at the University of Toronto (St. George Campus).

About the Conference:

As  Canada approaches its 150th anniversary of Confederation, this exciting time serves as an opportunity to reflect on our history, examine how it has shaped our present, and look towards our country’s future. This conference will be an opportunity to engage with Canada’s 150th anniversary, in the  context of how past, current, and future policies have affected minority and marginalized groups in Canada. What has  Canada’s progress to date been like? What are present realities, and what next steps can we take towards a more inclusive society?

This conference will bring together researchers, experts, academics, public policy professionals, staff, students, youth as well as community leaders and activists to share their research and projects and to engage in thoughtful  discussion and critical reflection. Together, we can work on taking the next steps towards building a  more  inclusive Canadian society.

Our three broad key themes are:

Economic  Inclusion and  the Labor Market: Gender wage gap, childcare, women in STEM and/or non-traditional fields, workplace supports.

Gender-Based Violence and its Intersections: Sexual violence prevention and support at post-secondary institutions, sexual violence/domestic violence/intimate partner violence responses and supports in the community, societal attitudes and behaviors.

The Role of Social Movements in Affecting Change: An examination of how social movements have played an increasing role in sparking change and fostering inclusion in our rapidly diversifying societies. What is the role of research and other societal contributions in this area?

Submissions:

We invite the submission of abstracts for papers, projects, workshops, video and poetry performances, and other artistic forms  of activism that address the above goals and themes,

which will  be selected for presentation at a facilitated roundtable discussion with other panelists.

We are particularly open to ways of presenting  information that invite conversation and the exchange of  ideas. The submitted abstracts should: clearly explain the topic, outline  the content of the

presentation, and highlight key   discussion points with  particular attention to the practice implications and/or links to how  it will advance inclusion in a  changing world. Abstracts should not exceed 500 words.

Submissions are welcomed from:

-Scholars, -Researchers, -Teaching faculty, -University and college staff, professionals in all campus activity/service areas including: admissions, student life, academic, financial aid, human resources, equity and diversity, human rights, alumni. –Students (including undergraduate and graduate students, student   leaders), -Activists, -Artists, -Community members  including community  based agencies and organizations.

The perspectives should include experiences of  diverse  persons, groups and populations with considerations on how different  identities can  intersect. Both  individual and group submissions are welcomed.

Note: we encourage submissions  examining issues related to the Aboriginal experience and perspective, particularly regarding the implications of Canada 150.

Submission Guidelines:

Proposals must connect to the  conference theme and goals and contribute  to the advancement of theory, practice, methodology, and/or community organizing.

Format:

-Title of Presentation. -Thematic Area: Presenters must choose from one of the three broad themes outlined above. -Presenters’ Information: Name, credentials, institution/company, and brief bio (maximum of 50 words).

Deadline:

All  abstracts are  due Wednesday March 22, 2017. Accepted abstracts will  be accepted on a

rolling basis via email. Please also submit a short biography (maximum 50 words).

The GDPP Conference will be held on April 7, 2017.

Questions and Request for Further Information:

Should you have  any questions please contact  the Gender, Diversity, and Public Policy Initiative, University of Toronto at: genderdiversityandpublicpolicy@gmail.com.

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2. Call for Applications: DIRECTOR, Centre for Research on Language and Culture Contact (CRLCC):

(Deadline: April 5th/17)

DIRECTOR, Centre for Research on Language and Culture Contact (CRLCC): New deadline

Applications and nominations are invited for the position of Director of the Centre on Language and Culture Contact (CRLCC), Glendon College, York University, for a term of two years, to begin July 1, 2017. Subject to successful rechartering of the CRLCC in 2019, there is a possibility for the mandate to be renewed for a further term.

The CRLCC is a bilingual research unit at York University’s Glendon campus. Its main goal is to foster innovative and collaborative interdisciplinary research on language and language-related areas among its members across academic and research units. The CRLCC is an inclusive space that brings together researchers from all areas interested in studying the relationship between language and society. Members have developed a specific focus in the following three areas: language ecology and language planning; language contact, variation and change; and, translation, interpreting and knowledge exchange.

The CRLCC offers emerging and well-established researchers a variety of opportunities and resources to become acquainted with each other’s work, with the work of international visiting researchers, and more generally with research on language and culture contact in the wider community. These resources include: a) lectures, workshops and an international conference; b) a translation research summer school; c) an online database of publications and media; and, d) space (a meeting room / classroom with a small, specialized library and a computer lab).

The ideal candidate would: a) be a member of the full-time faculty at York University, with priority to those appointed at Glendon College; b) have a distinguished record of language-related research; c) be an active member of the CRLCC; and, d) be able to facilitate CRLCC activities in English and French. The Director provides overall leadership for the Centre’s collaborative and individual research activities, develops external funding sources and builds the local and global reputation of CRLCC.  The Director is also responsible for administering the financial, organizational and academic activities of the Centre. The successful applicant will receive an administrative stipend and the appropriate course load reduction as stipulated by the YUFA Collective Agreement.

Applications and nominations (including a curriculum vitae and the names of three referees who may be contacted) should be sent to Prisca Ng How Tseung, Administrative Assistant, CRLCC and Research Office, Glendon College, York Hall B219; ngprisca@glendon.yorku.ca. Applicants are also invited to submit a statement about their vision for CRLCC, including goals, objectives, strategy of action and leadership style.  Deadline for applications and nominations: April 5th, 2017.

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3. Call for Papers: Violence Against University and College Women:

(Deadline: April 30th/17)

Call for Papers: Violence Against University and College Women:

Local and Global Manifestations, Shared Experiences, and Prevention Practices: (33.1,2).

Universities need to be safe places in order for all learners to thrive.  However, this is not the case for university and college women in many countries around the world, who experience sexual violence including rape, sexual coercion, sexual harassment, unwanted sexual contact, and stalking. Yet research on the scope, causes, and prevention of sexual violence against university and college women in most countries remains sporadic, underdeveloped, or nonexistent. Current research has also failed to examine the issue across local and national contexts in order to clarify shared experiences, common root causes, and best practices. Knowledge of the manifestations of the issue in institutions of higher education in countries in the Global South is especially lacking. In this special edition of the Canadian Woman Studies/les cahiers de la femme (CWS/cf), we invite contributions that explore critically the various aspects of the issue. The editors seek especially contributions located in countries in the Global South as well as studies utilizing various research methodologies and theoretical frameworks across the social sciences and the humanities.

Possible Topics include:

-How does the issue manifest itself in specific universities and locales? -How do women experience violence in spaces of higher education? How are these experiences and their effects shaped by individual and broader historical formations related to race, class, sexuality, religion, and other difference? -What are local, national and international root causes for violence against university and college women? -How have women on campuses responded to violence? -How have university and college administrators and counsellors responded (or not) to the issue? -What structures and policies addressing the issue are in place at campuses? Are these policies effective? -Whose and what knowledge, experience and worldviews inform the design of intervention and prevention programs?

-What help is available to support victims of violence on campuses? -What are local understandings, framing and meaning making related to “sexual violence” and “university/college woman?” -Is there a relation between space and violence on campuses?

Your ideas for additional topics are welcome. Invited are articles, research reports, oral histories, alternative forms of narration, poetry, drawings, and other art works that illuminate these issues.

DEADLINE: April 30, 2017.

Articles should be typed, double-spaced, and a maximum of 16 pages long (4000 words). A short (50-word) abstract of the article and a brief biographical note must accompany each submission. Please send a hard copy of your manuscript as well as emailing a copy. We give preference to previously unpublished material. If possible, please submit graphics or photographs to accompany your article. Please note CWS/cf reserves the right to edit manuscripts with respect to length and clarity, and in conformity with our house-style. To encourage use of the material published, CWS/cf has granted electronic rights to Gale Group, Micromedia Proquest and the H. W. Wilson. Any royalties received will be used by CWS/cf to assist the publication in disseminating its message.

Write or call as soon as possible indicating your intention to submit your work.

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OPPORTUNITIES

1. 2016 competition for the Ontario Graduate Policy Research Challenge:

(Deadline: April 21st/17)

Ontario Graduate Policy Research Challenge: Competition 2016.

We are re-posting the 2016 competition for the Ontario Graduate Policy Research Challenge.

This is an exciting opportunity for graduate students to share their research and innovative ideas in the areas of postsecondary education, employment and labour market with policy leaders in Ontario.

The Challenge seeks to create links between the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (MAESD) and policy research at higher education institutions in Ontario by facilitating dialogue between students, policy leaders and research faculty.

Support Ontario graduate research:

This competition is open to graduate students and recent graduates from masters’, doctoral and post-graduate certificate programs at Ontario publicly-assisted universities and colleges. Applicants are asked to formulate their research into a policy brief that demonstrates how their ideas can be applied to postsecondary education and labour market issues in Ontario.

Reward new ideas:

The top applicants will receive awards of $2,000 or $3,000 and present their ideas at MAESD.

Background Materials:

Application Materials: The Call for the 2016 competition, the Application Form and the faculty letter of support can be found here:

http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/eng/eopg/programs/ogprc.html.

Timelines: The deadline for the completion is April 21, 2017. Applications and any questions or concerns should be sent toGraduateChallenge@ontario.ca.

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2.  IPEE Summer School at York University with Nancy Peluso- Violent Political Ecologies- Resources, Labour, Transformation:

The International Political Economy and Ecology (IPEE) Summer School at York University is delighted to announce the 2017 course:

 

Violent Political Ecologies: Resources, Labour, Transformation.

WHEN: June 12 to 23, 2017 (1-4pm daily).

Taught by Professor Nancy Peluso (ESPM, UC Berkeley) with Professors Libby Lunstrum and Peter Vandergeest (Geography, York University) as co-instructors.

We welcome applications from all graduate students with relevant interests. Students need not be affiliated with York University to apply. For more information on the course and how to apply, please visit the course web page:

http://geography.gradstudies.yorku.ca/ipee2017/.

Course description: Visible or invisible, historical or contemporary, spectacular or slow, violence underlies many natures and socio-environmental relations, even those constructed as idyllic.  Agrarian, resource, labor, and mass forms of violence have been at the heart of political ecology’s concerns since the early days of the field’s emergence. This short course works to take this often implicit theme of violence and bring it to the surface while maintaining an understanding of its forms, relationships with other processes, and contexts.  Readings and discussions will cover the ways in which political ecology has attended to violence, gaps in these approaches, and how we might collectively begin to address these gaps to move in new directions. We will additionally examine the methodological and ethical challenges of conducting fieldwork on violence and of writing about violence in general and political ecological violence more specifically. A course outline should be available around early May.

Possible topics include:

-Violence & scarcity: political ecology vs. neo-Malthusian approaches. -Violence as slow, structural, spectacular. -Political ecologies of war & resources. -What difference does the resource make?

-Fieldwork & ethics on violence, in violent contexts.-Labor & resources: violent linkages from colonial to post-colonial politics.-Territories, land, & violence. -Sovereignty & governance. -Militarizations of conservation; securitizations of nature. -The biopolitics of humans, nonhumans, & their encounters: making live, letting die. -Violent movements: labor, inclusion, resistance.

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3. Regent Park Film Festival Opportunities:

(Deadline: February 24th/17, April 21st/17, May 12th/17)

Friends of the Regent Park Film Festival,

As you know, we are Toronto's only free community film festival. We strive to bring accessibility to film, whether to audience members, artists, aspiring film professionals or community members wanting to share their stories. We could not accomplish all this without the incredible support of so many dedicated volunteers.

Please help us spread the word about the following opportunities:

Do you know any artists or filmmakers who are looking to share their work with an audience?

Our CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS is now open and FREE to submit. We welcome films of all lengths and genres that reflect the multitude of experiences that make up our cities and communities. We are especially dedicated to showcasing works by Indigenous filmmakers and filmmakers of colour, as well as works by trans, queer and female identified filmmakers. Deadline is May 12. More info.

Do you know any individuals looking to develop their programming experience with a focus on social justice issues?

We are looking for PROGRAMMING COMMITTEE members who bring a critical eye, aesthetic sensibility, and passion for film to put together another excellent festival program for this coming November. This diverse and dedicated team of volunteers will work closely with our Programmer between May - August. All experience levels welcome. Deadline February 24 and April 21. More info.

We are also looking for Fundraising & Communications Committee Members and have an upcoming free Digital Activism Workshop.

As always, we really appreciate your support!

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