CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, June 18, 2018

----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

  1. CFR at York University welcomes Dr. Barnita Bagchi as visiting scholar
  2. Resources for finding academic and non-academic jobs/fellowships/other opportunities in gender and sexuality studies, humanities and social sciences 2018

EVENTS:

  1. CFR Presents: TRANS MATTERS Conference Keynote Lecture - Marvellous grounds: Remembering futures where we might survive by Dr. Jin Haritaworn (June 21st/18, OISE Library)
  2. CFR Presents: TRANS MATTERS Conference Keynote Lecture - Holy Wild by Gwen Benaway (June 22nd/18, OISE Library)
  3. CFR and SJE at OISE Present: Speculation, Education, and Literature: Aspects of South Asian Women's Writing in the 20th and 21st Centuries by CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Barnita Bagchi (June 27th/18, OISE Nexus Lounge)

-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. Hosting a Community Conversation: Global and Community Engagement
  2. Tri-Council: Equity, diversity and inclusion: an open letter to the research community / Équité, diversité et inclusion: lettre ouverte au milieu de la recherche

EVENTS:

  1. Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXIV (June 26th/18)
  2. Trauma-Informed Interventions through an Indigenous Worldview (June 26th/18)

CALLS: 

  1. Call for Participants: Study on Anti-Sexual Violence Education
  2. Call for Submissions: Sick Theories: Sickness & Sexuality (July 15th/18)
  3. Call for Chapter Proposals: Transgender Narratives (Application Deadline: July 31st/18)
  4. The Artifice
  5. Call for Papers on Gun Violence and Gun Control: Demeter Press (Deadline for abstracts: October 15th/18)
  6. Call for BSC Papers on LGBTQ+ print within Canada: Bibliographical Society of Canada (Deadline for 200-word abstract and short biographical note: December 1st/18)

OPPORTUNITIES:

  1. York University position in Gender, Indigenous People and Feminism: (Deadline: August 15th/18)
  2. Cuso International: International Volunteer Opportunities
  3. Limited Places Remaining: Professional Certificate in Strategic Gender Equity Planning (running Sept 17th-21st/18,|London, UK)

---CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH---

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

  1. The Centre for Feminist Research at York University welcomes Visiting Scholar Dr. Barnita Bagchi

Dr. Barnita Bagchi teaches and researches Comparative Literature at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. Educated at Jadavpur University, India, and the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, she has published widely on utopia, histories of transnational and women’s education, and women’s writing in western Europe and south Asia. She directs the Utrecht Utopia Network (utrechtutopianetwork.nl), which, for example, recently hosted an international workshop in Utrecht on ‘Urban Utopias: Memory, Rights, and Speculation.’ Most recently, she has been awarded a British Academy Visiting Fellowship to conduct research on Transcultural Utopian Imagination and the Future: Tagore, Gandhi, and Indo-British Entanglements in the 1930s, at Lancaster University in late summer and early autumn 2018.

Her books include the monograph Pliable Pupils and Sufficient Self-Directors: Narratives of Female Education by Five British Women Writers, 1778-1814 (New Delhi: Tulika, 2004), a part-translation with introduction, Sultana’s Dream and Padmarag: Two Feminist Utopias, by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (New Delhi: Penguin Classics, 2005), an edited volume, The Politics of the (Im)possible: Utopia and Dystopia Reconsidered (New Delhi, London, Thousand Oaks: SAGE, 2012), and the co-edited volume Connecting Histories of Education: Transnational Exchanges and Cross-Cultural Transfers in (Post)colonial Education, with Eckhardt Fuchs and Kate Rousmaniere (Berghahn Books, 2014). Her articles and chapters have appeared in volumes such as A History of the Indian Novel in English (Ed. Ulka Anjaria, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016), and in journals such as Paedagogica Historica, Women’s History Review, and CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture.

To learn more about Barnita and our other Visiting Scholars, please click here: http://cfr.info.yorku.ca/visiting-scholars/


  1. Resources for finding academic and non-academic jobs/fellowships/other opportunities in gender and sexuality studies, humanities and social sciences 2018

You may be interested in following the Gender/Sexuality Academic Funding Opportunities blog and the Race and Ethnic Studies Funding Opportunities blog which post jobs, fellowships, grants, internships in gender and sexuality studies/service/activism and race and ethnic studies, respectively. The blogs are run by Sarah Tuohey, Student Affairs Administrator at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago. Most of the postings seem to be US-based. Please note that both blogs are on pause until the Fall.

Academic Jobs Wiki

Academic Jobs Wiki website lists Academic Networking and Job Resources, Non-Academic Career Resources, and jobs for the Application Year 2017-18 and 2018-19 by field. I've excerpted some links you may find useful below. Please go to the Academic Jobs Wiki website for the full list.

American Studies 2018

Art History 2017-2018

Communication and Media Studies 2017-2018

Communication and Media Studies 2018-2019

Cultural Anthropology 2018-2019

Dissertation Fellowships 2017-2018

Dissertation Fellowships 2018-2019

Education 2017-2018

Film Studies 2017-2018

Geography 2017-2018

History 2017-18

History 2018-19

Humanities and Social Sciences Postdocs 2017-18

Humanities and Social Sciences Postdocs 2018-2019

Interdisciplinary Humanities and Liberal Arts 2017-2018

Womens/Gender/Queer Studies 2017-2018

Womens/Gender/Queer Studies 2018-2019

Academic Networking and Job Resources:

http://www.AcademicCareers.com - a global university job site used by colleges and universities to advertise teaching jobs, education jobs, professor jobs, faculty jobs. Jobs in all functional areas. Job seekers can use all applicant services for free. such as email alerts when matching jobs are posted and/or post a resume. Jobs in countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, United Arab Emirates, and all over Europe, Asia, Middle East.

http://www.academicjobsportal.com/ - a new, simple and functional portal for academic/research job advertisements worldwide! And for free!

#Alt-Academy - Alternative Academic Careers for Humanities Scholars

CFPlist.com offers a clean, innovative way to search calls for papers, chapters, and articles.  The site’s organization and streamlined, user-friendly interface distinguishes it from other CFP sites. Scholars can search by the three criteria: time (date), space (geography), and content (category):

H-Net Job Guide -The Job Guide posts academic position announcements in History and the Humanities, the Social Sciences, and Rhetoric and Composition, and serves a broad audience of administrators, faculty members, archivists, librarians, and other professionals in the humanities and social sciences. The Job Guide is fully sortable and searchable, and is available via email and the web at no cost to the jobseeker.

Non-Academic Career Resources:

The Association for Women's Rights in Development (AWID) job board

Charity Village

Linked In Group: PhD Careers Outside of Academia

The Versatile PhD, new home of Wrk4us, an international email discussion list on nonacademic careers for people with graduate education in Humanities, Education, and Social Science disciplines.

http://www.beyondacademe.com/ is a great resource for historians or others wanting to do public history, digital humanities, etc.


EVENTS:

  1. CFR Presents: TRANS MATTERS Conference Keynote Lecture - Marvellous grounds: Remembering futures where we might survive by Dr. Jin Haritaworn (June 21st/18, OISE Library)

The Centre for Feminist Research Presents:

TRANS MATTERS Interdisciplinary Trans Studies Graduate Student Conference Keynote Lecture

Marvellous grounds: Remembering futures where we might survive

Dr. Jin Haritaworn

Date: June 21, 2018

Time: 12:15-1:45PM

Location: OISE Library, 1st floor, 252 Bloor St West

Please click here for the ASL translation of the event announcement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgYBQEo3Pr8&feature=youtu.be

Summary:

As the longer history of murders of trans women and cis-men in and around the Church-Wellesley village, many of whom were people of colour, hits the mainstream news, these questions once again arise: Whose lives are worth missing? Whose disappearances from spaces imagined as gay or LGBT are worth reporting and investigating? How are notions of innocence and violence, and horizons of redress and transformation, complicated when the perpetrator is both a gay man associated with the degenerate/regenerating urban space of the “gay village,” and a white cis-man whom dominant voices in the village, and to some extent the media and police, register as “one of us”? And how do our activist scholarly practices of archiving, curating and programming serve to unmap or reinscribe these practices?

This talk draws on the work of the Marvellous Grounds collective (Choi ed 2017, Haritaworn, Moussa, Ware and Rodriguez forthcoming, Haritaworn, Moussa and Ware forthcoming, Kaur Panag and Rodriguez eds 2016), a queer and trans Black, Indigenous and people of colour mapping and archiving project coming out of York University. In this archive, the successful territorialization of the “gay village” becomes apparent as an effect of a carceral city that is not only neoliberal, but also racial and colonial, and that treats low-income trans women of colour in particular as excessive. To queer urban justice in a lethal environment that is fluent in the languages of diversity, and to prefigure futures that go beyond these murderous inclusions, means to remember differently, and to step into the unfinished legacies of those who are rarely missed, and whose removal has been constitutive of urban and academic spaces designated “gay,” “LGBT” and, increasingly, “trans”.

Speaker bio:

Jin Haritaworn is Associate Professor of Gender, Race and Environment at York University. Their publications include two books, numerous articles (in journals such as GLQ and Society&Space), and several co/edited collections (including Queer Necropolitics and Queering Urban Justice). Their book, Queer Lovers and Hateful Others: Regenerating Violent Times and Places (Pluto 2015), on queer Berlin, addresses both academic and non-academic readerships interested in queer of colour spaces and communities. Jin has keynoted in several fields on both sides of the Atlantic, including gender, sexuality and transgender studies, critical race and ethnic studies, and urban studies, and has made foundational contributions to various debates, including on gay imperialism, homonationalism, queer gentrification and criminalization, and trans and queer of colour space.

Co-sponsors: Department of Social Justice in Education at OISE, UofT; York University CUPE 3903 Trans Caucus, Department of Politics, Department of Social Science, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Health, Faculty of Graduate Studies, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, Graduate Women's Studies Student Association, Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, School of Arts, Media, Performance and Design, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, SexGen York, Sexuality Studies, York Accessibility Fund, Office of the Vice-President Research & Innovation, & the Centre for Feminist Research.

This event is part of the TRANS MATTERS Interdisciplinary Trans Studies Graduate Student Conference, organized by the Centre for Feminist Research.

Accessibility & Attendance information:

FREE EVENT.

Limited amount of tokens available. ASL interpretation provided.

Wheelchair accessible space. Accessible and universal washroom.

To RSVP, please email juliapyr@yorku.ca.

Facebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/719075735148797/


  1. CFR Presents: TRANS MATTERS Conference Keynote Lecture - Holy Wild by Gwen Benaway (June 22nd/18, OISE Library)

The Centre for Feminist Research Presents:

TRANS MATTERS Interdisciplinary Trans Studies Graduate Student Conference Keynote

Lecture

Holy Wild

by Gwen Benaway

Date: June 22, 2018

Time: 11AM-12:30PM

Location: OISE Library, 1st floor, 252 Bloor St West

Please click here for the ASL translation of the event announcement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgYBQEo3Pr8&feature=youtu.be

Summary:

Holy Wild is a critical reflection on the embodied experience of Indigenous Queer and Trans subjects. Drawing on critical Indigenous and Trans scholarship, Holy Wild explores the contradictions, complexities, and impossibilities of being Indigenous, Trans, and Queer. I argue that mainstream Western Queerness is an extension of the colonial project, rooted in colonial thought and transmisogyny. Liberation for Indigenous and Trans subjects cannot arise from Queerness without a sustained engagement with the colonial past as well as the sexual economies of Queer desire. Using Indigenous storytelling and worldview, I interrogate the ways that Queerness does not hold Indigenous and trans experiences in their fullness. Holy Wild is a theoretical rupture of generative resistance. Unwilling to perform apology nor productiveness, this talk is intended to challenge the non-Indigenous Queer subject to a dialogue with their colonial depression.

Speaker bio:

Gwen Benaway is a trans girl poet of Anishinaabe and Métis descent. She has published two collections of poetry, Ceremonies for the Dead and Passage, and her third collection, Holy Wild, is forthcoming from BookThug in 2018. She has been described as the spiritual love child of Tomson Highway and Anne Sexton. She has received many distinctions and awards, including the Dayne Ogilvie Honour of Distinction for Emerging Queer Authors from the Writer's Trust of Canada. Her poetry and essays have been published in national publications and anthologies, including The Globe and Mail, Maclean's Magazine, CBC Arts, and many others.

Co-sponsors: Department of Social Justice in Education at OISE, UofT; York University CUPE 3903 Trans Caucus, Department of Politics, Department of Social Science, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Health, Faculty of Graduate Studies, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, Graduate Women's Studies Student Association, Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, School of Arts, Media, Performance and Design, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, SexGen York, Sexuality Studies, York Accessibility Fund, Office of the Vice-President Research & Innovation & the Centre for Feminist Research.

This event is part of the TRANS MATTERS Interdisciplinary Trans Studies Graduate Student Conference, organized by the Centre for Feminist Research.

Accessibility & Attendance information:

FREE EVENT.

Limited amount of tokens available. ASL interpretation provided.

Wheelchair accessible space. Accessible and universal washroom.

To RSVP, please email juliapyr@yorku.ca.

Facebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/357402901429925/


3.CFR and SJE at OISE Present: Speculation, Education, and Literature: Aspects of South Asian Women's Writing in the 20th and 21st Centuries by CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Barnita Bagchi (June 27th/18, OISE Nexus Lounge)

The Centre for Feminist Research (CFR) at York University & the Department of Social Justice Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto Present:

Speculation, Education, and Literature: Aspects of South Asian Women's Writing in the 20th and 21st Centuries

By CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Barnita Bagchi

Introduced by Dr. Himani Bannerji

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

4.30 - 6pm

OISE Nexus Lounge, 12th floor, 252 Bloor St West, Toronto

Dr. Bagchi investigates utopian and dystopian writing by South Asian feminist and activist women, in particular Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, from the first half of the 20th century, Lila Majumdar, from the second half of the 20th century, and Vandana Singh, from contemporary times. Utopian and dystopian fiction are classifiable under the umbrella term speculative fiction, fiction with an apocalyptic or futuristic feel, which speculates with or takes risks with the reality it creates in the fiction. Much of Dr. Bagchi's published research has analysed literary sources, especially speculative fiction, as integral parts of histories of women's education, with education seen as both formal and informal, and as lifelong learning and self-development. While the history of women’s education is not an established field in South Asian studies, women’s history is, and Dr. Bagchi's presentation situates itself within this tradition. With utopia articulating dreams of a better life and anticipations of the future, combining social and imaginative experimentation, the presentation seeks to synthesize non-Eurocentric feminist utopian studies, histories of women's education, and comparative literary approaches.

Accessibility & Attendance information:

FREE EVENT.

Wheelchair-accessible entrance, wheelchair-accessible elevator (south elevator).

Accessible washroom on 12th floor. All-gender washroom in Nexus lounge.

Click HERE for directions: https://goo.gl/maps/sHWgWc1cL7R2

To RSVP, please email juliapyr@yorku.ca.


-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

  1. Global and Community Engagement (GCE): Community Conversations (Liberal Arts and Professional Studies)

The Office of the Dean, Global and Community Engagement is expanding the recently launched exciting community engagement initiative, Community Conversations (CC).

Community Conversation is more than a public talk, instead, it facilitates and encourages inclusive dialogue on any topic that would be of interest to the community in which we reside. CC offers a platform for engagement with you as the host/moderator and the participants by sharing their knowledge of the topic, raising questions and concerns, adding experiences and expressing their lived realities.

Community Conversation is a unique way to disseminate your research in the community and receive direct feedback that can help inform and shift your research. Consider a cluster in your department/unit; consider community members as co-hosts; PhD and other students; co-investigators, etc.

Conversations can be held across the GTA and beyond in public spaces, e.g. cafés, libraries, community centers, etc.

If you would like to host a conversation, please contact Rowena Linton (lint169@yorku.ca) who will assist you through the process.

Website Link: http://laps.yorku.ca/laps-in-the-community/community-conversations/

Ebook Link: http://laps.yorku.ca/ebooks/


  1. Tri-Council: Equity, diversity and inclusion: an open letter to the research community / Équité, diversité et inclus ion : lettre ouverte au milieu de la recherche

Overview:

Starting this summer, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) are asking all applicants for funding competitions (grants, scholarships, and fellowships) to self-identify with information on age, gender, Indigenous identity, and status as a member of a visible minority group or person with a disability. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has also recently implemented this requirement.

The granting agencies already collect information on some identity factors. Currently, this information is incomplete, collected in different ways, and lacks comparability. To address these concerns, the granting agencies have agreed to use the same questions and categories of responses, which are closely aligned with the way similar data is collected by Statistics Canada.

Why self-identification data collection is important:

The collection of self-identification data is driven by the Government of Canada’s commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion in the federal research enterprise.

The changes to the collection of self-identification data is also being guided by?

  • The Canada Research Coordinating Committee’s work plan which includes “removing barriers faced by under-represented and disadvantaged groups to ensure equitable access across the granting agencies and establish Canada as a world leader in equity, diversity and inclusion in research”;
  • Budget 2018 which requires the granting agencies “to publish an annual report for Canadians on progress in addressing challenges in the research system, including equity and diversity, and support for researchers at various career stages”; and
  • Canada’s Fundamental Science Review’s recommendation 5. 2 which states that federal funding agencies “should collaborate to improve data collection and analysis”.

A harmonized self-identification data collection process allows the granting agencies to monitor the equity performance of its programs and design new measures that achieve greater equity, diversity and inclusion in the research enterprise.

What questions are included in the mandatory self-identification form?

The granting agencies will ask for the following information:

  1. Age - What is your date of birth?
  2. Gender – Select the option that you identify with, i.e. Woman; Man; or Gender-fluid, non-binary; and/or Two-Spirit
  3. Indigenous Identity – Do you identify as Indigenous - that is First Nations (North American Indian), Métis, or Inuit?
  4. Person with a disability – are you person with a disability?
  5. Visible Minority - Do you identify as a member of a visible minority in Canada?

Completing the self-identification form will be mandatory, but for each category there is an option for “I prefer not to answer.”

Privacy and Collection of Information

The self-identification information is collected, used, disclosed, retained and disposed of in accordance with the Privacy Act and the Access to Information Act. The information will be managed in accordance with Treasury Board Secretariat policies, directives and guidelines on information management and protection of personal information, and with the Agency’s retention and disposition schedules.

Choosing to self-identify or not will have no consequences for an application. In funding opportunities where the Agency may offer special consideration for members of a designated equity group, applicants will be asked to provide their consent separately to use their self-identification information for that purpose.

Appropriate privacy notices will be provided and consent obtained when the voluntary self-identification information is collected.

If you would like more information click on the link below: http://www.science.gc.ca/eic/site/063.nsf/eng/h_97615.html 


EVENTS:

  1. Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXIV (June 26th/18)

“Toronto’s most diverse poetry reading and open mic series”

Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXIV

Admission Fee: $5

Date: Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Time: 6:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Location: Church of St. Stephen in-the-Fields,

Address: 365 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2N8

Barrier-free space, with gendered-neutral washroom

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/163447331174638/

EVERYONE IS WELCOMED!

ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES:

Jenna Tenn-Yuk: writer, facilitator, performer, and speaker, storyteller and spoken word artist, contributor to the CBC, Huffington Post & Ottawa Citizen, 2014 Vancouver Biennale artist-in-residence, writing coach at Firefly Creative Writing.

Rajinderpal S. Pal: winner of the 1999 Writers Guild of Alberta Award for Best First Book, short-listed for W.O. Mitchell City of Calgary Book Prize & the Alberta Book Award for Best Book of Poetry, for his second collection, Pulse.


  1. Trauma-Informed Interventions through an Indigenous Worldview (June 26th/18)

Presented by: Brianna Olson, Social Worker

Date: Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Time: 1:00 to 2:15 PM EST

Click this link to register: www.vawlearningnetwork.ca/webinar-series

Description: An Indigenous worldview and perspective centers the holistic wellness of the individual as part of the collective community, and exists in relation to the natural world, spirit world and ancestors.  An Indigenous trauma-informed approach recognizes the social historical impacts that have disrupted Anishinaabe Bimatisiwin (Indigenous life), and the revitalization of this worldview that naturally encompasses strategies of anti-oppression, non-interference and client self-determination.

Join us as we learn about the brilliant mind-body connection, trauma responses, and intervention strategies from an Indigenous worldview.

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain a basic understanding of brain/body connection, survival responses and Indigenous philosophies of higher thought and wisdom.
  • Unpack and problematize western pathology in relation to trauma responses.
  • Consider approaches to supporting trauma rooted in a holistic paradigm.

CALLS: 

  1. Call for Participants: Study on Anti-Sexual Violence Education

Are you a current student or a recent graduate (within one year) who has taken anti-sexual violence education at your university or college? This could include violence against women awareness, a consent workshop, talk, or course, self-defense class, workshop for your sports team, or something similar. Participants must be between 18 and 30 years of age; interviews last approximately 30-45 minutes and take place in Toronto. Confidentiality is assured and a 10$ honorarium is provided.

This research aims to: examine the relationship between anti-sexual violence education and young people’s sexual practices; provide young adults with a chance to voice their experiences of and strategies in sexual negotiations; be conducted in a non-judgmental, open-style interview; and contribute to the development of sexual violence prevention efforts, and hopefully, better sex!

Research conducted by Dr. Tuulia Law, York University

To participate in an interview or for more information contact: tlaw@yorku.ca or 647-809-9178.


  1. Call for Submissions: Sick Theories: Sickness & Sexuality (Application Deadline: July 15th /18.)

Sick Theories: A Trans-Disciplinary Conference on Sickness & Sexuality

Sick Theories is a two-day trans-disciplinary colloquium organized by Margeaux Feldman (University of Toronto) and Lauren Fournier (York University) through the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto, to be held in the Fall of 2018.

Thursday, November 8 - Friday, November 9, 2018

The Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

In Sick Theories, we take up this word “sick” and the ways in which it is different from and/or similar to “ill” or “disabled.” As a word, illness operates to make the realities of sickness more palatable for the neoliberal, capitalist world that depends upon the oppression of the sick body and labels it as unproductive. Sickness demarcates the messiness, ugliness, and inexplicable nature of disease, bringing us back to the original meaning of disease as dis-ease. What does it mean to be sick, as opposed to being ill? What directions might critical disability studies, mad studies, sexual diversity studies, and queer theory take us as we reconsider what it means to be sick? With Sick Theories, we bring together scholars, writers, artists, activists, and educators to untangle the relationships between sickness and sexuality. We advocate intersectional feminist frameworks, and encourage submissions from across disciplines, including Sexual Diversity Studies, Critical Disability Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, English literature, Visual arts, Women’s Studies in Education, and Performance Studies. In this transdisciplinary meeting of folks from varied backgrounds, we want to emphasize the importance of having people who identify as sick, mad, disabled (and related identifiers).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Sick woman theory
  • Illness narratives
  • Disability activism
  • Mad studies
  • Critical disability studies
  • “Mad pride,” “crip pride,” and other movements
  • Pathologization of sickness
  • Sickness and neoliberalism
  • Sickness and relationships
  • Sickness, madness, and intersectionality
  • STIs and HIV
  • “Sick” as a discourse of perversion and non-normativity
  • Writing, inscribing, performing sickness
  • Discourses of care
  • Temporality of sickness; chronic illness and the recurrent and ongoing
  • Shifting discourses of mental health and mental illness
  • The circulation, dissemination, and sharing of knowledge around health and illness
  • Sickness, sexuality, and spirituality
  • Alternative approaches to healing and care
  • Failure
  • Abjection
  • Marginalized and misunderstood sickness
  • Pathology and perversion
  • Pain, pleasure, and jouissance
  • Boundaries and limits

We welcome you to submit paper proposals, as well as proposals for workshops. Please consider questions of accessibility in the workshop proposals, noting any space requirements or other accessibility parameters.

For paper proposals: please submit an abstract of 250 words as a Microsoft Word (DOC) file, along with a brief bio, to sicktheories@gmail.com

For workshop proposals: please include a description of the workshop (250 words), along with any logistical requirements and facilitation information, as a Microsoft Word (DOC) file, along with a brief bio, to sicktheories@gmail.com

As a trans-disciplinary colloquium, we also welcome submissions of visual arts, sound art, performance, installation, video, and film, for an art exhibition and screening.

For film/video submissions, please submit the file as a MOV or MP4; if it available to be viewed online, you can also send us a link to the video with any required passwords to view. Please provide us with the artist name, title, length, and any other pertinent media details, including screening requirements. Please submit a brief bio along with your submission, along with a brief description or artist statement about the work and how it pertains to the Sick Theories theme (250 words). Submit these materials to sicktheories@gmail.com

For all other arts submissions, please submit up to 10 images of the body of work you are proposing as JPEGs, along with a brief description or artist statement about the work and how it pertains to the Sick Theories theme (250 words). While we do not have specific file size requirements, we suggest sending images of as high a resolution as is possible to send (given gmail file size requirements and what files you have access to). Please submit a brief bio along with your submission.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: JULY 15, 2018

Keynotes to be announced later this summer.

The event space will be accessible, and we will be bringing in an ASL interpreter.

Please direct any questions to the conference organizers, Margeaux Feldman and Lauren Fournier, at sicktheories@gmail.com

Facebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/167999903867964/


  1. Call for Chapter Proposals: Transgender Narratives (Application Deadline: July 31st/18)

Co-editors Kristi Carter and James Brunton are in search of works concerning transgender experiences and issues that make them distinct from other narratives of identity within the LGBTQIA+ community. These pieces can be scholarly OR creative, by single or multiple authors, but all should be constructed with an undergraduate audience in mind.

As intersectionality becomes a more familiar discourse framework in both formal and informal channels of activism and conversation, we expect pieces to address multiple aspects of identity, but with a focus on transgender, gendernonconforming (GNC), genderqueer, or nonbinary (NB) narratives.

For this collection, we seek submissions in these areas, but are open to pieces that combine multiple areas or offer new ones:

  • Feminist Intersectional pedagogies for trans teachers and trans students
  • Transfeminine and transmasculine narratives
  • Transition narratives
  • Family Studies/Perspectives
  • Performance and representation in fashion, social media, pop culture
  • Materialist feminist critiques of gender/sexuality
  • Criticism of TERF activism
  • Intersections of race, gender, and class
  • Legal studies
  • Political activism/social movements
  • Creative works in any genre involving these or related issues

The co-editors Kristi Carter and James Brunton welcome individual and co-authored proposals and chapters (or creative works) from both established and emerging scholars, including graduate students.

Expected length of abstract: 200-250 words. Deadline: July 31st, 2018.

Expected length of scholarly pieces: 5,000-8,000 words.

Expected length of creative pieces: flexible, but not to exceed 8,000 words.

Proposed deadline for full chapters: September 30th, 2018.

Please submit to: transgenderanthology@gmail.com 


  1. The Artifice (Online Magazine)

The Artifice is an online magazine that covers a wide spectrum of art forms. It is collaboratively built and maintained by the writers. It is structured to let you focus on the quality of the content while it deals with the exposure of it to an audience of millions.

We are currently expanding and we would like to provide an opportunity for your students to join our team of writers.

Do you want to write about Movies, TV, Anime, Arts, Comics, Games, Literature or other art forms? Do you want to get your foot in the door and enter the big-wide world of the online media and have your work read and shared by millions of readers? We invite you to The Artifice: http://www.the-artifice.com

Instead of recycling the same entertainment news stories or publishing commonplace editorials, The Artifice focus on unique topics that are intellectually stimulating and meaningful.

Our current writers range from undergraduates, to graduates, to emeritus professors and a bit of everyone in between.

Grab the opportunity and join our team of writers. Join now: http://the-artifice.com/write/


  1.  Calls for Papers on Gun Violence and Gun Control: Demeter Press: (Abstract Deadline: October 15th/18)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Demeter Press is seeking submissions for an edited collection entitled Gun Violence and Gun Control: Critical Engagements Deadline for Abstracts: October 15, 2018

Overview:

This interdisciplinary anthology will contribute to documenting, intervening, and participating in contemporary conversations about gun violence and gun control. We envision the anthology will be an open and innovative space for critical discussion employing a variety of perspectives and approaches including feminist approaches, and also welcome creative, and activist submissions. The volume will be a distinct collection, highlighting a diversity of  critical viewpoints, which will also serve as a dynamic forum where creative and scholarly contributions are synthesized to more holistically address issues in this area.

Contributions are being sought from a wide range of fields, that includes: law and legal studies, psychology, sociology, anthropology, women's and gender studies, cultural studies, literary studies, as well as other disciplines within the social sciences and humanities, and may utilize a variety of methodological approaches. Creative submissions that engage with the issue of firearms' regulation, gang culture and gun violence, and gun violence general, are also encouraged.  These may include: works of fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry and artistic representations, in addition to traditional academic writing, which will all be welcome.

Submission Guidelines:

Please send abstracts of approximately 250 words, together with a 150 word biographical statement before October 15, 2018

Notification of decisions re: acceptance will be communicated on or before

December 30, 2018

Completed chapters, 15-20 double-spaced pages in length, are due on or before

May 1, 2019

Publication date will be: Fall, 2019

Please send any inquiries, as well as submissions, to: Rebecca.Bromwich@Carleton.ca


  1. Call for Papers on LGBTQ+ print within Canada: Bibliographical Society of Canada (Deadline for 200-word abstract and short biographical note: December 1st/18)

LGBTQ+ print in Canada: overviews and perspectives

Special Issue of the Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada

(to be published in Fall 2019)

In 1975, Toronto police morality squad ordered Issue 18 of The Body Politic off the shelves because of a cartoon depicting two men engaging in a sexual act. In early January 1978, the newsmagazine would again find itself at the centre of controversy when its publishers were charged with the use of the mails for transmitting indecent, immoral or scurrilous literature. The resulting court cases would transform and help modernize the country’s otherwise restrictive postal laws. At the height of the sexual liberation movement, The Body Politic would become the newsmagazine of record for Canada’s LGBTQ+ communities with a readership that extended well beyond the national border. As Don McLeod points out, however, The Body Politic is part of a surprising long legacy of LGBTQ+ print publishing in Canada2. The first homosexual periodical, GAY, began publishing in 1964. Around this time, several homophile groups also began publishing newsletters for their members, a tradition that still continues among many LGBTQ+ organizations, especially in Quebec, where LGBTQ+ print publishing is particularly important. Throughout the 1990s, the proliferation of reprographic and computer technologies facilitated the emergence of a strong tradition of zine publishing, including the ground-breaking gendertrash from hell, which gave voice to genderqueers outside of the lesbian and gay press. Indeed, the rise of LGBTQ+ print publishing coincides with the mobilization of the homophile, gay and lesbian rights, queer, and trans movements over the course of the last six decades.

For this special issue of the Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada, we invite submissions that explore the histories of LGBTQ+ print publishing in Canada. More general panoramas as well as case studies are welcome. Below are some illustrative topics (not limitive) that would be suitable for inclusion in the Special Issue:

  • The general conditions of production, dissemination and reception of LGBTQ+ print publishing in Canada;
  • The different formats of LGBTQ+ print publications, such as monographs, comic books, newspapers, magazines, bulletins, tabloids, pamphlets, posters, leaflets (many case studies are possible);
  • The LGBTQ+ publishers (or the specific series and collections edited by more general publishers);
  • LGBTQ+ publishing and new technologies;
  • The history and impact of Women’s and/or LGBTQ+ bookstores;
  • The challenge of LGBTQ+ print publications in public libraries and/or school libraries;
  • LGBTQ+ prints and censorship.

Submissions must include a 200-word abstract and short biographical note. They may be submitted in French or English no later than December 1, 2018. Articles should be no more than 9,000 words and follow the journal’s preferred referencing style (Chicago 16th ed.). For more information about the submission process or style guide, please refer to the Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada’s website.

For information and questions, please contact the two Special Issue’s editors: Nicholas Giguère (Nicholas.Giguere@USherbrooke.ca) and Rebecka Sheffield (rebecka@archivalobjects.com).


OPPORTUNITIES:

  1. York University position in Gender, Indigenous People and Feminism: (Application Deadline: August 15th/ 18)

The School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies (York University) acknowledges its presence on the traditional territory of many Indigenous Nations. The area known as Tkaronto has been care taken by the Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, the Huron-Wendat, and the Métis. It is now home to many Indigenous Peoples. We acknowledge the current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation. This territory is subject of the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement to peaceably share and care for the Great Lakes region.

The School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University (Toronto) invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of assistant professor in the field of Gender, Indigenous people and Feminism to commence July 1st, 2019.

The full posting can be found here: http://webapps.yorku.ca/academichiringviewer/viewposition.jsp?positionnumber=1789

For this position, all areas of expertise are open. The ideal applicant must include a PhD (or near completion) in Indigenous Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies and/or Sexuality Studies and/or related fields; must demonstrate engagement with Indigenous communities and in their research and teaching with knowledge of indigenous methodologies and pedagogies; and are expected to demonstrate excellence or the promise of excellence in scholarly research, teaching and service, and have publications appropriate to their stage of career. The successful candidate will be expected to teach interdisciplinary courses in their own areas of expertise as well as contribute to the program by teaching in some of our compulsory courses in the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies. The successful candidate must be eligible for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and to contribute to the School’s Graduate program of Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies.

The due date for this application is August, 15th 2018. Applications should be sent to Jacinthe Michaud, Chair or Sue Sbrizzi, Administrative Assistant of the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, 206 Founders, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3.

All York University positions are subject to budgetary approvals. York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA Program, which applies to Aboriginal people, visible minorities, people with disabilities, and women, can be found at www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or by calling the AA office at 416 736 5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply.


  1. Cuso International: International Volunteer Opportunities (Application Deadline Date:  August 15th/18)

Cuso International is a non-profit international development organization, working to improve the lives of people living with poverty and inequality around the globe. Each year we mobilize hundreds of volunteer professionals who work with local partners to create positive, lasting change.

At Cuso International, we believe that in order for communities to thrive, men and women must enjoy the same human rights and be given the same opportunities to participate in decisions that affect their lives. Gender equality is not only a Sustainable Development Goal and a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world.

We are currently seeking Gender Advisors to volunteer with our partners around the world for 6-12 months. We provide a comprehensive training program that prepares volunteers for the experience, along with a financial support package, including flights, accommodation and a stipend that allows for a safe and healthy lifestyle.

Cuso International’s Volunteer Placement Website Link: https://curawebservices.mindscope.com/CUSOIN04387_CURA/Aspx/JobSearch.aspx?lang=en&Industry=1008&EmploymentTypeID=1#utm_source=Centre%20for%20Feminist%20Research%20-%20York%20University


  1. Limited Places Remaining: Professional Certificate in Strategic Gender Equity Planning (running Sept 17th-21st/18|London, UK)

As the Post-2015 Agenda takes shape, gender forms a key component, the UN Secretary General noting that ‘in all countries, gender stereotypes, exclusion and discrimination continue to perpetuate inequality'.

Course Overview:

Gender issues have become increasingly integrated into development and sectoral policy planning, and have been proven to be a crucial component of building an innovative society and successful economy, as well as to securing international financial support for many organisations. Nevertheless, despite there being increased awareness of the economic, social and political damage caused by gender discrimination, the UN has noted that the ‘gains have been too slow and too uneven'. This course examines and analyses a broad range of issues, such as the relationship between gender and development, education and health.

A strategic approach will be taken, which will enable participants to identify key stakeholders, barriers and planning techniques to address gender inequality in all aspects of governance, business and society. Through practical case studies and discussions with leading practitioners, delegates will develop comprehensive and clear plans to facilitate gender equity within their organisation.

Upon completion of this week-long course and subsequent successful completion of CMI written tasks, the successful candidate will be awarded a Level 7 CMI certificate in Management & Leadership showing the CMI units achieved. The CMI is the only chartered professional body in the UK dedicated to promoting the highest standards in management and leadership excellence. The professional qualifications offered by the Institute are internationally recognised and sought after.

How You Will Benefit:

  • Analyse the role gender holds in development planning
  • Understand how to integrate gender equity into strategic planning processes
  • Consider legislative initiatives to improve gender equality and reduce discrimination
  • Evaluate the consequences of gender initiatives

Topics Include:

  • Addressing the barriers to functioning gendered governance systems
  • Ensuring gendered planning processes in emergency and fragile states
  • Gender and leadership
  • Gender and social development: identifying and addressing inequity
  • Developing legislation with gender sensitivity

For more information on the program click the link: http://genderequity.parlicentre.org/programme.php