CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, October 25, 2018

-----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

1. CFR 2017-18 Annual Newsletter now available

2. Congratulations to CFR Research Associate David Murray on his successful SSHRC IDG application for “Still Poz, Still Queer, Still Here”!

3. CFR Research Associate Dr. Patrick Alcedo presents: "An Empire Stages Back: Nationalism, Postcoloniality and the Diaspora in Philippine Dance" Asia Colloquium Paper

4. CFR Research Associate Dr. Patrick Alcedo presents: Film Screening: "DANCING MANILENYOS" (November 13, 2018)

5. CFR Research Associate Dr. Jin Haritaworn and Marvelous Grounds Collective: Book Launch for Marvelous Grounds at the Naked Heart Festival (November 10-11, 2018)

6. CFR Research Associate Dr. Jin Haritaworn and Marvelous Grounds Collective: Book Launch for Queering Urban Justice at University of Toronto (November 14, 2018)

7. CFR Research Associate Dr. Roberta Buiani, Panel and Exhibition: Artsci Salo Presents “Gene editing, sexual reproduction and the arts” (October 27, 2018)

EVENTS:

1. CFR Meet n greet (November 1, 2018)

2. CFR Graduate Caucus meeting (November 1, 2018)

3. CFR and GFWS Present: Book Launch for Queer Politics in India: Towards Sexual Subaltern Subjects by Shraddha Chatterjee (GFWS) (November 6, 2018)

4. CFR Co-Sponsored: “Personal and Political: Stories from the Women’s Health Movement 1960-2010” with Dr. Lorraine Greaves (November 16, 2018)

5. CFR Co-Sponsored: Community Screening Event of Face, the Other Side 얼굴, 그 맞은편 (November 17, 2018)

OPPORTUNITIES:

1. ORU Centre for Feminist Research Director position (November 16, 2018)

2. Call for Nominations: Mary McEwan Memorial Award 2017-2018 (December 3, 2018)

-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

1. Book Release: Demeter Press is Honoured to Announce the Upcoming Release of White Unwed Mother: The Adoption Mandate in Postwar Canada (November 1, 2018)

EVENTS:

1. Ace Toronto Presents: Button Making Social & Open House for Asexual Awareness Week (October 27, 2018)

2. Another Story Bookshop: Book Launch for “Red Light Labour: Sex Work Regulation, Agency, and Resistance!” (October 28, 2018)

3. Global Labour Speaker Series Presents: The Women’s March and Intersectional Organizing: The importance of a critical race lens in industrial relations (October 29, 2018)

4. Workshop: Studio for Media Activism & Critical Thought's 2018-19 Workshop Series Presents #NotMyPremier: Media Activism in Ford's Ontario (October 30, 2018)

5. Public Lecture: YUFA Race Equity Caucus Presents Dr. Zoila Airall “Paradoxes: The Art of the Mission, Strategy and Commitment to Advancing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion” (November 2, 2018)

6. CERLAC Public Lecture: The 2018 Michael Baptista Lecture: Activism, Archives, and Performance: Commemorating 40 Years of CERLAC (November 8, 2018)

7. York Information Session: Building collaborations and partnerships in the Social Sciences and Humanities (November 8, 2018)

8. Public Lecture: Dr. Julian Gill-Peterson, author of Histories of the Transgender Child (November 14, 2018)

9. Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies (IFLS) talk: “Is it a man’s world? A feminist reimagining the right to free speech in the aftermath of the Charlottesville race riots” by Camile Gear Rich (November 16, 2018)

10. Free Event: Inanna Publications 40th Anniversary Party (November 22, 2018)

CALLS: 

1. Call for Papers, Posters, and Roundtable Proposals: UCLA Center for the Study of Women Presents “Thinking Gender 2019: Feminists Confronting the Carceral State” - 29th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference (October 28, 2018)

2. Call for Applications: Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada: 2019-2020 Contributions Program (October 31, 2018)

3. Call for Abstract Submissions: Global Labour Research Centre Graduate Student Symposium (November 4, 2018)

4. Call for Submissions: 2019 FAC Residency for Artists with Focus on Social Justice (November 14, 2018)

5. Call for Papers: Against the Mythologies of the 1969 Criminal Code Reform (November 30, 2018)

6. Call for Nominations: Women's and Gender Studies et Recherches Féministes Outstanding Scholarship Prize 2018-2019 (December 1, 2018)

7. Call for Papers: Indigenous Self-Determination in a ‘Chronically Mobile’ World: Critical Perspectives From Anti-Racist Scholars of Migration and Mobility (December 15, 2018)

8. Call for Papers: The Globalization Project: Falling Behind or Failing Forward?  Presented by Alternate Routes: A Journal of Critical Social Research and the University of Turin, in conjunction with the ILO-sponsored gallery exhibition Behind the Indian Boom: Invisible India (December 31, 2018)

OPPORTUNITIES:

1. Volunteer Opportunity: International Opportunities for Volunteer Work in Gender and Women’s Studies

2. Funding Available Via Mitacs GRA for Students Pursuing International Travel

3. Scholarship Opportunity: Lalitha Sundaram Malhotra Memorial Scholarship for an Undergraduate Law Student with A Disability at the University of Ottawa (October 31, 2018)

4. Job Opportunity: Assistant Lecturer Position in Art History and Visual Culture, Department of Visual Art and Art History at York University (November 12, 2018)

5. Job Opportunity: Teaching and Learning Specialist (Indigenization Speciality) position, the University of the Fraser Valley (November 14, 2018)

6. Job Opportunity: Peoples Studies – Assistant Professor in the Field of Indigenous Studies, Faculty of Arts and Science at Concordia University (November 15, 2018)

7. Job Opportunity: First Peoples Studies – Director of the First Peoples Studies Program, Faculty of Arts and Science at Concordia University (November 15, 2018)

8. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in North American Indigenous History, Department of History and Classical Studies at McGill University (November 26, 2018)

9. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor in Indigenous Studies, Department of Criminology at Ryerson University (November 26, 2018)

10. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor in Anti-Black Racism, Department of Criminology at Ryerson University (November 26, 2018)

11. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor (Media Studies) at Queens University (December 14, 2018)

12. Bursary Opportunity: APUS 50th Anniversary Bursaries Available for Part-Time Students at UOFT (February 1, 2019)

-----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH-----

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

1. CFR 2017-18 Annual newsletter now available

The CFR 2017-18 Annual Newsletter is now available for download at the following link: http://cfr.info.yorku.ca/files/2018/10/CFR-Annual-Newsletter-2017-18.pdf

2. Congratulations to CFR Research Associate David Murray on his successful SSHRC IDG application for “Still Poz, Still Queer, Still Here”!

Please join the Centre for Feminist Research in congratulating CFR Research Associate David AB Murray (Anthropology) on his successful SSHRC Insight Development Grant grant application for the project Still Poz, Still Queer, Still Here: Long Term HIV+ Queer Men in the Age of Treatment (1996-2018).

About the project: This project will examine how differentially positioned queer men in Toronto who have been HIV positive for 20 years or longer experience continuities and changes in stigma, viral identity management and life projects in order to gain a better understanding of social, economic and political dimensions and transformations of HIV/AIDS in Canada in 'the age of treatment' (1996-present day), a phase in the history of the global pandemic defined in part through the widespread availability of pharmaceutical treatments that have greatly improved the health and longevity of many (but not all) HIV+ people.

Congratulations, David!

3. CFR Research Associate Dr. Patrick Alcedo presents: "An Empire Stages Back: Nationalism, Postcoloniality and the Diaspora in Philippine Dance" Asia Colloquium Paper

Asia Colloquium Paper of the York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR)

https://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/empirestagesback/

An Empire Stages Back: Nationalism, Postcoloniality and the Diaspora in Philippine Dance

Patrick Alcedo, Associate Professor of Dance, York University, Toronto

Patrick Alcedo’s February 2016 lecture-performance, “An Empire Stages Back: Nationalism, Postcoloniality, and the Diaspora in Philippine Dance,” was a staging of how Filipino cultural productions respond to empire through dance and film. This lecture-performance mapped out histories of colonialism and imperialism in the Philippines and the Filipino diaspora through the cultures and stories encapsulated in folk and contemporary dance forms. Alcedo’s talk weaves his own trajectory as a scholar, dancer and filmmaker with the live staging of Filipino folk dances. The lecture-performance was structured through the frame of what Alcedo calls “intersecting modalities,” with live dance performances, images and excerpts from films and archival video footage, and was accompanied by a historical narration and an analysis in the form of an interspersed lecture. This paper represents the different modes of engaging with Filipino folk culture included in Alcedo’s February 2016 lecture-performance. In this paper, the text of his talk is partnered with videos of the dances staged at the live event and select images and videos from his visual aids.

An associate professor in the Department of Dance at York University, Patrick Alcedo holds a Government of Ontario Early Researcher Award. York’s School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design awarded him with both Junior and Senior Teaching Awards for excellence in teaching. He is the lead editor of Religious Festivals in Contemporary Southeast Asia (Ateneo University Press, 2016), which was nominated for the 36th National Book Award in the Philippines. In recognition of his achievements in dance research, in 2014 he received the Selma Jeanne Cohen Fund for International Scholarship on Dance from the Fulbright Association of America. The following year York University named him Research Leader. A director, producer, and writer of five documentary films, his feature-length documentary, A Piece of Paradise, has won four international film awards, including the Centennial Best Canadian Film Award and the National Bank Best First Feature Film Award at the 2017 Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival.

4. CFR Research Associate Dr. Patrick Alcedo presents: Film Screening: "DANCING MANILENYOS" (November 13, 2018)

Via Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival:

Featuring CFR Research Associate Patrick Alcedo

Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

In Their Words (Youth Shorts Program)

Touching on labour, activism, migration, and self-perseverance, these films are not just untold narratives; they are lived experiences.

November 13, 1:30pm, 401 Richmond Street West, Bachir/Yerex Presentation Space (4th floor).

DANCING MANILENYOS

Patrick Alcedo • Canada • 2018 • 20 min • English

In Manila, a group of young Filipinos dreams of making it big in the ballet world. Amidst the city’s disparate social class, ballet teacher Luther hopes to lift his students out of poverty through artistic and life skills one learns from dancing.

Film trailer: https://vimeo.com/288229620

http://www.reelasian.com/festival-events/in-their-words/

5. CFR Research Associate Dr. Jin Haritaworn and Marvelous Grounds Collective: Book Launch for Marvelous Grounds at the Naked Heart Festival (November 10-11, 2018) 

Featuring the art, activism, and writings of QTBIPOC in Toronto, Marvellous Grounds: Queer Colour Histories of Toronto tells the stories that have shaped Toronto’s landscape but are frequently forgotten or erased. Hear from the editors and contributors about how the book responds to an unmistakable desire in QTBIPOC communities for history and lineage. ASL available.

Details TBD.

In January 2019, join us for a launch of our two collections in Ottawa (Date TBA) at Venus Envy Ottawa!

6. CFR Research Associate Dr. Jin Haritaworn and Marvelous Grounds Collective: Book Launch for Queering Urban Justice at University of Toronto (November 14, 2018)

Women & Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto (room 2007D, 40 Willcocks St - TBC)

Learn about the three year process for planning and producing the two books! Together with a few contributors, we will share excerpts from Queering Urban Justice, and discuss challenges and successes of community building. Confirmed line up includes Tara Atluri, Kusha Dadui, OmiSoore Dryden, Monica Forrester, Jin Haritaworn, Elene Lam, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, and Syrus Marcus Ware!

In January 2019, join us for a launch of our two collections in Ottawa (Date TBA) at Venus Envy Ottawa!

7. CFR Research Associate Dr. Roberta Buiani, Panel and Exhibition: Artsci Salo Presents “Gene editing, sexual reproduction and the arts” (October 27, 2018)

Gene editing, sexual reproduction and the arts - Panel + exhibition

The ArtSci Salon

Saturday, 27 October 2018 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT)

Toronto, ON

ArtSci salon is proud to present two events to explore the entangled issues of sex and sexual fantasy, sexual reproduction and sexual regulation, fertility and sexual technologies. We invited artists and scholars to address these themes using their preferred approach: the result is a thought provoking series which interrogates and imagines these issues through human/non-human sexual fantasies, interrogates them by means of modified gynaecological instruments, rewrites potential scenarios as enhanced and/or elderly humans, or offers unexpected ways to hack sex right here, right now.

Edited

Reimagining sexual reproduction, fertility and the future. In the present…

Join us at the Opening

Saturday, October 27,

4:00 pm

The SciArt Cabinets Gallery,

Koffler Student Centre,

214 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 2Z9

The potentials of genome editing techniques have brought us predictions and critiques that couldn’t look any different: shiny, beautiful, perfect and disease-free prospects of life on the one hand, and a bleak, problematic, segregated, and battled future on the other. These are all projections that look at a maybe-not-so-distant future. But what about the present?

In the exhibition “edited”, four artists rethink the future by critically reflecting on the present. Focusing on themes revolving around sexual reproduction, fertility and sexual technologies, their artworks question unresolved issues in the present that we should address before launching ourselves into the future. Can we find interesting ways to draw attention to them and re-dress how they are currently treated through creative interventions? In addition to raising awareness about sexism, sexual rigidity and the medicalization of the body, each of these artworks suggests ways in which we might address, redress, hack and reimagine gynecological practice, hormonal management, human enhancement and sexual and cultural identity through the arts.

Artists:

Andrew Carnie, UnFolding Sheets

Samira Daneshvar, The Armamentarium of (Counter) Creation

Byron Rich & Liz Flyntz Epicurean Endocrinology, Cooking Sex

Adam Zaretsky centiSperm, mutaFelch and biPolar Flowers

Curated by the ArtSci Salon

The SciArt Cabinets Gallery is open

Mon-Fri 9:00 am-7:00pm

Sat-Sun 12:00-pm- 5:00pm

-Panel discussion

Gene editing, sexual reproduction and the arts:  the present, the future and the imagined

October 27th

6:00-7:30 pm

Location:

Lennox Hall - First Canadian Place

77 Adelaide Street W.

Toronto, ON M5X 1C1

ArtSci Salon will participate in the scientific conference GeNeDis (Genetics, Geriatrics and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research) with a special panel addressing the topic of gene editing and sexual reproduction from a sciart perspective. The discussion will be preceded by the official opening of an exhibition illustrating how present issues in gynaecology and sexual regulation, hormonal management, human enhancement and sexual and cultural identity may be addressed, redressed, hacked and reimagined through the arts.

Speakers:

Byron Rich, Allegheny College, USA

Samira Daneshvar, Artist and Designer, Toronto, University of Miami, USA

Adam Zaretsky, Marist College, USA

Dolores Steinman, University of Toronto, Canada

Chair: Roberta Buiani, ArtSci Salon, Fields Institute & Centre for Feminist Research, York University, Canada

In recent years, popular culture has been graced with countless news announcing new developments in genome editing. While many experiments are still in their early stages, media seem to be already very excited about the potentials that genome editing could bring. Often betraying a sensationalist and triumphant tone, news often focuses on the potentials that these developments will have for the betterment of the human species: the eradication of disease; the extension of life; the improvement of the body and its appearance etc.. the future looks hopeful and unproblematic according to these accounts. On the opposite end of the spectrum, pessimists see in these developments a potential worsening of the human condition: are these developments safe? What are the ethical implications? Who will these developments benefit? Given today’s social divisions and cultural conflicts, these voices predict a rather bleak future and warn against the pursuit of innovation at any cost.

What these radically opposed positions share is that they all tend to make predictions and look at the future: a shiny, beautiful, perfect future on the one hand, and a bleak, problematic and battled future on the other. With this panel, it is proposed to take a step back: before we look at what genome editing will bring us in the future, how about we look at the present? In particular, it is asked: what are the unresolved issues in the present that we should address before launching ourselves into the future? Can we find interesting ways to draw attention to them and re-dress how they are currently treated through creative interventions? More specifically, we would like to explore issues regarding sexual reproduction, fertility, and sexual technologies: we argue that artistic interventions pertaining to these topics, in addition to raising awareness about sexism, sexual rigidity and the medicalization of the body, may be suggestive of ways in which we might rethink the role of human enhancement and genome editing in the sciences as well as everyday life.

EVENTS:

1. CFR Meet n greet (November 1, 2018)

You are invited to the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR) meet n greet!

* Please note the change in date*

Date: Thursday, November 1, 2018

Time: 2.30-4pm

Location: 626 Kaneff

Accessibility: Wheelchair-accessible space, gender-neutral & gender-segregated washrooms. Light refreshments provided. Please advise of allergies/dietary needs with RSVP. Kaneff is not a scent-free environment. FREE event. All are welcome.

Please RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. RSVPs for catering purposes only.

Join us for light refreshments, meet feminist faculty, students and community members across York University, and learn about upcoming events, projects and activities - or suggest your own!

The meet n greet will be followed by the CFR Graduate Caucus meeting, 4-5pm, room 626 Kaneff. Please RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca.

2. CFR Graduate Caucus meeting (November 1, 2018)

CFR Graduate Caucus meeting

Date: Thursday, November 1, 2018

Time: 4-5pm

Location: 626 Kaneff

Accessibility: Wheelchair-accessible space, gender-neutral & gender-segregated washrooms. Kaneff is not a scent-free environment.

CFR Graduate Associates are invited to attend for the first 2018-19 meeting of the CFR Graduate Caucus, a space for graduate students to meet each other and brainstorm, collaborate, and propose events, research projects, and activities they want to spearhead through the CFR.

Please RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. (RSVPs for attendance numbers only)

3. CFR and GFWS Present: Book Launch for Queer Politics in India: Towards Sexual Subaltern Subjects by Shraddha Chatterjee (GFWS) (November 6, 2018)

The Centre for Feminist Research and the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies Present:

Book launch for

Queer Politics in India: Towards Sexual Subaltern Subjects

by Shraddha Chatterjee (GFWS).

Introduced by Dr. David Murray (Anthropology).

Moderator: Harshita Yalamarty (GFWS).

Respondents: Preity Kumar (GFWS) and Karuna Chandrashekar (SPTH).

Date: Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Time: 12-2pm

Location: 626 Kaneff Tower, York University

Accessibility: Wheelchair-accessible space, gender-neutral & gender-segregated washrooms. Light refreshments provided. Please advise of allergies with RSVP. Kaneff is not a scent-free environment. FREE event. All are welcome.

Link to the event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/876054432601468/

Brown bag event – bring your own lunch! Cookies and coffee provided.

RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. RSVPs for catering numbers only.

Summary: Queer Politics in India simultaneously tells two interconnected stories. The first explores the struggle against violence and marginalization by queer people in the Indian subcontinent, and places this movement towards equality and inclusion in relation to queer movements across the world. The second story, about a lesbian suicide in a small village in India, interrupts the first one, and together, these two stories push and pull the book to elucidate the failure and promise of queer politics, in India and the rest of the world.

This book emerges at a critical time for queer politics and activism in India, exploring the contemporary queer subject through the different lenses of critical psychology, Lacanian psychoanalysis, feminist and queer theory, and cultural studies in its critique of the constructions of discourses of ‘normal’ sexuality. It also examines how power determines further segregations of ‘abnormal’ sexuality into legitimate and illegitimate queer subjectivities and authentic and inauthentic queer experiences. By allowing a multifaceted and engaged critique to emerge that demonstrates how the idea of a universal queer subject fails lower class, lower caste queer subjects, and queer people of colour, the author expertly highlights how all queer people are not the same, even within queer movements, as the book asks the questions, “which queer subject does queer politics fight for”, and ”what is the imagination of a queer subject in queer politics?”

Bio: Shraddha Chatterjee is currently a PhD scholar in Gender, Feminist, & Women’s Studies at York University, Toronto. She has previously trained in psychology, and her work is informed by Lacanian psychoanalysis, critical psychology, feminist and queer theory, and cultural studies. She is involved with feminist queer spaces in New Delhi and Kolkata.

4. CFR Co-Sponsored: “Personal and Political: Stories from the Women’s Health Movement 1960-2010” with Dr. Lorraine Greaves (November 16, 2018)

York University’s School of Nursing Invites you to a

TALK and BOOK LAUNCH featuring:

Personal and Political: Stories from the Women’s Health Movement 1960-2010

With Dr. Lorraine Greaves (Centre of Excellence in Women’s Health)

Event Details FRIDAY NOV 16TH, 12:00

Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building Room 1005

88 The Pond Rd, North York, ON M3J 2S5

Refreshments Provided.

Books available.

* RSVP by 14 November to owhchair@yorku.ca

This book...

➢ Examines the role of feminism in transforming the healthcare system in Canada

➢ Analyses the "second wave" women's health movement in Canada between 1960 and 2010

➢ Describes how this feminist movement challenged diagnoses, treatments, regulations, policies, laws, and research

Co-sponsored by: The School of Nursing, Women's Health Research Chair in Mental Health Office, Health and Society, LAPS Health Policy & Management, Faculty of Health at York University; The Feminist History Society; and Second Story Press.

5. CFR Co-Sponsored: Community Screening Event of Face, the Other Side 얼굴, 그 맞은편 (November 17, 2018) Date: Saturday, November 17th, 2018 3pm-7pm

Location: Innis Town Hall

*Free of charge

In order to show global solidarity against digital sexual crime issues, Centre for Study of Korea (CSK) U of T, and Women Initiate New Domains (WIND) are going to screen a remarkable documentary film titled Face, the Other Side 얼굴, 그 맞은편.

Title: Face, the Other Side 얼굴, 그 맞은편

Director: Lee Sun-Hee

Genre: Documentary

Production: Korea 2018

Running time: 90 min

Synopsis:

Women’s fear that they would be stigmatized publicly and isolated from society caused by the leak of their sex video is far beyond ordinary people’s imagination. Nevertheless, the government are sitting on their hands. Nowadays people who exploit the female images and make profits have been highly industrialized. Yet far from punishing them, the government don't take it seriously. This documentary follows the story of young women’s growth from the exact place where the governmental power is out of reach.

Awards and Invitation:

Seoul International Women's Film Festival(SIWFF) (2017) - Ock Rang Award

Seoul International Women's Film Festival(SIWFF) (2018) - World Premier Screening

DMZ International Documentary Film Festival (2018) - Korean Competition

OPPORTUNITIES:

1. ORU Centre for Feminist Research Director position (Deadline November 16, 2018)

Applications are invited for the position of Director of the Centre for Feminist Research for a term of five years, to begin July 1, 2019.

ORU Description and History:

Established in 1991, the Centre for Feminist Research/ Le Centre de recherches féministes is an internationally recognized Center for research on gender, race, class, indigeneity, disability, sexuality, and women's issues. Its mandate is to promote feminist activities and collaborative research at York University by working to establish research linkages between York scholars and local, national, international and transnational communities. CFR carries out its mandate by supporting individual and collaborative research, developing research materials, communicating research results, providing opportunities and training for graduate students, fostering relationships with community organizations and government personnel, and through hosting visiting scholars from outside the university.

Position Requirements:

Applicants are expected to be members of the full-time faculty at York University, and to have a distinguished record of scholarship and research interests. The Director is expected to administer the financial, organizational and academic and collegial activities of the ORU, to develop external funding sources, and to maintain an active individual and collaborative research program.

Stipend:

The successful applicant will receive an administrative stipend and the appropriate course load reduction as stipulated by the YUFA or OHFA Collective Agreement. The Director of the Centre reports to the Associate Vice-President Research.

Application Process:

Applications should be sent to Emma Yuen (Operations Coordinator, Office of the Vice-President Research & Innovation) at emmay@yorku.ca.

Applications must include:

• Curriculum vitae

• Statement about vision for the Centre including goals, objectives, strategy of action and leadership style

• Names of three referees who may be contacted

Applications and nominations must be received by November 16, 2018.

2. Call for Nominations: Mary McEwan Memorial Award 2017-2018 (December 3, 2018) 

Please note: The following is an announcement for a PhD dissertation award.

DESCRIPTION OF AWARD

Named in honour of Dr. Mary McEwan, a feminist psychiatrist, this annual award of $1,000.00 will be awarded to one PhD dissertation produced in 2017-18 at York University in the area of feminist scholarship. An Awards Committee of faculty affiliated with the Centre will choose the winners.

If you have dissertations that were recommended for awards in 2017-18 (dissertations defended between September 1 2017 and September 30, 2018 are eligible), please consider putting them forward for this award. The submission deadline is Monday, December 3, 2018.

CRITERIA OF ELIGIBILITY

1. Must be a graduate student who has successfully defended a dissertation during the 2017-18 academic year.

2. The nominee's dissertation must concern feminist theory and/or gender issues.

3. The examining committee for the dissertation must unanimously recommend it for an award.

PROCEDURE FOR NOMINATION

Each nomination must include:

1. A copy of the dissertation and no more than a one-page statement from the nominee about the contribution the dissertation makes to feminist scholarship.

2. A letter of recommendation from the student's Supervisor commenting on the nominee's dissertation or thesis.

3. A statement from the Graduate Program Director noting that the nominee's dissertation was recommended as one that should be considered for a prize.

4. A copy of the external examiner’s report.

PROCEDURE FOR SUBMISSION

Nominations must be received by Julia Pyryeskina, Coordinator, Centre for Feminist Research, 611 York Research Tower no later than Monday, December 3, 2018.

Submissions and questions can be made via email to juliapyr@yorku.ca.

-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

1. Book Release: Demeter Press is Honoured to Announce the Upcoming Release of White Unwed Mother: The Adoption Mandate in Postwar Canada (November 1, 2018)

For the majority of "unwed mothers" in postwar Canada, having a child "out-of-wedlock" invariably meant being subject to the adoption mandate. Andrews describes the mandate as a process of interrelated institutional power systems which, together with socio-cultural norms, ideals of gender heteronormativity, and emerging sociological and psychoanalytic theories, created historically unique conditions in the post WWII decades wherein the white unmarried mother was systematically separated from her baby by means of adoption. Postwar elements  that came together as a kind of "perfect storm" created an unprecedented locus in history wherein unmarried mothers surrendered their babies for adoption in the hundreds of thousands in Australia, New Zealand, the UK, Canada and the United States.

This volume uncovers and substantiates evidence of the mandate in Canada, interrogates social work policies and practices, revisits the semi-incarceral "homes for unwed mothers", and quantifies the mandate through an extensive review of provincial reports; ultimately finding that approximately 300,000 unmarried mothers in Canada were impacted by illegal and unethical adoption practices, human rights abuses, and violence against the maternal body.

Valerie Andrews is an adoption activist, a Masters graduate from York University in Gender, Feminist and Women's Studies, and the Executive Director of Origins Canada.  Some of Valerie's works include The Language of Adoption, Crimes Against the Unmarried Mother, Sales and Marketing in Modern Domestic Adoption, #Flip the Script on Teen Mothers, Motherhood Denied: Canada's Maternity Homes, and Scripting/Disrupting "Birthmother" Identities.

"White Unwed Mother makes a unique and important contribution to the history of the adoption mandate in Canada. By including the voices of women impacted by forced adoption, and amassing unprecedented evidence about daily practices in maternity homes and the numbers of children taken, Andrews proves unequivocally that women did not surrender children by choice. This book is required reading for anyone interested in the history of adoption and theories and practice of maternity."

- Lori Chambers, Chair, Women's Studies, Lakehead University.

Save 40% off using coupon code MOTHERS until November 1, 2018!

EVENTS:

1. Ace Toronto Presents: Button Making Social & Open House for Asexual Awareness Week (October 27, 2018)

This event doubles as a button making social and an "open house" for Asexual Awareness Week. Feel free to bring your friends, classmates, family, partners, co-workers, neighbours, etc! Design and make your own buttons, and browse through educational zines and other resources about the asexual spectrum!

The button making social and open house will take place at The 519 Community Centre, in room 100.

Accessibility at The 519 Community Centre (519 Church St.):

• large ramp to enter building; elevators inside

• all gender washrooms available

• please avoid scented products (we will have unscented soap)

• closest TTC station is Wellesley which is *not* an accessible station. The next closest TTC station is Bloor-Yonge, which is accessible

• we regret that we are unable to offer ASL interpretation

2. Another Story Bookshop: Book Launch for “Red Light Labour: Sex Work Regulation, Agency, and Resistance!” (October 28, 2018)

Please share on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/events/357705678306431/

Join the editors and book authors to celebrate the launch of...

Red Light Labour: Sex Work Regulation, Agency, and Resistance!

Sunday October 28, 2018   |   6pm – 8pm

Burdock Music Hall** (1148 Bloor St W., Toronto)

www.burdockto.com/

Hosted by Anjula Gogia, with DJ Saira Chhibber

Presenters: Kara Gillies, Elene Lam, Valerie Scott, and Andrea Sterling

Edited by Elya M. Durisin, Emily van der Meulen and Chris Bruckert, this new collection published by the University of British Columbia Press advocates for social and economic justice within a sex-work-as-work framework. Chapter authors explore how anti-sex work laws and those who uphold them have constructed, controlled, and criminalized sex workers, their workspaces, colleagues, and clients. Contributors also highlight sex workers’ struggles for civic and social inclusion by considering their tactics, successes, and challenges as they work collaboratively and build alliances with diverse social movements.

https://www.ubcpress.ca/red-light-labour#

Partial book sale proceeds are being donated to Butterfly: Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Support Network (www.butterflysw.org/)

Sponsored by: the University of British Columbia Press, the Department of Criminology at Ryerson University, and Another Story Bookshop (www.anotherstory.ca).

** Burdock's Music Hall has a wheelchair accessible entrance through the Bottle Shop on Pauline Ave., however the washrooms are located down a flight of stairs in the basement.

3. Global Labour Speaker Series Presents-The Women’s March and Intersectional Organizing: The importance of a critical race lens in industrial relations (October 29, 2018)

The Global Labour Speaker Series is pleased to host

The Women’s March and Intersectional Organizing: The importance of a critical race lens in industrial relations with

Dr. Tamara Lee, Labor Studies and Employment Relations, Rutgers University

Dr. Maite Tapia, Human Resources and Labor Relations, Michigan State University

Monday, October 29th

Ross S802, York University

11:30am-1:00pm

Many scholars concerned with union revitalization in the United States focus on the structural obstacles that have restricted traditional union organizing. We turn our attention away from these well researched impediments to statutory union representation and focus instead on contemporary opportunities for worker organizing in an era of growing workforce diversity and heightened public discourse about identity politics.

Through a unique natural experiment with intimate data access, we examine the intersectional organizing processes of the national Women’s March over the past two years. opportunities for more inclusive frameworks for worker organizing, as well as illustrates the challenges and opportunities to building a more equitable solidarity based on a full acknowledgment of systemic discrimination and a focus on intra-class inequality. Thus, intersectional organizing is an important approach not only for union renewal, but for union relevance in a highly inequitable society.

Dr. Tamara L. Lee, Esq. is an industrial engineer and labor lawyer by professional training. She received her Ph.D. from the department of labor relations, law and history from the ILR School at Cornell University. Her academic research focuses on the popular participation of workers in macro-level political and economic reform in Cuba and the United States. She also conducts research on the political practice of workers under the National Labor Relations Act, the intersection of labor and racial justice, cross-movement solidarity building and the impact of radical adult education on workplace democracy. Her teaching focuses on identity politics in the workplace, and labor market discrimination

Dr. Maite Tapia is an Assistant Professor at the School of Human Resources and Labor Relations at Michigan State University. Her research revolves around organizing strategies of trade unions and community organizations in the US and Europe, as well as work, migration, and the concept of intersectionality. She has published some of her work in the British Journal of Industrial Relations, Socio-Economic Review, the International Journal of Human Resource Management, and the Journal of Industrial Relations and is co-editor of the 2014 Cornell University Press book “Mobilizing against Inequality: Unions, Immigrant Workers, and the Crisis of Capitalism.”.

This is a free event, however seats are limited. Please RSVP!

RSVP via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/the-womens-march-and-intersectional-organizing-tickets-51035077290

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/249548399045004/

Light refreshments will be served.

All are welcome.

The Global Labour Speaker Series is organized by the Global Labour Research Centre at York University and is co-sponsored by Department of Social Science, Department of Politics, Department of History, School of Social Work, CERLAC, Faculty of Education, Department of Geography, Department of Sociology and School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Study.

4. Workshop: Studio for Media Activism & Critical Thought's 2018-19 Workshop Series Presents #NotMyPremier: Media Activism in Ford's Ontario (October 30, 2018)

JOIN US AT

99 Gerrard Street East, Room SHE 560

Join us for the first event in the Studio for Media Activism & Critical Thought's 2018-19 Workshop Series, #NotMyPremier: Media Activism in Ford's Ontario

Toronto is angry. We have since gone to Queen’s Park, written letters and articles in protest to what the Doug Ford and the Ontario PCs have done. But what else do we do? What else can we do to disrupt, to make known our disappointment with the current government? Now is the time to mobilize. But how we even begin?

The event will feature Cheryl Thompson (Assistant Professor of Creative Industries at Ryerson University and author of Beauty In A Box: Detangling The Roots Of Canada's Black Beauty Culture, March 2019), Jessie Golem (photographer and creator of Humans of Basic Income), Shelagh Pizey-Allen (executive director of TTC Riders), and claude wittmann (Toronto performance artist and activist involved in the 100 Letters in 100 Days Campaign), who will share their own experiences of media activism.

Event Details

Date: Tuesday, October 30, 7:00 – 9:30 pm

Location: Ryerson University, Sally Horsfall Eaton Centre, 99 Gerrard St. E., Room 560 (fifth floor)

This event is free, wheelchair accessible, and will have ASL interpretation

5. Public Lecture: YUFA Race Equity Caucus Presents Dr. Zoila Airall “Paradoxes: The Art of the Mission, Strategy and Commitment to Advancing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion” (November 2, 2018)

YUFA’s Race Equity Caucus (REC) has been instrumental in raising concerns around race equity within the context of YUFA’s governance, workload, and bargaining, and the broader socio-political and institutional spheres that condition our lives at York University. On November 2, REC is honoured to present a public lecture by Dr. Zoila Airall, the Associate Vice President, Campus Life, Duke University.

Paradoxes:

The Art of the Mission, Strategy and Commitment to Advancing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

A public lecture by Dr. Zoila Airall, Associate Vice President, Campus Life, Duke University

Friday, November 2

2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Founders Assembly Hall

152 Founders College

This lecture is open to all members of the York Community. For more information, please email yufa@yorku.ca.

6. CERLAC Public Lecture: The 2018 Michael Baptista Lecture: Activism, Archives, and Performance: Commemorating 40 Years of CERLAC (November 8, 2018)

The 2018 Baptista Lecture commemorates the 40th anniversary of the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean with a talk by performance studies scholar Diana Taylor. The lecture will be preceded by a panel highlighting CERLAC’s record in supporting activism in the region over the past 40 years, with a particular focus on the CERLAC archives and their uses for understanding activism in Latin America.

Date: Thursday, November 8, 2018

Time: 2:00pm to 5:00pm

Place: Joseph G. Green Theater (Centre for Film and Theater) York University

Reception to follow

“ 'Making Presence': Regina José Galindo, Earth (2013)”
Is performing testimony, testimony? In Earth (2013), Guatemalan performance artist Regina José Galindo performs an event recounted by survivors of genocide at the trial of the exdictator Efrain Rios Montt. The archival testimony tells of how people were forced to dig a massive pit and then stand in front of it, to facilitate their execution and internment by the armed forces. The performance does not cite or allude to the testimony nor to the criminal acts that led up to it. So my question: what does the performance do or transmit? Does it expose? Denounce? Bear witness? Or is the performance itself a form of testimony?

7. York Information Session: Building collaborations and partnerships in the Social Sciences and Humanities (November 8, 2018)

10 AM to 12 PM

Harry Crowe Room (Atkinson 109)

You are invited to attend the Building collaborations and partnerships in the Social Sciences and Humanities event.

This information session is intended for faculty members working in SSHRC disciplines who are interested in getting a better understanding of how to develop fruitful collaborations with academic, community, and/or industry partners, as well as build and run large-scale research projects.

Following a roundtable discussion format, this session will be led by SSHRC-funded faculty members who have a successful history with such endeavours:

Pat Armstrong, Professor, Sociology, LA&PS – Principal Investigator, Reimagining Long-Term Residential Care & Co-Editor of the book, Creative Teamwork: Developing Rapid, Site-Switching Ethnography

Stephen Gaetz, Professor, Education – Director, Canadian Observatory on Homelessness & the Homeless Hub

Carolyn Podruchny, Associate Professor, History, LA&PS – Principal Investigator, “Aandse: Anishinaabe ways of knowing and the transformation of university-based knowledge creation and transfer”

Anna Hudson, Professor, Visual Art & Art History, AMPD – Director, Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage

Janine Marchessault, Dept. of Cinema & Media Arts, AMPD – Director, Archive / Counter-Archive

Michael Johnny, Manager, Knowledge Mobilization, Innovation York will also participate and share his expertise as relates to facilitating partnership building and knowledge mobilization.

This is a great opportunity for York community members, either early career or mid-career who are ready to change gears, to learn from their peers about the various approaches to forming collaborations and partnerships, and how to successfully maintain them.

Please RSVP if you are interested in attending this event. Refreshments will be served.

8. Lecture: Dr. Julian Gill-Peterson, author of Histories of the Transgender Child (November 14, 2018)

Join us for a lecture and Q&A with Dr. Julian Gill-Peterson, author of Histories of the Transgender Child (University of Minnesota Press, 2018)

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

11:30 AM – 2:30 PM

Winters College 030

York University

Discussant: Dr. Julia Sinclair-Palm, Carleton University

A light lunch will be served.

The Libel of Being New: Trans Children’s Letters to Doctors in the 1960s

Transgender children today face a libel against the reality of their existence in the assumption that they are a brand new generation, unprecedented and without history. This talk explores how that costly falsehood can be challenged and overcome by locating trans children on the front lines of negotiating the postwar medical model that emerged in the 1960s, turning to a remarkable and difficult archive of letters written by children to doctors during that decade.

9. Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies (IFLS) talk: “Is it a man’s world? A feminist reimagining the right to free speech in the aftermath of the Charlottesville race riots” by Camile Gear Rich (November 16, 2018)

Please join the Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies for this lunch talk on November 16 - do RSVP for space & catering purposes

Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies

Speaker series 2018-2019

Friday November 16 2018

1230 -2PM | Room 4034

Osgoode Hall Law School

Lunch served.  Please RSVP https://bit.ly/2P24sja

Camille Gear Rich, USC Gould School of Law

Is it a man’s world? A feminist reimagining the right to free speech in the aftermath of the Charlottesville race riots

Camille Gear Rich’s research and teaching interests include constitutional law, feminist legal theory, family law, children and the law and the First Amendment. She is the founder and director of PRISM: The USC Initiative for the Study of Race, Gender, Sexuality and the Law. She is also the founding director of Gould's First Generation Legal Professionals program. Rich is widely know for her research on law, discrimination and identity formation issues related to race, class, gender and sexuality.

Follow the IFLS via our website: https://ifls.osgoode.yorku.ca/

Or on twitter @OsgoodeIFLS

Save the Dates for upcoming speakers in this series:

Thursday, January 17 Alice Woolley, University of Calgary Law, Nasty Women & The Rule of Law “…the reasons for and consequences of how we talk about women lawyers.”

Wednesday, January 25 Catherine Hernandez, author of Scarborough “in conversation” about Access to Justice and Building Community in the absence of institutions.

10. Free Event: Inanna Publications 40th Anniversary Party (November 22, 2018) 

Join Inanna Publications as we celebrate 40 year of feminist publishing (1978-2018) @ Tranzac Club, 292 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto. Live music, dancing, refreshments, revelry, and raffle prizes. Featuring the amazing funk and soul stylings  of GRACE -  a Toronto based funksoulicious band of women bringing you  r&b, funk, soul, disco, rock and a whole lotta love! Not to be missed. Doors open 7:30pm. Free event. Details here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/come-out-and-celebrate-inanna-publications-40th-anniversary-tickets-51593269859?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

CALLS: 

1. Call for Papers, Posters, and Roundtable Proposals: UCLA Center for the Study of Women Presents Thinking Gender 2019: Feminists Confronting the Carceral State - 29th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference (October 28, 2018)

The UCLA Center for the Study of Women invites submissions of paper, poster, and roundtable proposals for our 29th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference. This year’s conference theme, Feminists Confronting the Carceral State, will focus on the gendered regimes of captivity, state violence, and incarceration, emphasizing feminist, queer, trans, abolitionist, and intersectional interventions.

We are specifically interested in presentations that explore gender differences in and gender as a mediator of incarceration and detention. We invite proposals for papers, roundtable presentations, and posters related to the captivity and subjugation of women, transgender, and gender-nonconforming individuals to state-sanctioned violence. We also welcome research on the criminalization of gender and sexual non-conformity, social institutions and carceral control, and intersectional abolitionist responses—historical and contemporary—to punishment.

Deadline for All Proposal Submissions:

Sunday, October 28, 2018 at 11:59PM PDT

Submission Information

We invite proposal submissions for the following categories:

Panel Presentations

Posters

Roundtable Sessions

Registered graduate students from any institution are eligible to submit presentation proposals for all Thinking Gender sessions, including the panel, poster, and roundtable presentations.

Registered undergraduate students from any institution are eligible to submit proposals for poster presentations only.

Full details – including proposal length requirements and additional specifications – are available in the attached call for proposals and on our website at http://csw.ucla.edu/TG19-CFP.

Registration Fee

To participate in Thinking Gender, successful applicants will be required to pay a registration fee of $50, the entirety of which will go towards covering conference costs.

Travel Grants

A limited number of Travel Grants will be available to support student presenter travel.  Application details will be provided to accepted presenters.

Deadlines

The deadline for all submission proposals is October 28, 2018. Submissions must be made online via the link at http://csw.ucla.edu/TG19-CFP. Once submissions are reviewed and accepted, all participants in the paper panel sessions will be required to submit a draft of their paper by January 28, 2019, for pre-circulation among their co-panelists and faculty moderator.

For full details, including proposal length requirements, additional specifications, and a link to the online submission system, visit http://csw.ucla.edu/TG19-CFP.

2. Call for Applications: Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada: 2019-2020 Contributions Program (October 31, 2018)

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) recently issued a Call for Proposals (CFP) under its 2019-20 Contributions Program and is encouraging the submission of research and knowledge translation applications that advance its strategic privacy priorities.   A summary is provided below.

Objectives are to:

·        Strengthen existing privacy research capacity in academic and not-for-profit sectors;

·         Generate new knowledge and support the development of expertise in selected areas of privacy and data protection;

·         Increase awareness and understanding among individuals and organizations across Canada of their privacy rights and obligations; and,

·         Promote uptake and application of research results by relevant stakeholders,

This year the OPC is interested in funding proposals for the planning and organization of one or more “design jams”.

A design jam is a sprint-like event, spanning one or more days, in which a broad range of participants (computer programmers, designers, impacted individuals, etc.) come together to collaboratively address a defined problem. The goal of a design jam is to finish with one or more prototype solutions which can then be further developed and/or made available to the public.

As design jams often have a precise focus, OPC would be interested in funding one or more events that are aimed at developing new, cutting-edge consent solutions that incorporate the OPC’s Guidelines for obtaining meaningful consent.

Design jam should aim to improve how consent is obtained in the digital world.

These may include, but are not limited to:

·        Consumer-facing tools: Tools that help users understand/navigate their consent choices;

·         Implementation tools: Designs and/or technologies which can be used by companies to implement our guidelines;

·         Industry-specific consent mechanisms: Mechanisms to help create a more consistent consent experience across an industry;

·         Standardized privacy settings: Patterns that make it easier for users to understand privacy settings, by making them more consistent across services.

Value: Up to $100K

Required Overhead: 15%

Duration: One year

Deadlines: Submission to ORS – October 31, 2018

Submission to agency – November 14, 2018 by 11:59 PM

For further details on this program, please consult the following links:

https://www.priv.gc.ca/en/opc-actions-and-decisions/research/funding-for-privacy-research-and-knowledge-translation/

https://www.priv.gc.ca/en/opc-actions-and-decisions/research/funding-for-privacy-research-and-knowledge-translation/how-to-apply-for-contributions-program-funding/applying-for-funding-under-the-contributions-program-annual-call-for-proposals/cp_guide/

3. Call for Abstract Submissions: Global Labour Research Centre Graduate Student Symposium (November 4, 2018)

The Global Labour Research Centre at York University invites proposals for presentations at its upcoming fourth annual international graduate student symposium, which will take place on February 21-22, 2019. To encourage the formation of the broadest intellectual community, we invite proposals on a wide range of issues and areas of research, including (but not limited to):

• Work, employment, and labour rights

• Migration, citizenship, and work

• Inequality, work, and labour markets

• Gender relations at work and in labour movements

• Revitalization of workers’ movements

• Work and popular culture

• Labour, colonialism, and decolonization

• Work, labour movements, and the environment

• Work and health

The symposium is designed to provide an interdisciplinary venue for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows to share their research ideas in a collaborative and supportive environment.

Submissions may include dissertation proposals or chapters, major research papers, or course papers. Participants are encouraged to present on works in progress. In addition, symposium participants will be encouraged to submit their papers for consideration for publication in the GLRC’s Graduate Symposium Proceedings.

Deadline for Submissions | November 4, 2018

• Title and a 150-word abstract of the proposed poster or panel presentation; and

• A short biography, including list of degrees, current position and research interests

Registration Fee | $30

Please submit your proposal and supporting information using the following link.

Submitters will be notified on the status of their proposal by November 16, 2018. For more

information about the symposium, please visit http://glrc.apps01.yorku.ca/event/international-

graduate-student-symposium-2019/

4. Call for Submissions: 2019 FAC Residency for Artists with Focus on Social Justice (November 14, 2018) 

The FAC residency will gather artists from May 13th to May 27th on Toronto Islands.  Please help us spread the word to your interested networks.

FAC will gather artists together who focus on social justice issues such as rape culture, transphobia, racism, ageism ableism, media representation, cultural appropriation, environmental degradation and impact on Indigenous lands, gender-based violence, and Islamophobic policies. We aim to create a space that is celebratory, positive, intellectually engaging and provocative. We are committed to this space being trans-inclusive, anti-racist, and intersectional.

The residency will include individual studio time accented with group discussions, communal dinners, film, guest speakers, group and individual critiques and trips into Toronto for gallery tours and relevant events.

Click here for submission details: factoronto.org/fac-residency-2019-call-for-submissions/

For sharing with your community we are including a JPEG for social media posts as well as a PDF for sharing over email.

For Twitter:  Call for Submissions: #Feminist Art Residency @torontofac hosted by @gibraltarpoint May 13 to May 27th 2019. Details here for submissions due on November 14th here: factoronto.org/fac-residency-2019-call-for-submissions/ #FeministArt #Residency #Toronto

For Facebook: @FeministArtCollectiveTO has launched their annual residency Call for Submissions! Hosted by @gibraltarpointTO May 13th to May 27th 2019 on Toronto Islands. Details for submission due November 14th here factoronto.org/fac-residency-2019-call-for-submissions/

For Instagram: @torontofac has launched their residency call for submissions! Hosted by @gibraltarpointto on Toronto Island from May 13th to May 27th 2019. Call for submissions due on November 14th. Visit torontofac.orgfor details. #FeministArt #ArtistResidency #Art #TorontoIslands

In Solidarity,

FAC Committee

5. Call for Papers: Against the Mythologies of the 1969 Criminal Code Reform (November 30, 2018)

Anti-69 is taking place on the unceded territories of the Algonquin nation.

In May 1969, amidst the rhetoric of the “Just Society,” the White Paper on the extinguishing of Indigenous sovereignty, and the early years of the initiation of state ‘multiculturalism,’ the Canadian government passed an omnibus Criminal Code reform bill. The Omnibus Bill is often celebrated based on the idea that it legalized or entirely decriminalized homosexuality, that Pierre Elliott Trudeau was trying to bring about equality for lesbians and gays, or that the reform established the right of women to access abortion and reproductive rights. None of these claims are true. To be sure, the legislation covered a wide range of changes including: reforms to the ‘homosexual’ offences of ‘gross indecency’ and ‘buggery’ that removed the criminal prohibition from acts committed in ‘private’ and involving only two people aged 21 and over; the decriminalization of limited access to abortion on ‘health’ grounds, if approved by a therapeutic abortion committee; and, in a related bill, the decriminalization of contraceptive information. However, after the reform, police charges against ‘homosexual’ sex increased, access to abortion and reproductive rights continued to be severely restricted, and barriers to accessing birth control continued.

2019 is the 50th anniversary of the Omnibus Bill and a series of public events and installations are being organized to celebrate it. We think it is crucial that space also be provided for critical voices.

Anti-69 is being organized to provide a forum for scholarly and activist work critical of the mythologies and limitations of the 1969 Criminal Code reform. Although focused on the Criminal Code, we intend to look at the reform—and the struggles around it—in its broader social, historical, colonial, classed, racialized, gendered and sexualized contexts.

Topics could include:

The Wolfenden report and the public/private, adult/youth strategy of sexual regulation/policing

Critical perspectives on Trudeau’s ‘Just Society’ project

The relation between the 69 reform and the White Paper on extinguishing Indigenous sovereignty

Birth control, abortion, and the 69 reform

Policing and sex workers

The impacts of the public/private strategy and the construction of the ‘public’ indecency of queer sex on the regulation of sexually explicit materials

Lesbian identity, lesbian liberation and/or the social and legal construction of lesbians and lesbianism

The treatment of queer people, gender nonconforming people, and sex workers in the prison system

The impacts of the 69 reform on Black, Indigenous and people of colour (BIPOC)

The relation between criminal law reform efforts and shifts away from an explicitly White Canada immigration policy

The limitations of state multiculturalism and the 69 reform

The impact of the reforms in smaller urban centres and rural areas

The national security campaigns and the 69 reform

Transnational discussions of the 69 reform

The construction of the ‘private’ responsible homosexual through the 69 reform

The impacts of the 69 reform on the gender binary and on trans people

How the reform led to an escalation of sexual policing against gay sex in the 70s and 80s

Early organizing efforts against the limitations of the 69 reform including the Abortion Caravan and the We Demand demonstration

The use of the free-standing abortion clinic strategy in challenging the limitations of the 69 reform

The use of the mythology of the 69 reform in the 2017 apology process

We are asking all people interested in presenting at the event to submit individual proposals of 150 words or proposals for panels, roundtables, and workshops of no more than 250 words. Please also attach a brief biography and send to papers@anti-69.ca by November 30, 2018. The venue is wheelchair accessible. Registration fees will be on a sliding scale, with no fee for low-income people.

Organizing committee: Tom Hooper, Lara Karaian, Gary Kinsman, Suzanne Lenon, Cassandra Lord, Danielle Normandeau, Karen Pearlston

6. Call for Nominations: Women's and Gender Studies et Recherches Féministes Outstanding Scholarship Prize 2018-2019 (December 1, 2018)

This annual prize, established in 2002, acknowledges the important contributions that Women’s and Gender Studies scholars have made to the field in the form of a monograph, edited collection, or a significant documentary film. The monograph, edited collection, or significant documentary film must have been published or distributed, in either English or French, between **1 January 2017 and 31 December 2017.**

The award will recognize work produced by Canadian scholars/filmmakers, work published or produced by Canadian presses/film production agencies, or work on Canadian topics. In order to be considered, all nominated authors and filmmakers must be members of the Association in good standing, during the year of the nomination and the year in which the prize is granted.

The nominated work must make a significant scholarly contribution to and expand knowledge and theorizing in the discipline of Women’s and Gender Studies, as determined by a committee of up to five WGSRF members.

Criteria include:

(i) relevance to Women’s and Gender Studies

(ii) currency of the subject matter to current debates and discussions

(iii) quality of style, presentation, research, and methodology

(iv) originality

Nominations are solicited from association members in good standing, book publishers, and film distributers. Authors may not nominate their own publications/documentary films, or publications/documentary films in which they have personal or financial interests.

The winner and any honourable mentions will be announced at the 2019 WGSRF annual conference at the University of British Columbia in late May 2019.

To nominate a monograph, edited anthology, or documentary film, please: arrange for one copy of the book or documentary to be sent to each person listed below:

Marie Lovrod

Women’s and Gender Studies

University of Saskatchewan

9 Campus Drive

Saskatoon, SK

S7N 5A5

Hans Rollman

85 Barters Hill

St. John’s, NL

A1C 4K6

Manuela Valle-Castro

Women’s and Gender Studies

University of Saskatchewan

9 Campus Drive

Saskatoon, SK

S7N 5A5

Annalee Lepp

Department of Gender Studies

P.O. Box 1700 Station CSC

Victoria, BC

V8W 2Y2

Questions? Contact Annalee Lepp at alepp@uvic.ca.

7. Call for papers: Indigenous self-determination in a ‘chronically mobile’ world: Critical perspectives from anti-racist scholars of migration and mobility (December 15, 2018)

Journal: Studies in Social Justice-https://journals.library.brocku.ca/index.php/SSJ/index

Issue Editors

Soma Chatterjee, PhD. Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, York University; Tania Das Gupta, PhD. Professor, Department of Equity Studies, York University

In a world of ‘accelerated dispossession’ (McNally, 2013), the right to migration is often a key pathway for freedom, albeit one that is unequally accessed by dominant and subaltern actors. And yet, the exercise of this right (e.g., via cross-border migration and subsequent justice claims) risks compromising the rights of Indigenous peoples who are internally displaced. As Dean Saranillio (2013) compellingly put it in the context of Hawaii: “the avenues laid out for immigrants’ success and empowerment are paved over native lands and sovereignty”. However, in the contemporary global order immigrants, migrants and refugees continue to meet Indigenous nations in contested geopolitical territories, and are faced with the complex responsibility of carving out a workable and just co-existence. It is in this context of world-wide migratory movements and ongoing occupations that we situate this special issue.

More than a decade has passed since Bonita Lawrence and Enakshi Dua (2005) signaled the necessity for more research on conflicts and collaborations between Indigenous and anti-racist justice (see also, Dhamoon, 2014; Jafri, 2012; Phung, 2011, Sehdev, 2011). More recently, Chickasaw scholar Jodi Byrd (2011) contemplated whether “… arrivants and other people forced to move through empire” could exercise their democratic justice claims without pushing Indigenous dispossession ‘toward a vanishing point’. Alongside and following such field-defining interventions highlighting the tensions and contradictions between anti-racist (which we understand to be a political position encompassing immigrant, refugee and broader diaspora issues) and Indigenous justice projects, a range of scholars have also drawn crucial attention to their separation as not natural, but constitutive of settler colonial capitalist nationalism (Chatterjee, 2018a, b, Day, 2016; Mamdani, 2012; Sharma, 2010, 2012, 2015; Stanley et al, 2014; see also Bakan, 2008; Bannerji, 2005; Coulthard, 2013; Sharma & Wright, 2008; Left Turn, 2007 etc.).

As such, the proposed special issue seeks to explore how anti-racist scholars, educators, and activists grapple with Indigenous self-determination as they conceptualize social justice in a world that Anthropologist Lisa Malkii (1992) evocatively called ‘chronically mobile’. What are their theoretical, epistemological and methodological considerations with regards to the political citizenship of migrant and refugee populations in occupied lands? Do their conceptualizations of anti-racist justice explicitly engage Indigenous self-determination? What are the challenges and possibilities in such engagements? To use but one example, what are the possibilities and challenges of ‘no border’ politics (a movement deeply committed to right to mobility as fundamental to migrant justice) in the geopolitical contexts of settler colonialism? Further, which are the disciplines at the front lines of these discussions and what insights (particularly interdisciplinary) could be drawn from those? Similarly, what are the views from activist frontlines which often are in productive tension with theoretical insights, or the postsecondary sector which has emerged as a key site for reconciliation? These are but a few of the questions we are interested in.

While rooted in an interest in Canadian anti-racist scholarship and the highly insightful debates and discussions cited above, we also invite abstracts from other sites where similar questions are being asked, and dialogues are underway (e.g., USA, New Zealand, Australia, The Pacific Islands, Norway, and parts of postcolonial South). We also bring to this special issue a resolutely interdisciplinary stance. As such, we invite contributions from interdisciplinary migration scholarship from Sociology, the broader Migration, Transnationalism and Diaspora Studies, Geography, Critical Race Studies, Indigenous Studies, Social Work, Women and Gender Studies, Disability Studies, Politics and Governance, Literature, Equity Studies, Education, Cultural Studies, Canadian Studies, and Environmental Studies etc.

We seek full-length articles, creative interventions and dispatches (see below for details on each of these). We also welcome contributions in the form of interviews and dialogues. As issue editors we plan to invite and engage discussants and/or provocateurs to further animate the conversations generated by the various contributions selected for the special issue.

Submission & publication timeline & other details

Please submit 250 words abstract to Soma Chatterjee & Tania Das Gupta at chatterjeedasgupta@gmail.com by 15th Dec, 2018. Please clearly indicate which of the three categories your contribution belongs to. Please do not hesitate to reach out to us if you have questions.

Abstract selection: by 15th January, 2019

Final paper submission to guest editors: 31st May, 2019

Initial review by editors and invitation for double blind review: 31st August, 2019

Reviews, revisions and final completion of special issue by: July-Aug, 2020

Articles (6 – 8,000 words): Original, previously-unpublished, and fully-referenced research contributions that significantly extend knowledge in the topic called for in the special issue along substantive, theoretical or methodological lines, and which are likely to be of interest to researchers and practitioners. Articles are peer-reviewed in a double-blind process.

Dispatches (< 4,000 words): Reports or commentaries from the non-academic and academic spaces of social justice practice, discourse and contestation. Dispatches may report on research activities, methodological innovations, movement experiences, mobilization efforts, educational practices, social justice events and actions, etc. Their aim is to show how theory is put to work in the field and to allow practitioners to enter a dialogue with academics that not only enriches research approaches but overcomes challenges many of us face because of a historically hierarchical flow of information from academia to the field. They need not employ an academic writing style or speaking position. Dispatches will be reviewed and vetted by the editorial team, which will work with authors as necessary to help shape submissions for publication. They will not be exposed to a blind review process.

Creative Interventions: Visual, aural or textual products using an aesthetic or evocative mode of address. Creative interventions will be reviewed and vetted by members of the editorial team or others with competence in the relevant areas of creative practice. They will not be exposed to a blind review process.

8. Call for Papers: The Globalization Project: Falling Behind or Failing Forward?  Presented by Alternate Routes: A Journal of Critical Social Research and the University of Turin, in conjunction with the ILO-sponsored gallery exhibition Behind the Indian Boom: Invisible India (December 31, 2018)

Alternate Routes: A Journal of Critical Social Research and the University of Turin, in conjunction with the ILO-sponsored gallery exhibition Behind the Indian Boom: Invisible India, invites submissions for our latest conference and special issue: The Globalization Project: Falling Behind or Failing Forward?

A retrospective with future implications: 2019 marks eleven years since the Great Recession and bank bailouts began, ten years since the Keynesian stimulus comeback, nine years since the recent austerity push, three years since the Paris Agreement, twenty years since the launch of the Euro, thirty years since the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement came into effect, and more than forty years since the ‘other’ 9/11 and onset of monetarism. How might we evaluate the longue duree of neoliberalism, and what might more recent trends like rightwing populism and illiberalism mean for the future of neoliberalism and the globalization project? How are labour and other social movements responding? What role, if any, for social democracy? And what to make of twenty-first century socialism?

Alternate Routes invites panel and paper proposals for its upcoming annual conference that probe the dialectic of continuity and change. To encourage broad intellectual engagement and debate, we are seeking paper and panel proposals on a wide range of topics relating to these trends, including but not limited to:

• Nationalism and Alt-Populisms

• The Neoliberal State and Globalism

• Labour Market Restructuring, Precarious work and Un(der)employment

• International Relations and Diplomacy

• Language, Literature and Art

• Uneven and Contradictory Regional Development

• Transnational Institutions and Global Governance

• Racialization and Gender Inequalities

• Imperialism and Colonialism

• International Trade and Investment

• Climate Change and ‘Green’ Capitalism

• Human Rights and Global Equity

For a full description visit www.alternateroutes.ca. Submissions are due no later than December 31st, 2018.

OPPORTUNITIES:

1. Volunteer Opportunity: International Opportunities for Volunteer Work in Gender and Women’s Studies

Have you always wanted to work on women & gender issues in other countries? You are needed in many places:

WOMEN & LITERACY: Uganda & Cameroon

Teach adult women who were excluded from an education how to read & write.

Most women over 30 were told by their fathers "I only have enough money to pay your brothers' school fees. You are only going to be a wife."

These women hunger to learn to read & write.

Work in the remote, rural villages in tropical Cameroon or the breath-taking mountains of Uganda.

EDUCATION: Uganda, Ghana, Kenya, Cameroon In most parts of Africa, fathers told their daughters "I only have enough money for your brothers' school fees.

Besides, you are just going to be a wife." It is only in the last 5-10 years that girls are allowed an education.

Now that girls are included in schools, we need your help:

Uganda secondary school: teach or tutor in English (writing, literature & grammar), Math, Chemistry, Physics or Biology.

Kenya primary: teach kids who have been orphaned by AIDS. Scrabble is the rage.

Ghana: tutoring/enrichment program for kids that were skipping school. Ghana is one of the drumming-est places in Africa You need not have special credentials for these placements. Just a desire to help with "girl child education."

WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT: Jordan

This organization is doing ground-breaking work with women: 1. economic empowerment - teaching job skills & entrepreneurship, including helping women work in the trades (which is really, really unusual for the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region); 2. social empowerment - launching discussions about women's & men's roles - which is also very unusual - and expanding what women can do and how they see themselves; 3. building leadership skills & political participation. 4. reproductive & sexual health. They would like people who can work with women at one of their 50 centers around country. You do not need to be able to speak Arabic but clearly it is great if you can. Jordan has earned its reputation as very friendly & safe. 50% of women who work with are Syrian refugees.

SEX TRAFFICKING: Nepal

~7,000 women and girls are trafficked from Nepal into India's sex trade per year.

Sex traffickers prey on young women in remote, remote parts of Nepal that want out of poverty.

Traffickers promise them a job; instead girls are tricked into prostitution and sexual exploitation in India.

Are you a rugged hiker? Come help in the remote villages: teach English and literacy to create another life for these girls.

Or work in their legal program teaching women their rights. Grant writers also needed.

BEGINNING STEPS re WOMEN & GENDER: Peru

This organization does many, many things: nutrition, education, health and farming.

They would also like to start discussions at their center and in remote villages about women and gender:

discussing women's roles and rights. Their aim is to begin to shift attitudes. Like in Africa, a women's body is not considered her own. A women's role is very constricted. Thus not radical but gentle steps in the beginning.

Spanish is essential; and if you can speak Quechua, a real plus.

This site is a great location for exploring Machu Picchu/ the Sacred Valley, Cuzco, Lake Titicaca and the Amazon.

ALTERNATIVES TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: Cameroon When a social worker from Canada asked an audience of 50 men, how many of them beat their wives. 48 hands went up!

"Why" "How else would you get them to mind?" You will also see corporeal punishment in schools and homes.

Are you comfortable with public speaking? Come teach positive reinforcement and other ways of interacting.

It would be especially helpful to have male Gender Studies students who can help shift attitudes and behavior.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: Costa Rica  - Spanish fluency required Work in the shelter; do community education; help women become economically independent so they can leave abusive relationships; and/or help develop counseling programs for women, men and kids.

If you have background in counseling, help with crisis, individual and group therapy.

If you have volunteered in a shelter (and can also speak Spanish) then you are also qualified for this placement.

Men who have backgrounds in Social Work or Psychology are needed to help start their men's program.

FAMILY PLANNING: Ghana & Cameroon

For women that have 10 kids, they will tell you that contraception is life changing.

African women realize that if they had fewer kids, they would have fewer mouths to feed and be less poor.

Now there is a groundswell in Africa and they are asking for help with this.

We need: people that can teach about various kinds of contraception that are within their reach; people that help with a shift in consciousness - a woman is considered property of her husband; a woman is often told by her mother to "do (sexually) anything he wants" - so that women see their body as their own.

We need men helping with this! Most African men are not willing to wear a condom...thus babies & AIDS.

INDIGENOUS WOMEN: Ecuador

Ecuador's indigenous people have gained more clout in the last 20 years.

Come teach farming or join indigenous women in the fields to help feed their families.

This is a beautiful part of Ecuador: volcanoes and colorfully clothed indigenous women.

Spanish is a must; Quechua a plus.

EMPOWERING GIRLS: India

This organization provides an positive alternative to alcoholic or abusive environments.

Come help with homework, assist in the school, help with vocational and mentor girls about future choices.

If you want to see the lives of females improved n the world, this is a good fit! Come help!

If you have strong experience, then you can train staff about signs and impact of physical, sexual and alcohol abuse.

If you have strong counseling skills, you can counsel girls. Good place for both experienced & beginning therapists.

This is in a part of India that has almost 100% literacy: known for bright, very friendly people and a beautiful coast!

MICRO-FINANCE & INCOME GENERATION: Rwanda, Costa Rica, India, Ecuador, Lebanon Most women in the poorer parts of the world would say empowerment is earning money for the family.

Micro-finance and "livelihood" skills are an important ticket out of poverty.

The most important part of MF is not the loan but helping micro-enterpreneurs succeed.

Costa Rica has an extraordinary dynamic female director: hilarious and gracious.

India is much more like the Grameen model - helping the poor in many ways.

Ecuador reflects the model that grew out of Liberation Theology: forming cooperatives.

Rwanda asks for help in Finance, IT (analyzing their database), Marketing or Operations.

Lebanon is sophisticated asking for help in operations, risk assessment & management, auditing.

Lebanese MFI would also like help developing mobile app, eCommerce & NF trainings.

If you want to work with women in community in Lebanon, Arabic is essential.

SEXUAL ABUSE: Kenya

While physical abuse/ domestic violence is beginning to be addressed throughout Africa, sexual abuse is still taboo and unaddressed. This program is an exception.

Experienced in trauma, sexual abuse, gender based violence, EMDR and/or PTSD? We need you here!

WOMEN'S HEALTH: Uganda

If you have a background in Public Health, Midwifery, maternal & child health you are needed at our 2 clinics.

LEGAL LITERACY: Cameroon

Throughout most of Africa, most citizens do not know their legal rights or how the legal system works.

They do not know how to make a complaint or testify in court. Empower common citizens by teaching them labor, family and inheritance law and how the legal process works. Enact it with them.

Throughout most of Africa, women are considered property of their husband.

If husband dies, the wife is dispossessed of the land that feeds her and the children and is inherited by husband's brother.

Thus inheritance law is perhaps the most crucial legal and human rights issue.

Are you an attorney, or do you have a background in law or are even pre-law? Come empower & teach!

Interested?

HOW TO APPLY

Please read NGOabroad website

http://www.ngoabroad.com/

and send answered Questionnaire and resume to:

info@NGOabroad.com

These are volunteer opportunities.

Both students & experienced professionals needed.

In all of these placements, both women and men are needed.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Most placements can fit to your schedule and for how long you can go.

WHEN TO APPLY

*People are already beginning to apply to volunteer in June, July & August.

We send this first announcement in Oct or Nov for those that like to get a leap on their summer plans.

We will send a 2nd, sometimes slightly revised, announcement in Jan or Feb.

It is smart to finish application process by March so you have time to prepare to go to another country.

Our volunteer programs do not just run in June, July & August - that is simply when the most people can go.

Except primary & secondary schools that have school schedules to adhere to, most of our programs run year round.

2. Funding Available Via Mitacs GRA for Students Pursuing International Travel

With the new academic year in full swing, you may have begun planning for international travel, whether for next semester or next year. If you haven’t already, you may wish to apply for Mitacs’s Globalink Research Award (GRA).

Recipients can get $6,000 in GRA support for research collaborations with universities abroad. You can submit applications at any time but are encouraged to apply at least 16 weeks prior to planned departure.

Destinations include Australia, China, EU member countries, India, Norway, and the United States — the complete list of eligible destinations is on the award web page, along with a searchable “Find A Professor” list of professors interested in hosting researchers from Canada.

Mitacs is now accepting applications for the Mitacs-JSPS Summer Program, which supports researchers in Canada to undertake 10-week research projects in Japan in Summer 2019. The program is open to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in all disciplines at Canadian universities. The deadline to apply for the Mitacs-JSPS Summer Program is December 5, 2018.

If you have any questions about GRA or the Mitacs-JSPS summer program, contact international@mitacs.ca. We look forward to receiving your applications.

3. Scholarship Opportunity: Lalitha Sundaram Malhotra Memorial Scholarship for an Undergraduate Law Student with A Disability at the University of Ottawa (October 31, 2018)

INTRODUCTION

This fund was generously created by the Malhotra Family in memory of Lalitha Sundaram Malhotra.

PURPOSE OF FUND

To provide financial assistance to undergraduate students registered at the Faculty of Law, Common Law Section at the University of Ottawa who have a physical, psychological or learning disability.

SCHOLARSHIP DETAILS

Eligibility Criteria

The applicant must:

be a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, person with the protected/refugee status or an international student;

be registered as a full-time undergraduate student (or have full-time equivalent status) at the Faculty of Law, Common Law Section of the University of Ottawa;

be in good academic standing;

be a student who has a physical, psychological or learning disability; and

demonstrate a commitment to disability rights.

Value of the award: Minimum $1,000

Number of awards: Variable

Frequency of the award: Annual

Level or program of study: Undergraduate

Application contact: Financial Aid and Awards Service

Application deadline: October 31

https://scholarships.uottawa.ca/p/a/102237/

Now posted to the NEADS website:

http://www.neads.ca/en/about/media/index.php?id=670

4. Job Opportunity: Assistant Lecturer Position in Art History and Visual Culture, Department of Visual Art and Art History at York University (November 12, 2018)

The Department of Visual Art and Art History, School of Arts, Media, Performance, and Design, York University invites applications for a teaching stream (alternate stream) tenure‐track position in Art History and Visual Culture at the rank of Assistant Lecturer, to commence July 1, 2019. The primary responsibilities of the successful candidate will be to teach undergraduate courses and to provide leadership in enhancing teaching and learning through curricular and pedagogical innovation.

A Ph.D. in Art History (completed by the start of the appointment) is required. The successful candidate will be a leader in developing foundational courses for Visual Art and Art History majors and non-majors. A broad, global, critically-engaged understanding of art history is required as is an understanding of contemporary art practices. Expertise in the arts of Africa and the African diaspora, Indigenous arts of the Americas or Islamic art would be desirable. Understanding of the field of art history and expertise in specific areas will be demonstrated through teaching experience and professional practice activities such as, but not limited to, publications, presentations, and exhibitions. If appropriate, the successful candidate may also be appointed to the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

The successful candidate will demonstrate excellence or clear potential for excellence in teaching university-level courses, a strong commitment to pedagogy and student success and the capacity to bring a theoretical and practical orientation to teaching, learning and program design in art history and visual culture. A record of pedagogical innovation in high priority areas such as experiential education, technology enhanced learning and community-based learning is preferred as is experience with curriculum development and universal design approaches to teaching and assessment. The successful candidate is also expected to provide evidence of service contributions or potential to contribute to service in administrative and committee work.

The Department of Visual Art & Art History of York University is one of the leaders in art history and art practice in Canada. Recent renovations of undergraduate studio spaces, expansion of the MFA studios, and a visual art study centre are contributing to the growth of the department. The department is committed to teaching critical issues in art and art history, and to the ongoing development of programs in all studies and studio areas.

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA program, which applies to Aboriginal people, visible minorities, people with disabilities, and women, can be found at www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or by calling the AA office at 416‐736‐5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply and to self-identify; however, Canadian citizens, permanent residents and Indigenous peoples in Canada will be given priority.

The deadline for receipt of completed applications is November 12, 2018. Applicants should submit a signed letter of application outlining professional experience, an up‐to‐date curriculum vitae and a teaching dossier which supports excellence and innovation in teaching such as course outlines, teaching reviews, workshop and professional development programs attended or led, and conference papers and publications relating to pedagogy and provide the names of three referees who can address the candidate’s qualifications and experience in relation to the position. Reference letters will only be requested for long-listed candidates. Applications must also include a completed Citizenship form: http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/. Applicants wishing to self-identify can do so by downloading, completing and submitting the "Affirmative Action" form found at the same site.

Complete application packages should to be sent to Rose LeCoche, Search Committee Secretary, at vaah-search@yorku.ca or in hard copy to: Department of Visual Arts and Art History, School of Arts, Media, Performance, and Design, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3.

5. Job Opportunity: Teaching and Learning Specialist (Indigenization Speciality) position, the University of the Fraser Valley (November 14, 2018)

Faculty opening

Posting number 2018.213

Position Teaching and Learning Specialist (Indigenization Speciality)

Group Faculty

Department Teaching and Learning

Contract type Faculty; Permanent; 100% full-time

Start date As soon as possible after closing date

Review date November 14, 2018

About UFV

The University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) is nationally recognized for its emphasis on teaching excellence, experiential and applied education, community engagement, and Indigenization. UFV is the school of choice for over 15,000 students. With six campuses and centres, UFV offers undergraduate and graduate programs in the arts, sciences, and professional studies, as well as trades and technology education, university preparation, and continuing education.

At UFV, we are dedicated to changing lives and building community. Our educational goals are to prioritize learning everywhere; be flexible and responsive; collaborate across boundaries; develop local and global citizenship; and integrate experiential learning. A British Columbia “Top Employer”, we are committed to providing a welcoming, inclusive and dynamic learning and working environment that is fair and respectful of everyone. Our culturally diverse employee and student populations reflect the local, national, international and Indigenous communities we serve. If you see yourself as a lifelong member of a community that values and nurtures innovation and creativity, cultivates leadership and citizenship, and where success builds on success, you belong at UFV.

Posting details

Reporting to the Associate Vice President, Teaching and Learning, the Teaching and Learning Specialist, a faculty position, will be responsible for the planning, implementing and evaluating of programs and services to support the professional teaching development of faculty members and staff in integrating Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing, into courses and programs, systems and processes. This should include the knowledge and ways of knowing particular to the Stó:lō people, on whose territory UFV is located.  An integral part of the work will be to ensure that faculty members and staff are preparing students to respond to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 Calls to Action. Responsibilities include the development, delivery, and evaluation of professional development programming on Indigenous knowledge, ways of knowing, pedagogies, decolonizing, and reconciliation at the individual, unit, department and faculty levels. The Teaching and Learning Specialist will also assist the department in other areas relating to curriculum and pedagogy. The Teaching and Learning Specialist will:

Develop workshops and conduct individual and group consultations on incorporating Indigenous knowledge, ways of knowing and Indigenous pedagogies into curriculum;

Develop short and long-term teaching and learning related goals for initiatives to improve Indigenizing programming in the Teaching and Learning Centre (TLC), including initiatives to equip instructors with the knowledge and skills to meet the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action;

Assist unit curriculum representatives in the writing of program and course proposals;

Develop and conduct decolonizing, Indigenization and reconciliation programming;

Develop online content and programming as related to local and wider Indigenous knowledge, practices and methodologies;

Develop and deliver faculty workshops and teaching sessions to improve pedagogical practices;

Prepare reports, planning and marketing of specialized events for the TLC;

Engage in reciprocal learning opportunities with Indigenous Elders, faculty and staff members, as well as students and community members;

Assess effectiveness of activities and action plans regarding the TLC’s Indigenizing mandate and make recommendations for improvement;

Maintain close relationships with the Indigenous leaders in the community;

Encourage, develop and partner with faculty members in the scholarship of teaching and learning around Indigenizing curriculum, programs and processes.

Qualifications

Master’s degree in a field relevant to the primary responsibilities and a minimum of five (5) years of related experience with preferably two years of experience in developing Indigenous curriculum and education materials;

Demonstrable appreciation of the obligations that come with working in S’olh Temexw, the traditional, unceded territory of the Stó:lō people;

Ability to integrate Indigenous ways of knowing into both teaching and learning practices and strategies;

An understanding of the importance of language to Indigenous culture and ways of knowing;

Solid understanding of Indigenization and its complexities in education;

Deep knowledge and understanding of the TRC’s Final Report and Calls to Action with particular focus on those pertaining to education, the UNDRIP, Treaties, Aboriginal Rights, intercultural competency and anti-racism;

Demonstrated capacity for self-reflection, and awareness of colonial history and the impacts of colonization;

Capacity to engage members of diverse communities and skilled in a variety of consultation techniques, protocols and strategies with the proven ability to listen to the needs of diverse faculty, staff, student, and community populations;

Experience in planning, preparing and delivering programming for those working in higher education and obtaining feedback;

Demonstrated experience with online and blended formats and other educational technologies, including methods that are consistent and appropriate to the transference of Indigenous ways of knowing;

Excellent interpersonal, facilitation, organizational, communication, and team-building skills, appropriate to Indigenous ways of knowing;

Demonstrated ability to work collegially and collaboratively;

Ability to think creatively, work on multiple projects under deadlines, and achieve results with minimal supervision;

Ability to provide clear, concise and complete verbal and written information at a level appropriate to the audience;

Ability to develop and maintain relationships with co-workers including Elders and stakeholders;

Superior ability to exercise judgment, maintain a high degree of professionalism, discretion and confidentiality;

Strong organization and prioritization skills and ability to manage workload;

Teaching experience at the post-secondary level is preferred;

General knowledge of the University’s mission, purpose and goals, and the role this position plays in achieving those goals;

Some work on non-regular days (i.e., weekend or evening workshops) at UFV BC campuses.

How to apply

The Selection Advisory Committee will begin reviewing applications on November 14, 2018; however, the position will remain open until filled.

Direct resume, including transcripts and evidence of appropriate qualifications, referring to Posting 2018.213 to:

Email application to: hrinfo@ufv.ca

Human Resources

University of the Fraser Valley

33844 King Road, Abbotsford, BC, Canada V2S 7M8

Phone: (604) 854-4554

Fax: (604) 854-1538

Website: ufv.ca

Find out how to prepare your application

Please note:

We thank all applicants for considering UFV for employment.

Incomplete applications will not be processed.

In order to be environmentally and fiscally responsible, only short-listed candidates will be contacted for interviews.

Short-listed candidates may undergo a criminal record check and/or a verification of their education credentials, as required.

Shortlisted applicants for staff positions will be required to provide copies of their most recent evaluation summary.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

UFV is committed to the principle of equity in employment: https://www.ufv.ca/hr/employment-equity/

6. Job Opportunity: First Peoples Studies – Assistant Professor in the Field of Indigenous Studies, Faculty of Arts and Science at Concordia University (Deadline November 15, 2018)

The School of Community and Public Affairs is currently seeking to develop its First Peoples Studies program further and invites applications for a tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor in the field of Indigenous studies.

The School of Community and Public Affairs is particularly interested in candidates who are familiar with a broad range of policy issues concerning Indigenous peoples in Canada and Quebec and who have demonstrated expertise in one or a combination of the following areas: Aboriginal economic development, Indigenous peoples-settler relations, health policy, social policy, community development, decolonization and the politics of self-determination, Indigenous governance, urban Indigenous issues, traditional ecological knowledge/environmental justice, Indigenous women.

Candidates must hold a PhD in a relevant discipline, have teaching experience at the university level and capacity for an active research program. The successful candidate works well and collaboratively in an interdisciplinary intellectual environment and will be expected to take an active part in university life and in the broader community through engagement in outreach activities.

Subject to budgetary approval, we anticipate filling this position, normally at the rank of Assistant Professor, for August 1, 2019. Applications must be submitted as a complete package, and must include:

A cover letter

An up-to-date, detailed curriculum vitae

A statement of research interests (including potential contribution to the enhancement of the First Peoples Studies program and Indigenous presence on campus)

A statement of teaching philosophy/interests

Course evaluations and/or other evidence of teaching effectiveness

One single article-length sample of scholarly work

Candidates must also arrange for three letters of reference to be sent separately.

Application packages and letters of reference can be forwarded either as hard copy or electronically via email, by November 15, 2018, to:

Dr. Chedly Belkhodja, Principal

School of Community and Public Affairs

Concordia University

1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West

Montreal, Quebec

H3G 1M8

Email address: chedly.belkhodja@concordia.ca

7. Job Opportunity: First Peoples Studies – Director of the First Peoples Studies Program, Faculty of Arts and Science at Concordia University (Deadline November 15, 2018) 

The School of Community and Public Affairs at Concordia University invites applications for the position of Director of the First Peoples Studies program (FPST), Quebec’s first (and currently only) undergraduate degree program specializing in First Peoples – First Nations, Inuit and Métis – within the Quebec and Canadian context.

The School of Community and Public Affairs is particularly interested in candidates who can develop an enduring vision and plan for the future of the FPST program and who have solid administrative experience in a university setting, a well-established record of research, teaching and academic leadership in the field of Indigenous studies, and strong familiarity with a broad range of public policy issues concerning Indigenous peoples in Canada and Quebec. The Director should have effective interpersonal and communication skills and commit to maintaining a respectful and collegial workplace.

We are actively seeking candidates with an established track record of leadership in and with Indigenous communities; an extensive knowledge and understanding of Indigenous education, community protocols, diverse Indigenous histories, worldviews, and Indigenous knowledge systems; a demonstrated track record in building respectful and constructive relationships with Indigenous communities, and a commitment to community-engaged research, teaching and learning.

Reporting to and working in close collaboration with the Principal of the School of Community and Public Affairs, the Director of the First Peoples Studies program is responsible for the development and the delivery of the program and works well in an interdisciplinary intellectual environment. The main tasks of the position include curriculum development, teaching, recruitment of new students, academic advising, recruiting and supporting part-time instructors, Indigenous community outreach and consultation, and liaising with various stakeholders such as local Indigenous communities, urban Indigenous organizations, and departments and programs across the University. The Director is expected to take an active role in the Indigenous Directions Leadership Group at Concordia. The successful candidate will also be expected to keep an active research profile.

Interested candidates must hold a PhD in one of the disciplines of the social sciences and humanities. Subject to budgetary approval, we anticipate filling this position at the rank of Associate or Full Professor for August 1, 2019. Applications must be submitted as a complete package, and must include:

A cover letter

An up-to-date, detailed curriculum vitae

A statement of research interests (including potential contribution to the enhancement of the First Peoples Studies program and Indigenous presence on campus)

A statement of teaching philosophy/interests

Course evaluations and/or other evidence of teaching effectiveness

One single article-length sample of scholarly work

Candidates must also arrange for three letters of reference to be sent separately.

Application packages and letters of reference can be forwarded either as hard copy or electronically via email, by November 15, 2018, to:

Dr. Chedly Belkhodja, Principal

School of Community and Public Affairs

Concordia University

1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West

Montreal, Quebec

H3G 1M8

Email address: chedly.belkhodja@concordia.ca

8. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in North American Indigenous History, Department of History and Classical Studies at McGill University (November 26, 2018)

Position description: The Department of History and Classical Studies at McGill University invites applications for a tenure-

track position in North American Indigenous History. The position start date is August 1, 2019. The appointment will be at the Assistant or Associate Professor level, depending on qualifications and experience, and will involve service and leadership in both the Department of History and the Indigenous Studies program at McGill. Field and period of specialization are open, but the successful applicant should have the potential to supervise graduate theses (MA, PhD) on Canadian topics. Broad engagement with Indigenous Studies, including Indigenous Studies methodologies and community-based research, is also of interest.

The successful candidate will hold a tenure track or tenured position in the Department of History and Classical Studies and will work closely with the Indigenous Studies program. An appointment at the Associate Professor level would come with the position of Director of that program, with appropriate course and service relief. The successful candidate will also be expected to contribute to the academic direction of the program. The language of instruction at McGill is English, but a working knowledge of French would be considered an asset.

For further information on the Department of History and Classical Studies, please consult the website www.mcgill.ca/history . For information on Indigenous Studies, consult the website of the Indigenous Studies Program at: www.mcgill.ca/indigenous . Questions can be directed to Prof. Jason Opal, Department Chair (jason.opal[at]mcgill.ca) or to Prof. Allan Greer, Search Committee Chair (allan.greer[at]mcgill.ca).

The successful candidate that satisfies the eligibility conditions of the Canada Research Chair (CRC) program may be supported by the University for nomination to a Tier 2 Chair in North American Indigenous History, which provides protected time for research within a full-time academic appointment. Nominees for Tier 2 Chair positions must be emerging scholars and hold the rank of assistant or associate professor, or possess the necessary qualifications to be appointed to these levels. A nominee who is more than 10 years from having earned their highest degree and has experienced legitimate career interruptions (e.g., maternity or parental leave, extended sick leave, clinical training, and family care) will be taken into consideration using the Tier 2 justification process.

Eligibility conditions for CRCs are found at http://www.chairs-chaires.gc.ca/program-programme/nomination-mise_en_candidature-eng.aspx#s3

Job Duties: Research, teaching, service

Qualifications and Education requirements: Candidates should have completed a PhD in a relevant field or be very near completion. Candidates who do not satisfy the CRC eligibility criteria for a Tier 2 Chair are nonetheless invited to apply for the position.

JOB DETAILS

Job classification: Tenure-track

Rank: Assistant Professor or Associate Professor

Job Status: Full-time

Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience

Application deadline: Review of applications will begin on November 26, 2018, and will continue until the position is filled.

APPLICATION PROCESS

Applications must be submitted: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/12114.

The following supporting documents are required:

• A cover letter and curriculum vitae;

• A statement of research;

• A writing sample (article- or chapter-length);

• The names and contact information of three referees. For Tier 2 nominees at the rank of

Assistant Professor who are within three years of their PhD, one referee must be the PhD supervisor.

For internal applicants only: Supporting documents include a recent curriculum vitae and a statement of research aligned with the designated subject area for the Chair.

9. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor in Indigenous Studies, Department of Criminology at Ryerson University (November 26, 2018)

Location: Ontario

Date posted: 2018-10-02

Advertised until: 2018-11-03

At the intersection of mind and action, Ryerson is on a transformative path to become Canada’s leading comprehensive innovation university. Integral to this path is the placement of equity, diversity and inclusion as fundamental to our institutional culture. Our current academic plan outlines each as core values and we work to embed them in all that we do.

The Opportunity

The Department of Criminology invites applications for a full-time tenure-track position, at the Assistant Professor level, beginning July 1, 2019, subject to final budgetary approval. The area of specialization is Indigenous Studies. Successful candidates will be expected to teach large introductory courses in Criminology as well as other courses in the area of Indigenous justice or law that contribute to our undergraduate (BA) program and our newly developed graduate (MA) program in Criminology and Social Justice.

The Department of Criminology in the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University in the city of Toronto, on the territory of the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Huron-Wendat peoples, has built an outstanding reputation for scholarly work in the field of social justice, criminology, and law. The faculty are interdisciplinary with backgrounds in sociology, history, women’s studies, law, political science, geography and criminology. The Department has undergone extraordinary growth and diversification over the past decade and has recently developed an MA program in Criminology and Social Justice. We are housed in the Faculty of Arts, a vibrant and inclusive contributor to the education of over 39,000 undergraduate and graduate students.

Responsibilities

Responsibilities include: teaching and supervision at the undergraduate and graduate levels; contributing to the undergraduate and graduate programs, including responsibilities to curriculum development/expansion, as appropriate; establishing and maintaining a strong, community-engaged research agenda; and participating in the academic life of the Department of Criminology, the Faculty and the University.

Qualifications

The successful candidate will hold a PhD in Criminology or in a field related to social justice (or should expect to do so by July 1, 2019). Candidates must have developed a research profile (e.g., evidence of an emerging scholarly record that demonstrates creativity and evidence of impact, such as peer reviewed publications, book chapters and other similar contributions, the ability to establish and maintain a community-engaged research program with a demonstrated commitment to knowledges and methodologies grounded in Indigenous worldviews), as well as provide evidence of high-quality teaching and student training including experience with course/curriculum review/development, and a capacity for collegial service. The successful candidate must be of Indigenous descent. With the Department’s rapid growth, as well as the Faculty of Arts’ growing Indigenous community, contributions to service and administration are valued and thus we look for candidates with the interest and capacity to contribute in this manner.

Equity at Ryerson

Ryerson University welcomes those who have demonstrated a commitment to upholding the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion and will assist us to expand our capacity for diversity in the broadest sense. In addition, to correct the conditions of disadvantage in employment in Canada, we encourage applications from members of groups that have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized, including First Nations, Metis and Inuit, Indigenous peoples of North America, racialized persons, persons with disabilities, and those who identify as women and/or 2SLGBTQ+. Please note that all qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, applications from Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

As an employer, we are working towards a people first culture and are proud to have been selected as one of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers and a Greater Toronto’s Top Employer for 2015, 2016 and 2017. To learn more about our work environment, colleagues, leaders, students and innovative educational environment, visit www.ryerson.ca, check out @RyersonU, @RyersonHR and @RyersonECI on Twitter, and visit our LinkedIn company page.

How to apply?

Applicants are asked to submit their application online via the Faculty Recruitment Portal. The application must contain the following:

A letter of application indicating the position being applied for and curriculum vitae

Three (3) recent research publications

Evidence of teaching effectiveness (such as a teaching dossier)

The names of at least 1 community-based and 2 academic referees

Please indicate in your application if you are a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada.

Confidential inquiries can be directed to the Department Hiring Committee Chair Graham Hudson at graham.hudson@crim.ryerson.ca. Applications must be submitted by Monday, November 26th, 2018.

Any inquiries regarding accessing the Faculty Recruitment Portal can be sent to Ms. Davina Chan, Senior HR Consultant at davina.chan@ryerson.ca. Indigenous candidates who would like to learn more about working at Ryerson University are welcome to contact Ms. Tracey King, M.Ed., Aboriginal HR Consultant, Aboriginal Recruitment and Retention Initiative, at t26king@ryerson.ca.

This position falls under the jurisdiction of the Ryerson Faculty Association (RFA).

The RFA collective agreement can be viewed at: https://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/faculty-affairs/rfa-collective-agreement/RFA_CA_2015_to_2018.pdf .

The RFA’s website can be found at: rfanet.ca.

A summary of RFA benefits can be found at: https://www.ryerson.ca/hr/employee-resources/rfa/full-time-LTF/benefits/

10. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor in Anti-Black Racism, Department of Criminology at Ryerson University (November 26, 2018)

Location: Ontario

Date posted: 2018-10-02

Advertised until: 2018-11-03

At the intersection of mind and action, Ryerson is on a transformative path to become Canada’s leading comprehensive innovation university. Integral to this path is the placement of equity, diversity and inclusion as fundamental to our institutional culture. Our current academic plan outlines each as core values and we work to embed them in all that we do.

The Opportunity

The Department of Criminology invites applications for a full-time tenure-track position, at the Assistant Professor level, beginning July 1, 2019, subject to final budgetary approval. The area of specialization is Anti-Black Racism. Successful candidates will be expected to teach large introductory courses in Criminology as well as other courses that contribute to our undergraduate (BA) program and our newly developed graduate (MA) program in Criminology and Social Justice.

The Department of Criminology in the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University in the city of Toronto, on the territory of the Anishinaabe, and Haudenosaunee and Huron-Wendat peoples, has built an outstanding reputation for scholarly work in the field of social justice, criminology, law, and critical race theory. The faculty are interdisciplinary with backgrounds in sociology, history, women’s studies, law, political science, geography and criminology. The Department has undergone extraordinary growth and diversification over the past decade and has recently developed an MA program in Criminology and Social Justice. We are housed in the Faculty of Arts, a vibrant and inclusive contributor to the education of over 39,000 undergraduate and graduate students.

Responsibilities

Responsibilities include: teaching and supervision at the undergraduate and graduate levels; contributing to the undergraduate and graduate programs, with responsibilities for curriculum development/expansion, as appropriate; establishing and maintaining a strong, community-engaged research agenda; and participating in the academic life of the Department of Criminology, the Faculty and the University.

Qualifications

The successful candidate will hold a PhD in Criminology or in a field related to social justice (or is expected to do so by July 1, 2019) and a strong preference for candidates who have lived experiences with anti-Black racism. Candidates should have developed a research profile  (e.g., evidence of an emerging scholarly record that demonstrates creativity and evidence of impact, such as peer reviewed publications, book chapters and other similar contributions, the ability to establish and maintain a community-engaged research program), with a demonstrated commitment to knowledges and methodologies grounded in anti-Blackness critiques, as well as provide evidence of high-quality teaching and student training including experience with course/curriculum review/development, and a capacity for collegial service. With the Department’s rapid growth, contributions to service and administration are valued and thus we look for candidates with the interest and capacity to contribute in this manner.

Equity at Ryerson University

Ryerson University welcomes those who have demonstrated a commitment to upholding the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion and will assist us to expand our capacity for diversity in the broadest sense. In addition, to correct the conditions of disadvantage in employment in Canada, we encourage applications from members of groups that have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized, including First Nations, Metis and Inuit, Indigenous peoples of North America, racialized persons, persons with disabilities, and those who identify as women and/or 2SLGBTQ+. Please note that all qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, applications from Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

As an employer, we are working towards a people first culture and are proud to have been selected as one of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers and a Greater Toronto’s Top Employer for 2015, 2016 and 2017. To learn more about our work environment, colleagues, leaders, students and innovative educational environment, visit www.ryerson.ca, check out @RyersonU, @RyersonHR and @RyersonECI on Twitter, and visit our LinkedIn company page.

How to apply?

Applicants are asked to submit their application online via the Faculty Recruitment Portal. The application must contain the following:

A letter of application indicating the position being applied for and curriculum vitae

Three (3) recent research publications

Evidence of teaching effectiveness (such as a teaching dossier)

The names of at least 3 academic referees

Please indicate in your application if you are a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada.

Confidential inquiries can be directed to the Department Hiring Committee Chair Graham Hudson at graham.hudson@crim.ryerson.ca. Applications must be submitted by Monday, November 26, 2018.

Any inquiries regarding accessing the Faculty Recruitment Portal can be sent to Ms. Davina Chan, Senior HR Consultant at davina.chan@ryerson.ca. Racialized candidates who would like to learn more about working at Ryerson are welcome to contact Ms. Carol Sutherland, Black Faculty and Staff Community Network, at c5suther@ryerson.ca.

This position falls under the jurisdiction of the Ryerson Faculty Association (RFA).

The RFA collective agreement can be viewed at: https://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/faculty-affairs/rfa-collective-agreement/RFA_CA_2015_to_2018.pdf .

The RFA’s website can be found at: rfanet.ca.

A summary of RFA benefits can be found at: https://www.ryerson.ca/hr/employee-resources/rfa/full-time-LTF/benefits/

11. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor (Media Studies) at Queens University (Deadline December 14, 2018)

The Department of Film and Media at Queen’s University invites applications from suitably qualified candidates for a tenure-track position in Media Studies at the rank of Assistant Professor commencing July 1, 2019. The successful candidate will hold a PhD and will be an outstanding scholar and teacher with a strong and active research program in critical media theory and/or digital media theory and at least two years of teaching experience. The successful candidate will have interdisciplinary and transnational links in their research program, demonstrated potential for research funding and publication, and a track record for collaborative initiatives. The successful candidate’s research profile should be strong enough to attract graduate students to the Graduate Program Film and Media, which will be launched in 2019. They must be willing to contribute to departmental and university service. The successful candidate will be an excellent teacher at all levels of our undergraduate and graduate programs. While this is an open call position, we are especially interested in candidates with interests in areas including, but not limited to: social media; digital arts; television; gaming; theories of expanded media; media and cultural studies; and/or advertising and consumer culture. Candidates with expertise in these areas with a focus on gender studies, LGBTQ2S studies, and/or critical race studies are especially encouraged to apply.

The Department of Film and Media at Queen’s has an outstanding reputation of strong teaching and scholarship, with a 50-year history based in a commitment to the intersection of theory and practice. The Department is housed in the Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts, a state-of-the-art facility with teaching and learning environments including a production studio, film screening theatre, sound recording studio, and a digital lab. The Department of Film and Media has collaborations with Computing (with a program called Computing and the Creative Arts) and the Dan School of Music and Drama (with the Stage and Screen program).

Candidates must have a PhD in hand, demonstrated excellence in an active research program, and at least two years teaching experience. The Department is interested in candidates with a very strong teaching and research profile.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information as to how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete. A complete application consists of:

A cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);

A current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications);

The names and contact information for three (3) referees;

A research dossier with three (3) writing samples;

A teaching dossier with at least two outlines for courses previously taught;

Course evaluations, and any other relevant materials the candidate wishes to submit for consideration.

Please arrange to have applications sent by email only directly to: Professor Gary Kibbins, Head of the Department of Film and Media at gk6@queensu.ca. The deadline for applications is December 14, 2018.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Professor Gary Kibbins at gk6@queensu.ca.

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/collective-agreementandat http://www.qufa.ca. Remuneration will be in accordance with the Collective Agreement, and appointments are subject to funding or enrolment criteria.

12. Bursary Opportunity: APUS 50th Anniversary Bursaries Available for Part-Time Students at UOFT (February 1, 2019)

APUS introduces new 50th anniversary bursaries for part-time students!

We are pleased to announce that as part of the Association of Part-Time Undergraduate Students’ (APUS) 50th anniversary celebration, we have restructured our Scholarship and Bursary program.

In addition to the APUS General Bursary, Jovita Nagy Bursary, and Marija Hutchison Bursary, we are providing a set number of bursaries to part-time undergraduate students who self-identify as Indigenous, Black, Queer and Trans, and/or disabled students/students with disabilities.

These bursaries are provided on the basis of financial need as determined by the Office of Enrolment Services.

APUS now offers the following bursaries:

APUS General Bursary

APUS Access Bursary

APUS Indigenous Student Bursary

APUS Black Student Bursary

APUS Queer and Trans Student Bursary

Jovita Nagy Bursary (for UTSC & UTM students)

Marija Hutchison Bursary (for part-time students in the TYP & Academic Bridging Programs)

Recognizing that part-time students face barriers to accessing funding from governmental and institutional programs, we are pleased to offer APUS bursaries to part-time undergraduate students on all three campuses of the University of Toronto.

Applications and eligibility criteria for the APUS bursaries are now available on our website at https://apus.ca/scholarships-bursaries/.

The deadline for the Fall bursary program is October 22, 2018 and the deadline for the Winter bursary program is February 1, 2019.

Please contact Member Services Coordinator at services@apus.ca with any questions about the APUS Bursary Program