CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, November 8, 2018

-----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1.    CFR Research Associate Dr. Tuulia Law publication: “Women and Gendered Violence in Canada: An intersectional approach” (2018) with Chris Bruckert
2.    CFR Graduate Associate Valerie Andrews Book Release: “White Unwed Mother: The Adoption Mandate in Postwar Canada” (November 2018)
3.    CFR Research Associate Dr. Patrick Alcedo’s Film "DANCING MANILENYOS" has won the Hollywood International Independent Documentary Award for Foreign Documentary Short. Screening at 401 Richmond Street West (November 13, 2018)
4.    CFR Research Associate Dr. Caroline Shenaz Hussein: Call for Chapters, “Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women: Understanding the Worldwide Phenomenon of ROSCAs (November 15, 2018)
5.    CFR Faculty Associate Dr. Shobna Nijhawan monograph: “Hindi Publishing in Colonial Lucknow: Gender, Genre, and Visuality in the Creation of a Literary 'Canon'” (December 2018)

EVENTS:
1.    CFR Co-Sponsored Book Launch: Sharing Breath: Embodied Learning and Decolonization, eds. Sheila Batacharya and Yuk-Lin Renita Wong (November 10, 2018)
2.    CFR Co-Sponsored: “Personal and Political: Stories from the Women’s Health Movement 1960-2010” with Dr. Lorraine Greaves (November 16, 2018)
3.    CFR Co-Sponsored: Community Film Screening of Face, the Other Side 얼굴, 그 맞은편 (November 17, 2018)

 OPPORTUNITIES:
1.    ORU Centre for Feminist Research Director position (November 16, 2018)
2.    Call for Nominations: Mary McEwan Memorial Award 2017-2018 (December 3, 2018)

-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1.    Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies Graduate Student Association Letter of Support for Mandi Gray
2.    Book Release: "Heavy Burdens: Stories of Motherhood and Fatness" Save 40% off until Nov. 15
3.    Applications Open for Mitacs-Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Program (November 21, 2018)

EVENTS:
1.    The City Seminar: Cities and Infrastructure- A One Day Workshop (November 8, 2018)
2.    Disability, Racism and Conceptions of the Jewish Body - Alternative Shabbes Potluck for Holocaust Education Week with Arielle Sugarman (November 9, 2018)
3.    Emerging Asian Urbanisms -Reading Discussion session on “Urban Informality” from “Poverty Capitol” (November 9, 2018)
4.    LGBTQ International Students Discussion: “My Mother Tongue” (November 12, 2018)
5.    Public Event: Community at Large: Contemporary Korean Art Talking about Communities (November 15, 2018)
6.    Book Launch: "Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice" with Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (November 15, 2018)
7.    Lunch Talk: Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies Presents Camille Gear Rich (USC Law) " Is it a man’s world? A feminist reimagining the right to free speech in the aftermath of the Charlottesville race riots" (November 16, 2018)
8.    Tamil Studies Symposium 2018 at York University: Tamil Pluralities-Interventions in Sameness in Critical Times (November 16-17, 2018)
9.    Kitty Lundy Memorial Lecture “Our Divide Is Inside Us” featuring Kinnie Starr (November 20, 2018)
10.    Film Screening: India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (November 22, 2018)
11.    Shab-e Sher (Poetry Night) 6th Anniversary (November 27, 2018)
12.    Save the Date: Annual Day of Persons with Disability Event (December 1, 2018)

CALLS:
1.    Call for Submissions: Made By Feminists / FAC Residency 2019 (November 14, 2018)
2.    Call for Proposals: Capacity-Building Fund at the Status of Women Canada (December 11, 2018)
3.    Call for Papers: Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium at University of Toronto (December 21, 2018)
4.    Call for Papers: CFP: HEART Conference “Locating the HEART and SOULS in Higher Education” An International Conference on the Future of the Humanities (January 11, 2018)
5.    Call for Papers: CFP: SOULS Conference “Locating the HEART and SOULS in Higher Education” An International Conference on the Future of the Humanities (January 11, 2018)
6.    Call for Applicants: University of Alberta Master’s Program in Gender and Social Justice Studies for 2019-2020 (January 15, 2019)
7.    Call for Proposals: Trans-Atlantic Platform (T-AP): Social Innovation Call for Proposals (January 31, 2019)
8.    Call for Papers: “Adoptionis Interruptus: Essays in Adoption and Sexuality” in “Adoption & Culture” (February 1, 2019)
9.    Call for Visiting Scholar Applications: Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center (March 1, 2019)

OPPORTUNITIES: 
1.    Job Opportunity: Tenure-Track Professorial-Stream Appointment in the Department of Politics, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, York University (November 12, 2018)
2.    Job Opportunity: Teaching and Learning Specialist (Indigenization Specialty) at The University of the Fraser Valley (November 14, 2018) – remove table
3.    Scholarship Opportunity: Laura Bassi Scholarship 2018/2019 (November 25, 2018)
4.    Job Opportunity: Tenure Stream Position in the History of the North American Continent at Dalhousie University, Department of History (December 10, 2018)
5.    Career Opportunity: Two Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs (CRC) (Indigenous Democracies, Democracy) at Ryerson University- Faculty of Arts (April 2019)


-----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1.    CFR Research Associate Dr. Tuulia Law publication: “Women and Gendered Violence in Canada: An intersectional approach” (2018) with Chris Bruckert
"Women and Gendered Violence in Canada: An intersectional approach by Chris Bruckert" (University of Ottawa, Criminology) and Tuulia Law (York University, Social Science) mobilizes the concepts of intersectionality and interlocking systems of oppression to unpack the ways violence inflicted on women is rooted in social, political, and economic systems that work through and with patriarchy, including colonialism, neoliberalism, capitalism, and national and global economies. From this point of departure it follows that women’s vulnerability to, and experience of, violence is shaped by intersecting aspects of their identities, social location, and negotiation (or rejection) of gender norms. Our use of the term gendered rather than gender-based violence reflects our conceptual framing; while gender is the unifying thread, the diverse instances and forms of violence women experience are rooted in a multiplicity of factors intersecting with gender. This allows us to include violence to which women are vulnerable that does not originate in gender but is a more indirect outcome of gender inequity and scripts (e.g., nurses’ experience of violence from patients and their families, violence for which they are routinely blamed by supervisors). It also broadens the scope of perpetration beyond individual men to violence committed by agents of the state (e.g., the neglect and abuse of Indigenous women by police), by women (e.g., domestic workers at the hands of their employers), by co-workers and customers in the workplace (e.g., the verbal violence endured by call-centre workers), indirectly as the result of policies (e.g., austerity measures that culminate in ill health), and emanating from the criminal justice system (e.g., the deployment of psychotropic medications to regulate incarcerated women).
https://utorontopress.com/ca/blog/tag/gendered-violence/
Congratulations, Tuulia!

2.    CFR Graduate Associate Valerie Andrews Book Release: “White Unwed Mother: The Adoption Mandate in Postwar Canada” (November 2018)

http://demeterpress.org/books/white-unwed-mother-the-adoption-mandate-in-postwar-canada/
Book synopsis:
In postwar Canada, having a child out-of-wedlock invariably meant being subject to the adoption mandate. Andrews describes the mandate as a process of interrelated institutional power systems that, together with sociocultural norms, ideals of gender heteronormativity, and emerging sociological and psychoanalytic theories, created historically unique conditions in the post WWII decades wherein the white unmarried mother was systematically separated from her baby by means of adoption.
This volume uncovers and substantiates evidence of the mandate in Canada, ultimately finding that at least 350,000 unmarried mothers in Canada were impacted by illegal and unethical adoption practices, human rights abuses, and violence against the maternal body.
Congratulations, Valerie!

3.    CFR Research Associate Dr. Patrick Alcedo’s Film "DANCING MANILENYOS" has won the Hollywood International Independent Documentary Award for Foreign Documentary Short. Screening at 401 Richmond Street West (November 13, 2018)
DANCING MANILENYOS
Patrick Alcedo • Canada • 2018 • 20 min • English
In Manila, a group of young Filipinos dreams of making it big in the ballet world. Amidst the city’s disparate social class, ballet teacher Luther hopes to lift his students out of poverty through artistic and life skills one learns from dancing.
Film trailer: https://vimeo.com/288229620
http://www.reelasian.com/festival-events/in-their-words/
Hollywood International Independent Documentary Award website: https://hiida.com/october-2018-winners.html
Congratulations, Patrick!

4.    CFR Research Associate Dr. Caroline Shenaz Hussein: Call for Chapters, “Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women: Understanding the Worldwide Phenomenon of ROSCAs (November 15, 2018)
Call for Chapters
"Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women: Understanding the Worldwide Phenomenon of ROSCAs"
Book Chapter Abstracts Due: 15th November 2018 (extended deadline) to chossein@yorku.ca
Editor is Caroline Shenaz Hossein, Associate Professor of Business & Society, York University, Toronto, Canada
Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women: Understanding the Worldwide Phenomenon of ROSCAs builds on the seminal edited work by Ardener and Burman Money go Rounds (1996) in which grass root activism through ROSCAs shows how banking joins up both the social and economic lives of women. Rotating and Savings Credit Associations (ROSCAs) are voluntary cooperatives that are purposely informal and carried out by people around the world for different reasons. Women are the ones who largely participate in these forms of diverse community economies as a way to provide self-help to each other, embrace cultural traditions and to counter exclusionary business. While there are ROSCAs engaged in helping women to cope with exclusion, the focus of Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women will be on the politicized acts of resistance in terms of women emancipating their voice through collective finance. Guided by Garveyism, ROSCAs in this volume are treated as acts of rebellion and defiance. Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women emphasizes women who use self-help and mutual aid in a calculated manner to advance projects-on their own terms. Such a take on ROSCAs is very much rooted in solidarity and social economics that is about TAKING BACK our economies. ROSCAs are an ancient institution practiced by almost every cultural group in the world. Yet the social economy literature has overlooked ROSCAs as the core to what social economics is all about. Instead, we know far more about individualized commercialized banks, which have only derailed the notion of group economics. The global financial crisis of 2007/08 and banking mess in Greece in 2015 are evidence that commercial banks are corrupt. ROSCAs are part of the diverse financial economies thinking that respects human beings and the money people make. Sensible women all over the West and in the Global South through their own pragmatic thinking are reorganizing banking. Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women will show how women stand up to commercialize finance and embrace diverse financial economies that are collective at its core. Women have defied societal norms to ‘modernize’ and they hold economic cooperation sacred when they choose to keep ROSCAs alive. This book will document the stories about ROSCAs from around the world. The cases must show how women around the globe organize ROSCAs, and give details of the mechanics of these groups in a specific cultural context. The book will document examples of ROSCAs in a case study format. Each case study examines the structure and the reasons why women in a certain cultural context use ROSCAs in spite of the modernity all around them. All chapter submissions should pay attention to cultural context and name the ROSCA that the women draw on to advance their own projects in spite of the pressures of conformity, commercialization and compliance to a modern system. Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women advances the thesis that solidarity banking is a legitimate form of assisting others, and can instruct formal financial institutions in ways to bring a human touch to how money is organized. All authors are to draw on feminist and racialized scholars thinking about diverse community economies on how to live well. Abstracts are to be 300 words. Due 15th November 2018 (extended!)—with earlier submission preferred. Full chapters are 5000-7000 words (exclusive of references) for peer review no later than 1st March 2019. All submissions subject to double-blind peer review and editorial review by an international expert panel. The chapters must have title, revised abstract, complete contact details and bibliography following MLA reference style and in 12 pt. font Times Roman. Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women will be published in a reputable press committed to diverse community economies. Solidarity Banking & Invincible Women will be of high quality like: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9781137602787
Editor: Caroline Shenaz Hossein is Associate Professor of Business & Society in the Department of Social Science at York University in Toronto, Canada. Author of Politicized Microfinance: Money, power and violence in the Black Americas (University of Toronto Press, 2016) Winner of the W.E.B Du Bois book award and editor of The Black Social Economy: Exploring community-based diverse markets (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018). See more at www.Caroline-Shenaz-Hossein.com
Questions go to chossein@yorku.ca

5.    CFR Faculty Associate Dr. Shobna Nijhawan monograph: Hindi Publishing in Colonial Lucknow: Gender, Genre, and Visuality in the Creation of a Literary 'Canon' (December 2018)
"Hindi Publishing in Colonial Lucknow" centers on the literary activities emerging out of the publishing house Ganga Pustak Mala in colonial Lucknow in the first half of the twentieth century. Closely associated with Ganga Pustak Mala was the Hindi monthly Sudha (lit. nectar, ambrosia), a literary, social, political and illustrated periodical, in which Hindi writings in prose and poetry, including Hindi literary criticism, and other activities concerning the Hindi public sphere, such as language politics, social reforms, matters concerning lifestyle, health, arts and sciences, and the political emancipation of women and men were promoted and developed. Building on the defining work of Gerard Genette on paratexts as well as on scholarship on text-image relationships, this book charts the literary networks established by the publishing house's proprietor and chief editor of Sudha, Dularelal Bhargava, who played a pivotal role in the emergence of Hindi literary production out of Lucknow and in the commercialization and nationalization of Hindi literature in the north Indian Hindi public sphere.
https://www.oupjapan.co.jp/en/node/24487


EVENTS:
1.    CFR Co-Sponsored Book Launch: "Sharing Breath: Embodied Learning and Decolonization," eds. Sheila Batacharya and Yuk-Lin Renita Wong (November 10, 2018)
CFR Co-Sponsored:
BOOK LAUNCH
"Sharing Breath: Embodied Learning and Decolonization" edited by Sheila Batacharya and Yuk-Lin Renita Wong
Date: Saturday, 10 November 2018
Time: 9:00–10:30 am
Location: Room 5–260
University of Toronto
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON M5S 1V6
Featuring a roundtable discussion that will address the process of generating academic scholarship and critique hegemonic modes of education.
Summary: Treating bodies as more than discursive in social research can feel out of place in academia. As a result, embodiment studies remain on the outside of academic knowledge construction and critical scholarship. However, embodiment scholars suggest that investigations into the profound division created by privileging the mind-intellect over the body-spirit are integral to the project of decolonization.
The field of embodiment theorizes bodies as knowledgeable in ways that include but are not solely cognitive. The contributors to this collection suggest developing embodied ways of teaching, learning, and knowing through embodied experiences such as yoga, mindfulness, illness, and trauma. Although the contributors challenge Western educational frameworks from within and beyond academic settings, they also acknowledge and draw attention to the incommensurability between decolonization and aspects of social justice projects in education. By addressing this tension ethically and deliberately, the contributors engage thoughtfully with decolonization and make a substantial, and sometimes unsettling, contribution to critical studies in education.
Sheila Batacharya completed her doctoral studies in Education, University of Toronto. Her scholarship in embodiment and embodied learning is fueled by her experiences teaching yoga and her curiosity and concern with articulating and practicing attunement to social-sentient embodied experiences in formal education and community contexts.
Yuk-Lin Renita Wong is a professor at the School of Social Work at York University. Her scholarship and teaching aim at deconstructing the power relations in the knowledge production and discursive practices of social work, and in re-centering marginalized ways of knowing and being.
Co-sponsored by: Athabasca University Press and OCAD University.

2.    CFR Co-Sponsored: “Personal and Political: Stories from the Women’s Health Movement 1960-2010” with Dr. Lorraine Greaves (November 16, 2018)
York University’s School of Nursing Invites you to a TALK and BOOK LAUNCH featuring:
Personal and Political: Stories from the Women’s Health Movement 1960-2010
With Dr. Lorraine Greaves (Centre of Excellence in Women’s Health)
Event Details FRIDAY NOV 16TH, 12:00
Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building Room 1005
88 The Pond Rd, North York, ON M3J 2S5
Refreshments Provided.
Books available.
* RSVP by 14 November to owhchair@yorku.ca
This book...
➢ Examines the role of feminism in transforming the healthcare system in Canada
➢ Analyses the "second wave" women's health movement in Canada between 1960 and 2010
➢ Describes how this feminist movement challenged diagnoses, treatments, regulations, policies, laws, and research
Co-sponsored by: The School of Nursing, Women's Health Research Chair in Mental Health Office, Health and Society, LAPS Health Policy & Management, Faculty of Health at York University; The Feminist History Society; and Second Story Press.

3.    CFR Co-Sponsored Event: Community Film Screening of “Face, the Other Side” 얼굴, 그 맞은편(November 17, 2018)
Film screening: 2:45 PM - 4:15 PM
Discussion and Q&A with Director LEE Sun Hee: 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
* Event is presented bilingually, in both English and Korean: film screening has Korean audio with English subtitles; Discussion/Q&A will have a Korean/English interpretation
Location: Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave, Toronto.
Registration: click "Tickets (FREE)" button or go to
https://face-the-other-side.eventbrite.ca
Presented by:
The Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK)
The Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies
Women Initiate New Domains (WIND)
Co-Sponsors:
The East Asian Studies Department at the University of Toronto
York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR)
Centre for Feminist Research at York University (CFR)
The Cinema Studies Student Union (CINSSU)
Film Synopsis:
The culture of men watching illegally filmed videos of sexual violence is becoming a huge problem in Korea. Videos of sexual intercourse filmed without the consent of women are publicly shared on illegal sex violence video sites. Female victims of these videos are branded as ‘something-something girl’ and become content products that are bought without copyrights. These transactions have created a huge market. Women can’t help but live in constant fear of getting their exposed bodies or sexual intercourses filmed anywhere, anytime, by anyone. Yet, the police are tepid with investigations and punishments, and consequently, female victims’ lives are destroyed psychologically, socially, and financially. Infuriated by reality, some ordinary women have turned into political feminist warriors. Getting by with part-time jobs, they voluntarily gather together and spend countless hours trying to identify the faces of the consumers of illegal videos so that they can collect enough evidence to report to the police. They also erase the victims’ videos and help them restore their life. Face, the Other Side goes beyond investigative reporting rather than simply unearthing the criminal cartel that consumes, produces, and distributes sexual violence videos. The film is an empowering story of young women growing into feminists and activists to reclaim the control of their bodies. They are the ones who change the world.
Director Bio:
LEE Sun Hee
Femi-tator – it is a word that I coined, as well as a value, and an occupation. My job is to organize and systematize women’s indignation. I write, make speeches, and sometimes bring my camera around to make documentaries, and dream of a world where feminism is common sense. In a few years, I hope to see NAH Hye-suk, the protagonist of my screenplay, Draw the Light, from long ago, on the screen and saying the line, “Virginity isn’t my hobby.”


OPPORTUNITIES:
1.    ORU Centre for Feminist Research Director position (Deadline November 16, 2018)
Applications are invited for the position of Director of the Centre for Feminist Research for a term of five years, to begin July 1, 2019.
ORU Description and History:
Established in 1991, the Centre for Feminist Research/ Le Centre de recherches féministes is an internationally recognized Center for research on gender, race, class, indigeneity, disability, sexuality, and women's issues. Its mandate is to promote feminist activities and collaborative research at York University by working to establish research linkages between York scholars and local, national, international and transnational communities. CFR carries out its mandate by supporting individual and collaborative research, developing research materials, communicating research results, providing opportunities and training for graduate students, fostering relationships with community organizations and government personnel, and through hosting visiting scholars from outside the university.
Position Requirements:
Applicants are expected to be members of the full-time faculty at York University, and to have a distinguished record of scholarship and research interests. The Director is expected to administer the financial, organizational and academic and collegial activities of the ORU, to develop external funding sources, and to maintain an active individual and collaborative research program.
Stipend:
The successful applicant will receive an administrative stipend and the appropriate course load reduction as stipulated by the YUFA or OHFA Collective Agreement. The Director of the Centre reports to the Associate Vice-President Research.
Application Process:
Applications should be sent to Emma Yuen (Operations Coordinator, Office of the Vice-President Research & Innovation) at emmay@yorku.ca.
Applications must include:
• Curriculum vitae
• Statement about vision for the Centre including goals, objectives, strategy of action and leadership style
• Names of three referees who may be contacted
Applications and nominations must be received by November 16, 2018.

2.    Call for Nominations: Mary McEwan Memorial Award 2017-2018 (December 3, 2018)
Please note: The following is an announcement for a PhD dissertation award.
DESCRIPTION OF AWARD
Named in honour of Dr. Mary McEwan, a feminist psychiatrist, this annual award of $1,000.00 will be awarded to one PhD dissertation produced in 2017-18 at York University in the area of feminist scholarship. An Awards Committee of faculty affiliated with the Centre will choose the winners.
If you have dissertations that were recommended for awards in 2017-18 (dissertations defended between September 1 2017 and September 30, 2018 are eligible), please consider putting them forward for this award. The submission deadline is Monday, December 3, 2018.
CRITERIA OF ELIGIBILITY
1. Must be a graduate student who has successfully defended a dissertation during the 2017-18 academic year.
2. The nominee's dissertation must concern feminist theory and/or gender issues.
3. The examining committee for the dissertation must unanimously recommend it for an award.
PROCEDURE FOR NOMINATION
Each nomination must include:
1. A copy of the dissertation and no more than a one-page statement from the nominee about the contribution the dissertation makes to feminist scholarship.
2. A letter of recommendation from the student's Supervisor commenting on the nominee's dissertation or thesis.
3. A statement from the Graduate Program Director noting that the nominee's dissertation was recommended as one that should be considered for a prize.
4. A copy of the external examiner’s report.
PROCEDURE FOR SUBMISSION
Nominations must be received by Julia Pyryeskina, Coordinator, Centre for Feminist Research, 611 York Research Tower no later than Monday, December 3, 2018.
Submissions and questions can be made via email to juliapyr@yorku.ca.


-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1.    Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies Graduate Student Association Letter of Support for Mandi Gray
25 October 2018

Open letter from the Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies Graduate Student Association:
We are writing to condemn the York University administration’s decision to end their partnership with the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic after less than a year. This decision breaches the terms of the settlement reached between the university and Mandi Gray in response to her Ontario Human Rights complaint. The settlement stipulates that the university will partner with the Clinic to provide counselling for survivors of sexual violence for four years. The Schlifer Clinic has supported survivors of violence for over 30 years. Based on their history and experience, the Clinic is well-equipped to provide survivor-led, trauma-informed counselling for survivors in our campus community. We are concerned that administration’s decision to end this partnership will leave survivors without access to adequate support on our campus.  Further, we are dismayed by the administration’s lack of transparency regarding their decision to end this partnership. This approach is consistent with the way that the administration publicly introduced the partnership. Specifically, they made no mention of its origins as a condition of the Human Rights complaint settlement and instead framed the partnership as a benevolent and voluntary commitment. Survivors on our campus deserve better. We unequivocally support Mandi Gray in her efforts to hold the administration accountable to the terms of the settlement. At the same time, we are outraged that the work of ensuring that there are adequate supports for survivors of sexual violence on our campus continues to fall on students. We urge the administration to reconsider their decision to end the partnership with the Schlifer Clinic and to take seriously their responsibility to provide support services for survivors of sexual violence.

2.    Book Release: "Heavy Burdens: Stories of Motherhood and Fatness" Save 40% off until Nov. 15
Demeter Press presents the release of "Heavy Burdens: Stories of Motherhood and Fatness" Edited by Judy Verseghy and Sam Abel. The book may be purchased for 40% off the listed price directly from our website until Nov. 15. Please use coupon code MOTHERS to save.
http://demeterpress.org/books/heavy-burdens-stories-of-motherhood-and-fatness/
Heavy Burdens: Stories of Motherhood and Fatness seeks to address the systemic ways in which the moral panic around "obesity" impacts fat mothers and fat children. Taking a life-course approach, the book begins with analyses of the ways in which fatphobia is enacted on pregnant (or even not-yet-pregnant) women, whose bodies immediately become viewed as objects warranting external control by not only medical professionals, but family members, and even passers-by. The story unfolds as adults recount childhood stories of growing up fat, or growing up in fear of being fat, and how their mothers' relationships with their own bodies and attempted weight-loss experiences shaped how food, exercise, and body management were approached in their homes in sometimes harmful ways. Finally, the book concludes with stories of women who have since become mothers, examining the ways in which having their own children altered their views on their own bodies and their perceptions of their mothers' actions, and working to find fat-friendly futures via their own parenting (or grand-parenting) techniques.
This book contains the artwork, stories, and analyses of nearly 20 contributors, all of whom seek to change the ways in which fatness is perceived, experienced, and vilified. It is the editors' hope that these works will compel readers to reconsider their negative views on fatness and to retain softness toward every mother and child who are simply fighting to exist in the face of fatphobia.

3.     Applications Open for Mitacs-Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Program (November 21, 2018)
Mitacs is accepting applications for the Mitacs-Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Program, which supports researchers in Canada to undertake 10-week research projects in Japan in summer of 2019.  A summary is provided below.
Objectives
To provide the opportunity for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in Canada to pursue collaborative research in Japan, allowing them to advance their own research while promoting scientific progress in both Japan and Canada
Value
•    Round-trip airfare, maintenance allowance (534,000 yen, less $3,000 CAD from Mitacs paid to the Canadian home university), as well as hotel room charges at Narita and Tokyo, and meals and accommodation charges in SOKENDAI.
•    Insurance during participant’s stay in Japan
•    A research support allowance for up to 158,500 yen for the host supervisor’s research related-expenses
Duration
10 weeks (from June 11 to August 21, 2019)
Deadlines
Submission to ORS – November 21, 2018
Submission to agency – December 5, 2018 by 5pm PT
For further information please visit the following web page:
https://www.mitacs.ca/en/programs/globalink/mitacs-jsps-summer-program?utm_source=call&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GRAJSPSCall-Oct102018-CanadianContacts


EVENTS:
1.    The City Seminar: Cities and Infrastructure- A One Day Workshop (November 8, 2018)
The City Seminar
An interdisciplinary series of presentations and discussions on urban landscapes, past and present.
Cities and Infrastructure: a one-day workshop
This one day workshop will think through the different ways in which infrastructure comes to be present in cities, the nature of its relationship with urbanization and how this might involve, perhaps even necessitate, a rethinking of the concept itself. It will bring together colleagues from across the universities of Toronto to compare and exchange conceptual, empirical and methodological insights on the past, present or future work on infrastructure.
Themes include, but are not limited to: incremental infrastructures, informational infrastructures, infrastructure as visioning and worlding strategy, infrastructural citizenship, infrastructural finance, infrastructure and global urbanisms/global sub-urbanisms, infrastructure and statecraft, and infrastructure and sustainable urbanism.
Speakers:
Ranu Basu (York University), Deborah Cowen (University of Toronto), Theresa Enright (University of Toronto), Roger Keil (York University), Matti Siemiatycki (University of Toronto), Linda Peake (York University), David Roberts (University of Toronto) and Kevin Ward (University of Manchester)
Thursday November 8, 2018
10am – 4pm
305 York Lanes
Everyone is welcome

2.    Disability, Racism and Conceptions of the Jewish Body - Alternative Shabbes Potluck for Holocaust Education Week with Arielle Sugarman (November 9, 2018)
Friday Nov 9 @ 6:30 pm
Venue: Dixon Senior Common Room (135A),
Wetmore Hall, 300 Huron St, UofT
Accessible Entrance on Classic Avenue
Disabled people were some of the earliest victims of the Nazi regime. This interactive talk will trace the history of the early treatment of Disabled persons in Europe, the connections made between Disabled folks and Jews, often based in "race science," eugenics, and ableism — and how this kind of thinking continues to inform racist and ableist norms today. We will examine the creation of identities such as the “Muscle Jew,” the “New Jew” and the “Sabra.”
Bring a dish to share, UJPO will provide challah and ceremonial wine and grape juice. $5 or PWYC — All are welcome
RSVP is appreciated: info@winchevskycentre.org
Sponsored by the United Jewish People’s Order (UJPO) – Toronto

3.    Emerging Asian Urbanisms -Reading Discussion session on “Urban Informality” from “Poverty Capitol” (November 9, 2018)
Emerging Asian Urbanisms
Reading Discussion Sessions
Fall 2018 | Date/location details below
The Fall term reading discussion sessions will follow the foundation theories and in depth work of Jennifer Robinson, Ananya Roy and AbdouMaliq Simone on the processes of urban development, planning and contestation across the continent. It aims to engage graduate students and faculty from different disciplines in exploring global south interventions and the post-colonial in urban theory.
In the Winter 2019 term, there will be an opportunity for participants to synthesize the work and present at roundtable events.
Please RSVP to amarkaur@yorku.ca.
Friday, 9 November 2018 | 1 to 3pm | Room 280A, Second Floor, York Lanes - Ananya Roy
Article: Urban Informality
Book: Poverty Capital
Expansion Piece: Bhan, Gautam (2009). ‘This Is No Longer the City I Once Knew’. Evictions, the Urban Poor and the Right  to the City in Millennial Delhi. Environment and Urbanization 21 (1): 127–42.
Facilitator: Nabeel Ahmed
ABOUT: The Emerging Asian Urbanisms series at the York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR) explores the diverse processes and practices of urbanism and urbanization in Asia. It draws upon calls made by Ananya Roy and Jennifer Robinson, among others, to investigate “new geographies of theory” as fertile sources of uncovering new ways of understanding urbanism everywhere. To RSVP: https://goo.gl/forms/H6ltw1qQDnZAAfWk1

4.    LGBTQ International Students Discussion: “My Mother Tongue” (November 12, 2018)
Monday, November 12, 2018 from 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm at 21 Sussex Avenue, Room 421 (Jim Delaney Lounge)
Join the LGBTQ+ International Students Group for a discussion about navigating spaces with our different languages, accents and cultures.
Are there people who sound like you in LGBTQ+ spaces you have been in?
How does the way you speak impact your experiences within different spaces at U of T and in Toronto?
Share your experiences and hear from other students. LGBTQ International Students events are organized by the Sexual & Gender Diversity Office (SGDO) and the Centre for International Experience (CIE) at the University of Toronto. This group exists to help build a network of students, identify needs, and foster a community on campus. Through the LGBTQ International Student group you will connect with others through fun and exciting activities!

5.    Public Event: Community at Large: Contemporary Korean Art Talking about Communities (November 15, 2018)
Community at Large: Contemporary Korean Art Talking about Communities
Thursday, 15 November 2018 | Noon to 2pm | Room 857, Eighth Floor, Kaneff Tower | York University
In this talk, Jieun Rhee will introduce three contemporary South Korean artists/art collectives in South Korea—Okin Collective, Mixrice, and Siren Eun Young Jung—whose art activities have evolved around changes and challenges that the communities have undergone in the processes of the turbulent history of modern South Korea.
Jieun Rhee is professor in the department of Art History at Myongji University, Seoul, Korea. She published articles on contemporary Asian Art in various journals such as Art History (Blackwell, London), Oriental Art (Singapore), N. Paradoxa (London), Art Theory and Practice (Seoul) and book chapters such as Feminism Art Theory: An Anthology 1968-2014 (Wiley-Blackwell). She is also the author of The Five Senses in Contemporary Art (Gamgakui Misulkwan, Seoul, 2012). Dr. Rhee is currently a visiting scholar at the History, Theory, and Criticism of Architecture and Art Program at MIT.
The event will be presented in English
This talk is organized by the Korea in the World, the World in Korea project at York University. It is funded by the Academy of Korean Studies and presented with the support of the York Centre for Asian Research.
For more information: kminyo@yorku.ca

6.    Book Launch: "Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice" with Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (November 15, 2018)
Another Story Bookshop the Unifor National Chair in Social Justice and Democracy, Ryerson University present the Toronto launch for:
CARE WORK: DREAMING DISABILITY JUSTICE by Leah Piepzna-Samarasinha
with disability justice arts/ activism/futures conversation with Leah, Syrus Marcus Ware and Wy-Joung Kou
Thursday, November 15, 2018, Eaton Lecture Hall, Ryerson University
Rogers Communications Centre, 80 Gould Street RCC-204, T'karonto/ Toronto ON
Free public event
www.anotherstory.ca
7 PM- 9 PM
Reading, conversation, books for sale and book signing.
Co-sponsored by the School of Disability Studies and The Office of the Vice-President, Equity and Community Inclusion, Ryerson University and Arsenal Pulp Press
Access info: The Eaton Lecture Hall is wheelchair accessible including bathrooms. ASL interpretation will be provided. Live captioning (CART) will be provided. We will have Tokens will be available. Please come fragrance free (leaving off cologne/perfume at minimum). We will have on-site childcare, please register by emailing anjulagogia@gmail.com with ages and number of children.
What the hell is disability justice? How does it intersect with healing justice and other movements for liberation? How do collective care, disability justice and sick and disabled Black and brown femmes save the world and each other during this time of apocalypse- or do we? Come discuss these and other provocative questions with writer, activist and cultural worker Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha and artist and activists Wy-Joung Kou and Syrus Marcus Ware, and celebrate this long-awaited, beautiful new book.
About the book:
In Care Work, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha outlines what it means to create spaces by and for sick and disabled queer people of colour, and creative "collective access"—access not as a chore but as a collective responsibility and pleasure –in our communities and political movements. Care Work is a mapping of access as radical love, a celebration of the work that sick and disabled queer/people of colour are doing to find each other and to build power and community, and a toolkit for everyone who wants to build radically resilient, sustainable communities of liberation where no one is left behind.

7.    Lunch Talk: Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies Presents Camille Gear Rich (USC Law) "is it a man’s world? A feminist reimagining the right to free speech in the aftermath of the Charlottesville race riots" (November 16, 2018)
Please join the Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies for this lunch talk  on November 16 - do RSVP for space & catering purposes
OSGOODE INSTITUTE FOR FEMINIST LEGAL STUDIES
SPEAKER SERIES 2018-2019
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 16 2018
1230 -2PM | ROOM 4034
Osgoode Hall Law School
Lunch served.  Please RSVP https://bit.ly/2P24sja
CAMILLE GEAR RICH, USC GOULD SCHOOL OF LAW
IS IT A MAN’S WORLD? A FEMINIST REIMAGINING THE RIGHT TO FREE SPEECH IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE RACE RIOTS
Camille Gear Rich’s research and teaching interests include constitutional law, feminist legal theory, family law, children and the law and the First Amendment. She is the founder and director of PRISM: The USC Initiative for the Study of Race, Gender, Sexuality and the Law. She is also the founding director of Gould's First Generation Legal Professionals program. Rich is widely know for her research on law, discrimination and identity formation issues related to race, class, gender and sexuality.
Follow the IFLS via our website: https://ifls.osgoode.yorku.ca/
Or on twitter @OsgoodeIFLS
Save the Dates for upcoming speakers in this series:
Thursday January 17 Alice Woolley, University of Calgary Law, Nasty Women & The Rule of Law “…the reasons for and consequences of how we talk about women lawyers.”
Wednesday, January 25 Catherine Hernandez, author of Scarborough “in conversation” about Access to Justice and Building Community in the absence of institutions.

8.    Tamil Studies Symposium 2018 at York University: Tamil Pluralities-Interventions in Sameness in Critical Times (November 16-17, 2018)
Tamil Pluralities: Interventions in Sameness in Critical Times
Tamil Studies Symposium 2018 at York University
Friday, 16 November 2018 || Room 140, HNES Building
Saturday, 17 November 2018 || 152 Founders College (Founders Assembly Hall)
Nov. 18-24 | 'When Memory Lives' Visual Art & Photography Exhibit | Artscape Youngplace
Organized by the Tamil Symposium Collective with support from: York Centre for Asian Research, James Bennett Financial, South Asian Legal Clinic Ontario, Council of Agencies Serving South Asians, and the Department of Humanities
More information: https://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/event/tamil-studies-symposium-2018/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/TamilStudiesYork/

9.    Kitty Lundy Memorial Lecture “Our Divide Is Inside Us” featuring Kinnie Starr (November 20, 2018)
You are invited to the Kitty Lundy Memorial Lecture “OUR DIVIDE IS INSIDE US.” Performance & Lecture featuring Kinnie Starr.
Date: Tuesday, November 20, 2018 | Doors open at 4 pm | Performance at 4:30pm sharp | ALL WELCOME
Location: Sandra Faire & Ivan Fecan Theatre, Accolade East Building, York University’s Keele Campus
Reception with refreshments to follow.
The 2018 Kitty Lundy Memorial Lecture features artist and activist Kinnie Starr to speak with and perform for the York University community. Starr’s career as a visual artist, musician, published author and spoken word artist has taken her around the world. Her current visual work touches on her areas of interest in race, home, family and humanity. She has worked in youth arts activism and mentorship and aims towards helping LGBT and First Nations youth—and ALL kids—find their voice and power.
For more information visit yorku.ca/laps/lundy

10.    Film Screening: India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (November 22, 2018)
Date and Time: Thursday, November 22, 2018 @ 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Location: Room 280N, York Lanes, York University
RSVP on our facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/261619971363334/
Synopsis
This documentary takes a comprehensive look at the “untouchables” in India. While the media projects a positive image of a democratic India, filmmaker Stalin K spends four years traveling the country to expose the continued oppression of the Dalits, “the broken people,” in a wide variety of communities, including Sikhs, Christians, and Muslims.
This event is presented by the YUGSA and ACE (Accessibility Community and Equity) with support from the York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR).

11.   Shab-e Sher (Poetry Night) 6th Anniversary (November 27, 2018)
Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) 6th Anniversary
Toronto’s most diverse & brave poetry reading and open mic series
Featured poets: Erin Kang & Gavin Barrett
Featured musician: Lata Swarn
Hosts:
Shab-e She’r strongly supports diversity, inclusion and courage in our line-up of features as well as our open mic participants. We have been doing that since our inception (Nov. 2012) without compromising freedom of expression.
Tranzac Club is an accessible venue with no stairs (aside from the stage) and they have two accessible gender neutral washrooms.
Zan & Terese Pierre
Time: Tuesday, November 27, 2018
Place: Tranzac Club, 292 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2M7
Main Hall
Doors open               6:15 p.m.
Open-mic sign-up     6:30 p.m.
Show                         7-10 p.m.
Admission: $5
Erin Kang  poet & storyteller, community organizer, and facilitator, founder of the grassroots project: Stories of Ours
Gavin Barrett  writer, creative director & entrepreneur, co-founder of idea consultancy& brand advertising agency barrettandwelsh
Lata Swarn Indian sitar player, poet & short story writer, music competitions judge, lecturer and music teacher
Shab-e She’r strongly supports diversity, inclusion and courage in our line-up of features as well as our open mic participants. We have been doing that since our inception (Nov. 2012) without compromising freedom of expression.
Tranzac Club is an accessible venue with no stairs (aside from the stage) and they have two accessible gender neutral washrooms.
Twitter: @BanooZan & @ShabeSherTO
Instagram: @banoo.zan

12.    Save the Date: Annual Day of Persons with Disability Event (December 1, 2018)
3rd Annual International Day of Persons with Disabilities Event
Date: Saturday Dec 1st, 2018
Time: 2-4PM
Location: Metro Hall, 55 John St., Rooms 308-309
FREE! Light refreshments will be provided
ACCESS Information:
Location is wheelchair accessible.
ASL and Live-Captioning will be available.
Attendant services will be available.
Facebook event page www.facebook.com/events/334867267303289
Register now at https://goo.gl/HfnCBf
For information about volunteering at the event registration table or to help attendees with way finding, please email uoftsba@gmail.com


CALLS:
1.    Call for Submissions: Made By Feminists / FAC Residency 2019 (November 14, 2018)
Feminist Art Collective (FAC), in partnership with the Gladstone Hotel, presents
Made By Feminists
Gladstone Hotel Ballroom
November 18, 10am - 4pm
A market of locally made, affordable DIY feminist creations with socially-minded programming, Made by Feminists provides an egalitarian and inclusive space for artists and art lovers to engage without the high cost of participation.
21 makers will offer their works for sale with an emphasis on sustainability and eco-consciousness. Works include housewares and home decor, fashion and accessories, jewelry, skin care and body products, paintings, illustrations, cards, prints, pins, and more!
Particpating Makers:
Amy Duval
Femmeboyant Designs
Homebody Collective
Incense Republic
Jessica’s Creatures
Laura Pitkanen
Luuee
Michelle Gauthier Aritistry
Monster Cliche
Monster Maiden Zines
Morgane Duchêne Ramsay
Natalie Very B
Sasa Naturals
Shebly McLeod
The Original Smiths
Tomato Frog Collective
Wild Moon
Wool and Stone
WooWoo Lab
Young Pup Lingerie
FAC Residency 2019 Call For Submissions DEADLINE NOV 14
Submissions DUE in one week! Nov 14, 2018. Click here for full details.
The FAC residency will gather artists together May 13th to 27th on Toronto Island. We are asking for participants whose art focuses on social justice issues such as rape culture, transphobia, racism, ableism, ageism, media representation, cultural appropriation, environmental degradation and impact on Indigenous lands, gender-based violence, and Islamophobic policies. We aim to create a space that is positive, celebratory, intellectually engaging and provocative. We are committed to this space being trans-inclusive, anti-racist, and intersectional. The residency will include individual studio time accented with group discussions, communal dinners, film, guest speakers, group and individual critiques and trips into Toronto for gallery tours and relevant events. The resulting residency work will be presented in a community exhibition at the end of the two weeks.

2.    Call for Proposals: Capacity-Building Fund at the Status of Women Canada (December 11, 2018)
About the capacity-building call for proposals
Status of Women Canada’s Women’s Program
Status of Women Canada works to advance equality for women and girls in Canada. One of the ways it does this is through the Women’s Program, which provides funding for organizations to advance equality between women and men in the economic, social and democratic life of Canada.
Capacity-Building Call for Proposals
The objective of this Call for Proposals (CFP) is to fund proposals that will increase the capacity of eligible women’s and Indigenous organizations whose initiatives contribute to a viable women’s movement in Canada to advance gender equality. Funding will increase organizational capacity and help organizations work collectively to address gender equality issues.
Open Call for Proposals
Status of Women Canada is pleased to invite eligible organizations to submit applications for funding through the Capacity-building Fund of the Women’s Program.
You will find details on the call, application, and review process in the Applicant Guide. You are strongly encouraged to read the Applicant Guide prior to filling out the Application for Funding. You may consult the Questions and Answers for more information.
Deadline for submission: December 11, 2018, at 11:59 a.m. Pacific Time
Notes: Funded projects are expected to begin in winter 2019. Eligible organizations may submit a maximum of one (1) Application for Funding in this CFP.
Information sessions
Please consult the Information Sessions Schedule to view available sessions. These sessions are meant to complement information provided in the Applicant Guide. Organizations can also participate in the sessions by teleconference.
Enquiries
If you have enquiries about this CFP process, please contact your Status of Women Canada office.

3.    Call For Papers: Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium at University of Toronto (December 21, 2018)
CALL FOR PAPERS
The Graduate Union of the Students of Art  (GUStA) at the University of Toronto is pleased to present the Sixth Annual Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium on March 15th, 2019 titled, "Confronting the Exhibitionary Order."
Friday March 15, 2019
East Common Room Hart House
7 Hart House Circle
University of Toronto
Toronto, ON M5S 3H3
Deadline for abstract submission: Dec 21, 2018
Introductory Address: Dr. Elizabeth Harney, Professor, art historian, and curator
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Julie Crooks, Independent scholar, art historian, and curator
To know what properly appertains to one individual is to have before one the classification -or the possibility of classifying- all others.” - Michel Foucault in The Order of Things
The theme of this year’s graduate symposium is “Exhibitionary Orders.” We welcome innovative contributions that critically engage with the history of exhibitionary orders and classification systems as tools for defining, ordering, and representing the world as an endless exhibition. The classification systems that helped inform modernism were dependent on comparative cognitive shortcuts and coded stereotypes that lay claim to the superiority and accomplishments of western civilization. This symposium seeks to question how the creation, presentation, and dissemination of visual and material culture and knowledge has resulted in the perpetuation of problematic imperial hierarchies. Debates around reparations continue to percolate in today’s political climate, urging us to interrogate the display tactics of museums, galleries, and biennials, as well as larger questions of exhibitionary orders in the world.
Potential themes may include, but are not limited to:
•    World exhibitions as sites for the creation, dissemination and transfer of knowledge
•    Colonial exhibitions and the development of museums, display tactics, and exhibitionary order
•    Ethnography and anthropology (human exhibits, ethnographic portraiture,
•    etc)
•    Historiography and the construction of historical narratives
•    Defining, ordering, and representing the world
•    The Enlightenment and classification systems
•    Colonialism/ Postcolonialism/ Decolonialism
•    Self-representation, mimicry, hybridity, and processes of disavowal
We encourage abstract submissions from graduate students of various backgrounds and disciplines. The Symposium will employ both presentations and panel discussions in the program. Chosen works must be 20 minutes in length and may be selected for either approach. Selected presentations will be featured for publication in the Wollesen Art Journal, a peer-reviewed publication of the symposium proceedings. For more information, please visit: https://gustasymposium.wordpress.com/.
Please submit an abstract (.doc/. docx/. pdf) of no more than 300 words to the Graduate Students of Art at gustasymposium@utoronto.ca by Friday, December 21, 2018 at 5:00 pm EST. Participants will be notified by email by the middle of January.
With appreciation,
Laura Tibi and Maria Mendoza Camba
Co-Chairs of the 6th Annual Wollesen Memorial Graduate Symposium
Department of Art | University of Toronto

4.    Call for Papers: CFP: HEART Conference “Locating the HEART and SOULS in Higher Education” An International Conference on the Future of the Humanities (January 11, 2018)
CFP: HEART Conference
“Locating the HEART and SOULS in Higher Education”:
An International Conference on the Future of the Humanities
10th Annual Conference
Bishop’s University, Sherbrooke, QC
March 15-16, 2019
HEART: Humanities Education and Research in Teaching
This international conference seeks to build capacities in scholarly teaching and supports research around learning in higher education within the field of the humanities. Standing at the intersection of disciplinary knowledge and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), this conference makes the case for the classroom experience as a rich site of knowledge production and, in doing so, challenges the typical disciplinary division of “real” research from its less-valued cousin, “just” teaching.
How can we understand classrooms as generative spaces brimming with fresh insights into the cultural, historical, and critical importance of the humanities? We believe that this is a crucial question in the fraught global climate of the 21st century, and higher education is one key space where we help foster and support future global citizens.
In exploring both the delight and the rich sites of research in teaching, this conference advocates for a pedagogical-scholarly practice grounded in and motivated by our experiences in forging intentionally designed, ethical, and curiosity-driven classrooms.
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
There are three submission options:
1. Research paper (15min paper presentation): We invite proposals for single paper presentations on the conference theme – teaching in a humanities classroom. The goal of these papers is to share knowledge and to encourage critical dialogue among conference participants. Paper proposals should be submitted by the first author and will last a maximum of 15 minutes each, including at least 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Papers will be grouped into sessions of two or three. The abstract part of the proposal text should be between 300 and 400 words.
2. Panel Proposal (1 hour 15min session): Panel discussions are particularly appropriate for topics that benefit from multiple perspectives and presenters, including disciplinary, institutional, and national perspectives. The goal for panel discussions is to provide panelists and audience members the opportunity to exchange insights, engage in discussion, and learn from each other’s experiences. Panel proposals should be submitted by the panel organizer and should feature two to four panelists, and last 60 minutes, with at least 15 minutes for discussion with the audience. The abstract part of the proposal text should be between 500 and 1,000 words, describing the panel as a whole (may also include descriptions of individual contributions and titles within the panel).
3. Welcome to my classroom (1 hour session): “Welcome to my classroom” is an interactive session that simulates a teaching experience. Presenters give a sample interactive class suitable for first-year students or a general audience. The 60 minute sessions would consist of two components: a presentation of a teaching moment, innovation or style, and a discussion of the pedagogy behind the presentation. The second part is intended as a forum for the audience to ask questions and relate the enacted elements to their own teaching experiences.
DOUBLE BLIND PEER REVIEW PROCESS
All submissions will undergo a double-blind peer review process and we are working a special journal issue on teaching and learning in the humanities to publish some of the papers following the conference.
Submit easily with our online platform at: https://form.jotform.com/53208388541256
Deadline for submission is January 11th, 2019.
Deadline to register as a presenter or a delegate is February 15, 2019.
For more information, please visit our website at www.heartandsoulsconference.com
ABOUT
Since its inception in 2009, QUEUC (Quebec Universities English Undergraduate Conference) has blossomed into the most successful English Undergraduate conference in Canada. This conference is held at Bishop’s University (in the beautiful Eastern Townships, 1.5 hours southeast of Montreal). Bishop’s University is located on Traditional and Unceded territory of the Abenaki People.
This year marks the 10th anniversary of QUEUC, which started as a small, Quebec-based, student-run conference in September 2009. Now, in its 10th year, we have updated our name – and our guiding vision – to champion undergraduate research and undergraduate teaching excellence in the Humanities.
This year, we have created two streams for the conference, one for showcasing undergraduate research (SOULS), and a new stream focused on research related to teaching in the humanities (HEART). This conference invites students and faculty from across Canada and around the world to consider taking part in rich conversation about the importance and urgency of learning and teaching the humanities in the 21st century.
Thanks to their strong commitment to undergraduate research and teaching, Bishop's University and the Maple League of Universities are sponsoring the conference and subsidizing the registration fees. Registration for students is $25 and for faculty, it is $75. This includes 2 dinners, 1 breakfast, 1 lunch, coffee and snacks, and 2 wine and cheese receptions. Travel and accommodations are not included, but we coordinate billets, car pools, pick-ups (when available) from the airport and bus stations, etc. We have made great efforts to ensure this conference is inclusive and affordable for all members of our learning communities.
QUESTIONS? Contact us:
Virginia Larose
HEART and SOULS 2019 Coordinator
heartandsouls@ubishops.ca
Dr. Jessica Riddell
Stephen A. Jarislowsky Chair of Undergraduate Teaching Excellence
Executive Director, The Maple League
Associate Professor, Department of English, Bishop’s University
3M National Teaching Fellow (2015)
Chair, Teaching and Leaning Centre (TLC)
jessica.riddell@ubishops.ca
Bishop’s University
2600 College
Sherbrooke, QC
Canada J1M 1Z7
www.ubishops.ca

5.    Call for Papers: CFP: SOULS Conference “Locating the HEART and SOULS in Higher Education” An International Conference on the Future of the Humanities (January 11, 2018)
CFP: SOULS Conference
“Locating the HEART and SOULS in Higher Education”:
An International Conference on the Future of the Humanities
Tenth Annual Conference at Bishop’s University
March 15-16, 2019
SOULS: the Scholarship of Undergraduate Literary Studies
SOULS is the new and improved QUEUC (Quebec Universities English Undergraduate Conference). This international conference welcomes students from across Canada, the US, and the UK. We receive 250 – 300 submissions annually, undertake a double-blind peer review process, and have an acceptance rate between 17 – 20 %. The quality of the undergraduate research is exceptional, and we publish the best 20 papers in an edited collection. This conference takes place over two days at Bishop’s University, which is located on Traditional and Unceded territory of the Abenaki People.
Research papers from all disciplines within the humanities – including all literary time periods and genres, films and media studies – will be considered.
Submission guidelines:
Submissions for SOULS should be undergraduate research papers in the Humanities. Submitted papers are usually essays that students have already submitted in upper year seminars and have received a grade of A- or higher (+80%). Papers should be 7-8 pages in length (excluding Works Cited) with a presentation time of 12 – 15 minutes. While we ask that you only upload one paper at a time, each individual is allowed to submit a maximum of two submissions. Please remove all identifying marks from your submission (your name, institution, course number, etc.). Submit easily with our online platform at: https://form.jotform.com/53208388541256
A Delightful and Rigorous Opportunity for Early Professionalization
In addition to two days of engaging panels, HEART and SOULS 2019 includes a range of exciting events, such as an English-themed Cranium night, a wine and cheese, and a plenary speaker! Everyone is invited to attend: if you do not have a paper to present, come as a participant!
Deadline for submissions is January 11, 2019.
Deadline to register as a presenter or a delegate is February 15, 2019.
Thanks to their strong commitment to undergraduate research and teaching, Bishop's University and the Maple League of Universities are sponsoring the conference and subsidizing the registration fees. Registration for students is $25 and for faculty, it is $75. This includes 2 dinners, 1 breakfast, 1 lunch, coffee and snacks, and 2 wine and cheese receptions. Travel and accommodations are not included, but we coordinate billets, car pools, pick-ups (when available) from the airport and bus stations, etc. We have made great efforts to ensure this conference is inclusive and affordable for all members of our learning communities.
For more information, please visit our website at www.heartandsoulsconference.com
Questions? Contact us:
Virginia Larose
HEART and SOULS 2019 Coordinator
heartandsouls@ubishops.ca
Dr. Jessica Riddell
Stephen A. Jarislowsky Chair of Undergraduate Teaching Excellence
Executive Director, The Maple League
Associate Professor, Department of English, Bishop’s University
3M National Teaching Fellow (2015)
Chair, Teaching and Leaning Centre (TLC)
jessica.riddell@ubishops.ca
Bishop’s University6.    Call for Applicants: University of Alberta Master’s Program in Gender and Social Justice Studies for 2019-2020 (January 15, 2019)
The Department of Women’s and Gender Studies is a hub for feminism, social justice studies, and engaged citizenship at the University of Alberta. The MA Program in Gender and Social Justice Studies is committed to intersectional analysis in historical and contemporary contexts. Its focus is on interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the political, aesthetic, and ethical questions that arise from the study of gender and social justice.
Professors in the Department work on a wide variety of research projects in gender and international development, sexuality and queer studies, critical animal and food studies, feminist religious studies, feminist cultural production, trauma and cultural memory, and more. Core and affiliated faculty members are trained and active in a variety of disciplines across the humanities, social sciences, fine arts, and beyond. Research at the Intersections of Gender (RIG) brings together intersectional gender-themed research at the University of Alberta.
We invite students from all academic backgrounds with a passion for social justice to apply.
Program Features:
• 12-month (course-based) or 24-month (thesis-based) program
• full- or part-time options
• research or creative theses and capstones suited to each student’s professional and scholarly goals
• core Praxis Workshop: gain practical experience and do social justice work in the community
• core Gender Research Workshop: delve into the published and ongoing research projects of core and affiliated faculty members from across the University
• varied GSJ seminars: 2018-2019 classes include Anthropocene Feminism, Gender & Bod[il]y
Violence in the Developing World, Making Feminist Media, and Indigenous Feminisms - plus
electives from across the University
• Graduate Assistantships and scholarships for most full-time students
The program is enhanced through an annual Feminist Research Speaker Series, an in-house feminist art gallery (femlab), and extensive University-wide Professional Development programming. Graduates of the program will be able to work in multiple social justice contexts, including education, non-profit organizations, or government.
Questions can be directed to gsjgrad@ualberta.ca.
Deadline for Fall Term 2019 admittance: January 15, 2019.

7.    Call for Proposals: Trans-Atlantic Platform (T-AP): Social Innovation Call for Proposals (January 31, 2019)
The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) recently announced that it is participating in the Social Innovation Call for Proposals (CFP) launched by the Trans-Atlantic Platform (T-AP). SSHRC is collaborating with key humanities and social science funders in Europe and the Americas to support international research projects that can contribute to increasing our understanding of societal transformations and the role of social innovation.  A summary is provided below.
Objectives
Research partners will receive funding from the national agency from their country of origin.  Collaboration through this call will enable researchers to:
address social challenges, such as the digital divide; urban and rural developments and cohesion; access to public services and infrastructure; ethnic conflicts; human rights and legislation; the current state of democracy; and equality and social, political and human values;
learn from the experiences of multisectoral collaboration for social innovation practices on both sides of the Atlantic (e.g., innovative forms of economic organization, new digital technologies and accessibility; global and local environmental issues and sustainable development; strategies for social cohesion; integration of health and social care services; and the improvement of education and overcoming of linguistic barriers);
apply and adapt approaches from one locale to another; and
generalize and/or scale up local experiences.
All projects MUST comprise of at least three eligible research partners requiring financial support from funders located in different T-AP SI participating countries and include teams from both sides of the Atlantic.
Webinar
SSHRC will be offering a webinar about the competition on November 22, 2018.  Consult the Upcoming Webinars page for instructions on how to participate.
Value
When a project is selected for funding, each of the teams will receive a grant from its respective country and funder(s). For Canadian teams, projects will be funded based on the funding request submitted by the team, via the itemized budgets and one-page justifications.
Canadian applicants can request up to a maximum of $175,000 in funding:
•    $100,000 from SSHRC
Quebec applicants eligible to apply for SSHRC funding may also apply for a supplement from the FRQSC:
•    $50,000
•    $75,000 (+ indirect costs)
Duration
24 - 36 months
Deadlines
Submission of application to ORS – January 31, 2019
Submission of final application to agency – February 14, 2019, 14:00 Central European Time
For more information on this CFP, please consult the following links:
https://www.transatlanticplatform.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/T-AP-Social-Innovation-Call-for-Proposals-Final-ENG-version-October-31-2018.pdf
https://www.transatlanticplatform.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Canada-SSHRC-and-FRQSC-National-Addendum-English-version.pdf
Please consult Canada specific documents at the following link to obtain more details on the application process:
https://www.transatlanticplatform.com/social-innovation/

8.    Call for Papers: “Adoptionis Interruptus: Essays in Adoption and Sexuality” in “Adoption & Culture” (February 1, 2019)
Adoptionis Interruptus: Essays in Adoption and Sexuality
Adoption & Culture publishes essays on any aspect of adoption’s intersection with culture, including but not limited to scholarly examinations of adoption practice, law, art, literature, ethics, science, life experiences, film, or any other popular or academic representation of adoption. Adoption & Culture accepts submissions of previously unpublished essays for review.
Adoption & Culture is the journal of The Alliance for the Study of Adoption and Culture (ASAC). ASAC promotes understanding of the experience, institution, and cultural representation of domestic and transnational adoption and related practices such as fostering, assisted reproduction, LGBTQ+ families, and innovative kinship formations. ASAC considers adoptive kinship to include adoptees, first families, and adoptive kin. In its conferences, other gatherings, and publications ASAC provides a forum for discussion and knowledge creation about adoption and related topics through interdisciplinary, culture-based scholarly study and creative practice that consider many ways of perceiving, interpreting, and understanding adoption.
Adoption studies scholarship explores multiple aspects of adoption’s intersection with culture including, but not limited to, scholarly examinations of adoption practice, law, art, literature, ethics, science, life experiences, and film. Adoption scholars examine discourses of adoption in all its various ways, complicating the ways adoption engages with normative ideologies of identity, family, culture, race, gender, nation, and citizenship.
Adoption interrupts meanings of family as biology and/or monoraciality (i.e., because meanings of biology and race so often coalesce) that are circumscribed by sexuality. It does so, because adoption undercuts bio-heteronormativivity and the emphasis bio-heteronormativity places on sexuality as the ideal means through which the family is and should be reproduced. As biological and/or racial interruption, adoption frequently is and has been associated with negative connotations. Indeed, families “touched by adoption” in any form (i.e., be it a result of relinquishment, surrender, transracial or transnational adoption, step-parenting, foster-parenting, parenting by adoptees, LGBTQ2S parenting and/or even parenting via new reproductive technologies) are often made out derogatively to be queer, unintelligible, affectively suspect, and/or motley assemblages. Of course, adoption is not merely a biological, bio-racial, or bio-genealogical interruption – it is also a sexual interruption, although it remains largely unexamined as such. In this light, adoption studies and sexuality studies have important things to offer each other as critical lenses that can be brought to bear on each other.
This special volume of Adoption & Culture invites new and original essays that expressly examine adoption and sexuality in order to interrupt and elucidate the effects of bio-heteronormative and/or monoracial paradigms of family. Essays or proposals may address a range of critical questions that are elicited at the crossroads of adoption and sexuality, and should speak to the volume’s main theme, Adoptionis Interruptus: Essays in Adoption and Sexuality, as it may relate to the following topics:
•      Sexual cultures within/without family
•      Bio-racial, transracial and/or transnational interruptions
•      (A)sexual representations, narratives or discourses of adoption
•      Adoption, (a)sexual identities, (a)sexual outsiders and/or outlaws.
•      Adopted vs sexual genealogies
•      Adopted desires, affects, or assemblages
•      Bio-families as sexual colonies or colonization
•      Adoption as (a)sexual attachment and grief
•      Adoption as (a)sexual subjectivity
•      (A)sexual pathologies or defects as adoption.
•      Bio-genetic and/or monoracial family romances or fantasies
•      Monoracial and/or bio-centric techno-families and reproductive ideals
•      Family as incest, adoption as outcest/outcast
•      The sexual exceptionalism(s) of biological and/or monoracial bonds
•      Proposals or abstracts that vary on, or interrelate, these themes are welcome.
•      Proposals or abstracts about other topics that speak directly and creatively to the volume’s theme of adoption and sexuality are also welcome.
Please submit 500-word essay proposals or abstracts by or before: February 1, 2019
Completed manuscripts must be submitted by or before: August 1, 2019
Submit all proposals and essays or direct questions to Frances J. Latchford: flatch@yorku.ca

9.    Call for Visiting Scholar Applications: Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center (March 1, 2019)
Visiting Scholars join a vibrant scholarly community at the Women’s Studies Research Center and have full benefits of institutional affiliation with Brandeis University. While Visiting Scholars do not receive a stipend, they are eligible to apply for work space at the Center, to present work-in-progress, join a study group, and apply to be a Scholar partner to a Brandeis undergraduate in the Student-Scholar Partnership Program. Visiting Scholars may be in residence for up to a year, but may be in residence for a shorter window of time (e.g. a single semester, two months in the summer, etc.) The position is renewable for an additional year.
Application deadline: All application components, including letters of recommendation, must be received by March 1st. Full application requirements are available online.

Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center (WSRC) is an innovative, interdisciplinary research facility of scholars, artists, students, and faculty who study gender issues and women’s lives. Advancing the social justice mission of Brandeis University, the WSRC contributes intellectually to the university as well as to national and international communities. Brandeis WSRC is directed by Professor of Sociology and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies Karen V. Hansen.


OPPORTUNITIES:
1.    Job Opportunity: Tenure-Track Professorial-Stream Appointment in the Department of Politics, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, York University November 12, 2018)
Academic Hiring - Position Listings
The Department of Politics, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies invites applications for a tenure-track professorial-stream appointment in the critical study of politics at any professorial rank (Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, or Professor), to commence July 1, 2019.
A PhD in Political Science or a related discipline is required. Candidates must have significant professional experience, demonstrated excellence in teaching and in scholarly research, and have produced publications appropriate to their stage of career.
The Department of Politics is internationally recognized as one of the world's leading sites of political scholarship informed by a diverse range of critical intellectual approaches, and is seeking a dynamic intellectual leader to help advance that reputation and the scholarly excellence on which it is based. The successful candidate will be establishing, or already have established, an international reputation for the excellence of their contribution to the critical study of politics. Applicants should have an ongoing program of research and specialize in or, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the Department of Politics, across the five fields into which the Department is organized: Canadian Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations (both International Political Economy and Security Studies), Political Theory, and Women and Politics. Their research should complement the present scholarly profile of the Department, and develop it in new and innovative ways. Candidates who would be competitive for nomination to the York Research Chairs program are encouraged to apply.
The successful candidate must be suitable for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The position will involve graduate teaching and supervision, as well as undergraduate teaching. The successful candidate should demonstrate an ability to attract high quality graduate students to work with them. Pedagogical innovation in high priority areas such as experiential education and technology enhanced learning is an asset.
York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA program, which applies to Aboriginal people, visible minorities, people with disabilities, and women, can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/ or by calling the AA office at 416-736-5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens, permanent residents and Indigenous peoples in Canada will be given priority.
Applicants should submit a signed letter of application outlining their professional experience and research interests, an up-to-date curriculum vitae, a sample of their scholarly writing (maximum 50 pp.), and a teaching dossier, and arrange for three signed confidential letters of recommendation to be sent to: Professor David Mutimer, Chair, Department of Politics, Email: polsjobs@yorku.ca (Subject line: Open Rank Search in Politics).
Self-Identification and Work Status Declaration forms may be found at: https://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/ . Applicants wishing to self-identify can do so by downloading, completing and submitting the form. A declaration of work status is required.
The deadline for receipt of completed applications is November 12, 2018. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

2.    Job Opportunity: Teaching and Learning Specialist (Indigenization Specialty) at The University of the Fraser Valley (November 14, 2018)
Posting number: 2018.213
Position: Teaching and Learning Specialist (Indigenization Speciality)
Group: Faculty
Department: Teaching and Learning
Contract type: Faculty; Permanent; 100% full-time
Start date: As soon as possible after closing date
Review date: November 14, 2018
About UFV
The University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) is nationally recognized for its emphasis on teaching excellence, experiential and applied education, community engagement, and Indigenization. UFV is the school of choice for over 15,000 students. With six campuses and centres, UFV offers undergraduate and graduate programs in the arts, sciences, and professional studies, as well as trades and technology education, university preparation, and continuing education.
At UFV, we are dedicated to changing lives and building community. Our educational goals are to prioritize learning everywhere; be flexible and responsive; collaborate across boundaries; develop local and global citizenship; and integrate experiential learning. A British Columbia “Top Employer”, we are committed to providing a welcoming, inclusive and dynamic learning and working environment that is fair and respectful of everyone. Our culturally diverse employee and student populations reflect the local, national, international and Indigenous communities we serve. If you see yourself as a lifelong member of a community that values and nurtures innovation and creativity, cultivates leadership and citizenship, and where success builds on success, you belong at UFV.
Posting details
Reporting to the Associate Vice President, Teaching and Learning, the Teaching and Learning Specialist, a faculty position, will be responsible for the planning, implementing and evaluating of programs and services to support the professional teaching development of faculty members and staff in integrating Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing, into courses and programs, systems and processes. This should include the knowledge and ways of knowing particular to the Stó:lō people, on whose territory UFV is located.  An integral part of the work will be to ensure that faculty members and staff are preparing students to respond to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 Calls to Action. Responsibilities include the development, delivery, and evaluation of professional development programming on Indigenous knowledge, ways of knowing, pedagogies, decolonizing, and reconciliation at the individual, unit, department and faculty levels. The Teaching and Learning Specialist will also assist the department in other areas relating to curriculum and pedagogy. The Teaching and Learning Specialist will:
•    Develop workshops and conduct individual and group consultations on incorporating Indigenous knowledge, ways of knowing and Indigenous pedagogies into curriculum;
•    Develop short and long-term teaching and learning related goals for initiatives to improve Indigenizing programming in the Teaching and Learning Centre (TLC), including initiatives to equip instructors with the knowledge and skills to meet the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action;
•    Assist unit curriculum representatives in the writing of program and course proposals;
•    Develop and conduct decolonizing, Indigenization and reconciliation programming;
•    Develop online content and programming as related to local and wider Indigenous knowledge, practices and methodologies;
•    Develop and deliver faculty workshops and teaching sessions to improve pedagogical practices;
•    Prepare reports, planning and marketing of specialized events for the TLC;
•    Engage in reciprocal learning opportunities with Indigenous Elders, faculty and staff members, as well as students and community members;
•    Assess effectiveness of activities and action plans regarding the TLC’s Indigenizing mandate and make recommendations for improvement;
•    Maintain close relationships with the Indigenous leaders in the community;
•    Encourage, develop and partner with faculty members in the scholarship of teaching and learning around Indigenizing curriculum, programs and processes.
Qualifications
•    Master’s degree in a field relevant to the primary responsibilities and a minimum of five (5) years of related experience with preferably two years of experience in developing Indigenous curriculum and education materials;
•    Demonstrable appreciation of the obligations that come with working in S’olh Temexw, the traditional, unceded territory of the Stó:lō people;
•    Ability to integrate Indigenous ways of knowing into both teaching and learning practices and strategies;
•    An understanding of the importance of language to Indigenous culture and ways of knowing;
•    Solid understanding of Indigenization and its complexities in education;
•    Deep knowledge and understanding of the TRC’s Final Report and Calls to Action with particular focus on those pertaining to education, the UNDRIP, Treaties, Aboriginal Rights, intercultural competency and anti-racism;
•    Demonstrated capacity for self-reflection, and awareness of colonial history and the impacts of colonization;
•    Capacity to engage members of diverse communities and skilled in a variety of consultation techniques, protocols and strategies with the proven ability to listen to the needs of diverse faculty, staff, student, and community populations;
•    Experience in planning, preparing and delivering programming for those working in higher education and obtaining feedback;
•    Demonstrated experience with online and blended formats and other educational technologies, including methods that are consistent and appropriate to the transference of Indigenous ways of knowing;
•    Excellent interpersonal, facilitation, organizational, communication, and team-building skills, appropriate to Indigenous ways of knowing;
•    Demonstrated ability to work collegially and collaboratively;
•    Ability to think creatively, work on multiple projects under deadlines, and achieve results with minimal supervision;
•    Ability to provide clear, concise and complete verbal and written information at a level appropriate to the audience;
•    Ability to develop and maintain relationships with co-workers including Elders and stakeholders;
•    Superior ability to exercise judgment, maintain a high degree of professionalism, discretion and confidentiality;
•    Strong organization and prioritization skills and ability to manage workload;
•    Teaching experience at the post-secondary level is preferred;
•    General knowledge of the University’s mission, purpose and goals, and the role this position plays in achieving those goals;
•    Some work on non-regular days (i.e., weekend or evening workshops) at UFV BC campuses.
How to apply
The Selection Advisory Committee will begin reviewing applications on November 14, 2018; however, the position will remain open until filled.
Direct resume, including transcripts and evidence of appropriate qualifications, referring to Posting 2018.213 to:
Email application to: hrinfo@ufv.ca
Human Resources
University of the Fraser Valley
33844 King Road, Abbotsford, BC, Canada V2S 7M8
Phone: (604) 854-4554
Fax: (604) 854-1538
Website: ufv.ca
Find out how to prepare your application
Please note:
•    We thank all applicants for considering UFV for employment.
•    Incomplete applications will not be processed.
•    In order to be environmentally and fiscally responsible, only short-listed candidates will be contacted for interviews.
•    Short-listed candidates may undergo a criminal record check and/or a verification of their education credentials, as required.
•    Shortlisted applicants for staff positions will be required to provide copies of their most recent evaluation summary.
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.
UFV is committed to the principle of equity in employment.

3.    Scholarship Opportunity: Laura Bassi Scholarship 2018/2019 (November 25, 2018)
The Laura Bassi Scholarship, which will award a total of $10,000 twice per annum, was established by Editing Press in 2018 with the aim of providing editorial assistance to postgraduates and junior academics whose research focuses on neglected topics of study, broadly construed. The scholarships are open to every discipline and are awarded in December and April:
Winter 2018
Application deadline: 25 November 2018
Results: 15 December 2018
Spring 2019
Application deadline: 25 March 2019
Results: 15 April 2019
All currently enrolled master’s and doctoral candidates are eligible to apply, as are academics in the first five years of their employment. Applicants are required to submit a completed application form along with their CV to scholarships@editing.press by the relevant deadline. Further details and application form: https://editing.press/bassi.html

4.    Job Opportunity: Tenure Stream Position in the History of the North American Continent at Dalhousie University, Department of History (December 10, 2018)
The Department of History at Dalhousie University invites applications for a tenure-stream position in the history of the North American continent, at the rank of Lecturer/Assistant Professor, specialization open. The position is open to historians of any part of the continent of North America. Candidates should be motivated towards interdisciplinary and community-engaged teaching and scholarship. Candidates should have a PhD by July 2019; ABDs will also be considered.
This position is part of the Dalhousie Diversity Faculty Award (DDFA) program. In keeping with the principles of Employment Equity, the DDFA program aims to correct historic underrepresentation. In accordance with the DDFA program and the nature of this position, the position is restricted to candidates who self-identify as Aboriginal or Indigenous. All such qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. Dalhousie’s recent creation of the Indigenous studies program and its strategic focus on indigenizing the curriculum will provide strong support to the successful candidate.
Established in 1818, Dalhousie is a leading, research-intensive university with more than 180 degree programs across eleven faculties. It is the largest university in Atlantic Canada and is located in the heart of Halifax, a scenic coastal city and capital of Nova Scotia, which is home to thirteen Mi’kmaq First Nations.
An application package for this position, due by December 10, should include:
• a cover letter (maximum of 2 pages)
• a complete CV
• publications, if applicable
• the names, addresses, and email addresses of three references
• a completed Self-Identification Questionnaire (available at
www.dal.ca/becounted/selfid)
Please submit applications electronically in PDF format to history@dal.ca. Applications can also be mailed as hard copies to the Department of History, Dalhousie University, 6135 University Avenue, P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H 4R2. For further information about this position, please contact the Search Committee Chair, Dr. Jerry Bannister, jerry.bannister@dal.ca. For information about the Dalhousie Diversity Faculty Award program, please contact Marlo Shinyei, Academic Recruitment Advisor (902-494-2935 or Marlo.Shinyei@Dal.ca).

5.    Career Opportunity: Two Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs (CRC) (Indigenous Democracies, Democracy) at Ryerson University- Faculty of Arts (April 2019)
The Opportunity
The Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University, in the City of Toronto, on the territory of the Anishinaabeg, Haudenosaunee, and the Huron-Wendat invites applications for two Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs (CRC) to be appointed in a department in the Faculty of Arts. One will be in Indigenous Democracies and the second will be in Democracy.
The selected candidates will be nominated by Ryerson University to apply for the Government of Canada’s CRC Program. Appointment to a faculty position at Ryerson University is conditional upon the successful award of a CRC to the candidate(s).
Successful candidates will be appointed at the Assistant or Associate Professor level, and will develop, with Ryerson University, the CRC application for the April 2019 deadline, with the goal of being appointed by January 1, 2020. These positions are subject to final budgetary approval. The successful nominees must be approved by CRC and will be offered positions in the academic units that are appropriate given their expertise.
Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs are intended for exceptional emerging scholars (i.e., candidates must have been an active researcher in their field for fewer than 10 years at the time of nomination). Applicants who are more than 10 years from having earned their highest degree (and where career breaks exist, such as maternity, parental or extended sick leave, clinical training, etc.) may have their eligibility for a Tier 2 chair assessed through the program’s Tier 2 justification process. Please contact the research office by sending an email to ovpri@ryerson.ca  with "Tier 2 Justification" in the title.
To meet the criteria of the CRC program, candidates must demonstrate potential to achieve international recognition in their fields in the next five to ten years, as well as capacity as Chairholders to attract, develop and retain diverse, excellent trainees, students and future researchers, particularly from under-represented groups such as women, racialized people, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and 2SLGBTQ+ people. Accordingly, candidates shall be assessed for excellent, emerging world-class research of high quality that is original, innovative and particularly creative. All Chairs are subject to review and final approval by the CRC Secretariat. Please consult the Canada Research Chairs website for more information about the CRC program and eligibility.
CRC Chair in Indigenous Democracies: We are seeking outstanding scholars to join our dynamic, community-focused research environment, bringing interest, insight and experience in enhancing our understanding of the intersections of Indigenous and liberal democracies. With Indigenous peoples often alienated from, and/or refusing to participate in state democratic practices, we seek to understand the terms of engagement. The successful candidate in Indigenous Democracies will explore the complexities of Indigenous involvement, or refusal, in state democratic institutions, norms and governance, as well as the contours of Indigenous forms of democracy, and the intersections of these distinct systems. The Chair’s research agenda will draw upon inter-disciplinary, pan-university and Indigenous research communities, and will organize and engage with public forums to bring together some of the brightest minds to help frame the relevant issues and find meaningful and effective solutions.
The central value of this proposed CRC position in Indigenous Democracies lies in its potential to create and mobilize practical knowledge along with beneficial policy implications that will help contribute to deeper and more just forms of political engagement, stimulating conversations that help challenge colonial relationships and enable greater peace, friendship and mutual respect among diverse political communities.
CRC Chair in Democracy: We understand democracy broadly to include a variety of theoretical, institutional and procedural orientations as well as a multitude of social impacts. Applicants for the CRC in Democracy may be inter-disciplinary and methodologically creative in their focus on democracy.  Central to this position is the Chairholder’s potential to create and mobilize practical knowledge, thereby strengthening democratic ideas, norms and institutions, fostering inclusion, democratic self-rule and outcomes as well as contributing to the Faculty of Arts’ leadership in conversations about democratic engagement.
Ryerson University and the Faculty of Arts
Ryerson University is known for its innovative programs built on the integration of theoretical and applied learning. More than 100 undergraduate and graduate programs are distinguished by a professionally-focused curriculum and strong emphasis on excellence in teaching, research and creative activities. Ryerson is also a leader in adult learning, with the largest university-based continuing education school in Canada. Ryerson University is located in the heart of Toronto’s diverse and complex downtown core.
Ryerson’s Faculty of Arts is comprised of ten humanities and social science departments, as well as several research centers, including the newly-launched Indigenous policy think-tank, the Yellowhead Institute. Serving a dual role within the University, the Faculty of Arts combines a liberal arts education with Ryerson's unique form of relevant, practical learning. The Faculty of Arts is also a home to both the Jarislowsky Chair in Democracy focused on the advancement of democracy and to the Democratic Engagement Exchange that fosters democratic engagement through partnerships with academic institutions, community organizations and government agencies.
Responsibilities
Responsibilities of the Chair include: building a research program that develops a research hub in the areas of Indigenous Democracies or Democracy contributing to interdisciplinary and collaborative research and the growth of graduate programs at Ryerson. The Chair will also carry out teaching and service duties.
Qualifications
Candidates must have a demonstrated, documented, commitment to upholding the values and practices of equity, diversity, and inclusion as they pertain to service, teaching, and scholarly, research or creative activities and will be expected to demonstrate an ability to make learning accessible and inclusive to a diverse student population. Candidates shall hold a strong research profile (for example, evidence of an emerging scholarly record, ability to establish and maintain an independent, externally funded research program), evidence of high quality teaching and student training, and a capacity for collegial service.
The following are expectations to be eligible for strong consideration:
•    A PhD in the humanities or social sciences with expertise in Indigenous Studies or Settler Colonial Studies; and/or a PhD in the humanities or social sciences and expertise in the study of democracy, including democratic theory, institutions, processes, and/or societal outcomes, as well as community-based experience;
•    Strong emerging research profile that demonstrates creativity and evidence of impact, such as peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed publications/contributions, public policy contributions, articles, memoirs, reviews, creative or artistic works, government publications, papers presented at scholarly meetings or conferences and participation in public discourse and debate, which constitute a contribution to research;
•    Demonstrated developing expertise in emerging research practices and methodologies, including interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral research, action research, translational research, practice research, as well as the Tri-Council Policy Statement on Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans, including the chapter on research involving the First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada;
•    Demonstrated ability to establish and maintain an independent, externally funded research program, including participation in community partnerships, group grants and/or ability to attract multi-center grants;
•    Demonstrated commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion in teaching and research, including recruiting, mentoring and supporting diverse students and research trainees from underrepresented groups such as women, racialized people, persons with disabilities and Indigenous peoples and 2SLGBTQ+ people;
•    Experience in developing knowledge mobilization practices that include community engagement.
•    Evidence of research collaborations or strong potential/ability to attract collaborative initiatives; demonstrated attention to equity, diversity and inclusion in those collaborations or initiatives;
•    Demonstrated experience in undergraduate course development;
•    For the CRC position in Indigenous Democracies, preference will be given to Indigenous scholars with lived experience, a strong commitment to Indigenous knowledges and methodologies, and who have extensive experience in collaborating with Indigenous students, organizations and communities.
Ryerson recognizes that scholars have varying career paths and that career interruptions can be part of an excellent academic record. Candidates are encouraged to provide any relevant information about their experience and/or career interruptions to allow for a fair assessment of their application. Search committee members have been instructed to give careful consideration to diverse experiences and knowledges, and be sensitive to the impact of career interruptions in their assessments.
Equity at Ryerson University
At the intersection of mind and action, Ryerson is on a transformative path to become Canada’s leading comprehensive innovation university. Integral to this path is the placement of equity, diversity and inclusion as fundamental to our institutional culture. Our current academic plan outlines each as core values and we work to embed them in all that we do.
Ryerson University welcomes those who have demonstrated a commitment to upholding the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion and will assist us to expand our capacity for diversity in the broadest sense. In addition, to correct the conditions of disadvantage in employment in Canada, we encourage applications from members of groups that have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized, including First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples, Indigenous peoples of North America, racialized persons, persons with disabilities, and those who identify as women and/or 2SLGBTQ+.
Please note that all qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, applications from Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.
As an employer, we are working towards a people first culture and are proud to have been selected as one of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers and a Greater Toronto’s Top Employer for 2015, 2016 and 2017. To learn more about our work environment, colleagues, leaders, students and innovative educational environment, visit www.ryerson.ca, check out @RyersonU, @RyersonHR and @RyersonEDI on Twitter, and visit our LinkedIn company page.
How to apply?
To submit an application, please select ‘start application’ above. The application package must contain the following:
•    A letter of interest and curriculum vitae.
•    3 recent research publications or equivalent.
•    A statement outlining the current and future scope of your research, how you incorporate equity, diversity and inclusion in your research practice, and your plans for sharing your research findings and knowledge (max. 5 pages).
•    Examples of recent teaching materials (eg course syllabi, workshops, community education events, mentoring and team building activities)
•    The contact information for three individuals who may be contacted for references.
Please indicate in your application if you are a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada.
Indigenous candidates who would like to learn more about working at Ryerson University and our vibrant Indigenous community in Toronto are welcome to contact Ms. Tracey King, M.Ed., Aboriginal HR Consultant, Aboriginal Recruitment and Retention Initiative, at t26king@ryerson.ca.
Applications and any confidential inquiries can be directed to the search committee chair, Dean Pamela Sugiman  c/o Ms. Kathryn Rowan, Manager, Academic Administration (krowan@ryerson.ca) .  Review of applications will begin after November 30, 2018, and will continue until the position is filled. We thank applicants in advance for their applications; however, only applicants under consideration will be contacted about their candidacy.
Ryerson is committed to accessibility for persons with disabilities. To find out more about our Access Ryerson initiative, and plans, policies and resources, please visit our Accessibility website - https://www.ryerson.ca/accessibility/. We want to ensure that all participants are able to engage fully in interviews and other activities that are part of the process. If you have any accommodation requests, please contact Davina Chan, Sr. HR Consultant at davina.chan@ryerson.ca. All requests for accommodation will be treated confidentially.
It is critical to Ryerson’s success to remove barriers and correct the conditions of disadvantage in Canada for under-represented groups. For this reason, by separate communication we will be inviting all applicants to voluntarily complete an online Diversity Self-ID questionnaire. The information collected will remain confidential. The communication will provide details on who will have access to the data and how it will be used.
Any inquiries regarding accessing the Faculty Recruitment Portal can be sent to Renee Gordon, HR Advisor, at renee.gordon@ryerson.ca.
This position falls under the jurisdiction of the Ryerson Faculty Association (RFA).
•    The RFA collective agreement can be viewed at: http://www.ryerson.ca/faculty-affairs/collective-agreements/rfa-collective-agreement/
•    The RFA’s website can be found at: www.rfanet.ca.
•    A summary of RFA benefits can be found at: http://www.ryerson.ca/hr/benefits/benefits_by_group/rfa/index.html.