CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, December 7th, 2017

-----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
  1. Congratulations to CFR Research Associate Kamala Kampadoo on winning the 2017 Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award!
  2. CFR office half-day closure: December 7th, 2017
  3. CFR office holiday closure: December 15, 2017 to January 2, 2018 inclusive

-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
  1. Reminder: Increase to provincial minimum wage
  2. New Canadian book on gender equity and gender transformative practice: Gender Unchained
  3. Demeter Press is Honoured to Announce the Upcoming Release of Spawning Generations: Rants and Reflections on Growing Up with LGBTQ+ Parents
  4. Demeter Press is Honoured to Announce the Official Release of Finding the Plot: A Maternal Approach to Madness in Literature
EVENTS:
  1. A Tale of the Sub-Human: The Rohingyas in Myanmar and Bangladesh (December 6th/17)
  2. The Plight of Rohingyas: Ethnic Cleansing, Genocide and Refugee Crisis (December 7th/17)
  3. Tracey Osborne Talk- The Climate Alliance Mapping Project: Public Political Ecology for Earth Stewardship (December 13th/17)
  4. Audra Simpson talk- Savage States: Settler Governance in an Age of Sorrow (January 17th/18)
CALLS:
  1. Call for Participants: Keele Campus Community Safety Research
  2. Call for Participants: The Border Probes
  3. Call for Abstracts: Call for Papers for the 2018 ANSER-ARES conference in CANADA
  4. Call for Papers: New Frontiers Graduate Conference in History 2018 (Deadline: December 15th/17)
  5. Call for Papers: Refusing to Fight: Reimagining War in Global Perspectives (Deadline: December 31st/17)
  6. Call for Proposals: Women's Xchange 15K Challenge (Deadline: January 8th/18)
  7. Call for Papers: The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference (Deadline: February 15th/17)
OPPORTUNITIES:
  1. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada - 2018-19 Contributions Program
  2. Institute for Women’s Policy Research: Special Assistant to the President
  3. Institute for Women’s Policy Research: Research Economist for Program on Gender Analysis in Economics (Deadline: December 15th/17)
  4. Queens University: Assistant or Associate Professor in African American Gender History (tenure track)(Deadline: January 8th/18)
  5. of Waterloo: Assistant Professor in Rhetoric and Digital Media (Deadline: January 15th/18)
  6. of Waterloo: Assistant Professor in Science, Culture, and Writing(Deadline: January 15th/18)
  7. of Waterloo: Associate Professor in Rhetoric and Communication(Deadline: January 15th/18)
  8. of Waterloo: Rhetoric and Technical or Science Communication (Two Lecturer Positions) (Deadline: January 15th/18)

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---CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH---

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
  1. Congratulations to CFR Research Associate Kamala Kampadoo on winning the 2017 Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award!

The Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS) honoured Social Science Professor Kamala Kempadoo with the 2017 Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award. The SSSS presented the award to Kempadoo on November 12 in Atlanta, Georgia, during the society’s 60th anniversary celebration.The award recognizes Kempadoo for her numerous contributions to advancing the understanding of human sexual behaviour and promoting the study of sexuality.

“This award is an important acknowledgment of the impact of Professor Kempadoo’s work. She is widely regarded as pre-eminent in her field; her peers and the many graduate students who have come to York to work with her have known this for a long time. The opportunity to celebrate her contributions with this award is entirely well-deserved,” says Sandra Whitworth, Associate Dean, Graduate Studies & Research in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

Kempadoo has been publishing pioneering work for over two decades. Her most substantial works include the books Global Sex Workers: Rights, Resistance and Redefinition (1998), Sexing the Caribbean: Gender, Race and Sexual Labour (2004) and Trafficking and Prostitution Reconsidered: New Perspectives on Migration, Sex Work and Human Rights (2005, 2012).

“My work is read by scholars, researchers, activists and sex workers, as well as by those engaged with questions about human trafficking,” says Kempadoo. “Apart from the focus on sexuality, my work connects to the SSSS through its attention to intersectionality and interdisciplinarity, which the association also sees as central to its mandate.”

At the SSSS anniversary meeting, relocated from Puerto Rico to the U.S. mainland after Hurricane Maria, Kempadoo was invited to give a plenary lecture titled “Researching Sexual Labour: From the Caribbean to ‘Foreign’.”

“I presented on the key ideas and questions in my research on sexual labour since the early 1990s, including studies of prostitution, sex work, transactional sex and sex tourism, as well as analyses of human trafficking, which includes ‘sex trafficking’,” says Kempadoo. “It foregrounded my research in the Caribbean and the ways sexual praxis — sexuality as action, interaction and lived experience — is constructed through racialized and economic relations of power. I wanted to show that through the study of sexual praxis of marginalized people, it is possible to chart ways to deconstruct and decolonize dominant ideas about human sexuality that continue to inform our understandings of prostitution and human trafficking.”

In the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, Kempadoo teaches Black, Caribbean, sexual labour and anti-trafficking studies in the graduate and undergraduate programs of Social & Political Thought; Gender, Feminist & Women’s Studies; International Development Studies; Work & Labour Studies; and Political Science.

Via Yfile: http://yfile.news.yorku.ca/2017/11/29/social-science-professor-honoured-for-20-years-of-studying-sexuality/
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  1. CFR office half-day closure: December 7th, 2017

Dear CFR Associates,

Please be advised that the Centre for Feminist Research will be closing early on Thursday, December 7, 2017, as of 1pm.
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  1. CFR office holiday closure: December 15, 2017 to January 2, 2018 inclusive

Dear CFR Associates,

Please be advised that the CFR Coordinator Julia Pyryeskina's last day in the office is Thursday, December 14, 2017. She is away from December 15, 2017 to January 2, 2018 inclusive for the winter break, and the Centre will be closed in her absence.
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-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
  1. Reminder: Increase to provincial minimum wage

Effective January 1, 2018, the Ontario minimum wage will increase to $14/hr.  All hiring units who are currently paying their work study students less than $14/hr will be required to increase the hourly rate to be in compliance.  Payroll will automatically update the hourly pay rate where applicable through a bulk upload process so you will not be required to submit a new Employee Transaction Form (ETF), however all time sheets submitted in the new year must reflect the new rate of pay.

Within the first two weeks of January, all units will be asked to submit the Fall hours worked by their students so that the first reimbursement can be assessed and processed.  The second call for hours will take place in March (for the Winter hours) at which time Student Financial Services will automatically adjust all pay rates to $14 (where applicable) so you will not be required to update your hiring information on the Work Study Employment Module.
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  1. New Canadian book on gender equity and gender transformative practice: Gender Unchained

Gender Unchained: Notes From the Equity Frontier

Equity remains elusive in contemporary global society. Gendered inequities abound and persist but are typically overlooked in our responses to difficult problems such as climate change, poverty, or economic crisis. Despite this blind spot, gender matters more than ever for achieving social and economic progress. Gender Unchained is a revelatory and tightly argued book that offers two ways forward. First, that we embrace the smashing of the gender binary and two, that we develop gender transformative approaches to solving the larger issues of our time. Inspirational and informational in equal measure, Gender Unchained is a well- reasoned call to action that examines many facets of gender inequity and offers real-world solutions for tackling it at the root.

It is available from www.genderunchained.com, the FriesenPress bookstore, Amazon, Chapters/Indigo, Barnes & Noble, and most major online retailers.
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  1. Demeter Press is Honoured to Announce the Upcoming Release of Spawning Generations: Rants and Reflections on Growing Up with LGBTQ+ Parents

Demeter Press is honoured to announce the upcoming release of Spawning Generations: Rants and Reflections on Growing Up with LGBTQ+ Parents, Edited by Sadie Epstein-Fine and Makeda Zook (May 2018).
http://demeterpress.org/books/spawning-generations-rants-and-reflections-on-growing-up-with-lgbtq-parents/
Save 40% off using coupon code MOTHERS until December 25, 2017!

As queerspawn, we have often presented our lives to conform to other people's expectations of what has been difficult for us, and what we have risen above. We have felt the pressure to be perfect in order to prove to the skeptics, the disbelievers, the pessimists, the straight-up haters, that we are a social experiment gone 'right,' producing 'well-adjusted' children. This anthology is about carving out a space for our voices. It is an attempt to create space for our stories without the pressures of having to conform to a narrative that demands perfection, that demands proving to on-lookers, both outside of and within queer communities, that we turned out 'all right.'

If you are looking for that narrative in this collection, you won't find it. Instead you will find voices that ask: What does it mean to be 'well-adjusted' in a world that teaches us to lie about our imperfections and to believe that we are alone in those imperfections? What does it means to be 'well adjusted' in a world that is ripe with problems and fraught with violence? What does it mean to be resilient in a world that will not allow us to reveal our imperfections for fear of putting our family's safety at risk? We are in fact, and all at once, resilient, imperfect, and fiercely protective of our families. We exist in a world of grey and this anthology is a reflection of our actual experiences, airbrushed for no one - at times humorous, light, joyous, prideful, and hopeful, at other times sad, and full of grief, guilt, shame, denial, resentment, and anger.

Sadie Epstein-Fine was born in 1992 to her two moms, surrounded by 11 other women in their home in Toronto. Raised going to Take Back the Night Marches and Jewish Women Against the Occupation protests, Sadie combines her passion for activism with her professional theatre career, as a queer/political theatre maker and Associate Artistic Director at Nightwood Theatre, Canada's foremost feminist theatre company.

Makeda Zook was born in Vancouver in 1986 to her two lesbian feminist moms. She is a white femme raised by a brown Jamaican femme and a white American butch who surrounded her with anti-oppression politics and chosen queer family. Makeda grew up in Toronto going to dyke marches and being encouraged to talk about her feelings. She recently completed her Masters of Public Health and currently works in sexual health promotion for a feminist NGO.
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  1. Demeter Press is Honoured to Announce the Official Release of Finding the Plot: A Maternal Approach to Madness in Literature

Demeter Press is honoured to announce the official release of Finding the Plot: A Maternal Approach to Madness in Literature, by Megan Rogers (December 2017).
http://demeterpress.org/books/the-maternal-journey-a-new-approach-to-storytelling/
Save 40% off using coupon code MOTHERS until December 25, 2017!

Over the past fifty years, feminist literary criticism has become theoretical rather than practical, severing any relationship between literary analysis and the real lived experiences of women. An example of this disconnect is the way in which the madwoman in feminist literature has become a lauded icon of liberation, when in reality her situation would be seen as anything but empowered. Finding the Plot takes this example to task, arguing that in fact any interpretation of women's madness as subversive reinforces the very gender stereotypes that feminist literary criticism should be calling into question.

Rogers argues for a radical approach. By constructing a ground-breaking revision of Joseph Campbell's Hero's Journey model, which releases the madwoman from her narrative captivity, Finding the Plot will transform the way you read, write, and interpret women's madness in literature.
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EVENTS:
  1. A Tale of the Sub-Human: The Rohingyas in Myanmar and Bangladesh (December 6th/17)

The first discussion in the event series, Rohingya in Peril: Buddhist/Muslim tensions in Myanmar and beyond.

The Rohingyas, considered by the United Nations as the world’s most persecuted people, have recently experienced unprecedented violence and brutality committed by Myanmar security forces and vigilantes. Following alleged attacks on Myanmar police posts and a military base by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) on August 25, 2017, Myanmar security forces indiscriminately fired on Rohingya civilians, burnt their houses down, raped girls and women, and killed thousands mercilessly in what the United Nations termed as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” This state-sponsored violence spurred 600,000 Rohingya to flee to Bangladesh in the past two months. The Rohingyas have experienced intense, ongoing violence because they are non-citizens in Myanmar. In fact, citizenship is a legal status conferred by the state that makes non-citizens a new ‘other,’ a vulnerable category viewed as less than human that Uddin refers to as being treated as “sub-human.” This talk will focus on the state of the Rohingyas in Bangladesh and Myanmar illuminating an intricate relation of statelessness, human rights and the paradox of the “sub-human.”

Nasir Uddin is a cultural anthropologist based in Bangladesh and a professor of anthropology at the University of Chittagong. His research interests include statelessness and refugee studies; human rights and non-citizens; indigeneity and identity politics; the state in everyday life; the politics of marginality and vulnerability; and borderlands and border people, particularly those of Bangladesh and Myanmar, the Chittagong Hill Tracts, and South Asia. His publications include To Host or To Hurt: Counter-narratives on the Rohingya (Refugees) in Bangladesh (2012); Life in Peace and Conflict: Indigeneity and State in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (2017) and Indigeneity on the Move: Varying Manifestation of a Contested Concept (2017). Currently he is working on a new monograph, the Rohingyas: A Tale of Sub-Human (2018).
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  1. The Plight of Rohingyas: Ethnic Cleansing, Genocide and Refugee Crisis (December 7th/17)

The Plight of Rohingyas: Ethnic Cleansing, Genocide and Refugee Crisis
When: December 7th, 2017. 2:30 to 4:00pm
Where: 280N York Lanes, York University
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  1. Tracey Osborne Talk: The Climate Alliance Mapping Project: Public Political Ecology for Earth Stewardship (December 13th/17)

CERLAC, the York Political Ecology Working Group, and the Faculty of Environmental Studies present:
Dr. Tracey Osborne

The Climate Alliance Mapping Project: Public Political Ecology for Earth Stewardship
When: Thursday, December 13, 2017 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Where: 280N York Lanes
The field of political ecology is a powerful approach for conceptualizing underlying causes of environmental change yet underutilized for guiding Earth Stewardship, an ethical response to the Anthropocene. In this presentation, I introduce Public Political Ecology and discuss why this moment of ecological crisis requires engaged scholarship from a political ecology perspective.

Tracey Osborne, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona. She conducts research on the social and political economic dimensions of climate change mitigation particularly in forest ecosystems of Latin America, as well as the finance mechanisms in place for solving the climate crisis. More recently she has been working collaboratively on a story map project called the Climate Alliance Mapping Project, which identifies priority areas for keeping fossil fuels underground across the Americas. She received her PhD from the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley.
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  1. Audra Simpson talk- Savage States: Settler Governance in an Age of Sorrow (January 17th/18)

Savage States: Settler Governance in an Age of Sorrow
170 St. George Street, JHB 100
Time: Jan 17th, 4:00 pm End: Jan 17th, 6:00 pm

Interest Categories: Women/Gender, Women & Gender Studies (FAS), United States Studies, Political Science, Law, Faculty of , Indigenous, History (FAS), Historical Studies (UTM), Historical and Cultural Studies (UTSC), Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in (OISE/UT), Canada, Anthropology (UTSC), Anthropology (UTM), Anthropology (FAS)
Public Lecture by Audra Simpson, Anthropology, Columbia U and JHI Distinguished Visiting Fellow 2017-18
The Jackman Humanities Institute is proud to present our Distiguished Visiting Fellow for 2017-2018
Audra Simpson, Anthropology, Columbia University
Savage States: Settler Governance in an Age of Sorrow

In what world do we imagine the past to be settled in light of its refusal to perish and allow things to start over anew? What are the conditions that make for this imagining, this fantasy or rather, demand of a new start point? In this piece I consider the world of settler colonialism, which demands this newness, and a world in which Native people and their claims to territory are whittled to the status of claimant or subject in time with the fantasy of their disappearance and containment away from a modern and critical present. This fantasy of a world without Indians or Indians whittled into claimants extends itself to a mode of governance that is beyond institutional and ideological but is in this study, deeply affective. In this piece I examine how the Canadian practice of settler governance has adjusted itself in line with global trends and rights paradigms away from overt violence to what are seen as softer and kinder, caring modes of governing but governing, violently still and yet, with a language of care, upon on still stolen land. This piece asks not only in what world we imagine time to stop, but takes up the ways in which those that survived the time stoppage stand in critical relationship to dispossession and settler governance apprehend, analyze and act upon this project of affective governance. Here an oral and textual history of the notion of "reconciliation" is constructed and analyzed with recourse to Indigenous criticism of this affective project of repair.

Audra Simpson is Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. She is the author of Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States (Duke University Press, 2014), winner of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association’s Best First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies Prize, the Laura Romero Prize from the American Studies Association as well as the Sharon Stephens Prize from the American Ethnological Society (2015). She is co-editor of Theorizing Native Studies (Duke University Press, 2014). She has articles in Theory & Event, Cultural Anthropology, American Quarterly, Junctures, Law and Contemporary Problems and Wicazo Sa Review. In 2010 she won Columbia University’s School for General Studies “Excellence in Teaching Award.” She is a Kahnawake Mohawk.

This event is free and open to all. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis and the doors will open at 3:30 p.m.
To request an accommodation for accessibility, please contact Kim Yates at the Jackman Humanities Institute at jhi.associate@utoronto.ca or (416) 946-0313 by 5 January 2018.
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CALLS:
  1. Call for Participants: Keele Campus Community Safety Research

My name is Jonathan De Iuliis, I am a Masters student in Geography at York University. I am doing research for my thesis titled Gendered Perceptions of Place on York University's Keele Campus Through A Lens of Personal Safety. The purpose of this research is to identify how campus spaces affect graduate and undergraduate students in different ways based on their gender identity. One way I am doing this research is by talking with students who are familiar with the York University Keele campus about their experiences and use of campus spaces. The interview will discuss topics of safety, design of space, gender identity, safety mechanisms, and overall experience at the Keele Campus.The interview process will take anywhere between 20-40 minutes in duration. The interview will take place at a mutually agreed upon location at a time that is also mutually agreed.

If you or anyone you know may be interested in participating or you have any questions please feel free to contact me at deiuliis@yorku.ca.
*This research has been approved by The Office of Research Ethics at York University (Certificate #:STU 2017-120)
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  1. Call for Participants: The Border Probes

Are you a member of the York University community and have you crossed the Canadian/ U.S. border by land, air or sea since the inauguration of Donald Trump?
The Border Probes project is looking for interview subjects and aims to catalogue and make sense of border crossing experiences, policies and practices.
Interviews may last from 30 to 120 minutes. Researchers guarantee privacy and confidentiality with regards to all correspondence and subsequent interviews. For those wishing to be more public about their experiences, there are plans to produce a series of videos and possibly a podcast series.
If you crossed the Canadian-American border since 2017 and are interested in participating in this study, email borderprobes@glendon.yorku.ca with the subject “Interview 2017.”

Should you wish to contact the project team anonymously, send an email from an account that is not connected with your real name.
Should you wish to send an encrypted email, please email elight@glendon.yorku.ca and download his PGP key.
Click here to see the poster.
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  1. Call for Abstracts: Call for Papers for the 2018 ANSER-ARES conference in CANADA

Association of Non profit and Social Economy Research (ANSER)
Nonprofits and the Social Economy: Gathering Diversities
Eleventh Annual Conference & Celebration
May 30 – June 1, 2018, University of Regina, Saskatchewan

ANSER 2018 PANEL: THE BLACK SOCIAL ECONOMY: AFRICAN PEOPLE AND COOPERATIVE BUSINESSES

Cooperation and collective organizing among racialized people is more important today under the new world order that is fixated on restoring white supremacy. The “Black social economy” is about mutual aid and self-help that remains autonomous from the state and business sectors because in most cases it is fighting against these two sectors. In this economy, racialized people who encounter social and business exclusion can carve out institutions that prioritize their best interests. The Black social economy is therefore focused on social and economic institutions that lift up the historically oppressed and their communities.

The Black Social Economy panel examines the African origins in the social economy and the resilience of Black communities - those people reacting against structural violence by rethinking the communities in which they organize and live. The Black social economy explores the African traditions that help oppressed people cope with harsh political and economic environments. The collectives in which Black people in the West engage are very much rooted in indigenous systems that unite this group of people stolen from their ancestral homelands. Conscientious and collective organizing is thus a means of creating meaningful livelihoods.

Black folk are doing much in terms of innovating within the social and solidarity economy; yet those stories are ignored or missing from the discussion.  It is time to “flip the script” and acknowledge the activism of Black people in the social economy. Building community-based economies has always been very much part of the lives of the African diaspora, and this building continues to be an integral part of living. This panel is making noise and showing the varied ways in which Black people have had to seek refuge, to help one another and to prevail.

Key dates:
Paper abstract and panel proposals due: 5 December 2017 (or ASAP)
Decision of submissions: 20 March 2018
Submit the abstract (100 words), title for paper and full names and titles of each author to chossein@yorku.ca
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  1. Call for Papers - New Frontiers Graduate Conference in History 2018 (Deadline: December 15th/17)

New Frontiers Graduate Conference in History 2018 – (Un)mapping Histories
February 22-24, 2018, York University

We are seeking proposals for the twenty-second annual New Frontiers in Graduate History Conference, to be held February 22-24, 2018 at York University in Toronto. Our theme this year is “(Un)mapping Histories”. We are seeking papers that examine mapping, broadly construed, as an integral part of contextualizing, visualizing and knowing. The subject of mapping questions how acts of naming and defining by various historical actors create maps and networks - some visible and tangible, others covert and imagined. Unmapping highlights the tension between theory, discourse and materiality. These broad themes can be applied to a variety of subjects and geographic fields.

We are very pleased to announce that our keynote address will be given by Dr. Howard Chiang, University of California, Davis. Howard Chiang received his PhD in the History of Science program at Princeton University in 2012. The talk draws from his monograph: After Eunuchs: Science, Medicine, and the Transformations of Sex in Modern China, forthcoming from Columbia University Press. Dr. Chiang’s recent publications include, among others, Queer Sinophone Cultures (2013, edited with Ari Larissa Heinrich), Historical Epistemology and the Making of Modern Chinese Medicine (2015, edited), and Perverse Taiwan (2016, edited with Yin Wang). He is currently working on two projects: one on global transgender theory and another on the history of psychoanalysis in global Chinese culture.

Though we have chosen a central theme for this year, we encourage papers from a wide range of national, regional, thematic, and methodological backgrounds. New Frontiers is an excellent opportunity for both MA and PhD students in history and related fields to present papers to colleagues from across Canada and the United States. We will be accepting papers on any geographic location and on a wide range of themes and topics including but not limited to:
History and Theory
Public Memory and Commemoration
Law, Politics, and Protest
Science, Medicine, Technology and Environment
Sovereignty and the State
Religion and Society
First Nations, Métis, and Inuit
Race, Ethnicity, and Identity
Gender, Sexuality, and the Body
Empire and Nation
Popular Culture and Consumerism
Migration and Diaspora
Work, Class, and Community
Applicants are invited to submit either individual papers or panels of two to three papers.

For individual papers, please submit a maximum 250-word abstract. For panel proposals, include a maximum 200-word panel abstract explaining the rationale for the panel. Submissions must be accompanied by at least three keywords and a short biographical statement. The deadline for submissions is December 15, 2017.  Please direct submissions to:
Maryann Buri, Alexander Hughes, and Noa Nahmias
By google form: https://goo.gl/forms/v6dpsY0ngNBVHr313
By email: yorknewfrontiers@gmail.com
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  1. Call for Papers: Refusing to Fight: Reimagining War in Global Perspectives (Deadline: December 31st/17)

Conference Call for Papers
Refusing to Fight: Reimagining War in Global Perspectives
11-13 October 2018
Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada

Violence and war play starring roles in historical research and education. They are also rich fodder for film and television, and books about war dominate the history sections of bookstores. Conflicts between and within groups, nations, empires, and kingdoms reveal political tensions, cultural divisions, social upheavals, and individual identities.

What about those who choose not to fight? Often derided as cowards, shirkers or traitors to a cause, these individuals rarely provide more than a beige canvas on which to display the supposedly more robust and vibrant colours of a real man (or woman). In most histories, the refusal to fight is the exception, and reasons to desert, to dodge a draft or resist a state’s call to war are rarely explored. Deserters and their stories are assumed unimportant, unmanly, unworthy of notice.

This conference will explore the myriad ways and reasons why people decide not to fight, from the ideological and religious, to the personal and practical. It will also assess how states, professions and populations have responded to deserters or draft-dodgers and the extent to which perceptions, representations, and the treatment of these men and women have changed over time. By bringing together scholars who engage with alternative visions of violence, war, heroism and manliness, we hope to gain a broader understanding of how ‘refusing to fight’ has been experienced, studied, and remembered around the globe, from Antiquity to the 21st century.

The conference organizers welcome paper proposals from a range of disciplines, including history, archaeology, the visual and performing arts, psychology, political science, sociology, and public health. Possible topics include:
-Memory and commemoration of desertion/draft-dodging/anti-war movements;
-Gender and desertion/draft-dodging/anti-war movements;
-Desertion, draft-dodging and anti-war movements in pre-national and nationalist eras;
-Representations of desertion, draft-dodging and ‘malingering’ in art and popular culture;
-Refugees and forced migrants as deserters/draft-dodgers;
-The historiography of desertion/draft-dodging/anti-war movements;
- “Refusal to fire” as a form of anti-war activism;
-Psychiatric and medical explorations of “refusal to fire”/ desertion/draft-dodging/anti-war movements;
-Offensive vs defensive wars, and their impact on desertion/draft-dodging/anti-war movements;
-Economic motivations for desertion/draft-dodging/anti-war movements;
-International borders as sites of desertion and draft-dodging;
-Consequences (short- and long-term) of desertion/draft-dodging/anti-war movements.

Individual submissions should include a title, an abstract of no more than 250 words, and a brief biography including your name, institutional affiliation (if applicable), and e-mail contact.

Only previously unpublished papers or those not already committed elsewhere can be accepted. The organizers plan to publish an edited collected of selected papers presented at the conference.

Please submit your proposal/abstract to the conference organizers, at refusingtofight@gmail.com by December 31st, 2017.  Notice of acceptance will be sent out by January 31st, 2018.
For further information, please visit the conference website at https://www.refusingtofight.ca
Organizers:
Dr. Gregor Kranjc
Dr. Renée Lafferty-Salhany
Dr. Colin Rose
Dr. Elizabeth Vlossak
Ms. Emma Green
Mr. John Raimondo
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  1. Call for Proposals: Women's Xchange 15K Challenge (Deadline: January 8th/18)

Women’s Xchange, a woman’s health knowledge translation and exchange centre, based at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto recently announced a Call for Proposals to support grassroots research projects. A summary of this initiative is provided below.

Objectives: To support research projects that address women’s health issues at the local level.
Note: Universities/Colleges, schools, hospitals are eligible only if they are working with a community agency that involves at least one eligible organization.
Duration: One year
Value: $15K
Deadlines:
Notice of Intent to agency – January 8, 2018 by 4pm
Submission of full application to ORS – January 25, 2018
Full application submission to agency – February 8, 2018 by 4:00pm

For further information on this funding opportunity and how to apply, please visit the following links:
http://womensxchange.womensresearch.ca/challenge/what-is-the-15k-challenge.html
http://womensxchange.womensresearch.ca/challenge/how-to-apply.html
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  1. Call for Papers: The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference (Deadline: February 15th/17)

“Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World”

About the Conference
The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies-in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces. Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted.

What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:
The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
“Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Who Should Attend?
In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives.

Proposals
Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.
The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.

Submission Guidelines
All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to cesa@ucalgary.ca

Special Journal Issue
A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines

Presenter Subsidy
CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.
The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018
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OPPORTUNITIES:
  1. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada - 2018-19 Contributions Program

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) recently issued a Call for Proposals (CFP) under its 2018-19 Contributions Program, and is actively encouraging the submission of research and knowledge applications that advance its strategic privacy priorities.   A summary is provided below.

Objectives are to:
Strengthen existing privacy research capacity in academic and not-for-profit sectors;
Generate new knowledge and support the development of expertise in selected areas of privacy and data protection;
Increase awareness and understanding among individuals and organizations across Canada of their privacy rights and obligations; and,
Promote uptake and application of research results by relevant stakeholders,
This year, the OPC is inviting research and knowledge translation applications that relate to one or several of their priority areas and related implementation strategies. The OPC’s priority areas are:
The Economics of Personal Information
Governance Surveillance
Reputation and Privacy, and
The Body as information

This year the OPC is particularly interested in funding research or knowledge translation projects that aim to promote the development and adoption of Privacy Enhancing Technologies (PETs).  The OPC is interested in project proposals that address the following areas:
Research to assess relative strengths and weakness of different categories of PETs;
Research to invent new PETs;
Research to improve the effectiveness of existing PETs;
Research to study what are the barriers to deployment and adoption of PETs and how should these be addressed;
Work to develop public education tools to better equip and enable individuals to avail themselves of the technologies that exist, and;
Some combination of the above.
Value:
Up to $100K
Required Overhead:
15%
Duration:
One year

Deadlines:
Submission to ORS – January 3, 2018
Submission to agency – January 16, 2018, by 11:59 PM
For further details on this program, please consult the following links:
https://www.priv.gc.ca/en/opc-actions-and-decisions/research/funding-for-privacy-research-and-knowledge-translation/
https://www.priv.gc.ca/en/opc-actions-and-decisions/research/funding-for-privacy-research-and-knowledge-translation/how-to-apply-for-contributions-program-funding/applying-for-funding-under-the-contributions-program-annual-call-for-proposals/cp_guide/

York University researchers are reminded that all applications for external research funding, including Letters of Intent, must be reviewed and approved by the Office of Research Services before they are submitted to the granting agency. For internal approval, the application must be accompanied by a completed ORS Application Checklist, which requires the Chair’s and Dean’s signatures. To ensure that the approved application is ready by the agency deadline, a complete application folder must be submitted to the ORS ten (10) working days prior to final submission date.
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  1. Institute for Women’s Policy Research: Special Assistant to the President

Full-time special assistant needed to perform a wide variety of duties for the organization’s President. IWPR is a dynamic, nonprofit, women’s policy research organization located in central DC near three metro stops (Farragut West, Farragut North, and Dupont Circle).  This position offers great exposure to policy issues affecting women and families and provides opportunities to serve as a liaison to a variety of people, including major media outlet reporters, members of Congress and their staff, policy experts, and national leaders of women’s and other nonprofit organizations.

Responsibilities:
Public Liaison
Screen calls to President’s office, address questions as needed, and personally handle calls where possible.
Assist with fielding press/media calls.
Schedule President’s speaking engagements and other public and media appearances and interviews.
Serve as representative of President and IWPR at meetings and functions as needed.
Scheduling and Administration
Schedule appointments for the President and maintain her calendar.
Arrange travel and follow up with related expense reporting and reimbursements for speaking engagements, conference attendance, etc.
Review mail, e-mail, and faxes, draft correspondence for President
Maintain files and assist with keeping the executive office orderly.
Serve as liaison to other IWPR departments and individual staff members, including senior management team, and research, development, and communications departments.
Assist with Research, Editorial, and Other Special Projects
Provide research assistance and writing for IWPR projects, speeches, articles, collected volumes, and other activities of the President, including creating slideshows, analyzing and displaying data in tables and graphs, literature review, annotated bibliographies, etc.
Provide editorial assistance for the Journal of Women, Politics & Policy.
Provide support for the President’s role in coalitions, other organizations, and Boards.
Assist with other duties related to the President’s projects and responsibilities as needed.
Staff Liaison to IWPR Board of Directors
Schedule and arrange periodic Executive Committee conference call meetings.
Schedule and arrange semi-annual Board meetings and help prepare and distribute meeting materials.
Take and distribute minutes for Executive Committee meetings and Board meetings.
Schedule other Board Committees, meetings, and calls as needed.

Qualifications:
Bachelor’s degree or significant equivalent experience.
Three years prior office experience.
Proficiency with MS Office, particularly MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Stata skills ideal.
Strong communication skills, both written and oral.
Strong organizational skills and attention to detail are essential.
Ability to handle multiple deadlines and keep track of simultaneous projects.
Position also requires tact and discretion as many confidential matters are involved.
Familiarity with women’s issues, public policy, and the social sciences.
Salary in the high $40,000s or $50,000s commensurate with experience and generous health insurance, transportation subsidy, retirement plan, vacation, and other leave benefits. Ideal starting date is January 2.

To apply:
Please email cover letter, resume, short writing sample, and contact information for three references in one PDF attachment to Specialassistant@iwpr.org.  No phone calls please.  IWPR is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

About IWPR:
The Institute for Women’s Policy Research conducts and communicates research to inspire public dialogue, shape policy, and improve the lives and opportunities of women of diverse backgrounds, circumstances, and experiences. We are the leading think tank in the United States applying quantitative and qualitative analysis of public policy through a gendered lens. IWPR advances women’s status through social science research, policy analysis, and public education. We develop new policy ideas, encourage enlightened public debate, and promote sound policy and program development. Our work also helps to change minds and improve the practices of institutions. IWPR operates on the principle that knowledge is power and that social science evidence based on strong data and analysis, compellingly presented and systematically disseminated, makes a difference in moving public policy. IWPR’s work is supported by foundation grants, government grants and contracts, donations from individuals, and contributions from organizations and corporations. IWPR is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization that also works in affiliation with the women’s studies and public policy and public administration programs at The George Washington University. To learn more about IWPR, please visit www.iwpr.org.
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  1. Institute for Women’s Policy Research: Research Economist for Program on Gender Analysis in Economics (Deadline: December 15th/17)

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank based in Washington, DC, seeks a Research Economist who will work at IWPR and teach in the Program on Gender Analysis in Economics (PGAE) at American University. This year-round position for a mid- or senior-level economist provides the opportunity to direct an academically rigorous, policy-oriented research program and provide high-quality instruction in a doctoral program.  The successful candidate will ideally begin work between June and September 2018.

The Research Economist will work in IWPR’s Washington, DC, office with an experienced, multi-disciplinary team of PhD-level researchers and research associates who work on a variety of topics related to employment, education, income security, work and family, health and safety, and women and girls of color. The research economist will also teach one course per semester at the American University campus and hold office hours and attend department committee meetings there. Title at AU is to be determined.

Candidates must have the Ph.D. in economics (preferably econometrics, general micro or macro, labor, public policy, health, education, or poverty), a proven track record of successful grant acquisition, demonstrated interest in policy issues affecting women of diverse backgrounds, and experience with domestic (US) policy analysis and/or program evaluation, as well as a record of peer-reviewed, published research; teaching experience is required.

Salary will be commensurate with experience and track record; a competitive salary and benefits package will be offered.
Applicants should submit their applications as soon as possible, but no later than December 15, 2017, to be interviewed at the ASSA meetings January 5-7 in Philadelphia. Please include, in one document, a cover letter describing your interest, your CV, one writing sample, and a list of 3 references. Apply to ResearchEconomist@iwpr.org.  Position is open until filled. EEO.

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  1. Queens University: Assistant or Associate Professor in African American Gender History (tenure track)(Deadline: January 8th/18)

The Departments of History and Gender Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, invite applications for a Queen's National Scholar (QNS) at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor. This joint faculty appointment will be a tenured or a tenure-track position with a preferred starting date of July 1, 2018.

We are seeking exceptional candidates with expertise in 20th Century African American Gender History and welcome applications from those who work at the intersection of Black, feminist, queer, and/or trans* studies. Scholars whose work emphasizes struggle, resistance, and social change are especially encouraged to apply.

Candidates must have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment; in order to be considered for the position applicants not yet holding the degree must have a scheduled defence date. The main criteria for selection are academic and teaching excellence. The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research leading to peer assessed publications and the securing of external research funding, as well as strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and an ongoing commitment to academic and pedagogical excellence in support of each of the department’s programs. Candidates must provide evidence of an ability to work collaboratively in an interdisciplinary and student-centred environment. The successful candidate will be required to make substantive contributions through service to both departments, the Faculty, the University, and/or the broader community. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. This position is subject to final budgetary approval by the University.

The Queen’s National Scholar Program expects that the successful candidate will demonstrate their ability to provide a rich and rewarding learning experience to all their students, and to develop a research program that aligns well with the University’s priorities. Further information on teaching and research priorities at Queen’s is available in the Queen’s Academic Plan, and the Queen’s Strategic Research Plan.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information as to how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of:
-a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
-a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications);
-a statement of research interests;
-a statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available);
-a writing sample of article or chapter length; and
-three letters of reference addressed to Dr. Rebecca Manley and Dr. Samantha King and emailed directly by the referees to history.chair@queensu.ca (with ‘QNS’ and the applicant’s last name in the subject line).

The deadline for applications is January 8, 2018.
Applicants are encouraged to send all documents in their application packages electronically as PDFs to Dr. Rebecca Manley and Dr. Samantha King at history.chair@queensu.ca (with ‘QNS’ and the applicant’s last name in the subject line) although hard copy applications may be submitted to:
Dr. Rebecca Manley
Associate Professor and Chair
The Department of History Room 212, Watson Hall
49 Bader Lane Queen’s University Kingston, Ontario CANADA K7L 3N6

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Cindy Fehr, in the Department of History, at fehr@queensu.ca.

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/collective-agreement and at http://www.qufa.ca.
Appointments are subject to review and final approval by the Principal. Candidates holding an existing tenure-track or continuing-adjunct appointment at Queen’s will not be considered.
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  1. of Waterloo: Assistant Professor in Rhetoric and Digital Media (Deadline: January 15th/18)

The Department of English Language and Literature in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Waterloo invites applications for a probationary position in Rhetoric and Digital Media at the rank of Assistant Professor, with a preferred start date of July 1, 2018. We are looking for a colleague with expertise in rhetoric and in digital media theory and practice who will contribute to our research and teaching in this area, as well as to the Department more broadly.  Expertise in critical making, critical data studies, or digital design is particularly welcome. Applicants for this position must have a completed PhD by time of appointment and provide evidence of research potential and achievement commensurate with their experience and a strong teaching record in relevant areas.

The successful candidate will be offered a wide range of teaching experiences, from first-year undergraduate courses through to graduate teaching and supervision of doctoral students. The current teaching load is 2 + 2, which normally includes one graduate course. The salary range for this position at the rank of Assistant Professor is $78,000 to $100,000.  Negotiations beyond this salary range may be considered for exceptionally qualified candidates.

The successful candidate will be involved in supporting our unique PhD degree, which integrates literary studies with the fields of rhetoric, media theory and design, communication, and discourse and text analysis. In addition, the successful candidate will teach courses related to our MA degrees, particularly the MA in Experimental Digital Media and the MA in Rhetoric and Communication Design; and courses related to our undergraduate degrees, particularly the Honours BA in Rhetoric, Media and Professional Communication. Since the Department promotes an integrated research culture, secondary expertise in a field of literary study is especially welcome.

Research opportunities include those available at the department’s Critical Media Lab, where the successful candidate will have access to extensive resources for digital design (please visit http://criticalmedia.uwaterloo.ca for more information) and at the university-wide Games Institute.

Applications are due by 15 January 2018. Please address applications to Professor Kate Lawson, Chair, Department of English Language and Literature, University of Waterloo. Application materials must be submitted online as PDF files through https://arts-ofas.uwaterloo.ca/english/. Please include a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and a teaching dossier and/or link to an e-portfolio, and arrange for three letters of reference to be uploaded.

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  1. of Waterloo: Assistant Professor in Science, Culture, and Writing(Deadline: January 15th/18)

The Department of English Language and Literature in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Waterloo invites applications for a probationary position in Science, Culture, and Writing at the rank of Assistant Professor, with a preferred start date of July 1, 2018. The successful candidate will have an established program of research in one of the following areas: ecocriticism; literature and the environment; science fiction studies; disability studies; literature of science; history of science; medical humanities; history of health and medicine; or an area of literary study relevant to the communication of science. A secondary area of research in writing, systems of knowledge production, new modes of publication, or other literary or rhetorical subfield, will be considered an asset. The Department promotes an integrated research culture, combining expertise in the fields of literary study, rhetorical study, and digital media.

Applicants for this position must have a completed PhD and should provide evidence of research potential and achievement commensurate with their experience and a strong teaching record in relevant areas. The successful candidate will teach writing- and speaking-intensive communication courses for science and/or engineering students; thus, experience teaching science and/or technical communication courses or courses in allied areas such as science and literature, history of science, or in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) studies, at the post-secondary level will be considered an important asset.

The successful candidate will be offered a range of teaching, from first-year undergraduate courses through to graduate teaching and the supervision of doctoral students. The current teaching load is 2 + 2, which normally includes one graduate course. The salary range for this position at the rank of Assistant Professor is $78,000 to $100,000.  Negotiations beyond this salary range may be considered for exceptionally qualified candidates.

The successful candidate will be involved in supporting our unique PhD degree, which integrates literary studies with the fields of rhetoric, media theory and design, communication, and discourse and text analysis. In addition, the successful candidate will teach courses related to our three MA degrees (Rhetoric and Communication Design; Experimental Digital Media; and Literary Studies), and our undergraduate degrees, including the BA Honours in Literature and the BA Honours in Rhetoric, Media and Professional Communication.

Applications are due by 15 January 2018. Please address applications to Professor Kate Lawson, Chair, Department of English Language and Literature, University of Waterloo. Application materials must be submitted online as PDF files through https://arts-ofas.uwaterloo.ca/english/. Please include a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and a teaching dossier and/or link to an e-portfolio, and arrange for three letters of reference to be uploaded.

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  1. of Waterloo: Associate Professor in Rhetoric and Communication(Deadline: January 15th/18)

The Department of English Language and Literature in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Waterloo invites applications for a tenured position in Rhetoric and Communication at the rank of Associate Professor, with specific expertise in technical and/or science communication. Additional expertise in the rhetoric of science and technology, intercultural communication, or assessment would be an asset.  An appointment date of July 1st, 2018 is preferred.

Applicants for this position must have a completed PhD and should provide evidence of significant research achievement and a strong teaching record in relevant areas. The successful candidate will teach writing- and speaking-intensive communication courses for engineering and/or science students; thus, experience teaching technical and/or science communication courses at the post-secondary level will be considered an important asset. A record of research funding will be a desirable asset.

The successful candidate will be offered a range of teaching, from first-year undergraduate courses through to graduate teaching and the supervision of doctoral students. The current teaching load is 2 + 2, which normally includes one graduate course.  The salary range for this position at the rank of Associate Professor is $100,000 to $180,000.  Negotiations beyond this salary range may be considered for exceptionally qualified candidates.

The successful candidate will be involved in supporting our unique PhD degree, which integrates literary studies with the fields of rhetoric, media theory and design, communication, and discourse and text analysis. In addition, the successful candidate will teach courses related to our three MA degrees (Rhetoric and Communication Design; Experimental Digital Media; and Literary Studies), and our undergraduate degrees, including the BA Honours in Rhetoric, Media and Professional Communication. Since the Department promotes an integrated research culture, secondary expertise in a field of literary study is especially welcome.

Applications are due by 15 January 2018. Please address applications to Professor Kate Lawson, Chair, Department of English Language and Literature, University of Waterloo. Application materials must be submitted online as PDF files through https://arts-ofas.uwaterloo.ca/english/. Please include a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and a teaching dossier and/or link to an e-portfolio, and arrange for three letters of reference to be uploaded (addressed to Professor Kate Lawson, Chair, Department of English Language and Literature, University of Waterloo).

More information about the Department is available at https://uwaterloo.ca/english/. Further enquiries may be directed to Professor Lawson at englishchair@uwaterloo.ca or at 519-888-4567, ext. 33965.

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  1. of Waterloo: Rhetoric and Technical or Science Communication (Two Lecturer Positions) (Deadline: January 15th/18)

The Department of English Language and Literature in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Waterloo invites applications for two Lecturer positions in Rhetoric and Technical or Science Communication, with a preferred start date of August 1, 2018. These are three-year definite-term appointments. Re-appointment and subsequent conversion to Continuing Lecturer is a possibility for both positions.

Applicants must have a completed PhD and a substantial record of teaching by the time of appointment. The successful candidate will primarily teach writing- and speaking-intensive communication courses for engineering and science students; thus, evidence of experience teaching technical and/or science communications courses at the post-secondary level will be considered an important asset. The successful candidate will also contribute to other areas of undergraduate teaching in communication, rhetoric, and/or literature.

The normal teaching load for this position is 7 term courses spread over three 12-week terms each year. The salary range for the rank of Lecturer is $65,000 to $95,000. Negotiations beyond this salary range will be considered for exceptionally qualified candidates.

Applications are due by 16 March 2018. Please address applications to Professor Kate Lawson, Chair, Department of English Language and Literature, University of Waterloo. Application materials must be submitted online as PDF files through https://arts-ofas.uwaterloo.ca/english/. Please include a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and a teaching dossier and/or link to an e-portfolio, and arrange for three letters of reference to be uploaded (addressed to Professor Kate Lawson, Chair, Department of English Language and Literature, University of Waterloo).

More information about the Department is available at https://uwaterloo.ca/english/. Further enquiries may be directed to Professor Lawson at 519-888-4567, ext. 33965 or by e-mail to englishchair@uwaterloo.ca.