CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, April 12th, 2018

---CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH---

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. CFR Research Associate Dr. Caroline Shenaz Hossein wins 2018 W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Book Award.
  2. CFR Research Associate Dr. Caroline Shenaz Hossein receives Early Researcher Award
  3. Congratulations to Joint Winners of the 2016-17 Mary McEwan Memorial Award, Dr. Funké Aladejebi and Dr. Rebecca Hall

---COMMUNITY---

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women - official country visit to Canada from 11 to 23 April 2018
  2. Videos from 2018 Sexual Violence Forum
  3. Demeter Press is Honoured to Announce the Upcoming Release of Breastfeeding and Culture: Discourses and Representation
  4. Press Release from Women in Judaism
  5. Summer 2018 Work/Study Program - IMPORTANT UPDATES
  6. Decent Work for Women: A literature review of women working in Ontario's nonprofit sector

EVENTS:

  1. On the Queer Stage (April 13th/18)
  2. Centre for Women Studies in Education presents: Wonderful Women Writer's Series (April 18th/18)
  3. Amber Jamilla Musser "Working Around the Incommensurate: Brown Jouissance and Kara Walker's A Subtlety" Lecture (April 19th/18)

CALLS:

  1. Call for Participants: Study on Self-Care
  2. Call for Papers: 50 Years of Socialist Feminism (Deadline: April 30th/18)
  3. Call for Publications: Academic Freedom and the Global University (Deadline: September 1st/18)
  4. Call for Papers: Public Feminisms in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Deadline: September 15th/18)

OPPORTUNITIES:

  1. Drummond Foundation - Request for Applications for Research Grants (Deadline: April 23rd/18)
  2. Indigenous Policy and Community Development Positions in the Early Years Sector (Deadline: April 23rd/18)
  3. Application Deadline Extended for Programming, Peer Support & Volunteer Coordinator (Deadline: April 23rd/18)
  4. OISE Scholarship Program for Indigenous Students (Deadline: April 27th/18)
  5. Chair in Transgender Studies Master's Degree Research Scholarships for Trans, Non-binary, and Two-Spirit Students (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)
  6. Chair in Transgender Studies Master's Degree Research Scholarships (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)
  7. Chair in Transgender Studies Doctoral Degree Research Scholarships for Trans, Non-Binary, and Two-Spirit Students (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)
  8. Chair in Transgender Studies Doctoral Degree Research Scholarships (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)
  9. Chair in Transgender Studies Research Fellowships for Visiting University-based Scholars and Professionals (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)
  10. Chair in Transgender Studies Research Fellowships for Community-based Scholars (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)
  11. Bamburgh Library Fellowships 2018 (Deadline: May 25th/18)
  12. Chair in Transgender Studies Undergraduate Degree Scholarship for Trans, Non-Binary, and Two-Spirit Students (Deadline: May 31st/18)

---CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH---

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. CFR Research Associate Dr Caroline Shenaz Hossein wins 2018 W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Book Award.

Via YFile: http://yfile.news.yorku.ca/2018/04/01/social-science-professor-wins-w-e-b-dubois-distinguished-book-award/

Professor Caroline Shenaz Hossein, from York University’s Department of Social Science, is a recipient of the 2018 W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Book Award.

The National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS) in the U.S. named Hossein the award winner for her book Politicized Microfinance: Money, Power and Violence in the Black Americas (2016) at its 49th annual meeting, titled Race and the Environment: Agency, Survival and the Continuing Challenges of Black Inequalities, held in Chicago on March 16.

The award honours Dr. W.E.B. DuBois (1868-1963), a famous academic, writer, historian and civil rights activist. He was the first African-American to earn a doctorate at Harvard and one of the co-founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The NCOBPS grants the award for books that contend with questions of political power, race and other intersections of oppression.

In her book Politicized Microfinance, Hossein crosses the Western Hemisphere to tell the untold stories of how people of African descent are hurt or helped when they engage with the financial world.


  1. CFR Research Associate Caroline Shenaz Hossein receives Early Researcher Award)

Via YFile: http://yfile.news.yorku.ca/2018/04/08/seven-york-university-researchers-receive-early-researcher-award/

Seven researchers from York University have each received funds through the Ontario government’s Early Researcher Awards (ERA) program. The researchers are Rebecca Bassett-Gunter, Hany Farag, Ryan Hili, Caroline Shenaz Hossein, Amy Muise, Jean-Paul Paluzzi and Christopher Perry. The Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science’s Early Researcher Awards program provides funding to new researchers working at publicly funded Ontario research institutions to build a research team.

The $140,000 represents the contribution from the Ontario Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science for the ERA award – $100k for the researcher and $40,000 in overhead to the institution. The ERA award is matched by a $50,000 contribution from the institution. Hence the researcher has a total of $150,000 available.

“York is delighted to see these individuals receive an Early Researcher Award: Rebecca Bassett-Gunter, Amy Muise and Christopher Perry from the Faculty of Health; Ryan Hili and Jean-Paul Paluzzi from the Faculty of Science; Hany Farag from the Lassonde School of Engineering; and Caroline Shenaz Hossein from the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies,” said Vice-President Research & Innovation Robert Haché.

“The funding provided by Ontario’s Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science will help to assist early career researchers in realizing their full potential,” he added.

Caroline Shenaz Hossein’s research project, in the Department of Social Science, examines the role of the social economy – comprised of community organizations as well as socially-conscious small businesses that support societal well-being – among African Canadians in the GTA, London and Oshawa. The project documents how racialized people, especially women, are excluded from economic development programs and how people cope with and resist business exclusion by relying on local social economies such as social enterprises, self-help groups, coops and nonprofits. Empirical evidence derived through community-based research will be mobilized to influence policy discussions about how the province can more equitably support social innovation that benefits racialized minorities, and to also develop new narratives that demonstrate the economic ingenuity of racialized Canadians.


  1. Congratulations to Joint Winners of the 2016-17 Mary McEwan Memorial Award, Dr. Funké Aladejebi and Dr. Rebecca Hall

The Centre for Feminist Research is proud to announce the joint winners of the 2016-17 Mary McEwan Memorial Award competition, Dr. Funké Aladejebi and Dr. Rebecca Hall.

Dr. Funké Aladejebi is an Assistant Professor in the Gender and Women's Studies department at Trent University. She is currently working on a manuscript titled, ‘Girl You Better Apply to Teachers’ College’: The History of Black Women Educators in Ontario, 1940s – 1980s,' which explores the importance of Black Canadian women in sustaining their communities and preserving a distinct black identity within restrictive gender and racial barriers. She has published articles in Ontario History and Education Matters. Her research interests are in oral history, the history of education in Canada, black feminist thought and transnationalism.

Dr. Aladejebi's dissertation, “Girl You Better Apply to Teachers’ College,” examines the role of black women educators in Ontario from the 1940s to the 1980s. In an attempt to contribute to historical analysis on black identity, citizenship and racial difference in Canada, this dissertation investigates the ways in which black Canadian women confronted and navigated socially constructed boundaries of racial alienation, limited institutional support and inequality within Ontario school systems.

Largely using oral interviews, school board minutes, newspapers, yearbooks, and community records, “Girl You Better Apply to Teachers’ College” argues that black women educators’ sense of belonging in the professional sphere circumvented subtle and overt forms of racial and social exclusion in Ontario schools. In an effort to locate themselves within the Canadian national narrative, black female educators navigated concepts of citizenship and created a new kind of belonging that was parallel to and, at times, intersected with concepts of Canadian statehood.

Dr. Rebecca Hall holds a PhD in Political Science from York University. She takes a feminist political economy approach to questions related to Indigenous/Canadian State relations, resource extraction, and gender-based violence, and has published peer-reviewed pieces on these topics. Hall’s research interests come out of her community work in the Northwest Territories, and she is grateful to the workers at The Native Women’s Association of the Northwest Territories and to the communities in and around Yellowknife for their teachings and their generosity. This summer, Dr. Hall will take up an appointment in the Department of Global Development Studies at Queen’s University.

Dr. Hall’s dissertation, entitled Diamonds are Forever: a decolonizing, feminist approach to diamond mining in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, takes a feminist political economy approach to the impact of the northern diamond mining industry on Indigenous women. It reveals the ways in which Dene, Métis, and Inuit women’s labours that contribute to the social reproduction of their kin and communities have been both a site of colonial restructuring towards the demands of extractive capital, and of decolonizing resistance. Woven through this analysis is an examination of the relationship between structural and embodied racialized and gendered violence. Dr. Hall argues that the gendered structural tension between the extractive regime and the reproduction of place-based social relations contributes to disproportionately high levels of embodied violence against Indigenous women in the NWT.

About the Mary McEwan Memorial Award:

Named in honour of Dr. Mary McEwan, a feminist psychiatrist, the Mary McEwan Memorial Award is awarded annually to one PhD dissertation produced per year at York University in the area of feminist scholarship. An Awards Committee of faculty affiliated with the Centre for Feminist Research selects the winners.

The 2016-17 Award was issued to joint winners.

For more information about the Mary McEwan Memorial Award, and to see past winners, click here: http://cfr.info.yorku.ca/awards/


-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women - official country visit to Canada from 11 to 23 April 2018

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women, its Causes and Consequences, Ms. Dubravka Šimonović, will undertake an official country visit to Canada from 11 to 23 April 2018, to examine and assess how the Government of Canada is implementing its international human rights obligations relating to the elimination of violence against women.

In this context, the Special Rapporteur is looking for information related to her mandate, amongst others:

- Identification of the *manifestations of violence against women* and girls;

- Identification of stakeholders/officials/civil society *to meet with*;

- *Key issues and challenges* faced in the implementation of the international and regional legal framework on violence against women (e.g. What are the main/most pressing causes of violence against women? What needs to be done? How can the Special Rapporteur contribute in making the situation better?)

- *Good practices* aimed at promoting gender equality and eliminating violence against women, including data collection initiatives to prevent femicide and all forms of gender based violence;

- Any information related to the State’s fulfilment of its human rights obligations to eliminate violence against women (*prevention, protection, prosecution and punishment, and the provision of effective remedies* for victims of violence against women);

- Any *other pertinent information* that you consider to be relevant for the visit of the Special Rapporteur.

Throughout her visit, the Special Rapporteur will particularly focus on women who encounter multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination, including *indigenous women*, women with disabilities, migrant and refugee women and women from remote or rural communities.

Please feel free to send any written material to the Special Rapporteur at vaw@ohchr.org. Your contribution will be kept confidential.


  1. Videos from 2018 Sexual Violence Forum

Sexual Violence Forum 2018: Videos now available online!

We are pleased to share videos of the proceedings from the Learning Network's 2018 Sexual Violence Forum: What Really Informs Consent?

In this one-day Forum, we discussed the role of marginalization, power imbalances, privilege and accompanying notions of entitlement, and the many ways in which social disparities inform “consent” and patterns of sexual violence.

Click here to: View Videos

Click here to: Learn more about the Forum

Thanks,

The Learning Network Team


  1. Demeter Press is Honoured to Announce the Upcoming Release of Breastfeeding and Culture: Discourses and Representation

Demeter Press is honoured to announce the upcoming release of Breastfeeding and Culture: Discourses and Representation, Edited by Ann Marie A. Short, Abigail L. Palko, and Dionne Irving (April 2018).

http://demeterpress.org/books/breastfeeding-culture-discourses-and-representations/

Save 40% off using coupon code MOTHERS until April 23, 2018!

For myriad reasons, breastfeeding is a fraught issue among mothers in the U.S. and other industrialized nations, and breastfeeding advocacy in particular remains a source of contention for feminist scholars and activists. Breastfeeding raises many important concerns surrounding gendered embodiment, reproductive rights and autonomy, essentializing discourses and the struggle against biology as destiny, and public policies that have the potential to support or undermine women, and mothers in particular, in the workplace. The essays in this collection engage with the varied and complicated ways in which cultural attitudes about mothering and female sexuality inform the way people understand, embrace, reject, and talk about breastfeeding, as well as with the promises and limitations of feminist breastfeeding advocacy. They attend to diffuse discourses about and cultural representations of infant feeding, all the while utilizing feminist methodologies to interrogate essentializing ideologies that suggest that women's bodies are the "natural" choice for infant feeding. These interdisciplinary analyses, which include history, law, art history, literary studies, sociology, critical race studies, media studies, communication studies, and history, are meant to represent a broader conversation about how society understands infant feeding and maternal autonomy.


  1. Press Release from Women in Judaism

PRESS RELEASE

Toronto, April 3, 2018

Women in Judaism: A Multidisciplinary e-Journal

We are delighted to announce the electronic publication of the new issue of Women in Judaism: A Multidisciplinary e-Journal. The journal can be accessed at http://www.womeninjudaism.org

Founded in 1997, the journal is the first multidisciplinary-refereed e-journal solely dedicated to gender-related issues in Judaism.

WOMEN IN JUDAISM: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY e-JOURNAL is an academic, refereed journal published exclusively on the Internet, and devoted to scholarly debate on gender-related issues in Judaism. The ultimate aim of the journal is to promote the reconceptualization of the study of Judaism, by acknowledging and incorporating the roles played by women, and by encouraging the development of alternative research paradigms. Cross-methodological and interdisciplinary, the journal does not promote a fixed ideology, and welcomes a variety of approaches.


  1. Summer 2018 Work/Study Program - IMPORTANT UPDATES

Please be advised that the Fall/Winter 2017 -2018 Work/Study program will end on the originally scheduled date of April 23, 2018; the Summer Work/Study program will also run on the original schedule of April 30 through August 31.

The deadline for the submission of Winter hours for reimbursement has now passed.  Student Financial Services will assess and process the reimbursements by the end of this week so that the journals transfers can be processed before year end.

Decisions on the summer work study submissions will be going out today.  The number of submissions for the summer program far exceeded the program's capacity; as such we were unable to approve all requests.  Every attempt has been made to be equitable and to maintain previous levels of support where possible.  All decisions are final.

For those positions that have not been approved for the Work/Study program, students can still be hired through the Summer Student process.  Information about this is available in YU Link: Manager Resources> Hiring and Paying Employees> Planning for a Hire> Getting a Summer Student Position Ready for Posting (https://yulink-new.yorku.ca/group/manager-resources/getting-a-summer-student-position-ready-for-posting)

Students interested in applying for the summer Work/Study Program must complete the summer Student Financial Profile (which is now open) and be deemed eligible for the program. There is the possibility that the labour disruption may impact the work study decisions (i.e. students who dropped Winter term courses after the start of the labour disruption).  In instances where potential hires are demonstrating an 'ineligible' decision, hiring managers should send an email to wspost@yorku.ca (for work study, CLAY and YES) or raypost@yorku.ca (for RAY program only) with the students name and sisid so that the students can be manually assessed and where applicable the decision manually amended.

Lastly, with respect to Bill 148, central HR has requested that the statement indicated below be added to all work study job descriptions in order to be in compliance with this new legislation:

The Work Study Student program provides on-campus job opportunities for eligible York University undergraduate students.  Work Study Student employees are provided opportunities to contribute to support roles while developing valuable, relevant skills and work experience for the workplace.  These roles offer a learning and development opportunity for Work Study Student employees to receive experiential on-the-job training, guidance and mentorship. Under the guidance of permanent staff members, Work Study Student employees will provide support to their relevant department/faculty in clerical, administrative and technical capacities.

Student Financials Services will add this description to all approved submissions on your behalf so no action is required on your part at this time.

Please feel free to send any questions you may have about this email to wspost@yorku.ca or raypost@yorku.ca (as applicable).

With regards,
Karen Warner
Manager, Scholarships and Bursaries
Partners in Student Success


  1. Decent Work for Women: A literature review of women working in Ontario's nonprofit sector

This review critically analyzes literature on the experiences of women working in Ontario’s nonprofit sector, from a wide variety of sources, in order to:

  • Paint a current and relevant picture of women’s employment experiences in Ontario’s nonprofit sector
  • Identify any gaps in research and data
  • Inform the development of future key activities for Ontario Nonprofit Network's larger project on Decent Work for Women Working in Ontario’s Nonprofit Sector

Access the executive summary and review here: http://theonn.ca/our-work/our-people/decent-work/decent-work-women/literature-review/

For more information please contact Pamela Uppal, Project Lead, pamela@theonn.ca, 416-642-5786 x504


EVENTS:

  1. On the Queer Stage (April 13th/18)

On the Queer Stage

Friday April 13, 2018: 6 pm to 8:30 pm

Art Gallery of Mississauga

300 City Centre Drive (Inside Mississauga Civic Centre)

Barrier-free space, all gender washroom, snacks provided

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2023926604526468/

ALL ARE WELCOME!

The Art Gallery of Mississauga is pleased to present On the Queer Stage, a community conversation with three theatre, stage and film LGBTQ artists who have roots in Mississauga. We are honoured to have Bilal Baig, kumari giles and Aldrin Bundoc join us to share their experiences in creating, performing and presenting. The artists will be speaking about their work, how gender and sexuality have played a role, and what the suburbs mean for them. The community conversation will be moderated by Anu Radha Verma.

All are welcome. Snacks provided. All gender washroom.

ARTIST BIOS

Bilal Baig is a young-queer-genderqueer-muslim playwright and actor. His first play, Acha Bacha, had its world premiere at Theatre Passé Muraille in February 2018. His other plays, Khwaja Sera and blue eyes killed him without blinking are currently in development at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre and Factory Theatre respectively. His personal essay, titled Something Greater than Ourselves, will be featured in the play publication of The Gay Heritage Project in spring 2018. As a performer, Bilal has worked with Studio 180 Theatre, Theatre Centre, Theatre by the Bay, SummerWorks Performance Festival and the Rhubarb Festival. Bilal also spends his time leading story creation workshops in elementary schools in North York and Scarborough through an organization called StoryPlanet, and is part of a collective that creates in-person hangout spaces for queer and trans south asians as well as an online space to connect called A Colour Deep.

kumari giles is a multi-disciplinary artist, dancer, storyteller, curator, logistics nerd, aerialist, food enthusiast and community cook. As a queer non-binary mixed maker of many things, they believe in art and movement as a tool for empowerment, transformation and healing. They are committed to nurturing overlooked brilliance, working collectively and challenging systemic power in the arts. They bring love, intention and integrity to independent and collective projects including CATALYST(2017), Sarap (2017) and their one-person play things i cannot speak (2015).

Aldrin Bundoc is a theatre and television actor, originally from The Philippines. He is a graduate of the George Brown Theatre Conservatory and continuously endeavours to support and strengthen the presence of Filipino artists in the media. Aldrin had leading roles in the Dora-nominated productions “Body Politic” (Buddies In Bad Times co-produced by LemonTreeCreations), and “Meet Cute” (Roseneath Theatre). Other credits include: Twelfth Night, Alls Well that Ends Well (St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival); American Buffalo, Julius Caesar (Unit102 Theatre); Lord Sword (Inter-Arts-Matrix); Flashpoint (CTV); The Firm (NBC); Private Eyes (Global).


  1. Centre for Women Studies in Education presents: Wonderful Women Writer's Series (April 18th/18)

Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE) and Innana publication presents

Wonderful Women Writer’s Series

A reading series showcasing some of the finest women writers and their feminist & women centered fiction.

Our women writers are:

Kelli Deeth, The other side of youth, was shortlisted for Relit award

Lisa DeNikolits, is the award-winning author of ‘seven impressive novels, each marked by wild creativity and memorable characters.’ – Open Book Toronto

Catherine Graham, the winner of IFOA’s Poetry NOW, is the author of six poetry collections including The Celery Forest and the debut novel Quarry

Mehri Yalfani, an Iranian writer and poet, the author of eight novels, and five collections of short stories and poems in Farsi and English.

When: 5:15 – 7p.m. April 18th/18

Where: 2-227, OISE 252 Bloor St West

Toronto

This series is coordinated and hosted Dr. Nora Gold, prize-winning author and Writer-in-Residence at the CWSE.

Open to Public

Free Event

Sujata Thapa

Program Coordinator, Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE)

Office Hours: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/preview/cwse/Contact_Us.html

Room 2-225, OISE, University of Toronto

Phone: 416-978-2080

https://www.facebook.com/thecwse/


  1. Amber Jamilla Musser "Working Around the Incommensurate: Brown Jouissance and Kara Walker's A Subtlety" Lecture (April 19th/18)

The UB Gender Institute and the HI Queer Studies Research Workshop are pleased to announce

Amber Jamilla Musser

"Working Around the Incommensurate: Brown Jouissance and Kara Walker's A Subtlety"

When: Thursday April 19. At 3:30pm

Where: 120 Clemens Hall, UB North campus

Reception will follow

About Amber Jamilla Musser:

Amber Jamilla Musser is an Associate Professor or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research is at the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality studies. Her monograph, Sensational Flesh: Race, Power, and Masochism (NYU Press, 2014) uses masochism as a lens to theorize different felt relationships to power. The book beings together debates on masochism within feminism, discussions of masochism from psychoanalysis and critiques of colonialism, literary presentations of masochism, and performance and visual art that draws on masochism's repertoire in order to make an argument about the relationship between sensation and knowledge production and the racialization of our current episteme of sexuality. Her current research project, "Brown Jouissance: Feminine Imaginings" uses women of color's aesthetic labors to re-imagine epistemologies of sexuality so that they center brown femininity.

Dr. Musser has also published widely on race and critical theory, queer femininities and race, race and sexuality, and queer of color critique. She has an MSt in Women's Studies from Oxford University and received her PhD in History of Science from Harvard University. She has previously taught gender studies at New York University and Brown University. At Washington University she teaches "Sexuality and the State," "Advanced Queer Theory: Intimacies of Precarity," "The Politics of Pleasure," "Queer of Color Critique: Sense and Sexuality," and "Feminist Theory."


CALLS:

  1. Call for Participants: Study on Self-Care

My name is Emma Morris. I am a graduate student at Ryerson University in the School of Professional Communication. I am seeking participants for a research study on self-care in non-profit organizations.

This research is being done as part of a Major Research Project I am writing to fulfil the requirements of a Master of Professional Communication, under the supervision of Dr. Jane Griffith. The focus of the research is narratives and practices of self-care within non-profit spaces. My research seeks to explore how self-care is used, particularly in feminist or women-focused organizations. For this project, self-care will be defined as practices and activities determined by an individual to best support their personal well-being in times of stress or trauma, or as a preventative measure to support their personal well-being.

To participate you need to be a current or former employee of a women-focused non-profit (e.g., women’s shelters, legal clinics, women’s rights organizations, non-governmental organizations working on women’s issues) OR work in a women-focused role at a non-profit that does not have a specific focus on women.

If you agree to volunteer, you will be asked to participate in one 60-90 minute interview. This interview will take place at Ryerson University or via video-conferencing software such as Zoom.

Participation in this study is completely voluntary. There are no paid incentives for participating in this study. If you choose not to participate it will not impact our relationship or your relationship with Ryerson University.

The research has been reviewed and approved by the Ryerson University Research Ethics Board.

If you are interested in more information about the study or would like to volunteer, please email emma.morris@ryerson.ca


  1. Call for Papers: 50 Years of Socialist Feminism (Deadline: April 30th/18)

Call for Papers: 50 Years of Socialist Feminism

2019 marks 50 years since the publication of Margaret Benston’s “The Political Economy of Women’s Liberation,” a seminal article in the modern development of socialist feminism. In it, Benston proposes that “housework” (as she called the labour of sustaining this and the next generation of workers) be considered in relation to processes of capitalist value creation. Widely circulated prior to its publication in Monthly Review, and debated internationally for years afterward, Benston’s article opened the doors to a socio-materialist critique of women’s oppression that has defined socialist feminist theory and politics ever since.

Historical Materialism Toronto is organizing a symposium, to take place in Toronto, September 26th to 29th, 2019, to commemorate this important contribution, as well as to explore the ways in which socialist feminist theorising and politics has grown through and beyond Benston’s intervention. We wish to bring together a new generation of socialist feminist theorists to discuss the current state of socialist feminist politics, our continued strengths, and the weaknesses that we still need to address to truly apply a socio-materialist critique of social oppressions and exploitation. What is the current state of socialist feminist theorising, where is it going, and where should we be going?

We will give priority consideration to papers that discuss socialist feminist approaches to questions of race and racialization, imperialism, colonialism, indigeneity, ecology, sexualities, gendered violence, and disability.

We invite you to submit an abstract for a paper that engages current ideas, debates and discussions relevant to socialist feminist theory and politics. Presenters will circulate their papers in advance, and use the Symposium to further clarify and elaborate their work. A selection of papers will be organized into a volume to be submitted for publication (either as an edited collection or a journal special issue).

Abstracts should be between 200 and 250 words. To submit, please email your name, affiliation, contact information, and abstract to historicalmaterialismtoronto@gmail.com, no later than April 30, 2018.

Thank you.

Historical Materialism Toronto

50 Years of Socialist-Feminism Organizing Committee


  1. Call for Publications: Academic Freedom and the Global University (Deadline: September 1st/18)

Theme: Academic Freedom and the Global University

Publication: Volume edited by Kevin W. Gray

Deadline: 1.9.2018

The expansion of American-style education overseas has been both an economic success, if measured by the rise in numbers of American, European, and Australian universities rushing to set up campuses in Asia and the Middle East is to serve as a measure, and a source of great consternation for academics concerned with norms of free inquiry, and intellectual freedom. In well-known cases such as at NYU and Yale, faculty at home campuses have resisted the opening of new satellite campuses for fear that their colleagues teaching on those campuses would be less free to teach and engage in intellectual inquiry, and that students studying on those campuses be denied the free inquiry that is normally associated with liberal arts education. Those critics point to the denial of visas to academics wishing to carry out research on foreign campuses (as with well-known cases at NYUAD), the sudden termination of employment at schools in both the Middle East and Asia, or the last-minute cancellation of conferences at those schools, as evidence that they were correctly suspicious of the possibility that liberal arts programs could exist in those regions. Supporters of the project, conversely, have argued either than opening up foreign campuses would bring free inquiry to (supposedly) closed societies, improve educational opportunities for students who would otherwise be denied them, or, perhaps less frequently, that free inquiry will be no less pressured than in the United States or Western Europe (where recent controversies, such as that involving Steven Salaita at the University of Illinois, or Ward Churchill at the University of Colorado, have shown that academics in the United States are often exposed to political pressures as well)

This volume flows from a workshop initially held under the auspices of the Committee for International Cooperation of the American Philosophical Association’s meeting held in Baltimore, in January 2017. We already have four confirmed chapters coming from that workshop. We are looking for contributions addressing issues of academic freedom on foreign and branch campuses. The book will be published as part of the book series Expansion and Internationalization of Higher Education in Asia, North Africa, and the Middle East (edited by Kevin W. Gray and Hassan Bashir, Lexington Books).

For this book, we are particularly interested in:

Cases studies dealing with the pressures on academic freedom in different geographical locations.

Analyses of how mechanisms under which pressure is brought to bear on academics teaching and researching in the Asia, the Middle East (or perhaps elsewhere).

Critical analysis of the transformation of norms of academic freedom in North American and Europe, and an analysis of how these transformations relate to events in the developing world.

How restrictions on research and inquiry manifest themselves in pedagogy.

Some other topics relevant to the discussion of academic freedom.

Short proposals of approximately 300-500 words should be sent to Dr. Kevin W. Gray at kevinwgray@gmail.com by September 1, 2018, with the anticipation that final chapters of approximately 6,000-10,000 words will be received by February 1, 2019

Any informal inquiries should also be sent to:

kevinwgray@gmail.com


  1. Call for Papers: Public Feminisms in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Deadline: September 15th/18)

Special Issue: Public Feminisms

http://signsjournal.org/for-authors/calls-for-papers/

Even as antifeminist and right-wing forces have gained footholds worldwide, feminists have forcefully asserted themselves in the public sphere as key voices of resistance. From the Women’s Marches around the world that took place the day after Donald Trump was inaugurated, to the 2012 protests in Delhi, to a new resurgence of writers proudly adopting the moniker, feminists have organized to claim public space and a public voice. It is no overstatement to claim that “the resistance” is being led by women, with intersectional feminism at its core.

Meanwhile, a shifting media landscape has enabled contradictory dynamics: feminists—through innovative uses of social media and online media outlets, as well as mainstream media—have found (and created) platforms to amplify their public voices, yet the pool of public intellectuals and the punditry continues to be largely dominated by white men.

This special issue seeks to address these dynamics through a multifaceted and interdisciplinary discussion of “Public Feminisms.” Signs has sought—through the creation of the Feminist Public Intellectuals Project—to actively advocate for feminist voices in both the scholarly and the public sphere, building a critical mass of public intellectuals who speak with a feminist voice to audiences outside of academia. These multipronged efforts have engaged feminist theorizing and historicizing with the pressing political and social problems across the globe. This special issue seeks to further extend the discourse of public feminisms.

Possible areas of focus might include:

How have new forms of media enabled new public forms of feminism (or antifeminism)? How does changing media create new risks for feminist discourse or feminist individuals?

How are feminist publics and public feminisms represented in literature, film, television, theater, dance, or other cultural forms today and in prior moments of resistance? How can these forms of expression be put to feminist use?

How has feminism either challenged or contributed to the concept of publicness itself? What historical models of publicness has feminism adopted or transformed?

How has claiming public space related to claiming discursive space, or vice versa? How have feminisms conjured new publics or counterpublics?

How do race, nation, religion, class, sexuality, and caste structure where and which feminisms tend to become public? How have feminists across time challenged these dynamics?

How do nonfeminist forces shape what circulates in the name of feminism, and how can feminists combat it?

What can comparisons among different historical eras, geographical areas, or political climates tell us about the conditions under which public feminisms can emerge?

To what extent are new languages necessary to shifting public discourses about feminism? How are new conceptual languages or vocabularies adopted as part of public discourse?

Signs particularly encourages transdisciplinary and transnational essays that address substantive feminist questions, debates, and controversies without employing disciplinary or academic jargon. We welcome essays that make a forceful case for why public feminism demands a specific and thoughtfully formulated interdisciplinary feminist analysis and why it demands our attention now. We seek essays that are passionate, strongly argued, and willing to take risks.

The deadline for submissions is September 15, 2018.

Please submit full manuscripts electronically through Signs’ Editorial Manager system at http://signs.edmgr.com. Manuscripts must conform to the guidelines for submission available at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/signs/instruct.


OPPORTUNITIES:

  1. Drummond Foundation - Request for Applications for Research Grants (Deadline: April 23rd/18)

The Drummond Foundation recently announced a Request for Applications for 2018-2019.  Please see below for further details.

Objective

The Foundation invites applications from clinical investigators who are interested in Aging related research and improving the quality of life of socially, mentally, or physically disadvantaged older adults, their families, and caregivers.

Eligibility

Applicants are eligible if they are:

an early-career investigator (within 6 years of first university or clinical appointment), or a mid-career or senior investigator clearly making a bridge to a new field, and new to the Drummond Foundation

Value: Up to $25K

Duration: 1 year

Deadlines

Submission of Letter of Intent to ORS – April 23, 2018

Submission of Letter of Intent to agency– May 7, 2018

Submission of full application to ORS – August 20, 2018

Submission of full application to agency (by invitation only) – September 3, 2018

For more details on this opportunity, please visit the following links:

https://www.drummondfoundation.ca/

http://www.drummondfoundation.ca/pdf/RFA_Eng.pdf


  1. Indigenous Policy and Community Development Positions in the Early Years Sector (Deadline: April 23rd/18)

Division: Children's Services

Section: System Planning and Policy Development

Work Location: METRO HALL, 55 JOHN ST

Job Stream: Children, Community & Social Services

Job Type: Permanent, Full-Time

Salary/Rate: $102,029.20 - $119,883.40 / Year

Hours of Work (bi-weekly): 70.00

Shift Information: Monday to Friday - 35 Hours

Affiliation: Non-Union

Number of Positions Open: 1

Posting Date: 30-Mar-2018

Closing Date: 23-Apr-2018

Job Description

This is a unique career opportunity for an Indigenous person who has the subject matter expertise, skills, confidence and commitment to lead the City of Toronto in creating and implementing strategies promoting reconciliation with local First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities. As part of its commitment to reconciliation, the City is committed to working with Indigenous partners to explore ways to strengthen the capacity of Indigenous organizations and associations to plan, lead and deliver initiatives for local Indigenous communities.

Reporting to the Program Manager, Child and Family Centres, the Indigenous Consultant Children's Services is responsible for managing Indigenous EarlyON Child and Family Centre programs and other relevant early years programs and services. This individual:

Develops and implements planning tools, guidelines and operational policies to ensure integrated service planning that takes into account the needs of Indigenous families, developments within the field, corporate policies and practices, legislation and initiatives by other levels of government.

Ensures financial accountability through review and analysis of operational budgets and capital funding requests.

Ensures project expenditures are controlled and maintained within approved budget limitations. Contributes to the unit’s budget by developing budget submissions for specific functional area.

Manages Indigenous EarlyON Child and Family Centre programs and services and ensures service targets are met as outlined in the Service Plan for Children's Services.

Manages project teams that initiate, develop and implement policies/programs and City-wide initiatives. Recruits the project team, develops project plan/timelines, and ensures effective teamwork, communication, high standards of work quality and organizational performance.

Conducts and evaluates research, analyzes information and develops recommendations on matters related to child and family centres and integrated children's services.

Manages contentious issues/serious occurrences, ensuring follow up documentation, corrective action and implementation of preventative strategies.

Evaluates, monitors and provides direction to programs under contract in accordance with Council approved policies/legislation, and ensures services are responsive, inclusive, developmentally appropriate and of high quality.

Ensures compliance with service contracts, legislative requirements and service improvements through negotiation of action plans.

Liaises and negotiates with provincial staff, local levels of government, elected officials and community groups regarding the interpretation and application of policy, and provides technical advice on the City's guidelines and policies related to child and family centres and integrated service delivery.

Responds to media enquiries, prepares media materials and briefing notes as necessary on issues receiving media attention.

Manages and provides advice and support to relevant stakeholder advisory committees, other community networks and political sub-committees.

Represents the Division on cross divisional and intergovernmental initiatives and represents the unit in cross Divisional initiatives regarding information dissemination, policy/research issues and service planning.

Prepares briefing notes and information for committee reports.

Manages, plans and presents at community events such as local planning sessions and training and development conferences.

Represents the Corporation and the Division on a variety of community groups and research groups, collaborates with child and family centre agencies, Boards of Education, municipal/provincial politicians and staff to ensure local service planning and delivery meets the needs of children, families and community.

Key Qualifications:

Lived experience as an Indigenous person, and experience working with Indigenous families and/or community organizations.

Post-secondary education in a relevant field or an equivalent combination of education combined with relevant experience.

Considerable experience and knowledge in the development, monitoring and evaluation of programs and services for children and families through applied knowledge of child and human development theories and/or family support principles.

Considerable experience in project management and program development related to human services, including experience in managing multiple assignments and setting priorities.

Experience in the management and evaluation of programs and services in a human services environment with respect to quality assurance, risk management and best practices to ensure performance outcomes, service objectives and program priorities are met.

Knowledge and skill in community development with the ability to establish effective working relationships with a variety of community service and support agencies, politicians and other levels of government utilizing strong interpersonal and relationship building skills.

The ability to supervise, coach, motivate and coordinate the activities of staff along with the ability to effectively handle day to day labour relations matters.

Excellent analytical skills with the ability to effectively identify problems, propose solutions and follow through with the implementation of decisions.

Proficiency using Microsoft Excel, Word and Power Point.

Thorough knowledge of the legislation and policies governing the planning, funding and delivery of early years programs and services.

Strong written and oral communication skills with the ability to develop and deliver presentations to a variety of audiences.

Sound knowledge of current issues and trends in the children’s services field and delivery of indigenous community services.

Additional Information:

If you are interested in learning more about this consultant cs (indigenous) position, and what it is like to work at the City of Toronto, please email your request to participate in a teleconference call to toeycfc@toronto.ca, subject:" indigenous recuitment", and we will provide a conference contact # and a conference ID.

This teleconference call will be held on Thursday, April 12th from 4:00pm – 5:00pm and you will be able to ask questions of a HR recruiter and the program manager.

You can also join us at #talenttalkto on Thursdays from 11:30am – noon, where you can tweet questions about any posted positions and the city's application process.

Accommodation: The City of Toronto is committed to fostering a positive and progressive workforce reflecting the citizens we serve. We provide equitable treatment and accommodation to ensure barrier-free employment in accordance with the Ontario Human Rights Code, Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act and the City of Toronto's Accommodation Policy. You can request for accommodation related to the protected grounds at any stage of the City's hiring process, i.e., application, assessment and placement.

If you are an individual with a disability and you need accommodation in applying for this position, please email us at application.accommodation1@toronto.ca, quoting the job ID # and the job classification title.

If you are invited to participate in the assessment process, we ask that you provide your accommodation needs in advance at that time. Please be advised that you may be requested to provide medical/other documentation to Human Resources to ensure that appropriate accommodation is provided to you throughout the hiring process.

https://www.brainhunter.com/frontoffice/seekerViewJobDetailAction.do?sitecode=pl389&jobId=2300459&page=search&external=


  1. Application Deadline Extended for Programming, Peer Support & Volunteer Coordinator (Deadline: April 23rd/18)

*DEADLINE EXTENDED: April 23rd 12 p.m. (noon)

Position Title: Programming, Peer Support & Volunteer Coordinator

Position Type: Full-time, 25 hours per week

Starting Wage: $20.00 per hour plus benefits and vacation, occasional evenings and weekends, with a 3 month probation period.

Workplace Environment: Union, Workers United

Starting Date: June 2018

Application Deadline: April 23, 2018 - 12 P.M. (noon)

About Students for Barrier-Free Access (SBA)

Students for Barrier-Free Access (SBA) at the University of Toronto is a student-funded, student and volunteer led non-profit that advocates for equity, access, and the rights of graduate and undergraduate disabled students.  SBA operates a drop-in centre with bookable study rooms, a computer lab with accessible software (Dragon, Kurzweil, Jaws, ect.), and a social space for students and community members. SBA works from a disability justice framework. Through our campaigns, programming, workshops, and events we challenge systemic ableism and barriers to accessing post-secondary education.

Statement of Intent

Students for Barrier-free Access (SBA) is looking to hire a Programming, Peer Support and Volunteer Coordinator. The Coordinator responsibilities involve supporting SBA members through peer support, programming, and volunteer coordination. They must be committed to working from a disability justice, trans-positive, anti-racist, and anti-oppressive framework. They will require an understanding of systemic, historical, everyday barriers and structural oppression that exist within academia [post-secondary institutions] and in the community-at-large. However, a post-secondary degree or diploma is not required for this position.

SBA requires individuals with previous experience in organizing with marginalized groups and communities, prefers individuals who have experience volunteering or working with a volunteer student led board of directors with limited time and capacity, openness to being trained in providing referrals to resources and services (both on and off campus), and the ability to simultaneously maintain long term (peer support groups) and short-term (volunteer appreciation party) projects. This position reports to a volunteer student board of directors where day to day supervision is not possible. Please mention all relevant experience including volunteer experiences which will be given the same priority as paid work.

Qualifications:

Ability to coordinate multiple short-term & long-term projects simultaneously

Ability to be self-directed and work with minimal supervision

Experience with volunteer coordination

Experience coordinating, facilitating, and developing programs, workshops and events

Experience with program and event outreach

Experience providing peer support

Working knowledge of Windows OS, Mac, MS suite, email, internet research tools and social media

Job Duties and Responsibilities:

Administration

Plan Annual General Meeting, Board of Director (BOD) elections, and provide administrative support for BOD meetings

Maintain day-to-day operations of the computer lab and help with troubleshooting

Become familiar with adaptive technologies in the SBA computer lab and coordinate technology updates and trouble-shooting with the ATRC technician

Committee Support

Coordinate programming, outreach and volunteer committee.

Programming

Coordinate and facilitate the Centre programming

Support volunteers and board members with goal setting and programming initiatives

Liaise with campus groups for planning joint activities and coalition building for programming

Outreach

Conduct outreach for SBA programming, events, and peer support groups, including SBA open house

Maintain website, newsletter, social media accounts, bulletin boards, and displays and tables

Drop-in Peer Support/ Referrals/ Groups

Provide drop in peer support and referrals

Develop and maintain peer support groups

Volunteer Management

Facilitate/coordinate orientation and training for volunteers, including anti-oppression training

Meet and interview new volunteers

Maintain SBA Co-Curricular Record volunteer program

Provide reference letters for volunteers as needed

Maintain and update training and volunteer manuals and other text-based training resources

How to Apply

SBA only considers applications from people who identify as part of the disabled/mad community. We welcome and encourage applications by disabled/mad identified folks from marginalized communities and invite indigenous people, black people, people of colour, women, gays, lesbians, bisexuals, ACE spectrum people, queer people, transgendered people, transsexual people,  intersexed people, working class people, single parents, immigrants to apply for this position. Applicants are encouraged to self-identify in their cover letters, which will be kept confidential and only shared among members of the hiring committee for hiring purposes only.

In your cover letter please include responses to the 4 questions below with no more than 250 word responses to each of the questions. You are welcomed to submit your responses in alternative format such as a video or audio response.

How do you imagine centring a disability justice framework into (a) programming initiatives or (b) a volunteer program?

What do you feel is the relationship between disability justice and anti-colonial organizing work?

What are some skills/ experiences [paid and unpaid] you bring to SBA.

What do you hope to gain from this opportunity?

To apply, please submit the following info by April 23, 2018 12:00 P.M. (noon)

Cover letter which includes a response to all four questions listed above

Resume

Complete applications can be emailed, mailed or dropped off in person at:

Students for Barrier-free Access:

c/o of the Hiring Committee

215 Huron St. Suite 924

Toronto, ON M5S 1A

E-Mail: sbahiringcommittee@gmail.com

We are open Monday – Thursday 1:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.

SBA welcomes inquiries about job postings and application process by email only until April 16th. Please email the Hiring Committee at sbahiringcommittee@gmail.com with any inquiries.

Accommodations will be provided for the interview process by request only.

For more information about the SBA Centre or programs, visit www.uoftsba.com


  1. OISE Scholarship Program for Indigenous Students (Deadline: April 27th/18)

The OISE Scholarship Program for Indigenous Students includes two scholarships of $7,500 awarded annually to Indigenous students who are registered on a full-time basis in a graduate degree program at OISE. One scholarship will be awarded to an Indigenous student in a Doctoral program and one to an Indigenous student in a Master?s program. This award is open to all Indigenous candidates at OISE (First Nations, Métis, Inuit and Indigenous Peoples from outside of Canada) with preference given to applicants who have not previously been awarded this scholarship. The recipient will be selected on the basis of academic merit and previous and intended contributions to their community.

Deadline for the 2018 application is April 27, 2018.

The application can be downloaded here.


  1. Chair in Transgender Studies Master's Degree Research Scholarships for Trans, Non-binary, and Two-Spirit Students (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)

Two or more $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to current or entering academically outstanding master's degree students who self-identify as trans, non-binary, or Two-Spirit and who are pursuing research in any field, including creative or performative activity.  Preference will be given to students who demonstrate financial need.

Applications must be written in plain English appropriate for an interdisciplinary committee.

Submission: please submit all required documents to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, c/o Yvonne Rondeau, Scholarship Officer University Centre A207 scholoff@uvic.ca

IMPORTANT DATES:
Posting opens: February 1st, 2018
Posting closes: April 30th, 2018 (DEADLINE EXTENDED)
All applicants will be notified by the end of May.  Successful applicants will be issued the award in June.

*Applicants may apply to multiple awards, if eligible. Complete the application of each award for which you want to be considered. No more than one award per applicant will be given in each competition cycle.

https://www.uvic.ca/research/transchair/assets/docs/Application%20-%20Chair%20In%20Transgender%20Studies%20Masters%20Degree%20Research%20Scholarship%20For%20Trans%20Students.pdf


  1. Chair in Transgender Studies Master's Degree Research Scholarships (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)

Two or more $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to current or entering academically outstanding master's students pursuing trans-related research in any field, including creative or performative activity. Priority will be given to students who self-identify as trans, non-binary, or Two-Spirit and further preference will be given to students who demonstrate financial need.

Applications must be written in plain English appropriate for an interdisciplinary committee.

Submission: please submit all required documents to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, c/o Yvonne Rondeau, Scholarship Officer University Centre A207 scholoff@uvic.ca

IMPORTANT DATES:
Posting open: February 1st, 2018
Posting closes: April 30th, 2018 (DEADLINE EXTENDED)
All applicants will be notified by the end of May.  Successful applicants will be issued the award in June.

*Applicants may apply to multiple awards, if eligible. Complete the application of each award for which you want to be considered. No more than one award per applicant will be given in each competition cycle.

https://www.uvic.ca/research/transchair/assets/docs/Application%20-%20Chair%20In%20Transgender%20Studies%20Masters%20Degree%20Research%20Scholarship.pdf


  1. Chair in Transgender Studies Doctoral Degree Research Scholarships for Trans, Non-Binary, and Two-Spirit Students (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)

One or more $5,000 scholarships will be awarded to current or entering academically outstanding UVic doctoral degree students who self-identify as trans, non-binary, or Two-Spirit pursuing research in any field, including creative or performative activity. Preference will be given to students who demonstrate financial need.

Applications must be written in plain English appropriate for an interdisciplinary committee.

Submission: please submit all required documents to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, c/o Yvonne Rondeau, Scholarship Officer University Centre A207 scholoff@uvic.ca

IMPORTANT DATES:
Posting opens: February 1st, 2018
Posting closes: April 30th, 2018 (DEADLINE EXTENDED)
All applicants will be notified by the end of May.  Successful applicants will be given $2,500 in June, and $2,500 in July.

*Applicants may apply to multiple awards, if eligible. Complete the application of each award for which you want to be considered. No more than one award per applicant will be given in each competition cycle.

https://www.uvic.ca/research/transchair/assets/docs/Application%20-%20Chair%20In%20Transgender%20Studies%20Doctoral%20Degree%20Research%20Scholarship%20For%20Trans%20Students.pdf


  1. Chair in Transgender Studies Doctoral Degree Research Scholarships (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)

One or more $5,000 scholarships will be awarded to current or entering academically outstanding UVic doctoral degree students pursuing trans-related research in any field, including creative or performative activity. Priority will be given to students who self-identify as trans, non-binary, or Two-Spirit, and further preference will be given to students who demonstrate financial need.

Applications must be written in plain English appropriate for an interdisciplinary committee.

Submission: please submit all required documents to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, c/o Yvonne Rondeau, Scholarship Officer University Centre A207 scholoff@uvic.ca

IMPORTANT DATES:
Open: February 1st, 2018
Posting closes: April 30th, 2018 (DEADLINE EXTENDED)
All applicants will be notified by the end of May.  Successful applicants will be given $2,500 in June, and $2,500 in July.

*Applicants may apply to multiple awards, if eligible. Complete the application of each award for which you want to be considered. No more than one award per applicant will be given in each competition cycle.

https://www.uvic.ca/research/transchair/assets/docs/Application%20-%20Chair%20In%20Transgender%20Studies%20Doctoral%20Degree%20Research%20Scholarship.pdf


  1. Chair in Transgender Studies Research Fellowships for Visiting University-based Scholars and Professionals (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)

Three or more $1,000 fellowships will be awarded by the Chair in Transgender Studies to visiting university-based scholars and professionals pursuing trans-related research at UVic. Priority will be given to those who self-identify as trans, non-binary, or Two-Spirit, and further consideration will be given to the project’s budget.

Applications must be written in plain English appropriate for an interdisciplinary committee.

Submission: please submit all required documents to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, c/o Yvonne Rondeau, Scholarship Officer University Centre A207 scholoff@uvic.ca

IMPORTANT DATES:
Posting opens: February 1st, 2018
Posting closes: April 30th, 2018 (DEADLINE EXTENDED)
Normally, successful applicants will be issued award after their visit.

*Applicants may apply to multiple awards, if eligible. Complete the application of each award for which you want to be considered. No more than one award per applicant will be given in each competition cycle.

https://www.uvic.ca/research/transchair/assets/docs/Fellowship%20Application%20-%20Chair%20In%20Transgender%20Studies%20Visiting%20Fellowship.pdf


  1. Chair in Transgender Studies Research Fellowships for Community-based Scholars (DEADLINE EXTENDED) (Deadline: April 30th/18)

Two or more $1,000 fellowships will be awarded by the Chair in Transgender Studies to community-based scholars pursuing research at UVic in any field, including creative or performative activity, which will benefit trans, non-binary, and Two-Spirit people. Priority will be given to those who self-identify as trans, non-binary,or Two-Spirit, and further consideration will be given to the project’s budget.

Applications must be written in plain English appropriate for an interdisciplinary committee.

Submission: please submit all required documents to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, c/o Yvonne Rondeau, Scholarship Officer University Centre A207 scholoff@uvic.ca

IMPORTANT DATES:
Posting opens: February 1st, 2018
Posting closes: April 30th, 2018 (DEADLINE EXTENDED)
Normally, successful applicants will be given the award after their visit.

*Applicants may apply to multiple awards, if eligible. Complete the application of each award for which you want to be considered. No more than one award per applicant will be given in each competition cycle.

https://www.uvic.ca/research/transchair/assets/docs/Fellowship%20Application%20-%20Chair%20In%20Transgender%20Studies%20Community%20Fellowship.pdf


  1. Bamburgh Library Fellowships 2018 (Deadline: May 25th/18)

Durham University

Location: Palace Green Library

Salary: £1,500 towards travel and accommodation

Hours: Flexible

Contract type: bursary

Closes: 25 May 2018

Thanks to the generous support of the Lord Crewe’s Charity, we are delighted to be able to offer two research fellowships, to be taken up before the end of 2018. The successful fellows will receive access to Durham University’s extensive special collections, as well as to material held at Durham Cathedral and Ushaw College. However, the focus of the proposed research must be the Bamburgh Library collection, held at Palace Green Library.

Who can apply?

The award is open to applicants with an academic background (from PhD student to senior staff) in any discipline and to library professionals with an interest in book or library history or practice-based research. Please note that fellows will need to make their own arrangements for travel and accommodation. Fellows also need to ensure their eligibility to work in the UK before making arrangements.

The expected model for each fellowship is one month full-time. However, we are open to enquiries and proposals for alternative models, for example part-time over a longer period (before the end of 2018 and with the same funding), particularly if that enables applications from library professionals.

The aim of the fellowships is to further knowledge of the history of the Bamburgh Library, its contents and its previous owners, and to support the dissemination of this knowledge to academic and non-academic audiences.

Each fellow will be required to contribute a research output (e.g. a lecture or article) and to write a report on their fellowship as a condition of their acceptance of the award. Imaginative proposals for wider dissemination of their research will be welcomed. Both Durham University and the Lord Crewe’s Charity must be acknowledged in any resulting output from the fellowship.

How to apply

If you are interested in applying for one of the fellowships, please send us the following information:

CV

A summary of your proposed research while at Durham (max. 3 sides of A4), which should contain:

An outline of the project

A list of items in the collection relevant to your research

An explanation of how your research relates specifically to the Bamburgh Library, the Lord Crewe’s Charity, or to members of the Sharp family

A proposal for the dissemination of your research

How the research will help further our understanding of the library, collection, and /or its history

Preferred dates for taking up the fellowship

Enquiries and proposals should be directed to Dr Danielle Westerhof, Rare Books Librarian (Bamburgh Library) at danielle.m.westerhof@durham.ac.uk.

For further information about the Bamburgh Library and its history, please visit to following pages:

https://www.dur.ac.uk/library/asc/collection_information/bamburgh/

http://www.lordcrewescharity.org.uk/history/bamburgh-library

http://bit.ly/BamburghCollection (This will take you to a saved search on our catalogue)

https://dur.ac.uk/library/asc/collection_information/bamburgh/fellowships/ (Full version of the advert)


  1. Chair in Transgender Studies Undergraduate Degree Scholarship for Trans, Non-Binary, and Two-Spirit Students (Deadline: May 31st/18)

Two or more $500 scholarships will be awarded to academically outstanding trans, non-binary, or Two-Spirit undergraduate students entering third or fourth year who are pursuing a degree in any field. Priority will be given to students whose studies are trans-related.  Further preference will be given to students who demonstrate financial need.

Applications must be written in plain English appropriate for an interdisciplinary committee.

To be considered for this scholarship, complete the in-course scholarship application, available through My Page.

IMPORTANT DATES:
Posting opens: April 1st, 2018
Posting closes: May 31st, 2018
While only winners will be notified, all applicants can view the status of their application by logging in to their UVic My Page account. Funds are disbursed in one instalment in September 2018.

Please note: in order for the recipient to receive the scholarship, the student must register and remain registered in a min. of 12 academic units throughout 2018/19 Winter session. If at any point the student drops below 12 academic units, the scholarship will be rescinded. Students will be notified before this happens and will have a chance to appeal the decision.

*Applicants may apply to multiple awards, if eligible. Complete the application of each award for which you want to be considered. No more than one award per applicant will be given in each competition cycle.