CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, December 6, 2018

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ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1.    CFR Research Associate Dr. Caroline Shenaz Hussein's book “Politicized Microfinance" shortlisted for 2019 IAFFE Agarwal Book Prize

EVENTS:
1.    CFR Co-Sponsored: Winter Clothing Drive for FCJ Refugee Centre (ending December 7, 2018)

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EVENTS:
1.    Sampradaya Dance Creations Presents: Dispelling Darkness | South Asian Survivors of Sexual And Domestic Violence In The Greater Toronto Area Regain Voice Through Performance Art (December 8, 2018)
2.    UofT Students for Barrier-Free Access (SBA) Presents: Crafternoons: Adaptive Clothing Hacks Part 2 (December 12, 2018)
3.    York University Office of Alumni Engagement: Stakeholder Consultation - LGBTQ+ Alumni Network (December 14)
4.    Toronto Enterprise Fund: ESE Idea Accelerator - 3 part event (December 14, 2018)
5.    Early Registration for the Duke 2019 Feminist Theory Workshop (December 15, 2018)
6.    Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXIX (December 18, 2018)
7.    York University’s Children, Childhood & Youth (CCY) Program Presents: film screening of Tiny Shoulders: Rethinking Barbie (Nevins, 2018) and a fireside chat with KIM CULMONE, 2019 Alexander F. Chamberlain speaker (January 21, 2019)

CALLS

1.    Call for Proposals: Nunavut General Monitoring Plan Funding Program 2019-2022 (December 7, 2018)
2.    Call for Submissions: 12th Annual Toronto Group Conference at University of Toronto, Faculty of Law (December 14, 2018)
3.    Call for Proposals: philoSOPHIA: A Feminist Society (December 15, 2018)
4.    Call for Papers: CAFRMS 2019 “Interrogating Integration,” Hosted in Collaboration with the Centre for Refugee Studies (extended deadline December 15, 2018)
5.    Call for Papers: “Comparative Procedure in State-to-State Disputes” Organized by The Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies (December 31, 2018)
6.    Call for Proposals: Interface 2019 hosted by The Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture (ICSLAC) presents (Un)bound: Interdisciplinary Dialogues (January 11, 2019)
7.    Call for Papers: Special issue on Masculinity and Gender Relations in Canadian Punjabi Communities (January 14, 2019)
8.    Call for Applications: 2019-2020 Research Associate Program, Five College Women's Studies Research Center (February 15, 2019)

OPPORTUNITIES:

1.    Career Opportunity: Women’s Xchange One Year Research Fellowship at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto (December 10, 2018)
2.    Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor in the Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies (Department of Social Sciences) at Brock University (January 14, 2019)
3.    Applications Open for 2019-20 York-Massey Fellowship and Visiting Scholarships (January 14, 2019)
4.    Grant Opportunity: SSHRC Connection Grants – Research Data Management Capacity Building Initiative (February 1/May 1/August 1, 2019)
5.    Grant Opportunity: SSHRC Insight Development Grants Competition (February 4, 2019)
6.    Research Opportunity: Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships - Summer 2019 at The University of Chicago Library(March 4,2019)

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ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1.    CFR Research Associate Dr. Caroline Shenaz Hussein's book “Politicized Microfinance" shortlisted for 2019 IAFFE Agarwal Book Prize
CFR Research Associate Caroline Shenaz Hossein’s book “Politicized Microfinance: Money, Power, and Violence in the Black Americas” is one of the finalists for the 2019 International Association for Feminist Economics (IAFFE) inaugural Suraj Mal and Shyama Devi Agarwal Book Prize.
The winner will be announced on March 1, 2019.
The prize carries an honorarium of $1000 and a citation describing the book’s merits. An additional amount (up to $1500) will be available to cover the author's expenses to attend the award ceremony at the 2019 IAFFE annual conference in Glasgow, Scotland. The prizewinner will be invited to make a presentation or participate in a conference event on the book’s subject.
Congratulations Dr. Caroline Shenaz Hussein!
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EVENTS:
1.    CFR Co-Sponsored: Winter Clothing Drive for FCJ Refugee Centre (Ongoing to December 7, 2018)
As part of the Refugees Welcome Here! campaign for 2018-2019 WUSC Keele is leading and many on-campus student organizations, departments and colleges are collaborating in our 2018 Winter Clothing Drive for clients of the FCJ Refugee Centre, running until December 7th.
If interested, you can read about last year’s efforts and the spirit of this initiative at this link.
The York U Refugees Welcome Here! Campaign, led by WUSC Keele have organized the:
Winter coat and clothing drive for clients of the FCJ refugee centre
“In Canada, with winter coming we believe at our centre that the protection of refugees begins with winter clothes to provide a warm welcome. It is beautiful to see York students acting in solidarity with humanity from the earliest years of their post-secondary education.”
-FCJ Refugee Centre Co-Director Francisco Rico Martinez
The following are the on-campus drop off spots and participants to date:
207 BETHUNE COLLEGE (College Head’s Office)
217 FOUNDERS COLLEGE (College Head’s Office)
107 MCLAUGHLIN COLLEGE- Amnesty International at York
106 FIRST STUDENT CENTRE-York Federation of Students (YFS)
329 SECOND STUDENT CENTRE- Islamic Relief
1009 IGNAFF KANEFF BUILDING (Osgoode Hall Law School)-Community and Legal Aid Services Program (CLASP)
807 KANEFF TOWER- Centre for Refugee Studies/Syria Response and Refugee Initiative/
WUSC Keele Committee/Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean(CERLAC)/ Centre for Feminist Research
The Refugees Welcome Here! campaign is supported by the Syria Response and Refugee Initiative of York’s Centre for Refugee Studies (www.yorku.ca/refugees). Thank you WUSC Keele for leading this year’s Winter Clothing Drive.
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EVENTS:
1.    Sampradaya Dance Creations Presents: Dispelling Darkness | South Asian Survivors of Sexual And Domestic Violence In The Greater Toronto Area Regain Voice Through Performance Art (December 8, 2018)
MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO (December 3, 2018) – Social change in Ontario’s South Asian community is at the heart of Dispelling Darkness, a two-year multi-disciplinary project involving artists and survivors of sexual and domestic violence.  In partnership with SAWITRI Theatre, Punjabi Community Health Services (PCHS), and Art Gallery of Mississauga, Sampradaya Dance Creations will present a survivor participation performance on December 8, 2018, at 6pm at Sampradaya Theatre, 3250 Ridgeway Drive, Mississauga.  The piece includes spoken word, shadow puppetry, and dance/movement to inspire action in eliminating sexual violence and harassment against South Asian women.
Taking place during the UN's 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence which began on November 25th, Dispelling Darkness is made possible through the Creative Engagement Fund to Stop Sexual Violence and Harassment in Ontario.  The fund launched in 2015 and is administered by the Ontario Arts Council on behalf of the Ministry of the Status of Women.
Lata Pada, Artistic Director, Sampradaya Dance Creations
“We are extremely grateful to have received support for this important initiative not only for the South Asian community, but to tackle an issue that crosses all ethnic boundaries with care and sensitivity.  As an organization that has been a professional dance company for over 25 years, this project allows us to further explore how art forms such as dance, theatre, and spoken word can be used as a tool and vehicle for expression and change within the context of sexual violence and harassment to bring about a brighter and healthier future."
Dispelling Darkness aims to challenge the deep-seated stigma attached to domestic abuse in South Asian households.  The three Mississauga women participating in the program have spent the last several months working closely with artists from the disciplines of dance, music, and theatre, along with certified counsellors, to create a narrative based on their personal stories.  By way of writing, singing, and moving, the workshops are filled with positive affirmations to cultivate courage, compassion, and strength within the survivors.
"Every time is a different and beautiful experience – healing through learning to express.  I am very thankful for the support and this group of women.  I am here to share my story because I do not want anyone else to go through what I went through."
"I like to attend these workshops.  I have good friends here now.  I even learn how to live from here.  Before I joined these sessions, I felt alone and upset.  Now I feel better when I share my feelings and have someone listen."
"It’s a wonderful experience every time I join the session.  Learning something new every session with different techniques.  I am grateful to be here."
Sampradaya has launched a GoFundMe campaign to raise additional money for the project.  Dispelling Darkness will continue into 2019 with the hope of building a supportive and safe space for more women in the GTA to create visual and performance art.  The project is a unique opportunity not only to help survivors rebuild their lives and banish feelings of guilt and shame, but also send a strong message to the South Asian community about the aftermath of violence against women and the need for prevention.
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2.    UofT Students for Barrier-Free Access (SBA) Presents: Crafternoons: Adaptive Clothing Hacks Part 2 (December 12, 2018)
If you missed the first instalment of Adaptive Clothing Hacks last week, don't worry because we're doing it all again on December 12th!
Come craft with us as we learn and share Do It Yourself and Do-It-Together adaptive clothing hacks!
December 12th, 2018 from 5pm – 8pm
"Hacking" something is just a shorter way to say "finding creative solutions to make the day-to-day experience of something easier".
As Disabled and Mad folks, there is no shortage of creative ways we have learned and shared how to make our environments more accessible and functional for us!
Creating shortcuts and adaptations in our favourite clothing can:
Reduce the energy we need to expend getting dressed and undressed
Reframe our relationship to clothing - we can change our clothing to suit our bodies' needs, instead of feeling like we have to change our bodies to fit clothing that was never designed with us in mind!
Reuse clothing we love but that doesn't serve us - saving money on having to buy new items when our bodies change over time
Over the course of these two fun crafting sessions, we will explore how to:
•    Replace shirt buttons with magnets
•    Convert lace-up shoes to slip-ons
•    Do simple alterations to customize the fit of your favourite clothing items
•    Add handy pockets
•    Modify zipper pulls
No-sew, hand-sew and machine-sew techniques will be used, all supplies and equipment provided - just bring clothes to work on!
REMINDER: If you are choosing to add grippy paint to socks, gloves or any other warm wearables, you must remember to bring extras so that you have something to put on to keep warm on the way home - the paint will have to dry overnight at the centre for pickup later.
ACCESS INFORMATION:
If you require ASL interpretation for one or both of these dates, please contact uoftsba@gmail.com - please request ASL by November 28th.
We will have snacks and non-alcoholic beverages, including gluten free and vegan options!
The building is wheelchair accessible and has two elevators. We are located on the 9th floor, and there are gendered multi-stall washrooms and one non-gendered single-stall accessible washroom on the same floor as the event.
SBA is a fragrance-free space, so please arrive to the event free of scented body and laundry products - see our facebook event page for more on this.
For more information, see our Facebook event
link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1986716598299713/
Drop-in style, come for some* or stay the whole time.
*the front door of our building locks at 5:30. If you arrive after 5:30, please call us at the centre at 416-967-7322 and we will come down and let you in.
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3.    York University Office of Alumni Engagement: Stakeholder Consultation - LGBTQ+ Alumni Network (December 14)
The Office of Alumni Engagement is launching an LGBTQ+ alumni network in the new year. We are looking to get broad input from various members of the York community who may have an interest in engaging alumni, and we thought of the Centre for Feminist Research.
We would greatly appreciate as many individuals as possible to attend to provide input. Staff will be able to provide suggestions around what they would like to see, and how we can best engage our graduates. This is a new direction for us, as we have normally launched program-based or college-based networks.
The consultation with be held at West Office Building on Friday December 14th, from 1:00pm until 2:00pm. Individuals who are interested in attending should let me know no later than Wednesday December 12th at noon. Please RSVP to Alumni Engagement Officer Zachary Nichols at znichols@yorku.ca.
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4.    Toronto Enterprise Fund: ESE Idea Accelerator - 3 part event (December 14, 2018)
ESE Idea Accelerator: We’re launching our next ESE Idea Accelerator. The program provides 4 workshops to strengthen an early-stage employment social enterprise idea. At the end of the program, participants have the chance to pitch for a $5-10K Catalyzing Grant, which can be used to purchase the services of a coach to complete a feasibility study / business plan.
Applications close Dec 14.
ESE Idea Accelerator Pitch Night: On Dec 11, we’re hosting the Pitch Night for our most recent ESE Idea Accelerator. During the event, 5-7 emerging social entrepreneurs will pitch their early-stage employment social enterprise idea to a panel of expert judges. It’s sure to be a neat event, and we’d love your network to join us. Tickets here https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pitch-night-ese-idea-accelerator-tickets-51973314583 .
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5.    Early Registration for the Duke 2019 Feminist Theory Workshop (December 15, 2018)
Dear Friends,
Early registration is now open for the Feminist Theory Workshop. The workshop is FREE and early registration will last from now until December 15, 2018.  The Feminist Theory Workshop (FTW) will be held at Duke University on March 22 and 23, 2019.
The Feminist Theory Workshop (FTW), which is in its thirteenth year, offers a unique opportunity for internationally recognized faculty and young scholars to engage in sustained dialogue about feminist theory as a scholarly domain of inquiry. The “workshop” approach of this conference requires active participation of both presenters and attendees.
One of the goals of the Feminist Theory Workshop is to promote a more diverse dialogue among scholars of feminist theory and to foster a vibrant international community of scholarship. To that end, we bring together internationally recognized keynote speakers and emerging young scholars to engage in lively and focused debate.
The keynote speakers for 2019 are Lauren Berlant George Pullman Distinguished Service Professor of English and Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Cultural Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago; Anne Anlin Cheng Professor of English, Director of American Studies, and affiliated faculty in the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University; C. Riley Snorton Professor of English and Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago; Kim TallBear Associate Professor of Native Studies, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous People, Technoscience, and Environment, Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, Canada; in addition to special guests who will serve on the closing roundtable.
REGISTRATION
To register click https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=2545023 . Please note the registration link will not be posted on our website until after early registration ends.
GENERAL INFORMATION
For more information about the 2019 Feminist Theory Workshop and or to obtain information about previous workshops please click on this link http://gendersexualityfeminist.duke.edu/conferences.  In addition, you can also find information to join our Feminist Theory Workshop Closed Facebook group.
LODGING
To obtain information about lodging options, click https://www.choicehotels.com/reservations/groups/oc40b1?source=EMCHGGI&checkInDate=2019-03-21&checkOutDate=2019-03-25&ratePlanCode=BMVACA or go to our previously mentioned website.
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6.    Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXIX (December 18, 2018)
Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXIX
Toronto’s most diverse & brave poetry reading and open mic series
Featured poets: Meena Chopra & Casey Garcia
Hosts: Bänoo Zan & Terese Pierre
Time: Tuesday, December 18, 2018
Place: Tranzac Club, 292 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2M7
Main Hall
Doors open               6:15 p.m.
Open-mic sign-up     6:30 p.m.
Show                         7-10 p.m.
Admission: $5
Meena Chopra poet, visual artist, designer, artist educator, writing in English & Hindi, publisher of ethnic news weekly StarBuzz
Casey Garcia young but seasoned spoken word poet & performer, with engaging high-energy stage presence
Twitter: @BanooZan & @ShabeSherTO
Instagram: @banoo.zan
https://www.facebook.com/events/377294929674226/
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7.    York University’s The Children, Childhood & Youth (CCY) Program Presents: film screening of Tiny Shoulders: Rethinking Barbie (Nevins, 2018) and a fireside chat with KIM CULMONE, 2019 Alexander F. Chamberlain speaker (January 21, 2019)
The Children, Childhood & Youth (CCY) Program proudly presents a film screening of Tiny Shoulders: Rethinking Barbie (Nevins, 2018) and a fireside chat with KIM CULMONE, our 2019 Alexander F. Chamberlain speaker.
Kim Culmone, Mattel's Vice President of Barbie Design, sets the global creative vision for the No. 1 toy property in the world. She leads an award-winning team of product, packaging and graphic designers who are entrusted with maintaining the brand’s position as a leader in play innovation. Through purpose-driven, human-centric design Kim championed the most diverse Barbie doll line in the brand’s history. The 2016 Fashionistas collection introduced an unprecedented variety of skin tones and hair texture, and launched three new body types—curvy, tall and petite. This bold reinvention generated 5 billion media impressions worldwide, led to a TIME cover and was named one of the “Top 25 Inventions of 2016” by the magazine.
In her 59 years, Barbie has become a fashion icon, a lightning rod and a topic among feminists. Tiny Shoulders: Rethinking Barbie, featuring newly discovered footage and unprecedented access to the inner workings of a toy giant during Barbie’s biggest reinvention, surveys 60 years of women in popular culture through the lens of this 11.5 inch, Zelig-like plastic icon. Featuring interviews with Gloria Steinem, Roxane Gay, Peggy Orenstein, Mattel insiders and cultural historians, the documentary reveals, through both funny and fascinating archival material, and fly-on-the-wall observations of Barbie’s current architects, the progression and regression in the fight for gender equality.
Please join us on Monday, January 21st, 2019 between 10:30am-1:30pm, in York's New Student Centre. All are welcome.
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CALLS:
1.    Call for Proposals: Nunavut General Monitoring Plan Funding Program 2019-2022 (December 7, 2018)
The Nunavut General Monitoring Plan (NGMP) Secretariat recently issued a Call for Proposals (CFP) for the 2019-2022 funding cycle for Nunavut specific research.  A summary is provided below.
Objectives
To provide for the collection, analysis and dissemination of information regarding the state and health of the eco-systemic and socio-economic environments in the Nunavut Settlement Area.
Applicants are required to submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) and must demonstrate how the planned project will meet one or more monitoring priorities established by the NGMP Steering Committee (please see table below).
2019-2022 NGMP Monitoring Priorities
Required Overhead
15%
Value
Not stated
Duration
Up to 3 years
Theme:                    Valued Component:
1. Terrestrial Wildlife     Caribou, Muskox, Wolverine, Polar bear, Grizzly bear, Wolves, Species at Risk
2. Climate and Weather         Weather/meteorology related to the climate change
3. Freshwater    Surface water quality, Sediment quality, Water quantity, Hydrology, Groundwater
4.Transportation            Infrastructure & Activity
5. Economy                 Employment, Economic activity
6. People     Demographics: Health and wellbeing, Food security, Education and training, Housing, Crime, Energy use, Culture and Language
Deadlines
LOI due at ORS – December 7, 2018
LOI due at agency – December 21, 2019 by 23:59 Pacific Time
Full application due at ORS – February 14, 2018
Full application due at agency (by invitation only) – February 28, 2019 by 23:59 Pacific Time
For further details on this funding opportunity, guidelines and information on the preparation and submission of the LOI and full application, please consult:
http://www.ngmp.ca/eng/1363792048577/1363792058944
2.    Call for Submissions: 12th Annual Toronto Group Conference at University of Toronto, Faculty of Law (December 14, 2018)
The Toronto Group Conference connects graduate students and emerging scholars from across the globe. This year’s 12th annual Toronto Group Conference will bring together researchers and scholars of international, transnational and comparative law to examine the modes and forms of resistance to international law and the global legal order from various perspectives and using a variety of different approaches. We invite submissions addressing the topic from a broad range of perspectives, looking for example at economic globalization, global/generic constitutionalism, resistance to the establishment of global legal standards and institutions, or contributions dealing with the rise of new transnational actors.
Questions the Conference might address include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Where and when is resistance to international law and the global legal order taking place? Who is resisting? How, why and in what forms does resistance occur?
• Is there a broader context framing expressions of resistance or is it an isolated phenomenon? In particular, how might the rise of neo-nationalist and populist movements shape broader global discussions about the ongoing role of international law?
• How do seemingly predominant narratives relate to alternative narratives emerging in particular from the Global South?
• How do domestic constitutional and sub-constitutional responses to transnational actors and the mutations of the global legal order differ?
The Conference aims at creating a space where early career scholars can receive feedback on their research, so each applicant selected to present will be assigned a faculty member discussant of the participating institutions.
Submission of Paper Proposals
The Organizing Committee welcomes abstract submissions that address the theme above or other related emerging issues. Interdisciplinary contributions integrating the insights of, for example, sociology, anthropology, economics or history are encouraged. Applicants are invited to send an abstract of 500 words outlining their main arguments and methodology and a short bio of 100 words by December 14, 2018. Proposals will be evaluated based on their relevance to the theme, the interest they present in relation to other proposals, and their overall quality. Applicants will be notified of results by mid-January 2019. Selected applicants are expected to submit completed papers in early March 2019.
Questions and abstracts should be sent to: torontogroupconference@gmail.com
*** Please join us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/TorontoGroup/ and for more information see
https://torontogroup.wordpress.com ***
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3.    Call for Proposals: philoSOPHIA: A Feminist Society  (December 15, 2018)
philoSOPHIA: A Feminist Society
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
May 9-11, 2019
Memorial University of Newfoundland St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada
The 13th annual meeting of philoSOPHIA will run from the evening of Thursday, May 9, to the evening of Saturday, May 11, 2019, at Memorial University in beautiful St. John’s, Newfoundland. Keynote speakers will include MARÍA LUGONES and UMA NARAYAN. Contributions in the area of decolonial feminisms are especially welcome.
DESCRIPTION: philoSOPHIA began with a focus on collective discussion of work in progress, so as to help foster a mutually supportive and collaborative community of feminist scholars in continental philosophy. To that end, this year’s program will aim to accommodate some intimate, closed workshops focused on developing productive interaction among participants, as well as regular, stand-alone panel presentations and four to five plenary sessions. Workshop participants will meet together and present their papers to each other either in the mornings or the afternoons of Friday and Saturday, and will be free to attend plenary sessions as well as panel sessions outside of that dedicated time. In your submission, you must specify what format you prefer (workshop or panel), and we will aim to accommodate that preference. Reviewers will not privilege one or the other format.
GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSION:
1. Submit one of the following:
a) Individual abstracts of 500-700 words
b) Complete papers (3000 words) with an accompanying abstract (100-150 words)
c) Panel proposals (500 words) with individual abstracts (500-700 words each)
d) For graduate students who wish to be considered for a travel award, a complete paper (3000 words) with an accompanying abstract (100-150 words)
2. Prepare your submission for anonymous review, with identifying information (name, institutional affiliation, and a brief bio) appearing only in your submission email.
3. Submit only one work for consideration.
4. Identify in your email whether you wish to be considered for a workshop or a panel.
5. Include in your submission only one document. Panel submissions should also be grouped into one file.
6. Identify the word-count of the abstract and (if relevant) paper.
7. If you are a graduate student, identify yourself as such in your submission email to be eligible for the graduate student travel prize. Up to two such prizes will be awarded for the best graduate student papers.
8. If you are a graduate student or on contract, underemployed, etc. and would benefit from travel aid, please identify yourself as such in your submission email. If a grant application that is in process is successful, travel costs may be subsidized.
Submit all proposals electronically to philosophia2019conference@gmail.com
DEADLINE: DECEMBER 15, 2018
For more information, visit www.philosophiafeministsociety.com
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4.    Call for Papers: CARFMS 2019 “Interrogating Integration,” Hosted in Collaboration with the Centre for Refugee Studies (extended deadline December 15, 2018)
INTERROGATING INTEGRATION
Hosted in collaboration with the Centre for Refugee Studies
York University, Toronto
May 14th to May 16, 2019
Preceded by CARFMS/CALACs collaborative mini-conference:
Bridging the Gaps: Understanding Current Mobilities in the Caribbean and Latin America and their Policy Implications
York University, Toronto
May 13, 2019
Integration is a contested concept – most especially in the field of refugee and forced migration studies. Describing the act of combining distinct parts into a whole, the term is apt for advancing the inclusion of migrants within political communities, the mixture of diverse stakeholder perspectives, and more progressive global governance regimes. But integration is also coupled with processes of exclusion. State political boundaries rest on ongoing colonial practices and categories of thought that leave little room for Indigenous perspectives. The regional harmonization of state laws and policies regarding border controls, interdiction, economic migration, and asylum reinforce the contingency of political membership upon citizenship. Integration also highlights perpetual tensions between unity and diversity within and across diverse political communities.
CARFMS 2019 will bring together scholars, practitioners, and those with lived experience of forced migration to reflect on the meanings, and pathways, to integration. CARFMS 2019 invites applications for innovative panels, workshops, sessions, presentations and demonstrations on the following themes:
How do we define, support, and appraise the integration of refugees into communities?
How do and should we integrate policies and practices for human mobilities?
How can we support postcolonial refugee scholarship in relation to membership in political communities, with an emphasis on indigenous perspectives and migrant experience?
How can we integrate local knowledge and practices in constructive ways?
1. How do we define, support and measure the integration of refugees into communities?
A dominant theme of refugee settlement research and practice focuses on whether and how refugees are included, or excluded, from the society in which they reside. Early models of integration emphasised employment and participation in the market economy (Levitas, 2013), and continue to be seen as key markers of integration by many policy makers and settlement programs. However, this focus has been challenged by post-colonial scholars as failing to acknowledge the impact of how social, structural and political factors in host communities create social exclusion (Davies, 2005; Galabuzi, 2006; Labonte, 2004).
In this theme, we welcome papers that
Critically reflect on integration theories and settlement policies
Report on promising practices that support social change and refugee integration and how they relate to settlement policies at the local, regional, national and/or international level
Identify and improve methodologies for the study of integration at the individual and societal levels
2. How do and should we integrate policies and practices for human mobilities?
Policies and practices designed to exclude forced migrants are relatively well integrated at the national and international level and their effectiveness for systematic exclusion is in part supported by purposeful fragmentation of categories of migration. It is becoming increasingly clear that the global refugee regime is out of step with current patterns of migration, the reality of which is messy and cannot be reduced to the existing frameworks. There has been a global recognition of the need to address increasing migration pressures, as evidenced by the Global Compact on Refugees and the Global Compact on Migration. However, there is also a growing movement to restrict migration by country of origin, religion, and reasons for migration. Increased restrictions in the face of increased pressure to migrate are also resulting in more irregular migration. In this theme, we welcome papers and workshops addressing laws, policies and practices pertaining to the integration of policies for a range of migration pathways.
How are international legal and policy tools integrating versus separating different migration pathways?
What are the consequences of separating out different migration pathways for policies and for migrants themselves?
Are there promising pathways or practices for integrating different migration pathways, resources, and policies?
3. Critical and postcolonial refugee perspectives: Integrating scholarship with indigenous people and refugees.
Displacement caused by violence is not limited to refugee-producing countries. Settler states, like Canada and the US, and the indigenous peoples whose land settlers live on have histories of cultural genocide, separation, isolation and exclusion from the mainstream polity. Recognition of others’ needs, rights, and livelihoods in itself may not be sufficient as indigenous scholars in Canada have argued (Coulthard, 2014). Likewise, integration into an existing political community may not be desirable or politically acceptable to indigenous nations who have faced forced family separation through residential schools, loss of land and/or livelihoods, and the systemic social exclusions produced through these state-led practices.
What would a world that includes both indigenous and refugee peoples look like?
What does decolonizing refugee studies look like?
How do we imagine, identify, and translate refugee and indigenous scholarship using indigenous knowledge and practices?
How are reception and settlement practices shaped by settler histories and geographies?
How do we understand the current forces of displacement in their historical and political context?
4. Integrating local knowledge and practices
The need for local and contextualized research and a greater attention to refugee voices continues alongside the need for high level analysis of global pathways, patterns and policies. How can we better facilitate the integration of the knowledge of those with lived experience of migration, and members of the local communities in which they seek asylum or resettlement; practitioners providing settlement services; researchers studying forced migration; and policy makers? Following on the partnership themes raised in the 2018 conference, we seek papers addressing the following issues:
How do we support policies and practices that promote, respond to and include different knowledges?
Are there methodological innovations that can better integrate these different knowledges?
What are promising practices for ensuring that different voices, knowledges and practices are included in the development of policies at the local, national and international levels?
Bridging Day CARFMS/CALACs Collaborative Mini-Conference
May 13, 2019
York University
Bridging the Gaps: Understanding Current Mobilities in the Caribbean and Latin America and their Policy Implications
On May 13, a Bridging Day Preconference will be held between the meeting of the Canadian Association for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CALACS) and the conference of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS).  This Bridging Day seeks to encourage integration between the two associations and addresses the growing complexity and severity of forced migration in the hemisphere. Participation in the Bridging Day will have a separate registration with a small fee to cover lunch and fees for a guest speaker. Details for this preconference will be released shortly.
Abstract Submission
We welcome submissions for panels (1.5 hours), individual papers, or workshop (1 hour) formats that can include diverse discussion and/or presentation formats. Please indicate which theme your submission aligns with.
For panel presentations, indicate the overall theme of the panel in your abstract and then the individual author and their abstracts in the same submission.
Deadline for submissions is now December 15, 2018
Please use this online form to submit your abstract: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSenx3x0gda8jv0FJEH3u4os77kQb8JKqM7LFKqMwpEOOiStJQ/viewform
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5.    Call for Papers: “Comparative Procedure in State-to-State Disputes” Organized by The Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies (December 31, 2018)
The Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies is organizing  a conference on “Comparative Procedure in State-to-State Disputes” on 28-29 May 2019 in The Hague.
The objective of the conference is to engage in a transversal and comparative analysis of the procedural aspects of the settlement of interstate disputes in international law. The conference will take stock of the procedure applicable in various interstate dispute settlement bodies, including international courts and tribunals and arbitration, but will also cover regional courts and tribunals. As the settlement of interstate disputes through recourse to courts and tribunals has grown gradually over the years, not only through the creation of new mechanisms to that effect but also through the use of existing courts and tribunals, the organizers of the conference are convinced that a comparative view and analysis of the procedure – in theory and practice- is beneficial to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of the various procedural rules and regulations, and in the end contribute to foment cross-fertilization between interstate dispute settlement bodies.
The conference will be divided into several panels based on substantive procedural issues rather than on specific courts and tribunals, to reflect the comparative approach to the topic. Each panel will combine invited speakers and speakers which have been accepted through a call for papers.
Call for Papers
The organizers invite academics and practitioners to submit proposals for the panels, as detailed in the attached call for papers. Authors are encouraged to provide proposals that are comparative in nature, rather than focusing on one body or institution.  The deadline for the submission of papers is 31 December 2018.  The details for the submission of proposals and timeline can be found in the attachment.
Panels and topics for discussion
Panel I. The Impact of the Interstate Nature of the Dispute on the Procedure
Topics to be covered include, amongst others:
• Establishing jurisdiction over states
• Applicable law
• Challenge, Appeal, and Enforceability
• Procedural considerations related to sovereignty
• Political nature of court or tribunal / link of the court or/tribunal to a particular international or regional organization / reliance on states for funding and existence
• Transparency in state to state disputes
Panel II. Selection and Appointment of Judges and Arbitrators
Topics to be covered include, amongst others:
• Election/appointment procedures
• Lifetime appoints vs. limited-term appointments
• “Sitting” vs. “occasional” judging
• Number of judges to hear a dispute (related to deliberation and
awards/judgments)
• Conflicts/challenges
• Gender and diversity
Panel III. Procedures for written and oral argument
Topics to be covered include, amongst others:
• Limitations on, format of, and consideration of written argument
• Decisions on written argument without oral presentation
• Time periods
• Availability of oral argument
• Time for counsel
• Presentation format/order of argument
• Questions from the bench
• Language/translation
Panel IV. Evidence and Witnesses
Topics to be covered include, amongst others:
• Submission of evidence
• Rules of evidence
• Privileges specific to sovereigns (e.g. deliberative process)
• Appropriateness of adverse inferences in sovereign context
• Availability of witness testimony
• Written vs. oral submissions
• Immunity considerations with respect to state officials
• Experts
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6.    Call for Proposals: Interface 2019 hosted by The Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture (ICSLAC) presents (Un)bound: Interdisciplinary Dialogues (January 11, 2019)
Call for Proposals
Interface 2019 hosted by The Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture (ICSLAC) presents (Un)bound: Interdisciplinary Dialogues to be held on May 3rd and 4th at Carleton University, located on unceded Algonquin territory (Ottawa). This year’s theme (Un)bound invites graduate students, emerging scholars, and artists whose research or creative practice attempts to cross traditional borders and boundaries within the academic or artistic realms. (Un)bound will explore what it means to be bound by constraints whether real or imagined, as well as the possibilities and struggles that emerge when we risk creating and/or working outside of these structured confines. The conference will provide a congenial environment where participants can present interdisciplinary research and form professional connections with like-minded peers.
ICSLAC welcomes creative and defined submissions for research papers, panels, performances, and workshops from graduate students at the MA and Ph.D. levels, as well as from emerging and independent artists or scholars. We are interested in submissions that critically consider, but are not limited to:
- borders, boundaries, and mapping
- migration and diaspora
- identity
- politics and political economy
- decolonial/post-colonial methodologies and globalisms
- interdisciplinarity in music, art, film, or literature
- critical cultural theory
- media and digital cultures
- feminist and queer theories
- interdisciplinary studies in education and pedagogy
- memory studies and museology
- environmental studies and ecocriticism
Keynote speaker: Dr. Lisa Lowe
Lisa Lowe is Distinguished Professor of English and Humanities, a faculty member of the Consortium of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora, and Director of the Center for the Humanities at Tufts University. In January 2019, she will join Yale University as Samuel Knight Professor of American Studies.
More information about her research can be found here.
Submission deadline: Friday, January 11, 2019
Contact: unboundconference2019@gmail.com
Website and registration: www.interfaceunbound.com
Proposals will be selected through a blind jury process. Please include your name, institutional affiliation, and bio (max. 100 words) in the body of your email and attach an abstract (max. 300 words) with a list of keywords, without any identifying information, as a PDF file. If you are submitting a performance or workshop proposal, please outline the intended length and structure in your submission as well as capacity limitations.
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7.    Call for Papers: Special issue on Masculinity and Gender Relations in Canadian Punjabi Communities (January 14, 2019)
Punjabis in Canada occupy a significant place in the country’s socio-cultural, political, and economic landscape. Their population is growing with a young generation of Punjabis being born and growing up in Canada as well as with the arrival of Punjabis from elsewhere. Yet scholarly work about Canadian Punjabis is limited, particularly research related to gender dynamics. Within an intent to contribute to literature on gender issues among Canadian Punjabis, we propose a collection of scholarly articles on masculinities and gender relations. Several issues such as gender discrimination, intimate partner violence, ‘honour’-based crimes, son preference and sex selection, and drug and gun violence confront a relatively young Canadian Punjabi community in a racialized context of socio-economic and cultural discrimination. South Asian men have been associated in the media and in dominant discourses in violent terms—as gangs, victims, and perpetrators of violence—and as participating in “barbaric cultural practices.” South Asian families are scrutinized as contributing to this hyper violence through poor parenting practices and cultural values that favour boys over girls, supporting ideologies that see racialized communities as inherently violent and backward in their practices. These constructions originate from deep colonial beginnings and are supported through repetitive messaging and practices, such as racial profiling, media portrayals of crime and violence, and even through practices that target racialized communities as requiring change, rather than the colonial racist system being overhauled and decolonized.
There are important questions to be asked on how gender is constructed in Punjabi communities in Canada, what social factors contribute to the hypermasculinity of Punjabi boys and men, what roles hypermasculinity plays in transnational migration, family formation, and gender dynamics in Punjabi households, and several other questions that have received inadequate attention in research and writing. We are particularly interested in explorations of Punjabi masculinities, colonial constructions of South Asian families and communities and its role in toxic masculinity, the impact of systemic and everyday racism on the lives of second-generation Punjabi women and men in Canada as well as research that explores these issues through lens of transnationality, connecting not only Punjab and Canada, but also the wider networks and nodes of the global Punjabi Diaspora.
The proposal is for a collection of (8 to 10) articles to be published as a special issue in a peer-reviewed journal. The journal will be decided on the basis of shortlisted abstracts. The special issue will contribute to (re)-thinking masculinities and gender in the Canadian Punjabi community in relation to how marked (Punjabi) bodies encounter systemic racism and violence and the intersections with hypermasculinity and family violence.
By Canadian Punjabi, the proposal refers to those whose (ancestral) place of origin is Punjab in present day India and Pakistan, whose religion is Sikhism/ Hinduism/ Islam and any other or no religion. When we use the term ‘community’, it is intended to encompass the diversity among Punjabis in Canada.
Contributions to the special issue are invited from scholars in diverse fields, theoretical frameworks, and scale (micro-level to global or transnational scale) that explore the Punjabi Diaspora in Canada from multiple contexts. Micro-level analyses contextualized in larger processes of change are particularly sought for this collection. We welcome in particular interdisciplinary contributions founded in the view that the issues we are dealing with are multi-faceted and embedded in complex structures and processes. Articles should be based on original first-hand data collection or on the analysis of original data. The articles should push further existing understandings of masculinities and gender issues in the Canadian Punjabi community. We would particularly like to welcome contributions from emerging scholars working on this topic. Partial funding to facilitate participation in the workshop may be available depending on the final shortlist of authors.
Editors
Sharada Srinivasan, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Gender, Justice and Development, University of Guelph
Mandeep Kaur Mucina, Assistant Professor, University of Victoria
Margaret Walton-Roberts, Professor, Wilfrid Laurier University
Calendar
New Deadline for abstracts: 14 January 2019 (Abstracts should be 250 words long including a title)
Shortlisted authors to be contacted: 31 January 2019
Deadline for draft papers: 01 March 2019
Two-day workshop at the University of Guelph: 09–10 May 2019. All draft papers (9000 words all inclusive)made available to all authors. Each contributor must read all of the papers before the workshop. Each author is invited to prepare a discussion of one of the papers.
Deadline for revised papers and introduction: 31 July 2019
Submission to journal: September/ October 2019
Email canadian.punjabi.masculinity@gmail.com to submit an abstract (250 words including a title) along with four keywords and a 100-word bio for each author by the new deadline of 14 January 2019.
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8.    Call for Applications: 2019-2020 Research Associate Program, Five College Women's Studies Research Center (February 15, 2019)
Five College Women's Studies Research Center
Call for Applications for Research Associates in 2019-2020
Deadline: February 15, 2019
Apply at https://apply.interfolio.com/57537
The Five College Women’s Studies Research Center is located in a geographic area with one of the largest concentrations of scholars dedicated to feminist scholarship in the world. As of 2018, the Center has hosted over 415 researchers from more than forty-four countries and thirty-six states across the United States. Provided with office space and access to extensive consortium resources, Associates gather regularly to discuss their research with each other and local faculty in a variety of settings.
To apply, applicants should complete an online application that includes a project proposal (up to three pages in length), curriculum vitae and contact information for two professional references. Project proposals should include 1) a statement about the contribution to and significance of the project or dissertation for women, gender, and sexuality studies, 2) a detailed description of the project or dissertation and timeline, and 3) how a stay in the Five Colleges will advance the project or dissertation.
Travel, housing and living expenses are the responsibility of Associates in this unpaid residency. It is important that Associates remain in residence for the duration; beyond this requirement for the facilitation of community, Associates define the scope of their research program for the semester or year. The Center’s Director will help identify conversation partners and resources as requested.
For further information, visit https://www.fivecolleges.edu/fcwsrc or email fcwsrc@fivecolleges.edu.
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OPPORTUNITIES:
1.    Career Opportunity: Women’s Xchange One Year Research Fellowship at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto (December 10, 2018)
Applications for a one year Research Fellowship are now being
accepted.
Program: Women’s Xchange
Location: Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario
Anticipated Start: Jan. 2019
Duration of position: One year with possibility for renewal
A position for a full-time postdoctoral fellow is available with Women’s Xchange, Women’s
College Hospital under the supervision of Dr. Paula Rochon, V.P. of Research and
Women’s Xchange Lead and Dr. Robin Mason, Scientific Lead Women’s Xchange.
Women’s Xchange is a women’s health knowledge translation and exchange centre
based at Women’s College Hospital. Funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term
Care’s Health System Research Fund the centre is advancing the latest knowledge about
the health of women to care providers, scientists, policy makers and community leaders.
By promoting the development of women’s health research across the province, the
centre aims to create a more equitable and sustainable health care system for women
and all Ontarians.
We are seeking an individual with experience in qualitative research to lead a participatory
study on sex and gendered experiences of diabetes as part of Diabetes Action Canada,
one of the chronic disease networks funded through CIHR’s Strategy for Patient Oriented
Research.
Description of the role
The Fellow will be expected to:
• Lead the qualitative study with Diabetes Action Canada’s patient partners from ethics
submission, through analysis and manuscript preparation;
• Attend and contribute to regular team meetings;
• Assist with other Women’s Xchange activities including work arising from the sex and
gender support service (may include reviewing external proposals);
Qualifications and Experience:
• PhD degree required
• Expertise in conducting and analyzing qualitative interview data
• Prior publications in peer reviewed journals
• Exceptional organizational and project management skills
• Exceptional writing and communication skills
• Excellent computer skills and software expertise.
• Flexible, creative thinker
• Ability to work independently and in a team
This position is available on a one year contract with possibility of renewal.
Deadline: Dec. 10, 2018
Application Guidelines:
1. Provide a cover letter summarizing your research interests, career plans, and
future research goals
2. Current CV
3. Names and e-mails of two references (current/former supervisors)
4. Send via email to robin.mason@wchospital.ca with ‘Postdoctoral Fellow
Application’ in the subject line
Candidates must be eligible to work in Canada.
We thank all applicants. Only individuals who are short-listed will be contacted for an
interview.
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2.    Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor in the Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies (Department of Social Sciences) at Brock University (January 14, 2019)
Job Posting:
Faculty of Social Sciences
Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies
Assistant Professor
Job summary
The Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST) at Brock University invites applications for a probationary tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor effective July 1st, 2019. This position focuses on the field of Antiracist, Decolonial Feminist Analysis and Activism. In the Centre, faculty teach a variety of courses from large lectures to small seminars as well as courses with a specific focus and more broad, survey courses. The successful applicant can apply for opportunities to supervise MA students in the Social Justice and Equity Studies program and other graduate programs on campus. Applicants should have completed thePh.D. by the time of appointment (or be near completion) and provide evidence of potential for excellence in teaching and scholarly achievement. The candidate can be expected to engage in a program of research, participate in the affairs of the Centre and fulfill service commitments to the Centre and University.
Qualifications
Applicants should have completed the Ph.D. in a relevant field by the time of appointment (or be near completion) and provide evidence of potential for excellence in teaching and scholarly achievement.
Notes
Applicants should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, a statement of teaching philosophy, evidence of potential for successful and innovative teaching, a statement of research, a sample of scholarly writing, and three confidential letters of reference by January 14th, 2019. All material should be sent via email (pdf preferred) to smoore@brocku.ca and addressed to Dr. Shannon Moore, Director of the Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies. The position is subject to final budgetary approval. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. Brock University is actively committed to diversity and the principles of employment equity and invites applications from all interested candidates. Women, Indigenous peoples, members of visible minorities, people with disabilities and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, two-spirit and queer (LGBTQ2+) persons are especially encouraged to apply and to voluntarily self-identify as a member of an equity seeking group as part of their application. Candidates who wish to be considered as a member of one
or more equity seeking groups should fill out the Self-Identification form and include the form.
Differing career patterns may be more common among members of designated groups, and those who have experienced leaves from the workplace. These differences will be taken into account in assessing the experiences and qualifications of members of these groups, or those who have experienced leaves from the workplace. We will accommodate the needs of the applicants and the Ontario Human Rights Code and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) throughout all stages of the selection process, as outlined in the Employee Accommodation Policy https://brocku.ca/webfm_send/39939. Please advise Shannon Moore (smoore@brocku.ca) to ensure your accessibility needs are accommodated through this
process. Information received relating to accommodation measures will be addressed confidentially. Brock University is located in St. Catharines atop the Niagara Escarpment. The scenic location within the Niagara Peninsula boasts an expanding wine-making and tourism sector with over 12 million visitors touring the natural beauty of Ontario’s vineyard country, Niagara Falls, and historical landmarks. Just a 30-minute drive to New York State and within an hours drive to Hamilton and Toronto, St. Catharines has a population of approximately 130,000 people and is accessible to a dynamic market of professional and amateur sport and an exceptional range of leisure and recreation opportunities.
More information on WGST can be found on the university website https://brocku.ca/social-sciences/departments-and-centres/womens-studies
Also, information about the City of St. Catharines can be found on the city’s website
https://www.stcatharines.ca/en/
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3.    Applications Open for 2019-20 York-Massey Fellowship and Visiting Scholarships (January 14, 2019)
The Office of Research Services (ORS) invites applications for the 2019-20 York Fellowship and two Visiting Scholarships at Massey College in the University of Toronto. The Fellowship and the two Scholarships are open to full-time faculty members planning to go on sabbatical or other leave during 2019-20. The Fellowship will provide the selected faculty member with prime office space in the College for the academic year and the status of a full Senior Resident of the College, with dining privileges (such as attendance of all High Tables subject to College rules). The title "York Fellow of Massey College" remains for life or while mutually agreeable.
The Visiting Scholars will have a carrel in the College and access to Robarts Library and all public rooms in the College. Membership in the Massey Alumni Association is granted to Visiting Scholars at the completion of their program.
Massey College is an independent college situated in the University of Toronto campus, almost directly opposite the Munk School of Global Affairs and very close to the Robarts Library. It consists of a junior fellowship, made up of graduate students, and a senior fellowship, consisting primarily of faculty, of whom an increasing number come from York University. (See below for a list of past successful candidates.) York Fellows and Visiting Scholars are expected to participate in the activities of the College and contribute to fulfilling its mission.
Application Process & Deadline
Interested individuals are asked to submit to the Office of Research Services a letter outlining sabbatical or other leave plans, including reasons for wishing to be at Massey College, along with a current curriculum vitae, by Monday, January 14, 2019. Please submit the letter and curriculum vitae via email to: Mark Roseman, Director, SIRI, Office of Research Services, 5th Floor, Kaneff Tower, (roseman@yorku.ca).
Submissions will be reviewed by the Major Awards Advisory Committee (MAAC), which will then provide advice to the Vice-President Research & Innovation (VPRI) on top tier candidates.  The VPRI will then put forward the top three applications to Massey College for their consideration. Results are expected to be announced in March 2019.
Past York Fellows of Massey College
2001-02  George Fallis, Department of Economics, Faculty of LA&PS
2002-03  Elizabeth Cohen, Department of History, Faculty of LA&PS
2003-04  John Mayberry, Department of Theatre, Faculty of Fine Arts
2004-05  Jonathan Warren, Department of English, Faculty of LA&PS
2005-06  Katey Anderson, Department of Humanities, Faculty of LA&PS
2006-07  Sampa Bhadra, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science and Engineering
2007-08  Stephen Brooke, Department of History, Faculty of LA&PS
2008-09  Maria Figueredo, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, Faculty of LA&PS
2009-10  George Georgopoulos, Department of Economics, Faculty of LA&PS
2010-11  Peer Zumbansen, Osgoode Hall Law School
2011-12  Laura Levin, Department of Theatre, Faculty of Fine Arts
2012-13  Peter McKinnon, Department of Theatre, Faculty of Fine Arts
2013-14  Alice MacLachlan, Department of Philosophy, Faculty of LA&PS
2014-15  Michael Zryd, Department of Film, Faculty of Fine Arts
2015-16  Sarah Parsons, Department of Visual Art and Art History, School of the Arts, Media, Performance and Design
2016-17  Naomi Adelson, Department of Anthropology, Faculty of LA&PS
2017-18  Lily Cho, Department of English, Faculty of LA&PS
2018-19  Jennifer Steele, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health
Past Visiting Scholars at Massey College
2013-14 Benjamin Berger, Osgoode Hall Law School
2014-15    Francois Tanguay-Renaud, Osgoode Hall Law School
2014-15    Marshall McCall, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science
2014-15    Kathy Young, Department of Geography, Faculty of LA&PS
2015-16    Douglas Hay, Osgoode Hall Law School & Department of History
2015-16    Leo Panitch, Department of Political Science, Faculty of LA&PS
2016-17    Heather Lotherington, Faculty of Education
2016-17    Patricia Burke Wood, Department of Geography, Faculty of LA&PS
2017-18    Karen Krasny, Faculty of Education
2017-18    David McNally, Department of Political Science, Faculty of LA&PS
2018-19    Gabrielle Slowey, Department of Politics, Faculty of LA&PS
2018-19    Joan Judge, Department of History, Faculty of LA&PS
Contact
Mark Roseman
Director, SIRI
Office of Research Services
roseman@yorku.ca
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4.    Grant Opportunity: SSHRC Connection Grants – Research Data Management Capacity Building Initiative (February 1/May 1/August 1, 2019)
The Social Sciences and Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) recently launched the Research Data Management Capacity Building Initiative – Connection Grants, a special call to support the research community’s development, adoption and dissemination of research data management standards, practices, tools and skills appropriate to their field.  A summary is provided below.
Objectives
To help the Canadian social sciences and humanities research community strengthen its capacity in data management.
The Research Data Management Capacity Building Initiative offers the research community Connections Grants to support the development, adoption and dissemination of research data management standards, practices, tools and skills appropriate to their field.
Research Data Management Capacity Building Initiative applications are subject to the Connection Grants evaluation criteria and scoring. In addition, as part of its assessment of the proposal’s relevance to the objectives of the Connection program, under the Connection Grants Challenge criteria, the merit review committee will evaluate the degree to which applications respond to one or more of the following objectives:
develop and/or adopt data management standards, practices, tools and skills within and across disciplines and institutions, with a focus on the social sciences and humanities;
connect researchers or students with data management professionals and service providers (e.g., librarians, programmers, specialists in research ethics, etc.), and other stakeholders (e.g., research subjects and users) to increase knowledge of data management
share and develop knowledge and skills relating to data collection and storage, metadata, preservation, retention, sharing, credit and citation;
share and develop knowledge and skills related to the responsible ownership, control, access and possession of data used or created in the context of Indigenous research (e.g., the application of OCAP® principles); and
through other activities, enable the social sciences and humanities research community to strengthen its ability to fulfill the roles and responsibilities indicated in the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management, and the requirements proposed in the draft tri-agency research data management policy.
Value
Up to $50K
Duration
1 year
Deadlines
ORS deadline for full review           Agency deadline
January 18, 2019            February 1, 2019
April 17, 2019                 May 1, 2019
July 18, 2019                 August 1, 2019
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5.    Grant Opportunity: SSHRC Insight Development Grants Competition (February 4, 2019)
The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) recently launched the 2019 competition for the Insight Development Grants (IDG) program.  The application form is now available on SSHRC’s Research Portal.  This program supports research in its initial stages.
A summary is provided below.
Objectives
-    to enable the development of new research questions, as well as experimentation with new methods, theoretical approaches and/or ideas; and
-    to foster research in its early stages, but are not intended to support large-scale initiatives
Proposed projects may involve, but are not limited to, the following types of research activities:
•    case studies;
•    pilot initiatives; and
•    critical analyses of existing research.
SSHRC welcomes applications involving Aboriginal research, as well as those involving research-cretion.
NOTE: The Office of Research Office would like to bring researchers attention to SSHRC guidelines around submission of multiple applications.  An individual may not, in a calendar year, submit as applicant (principal investigator/project director), an application for both an Insight Development Grant and an Insight Grant.
Value
$7,000 - $75,000
Duration
1 – 2 years
Deadlines
Submission to ORS for review – January 21, 2019
Submission to agency – February 4, 2019
Submission to ORS of hard copy of full application plus completed and signed ORS checklist and electronic submission to SSHRC – no later than 12noon on February 4, 2019
Complete details on this opportunity may be obtained by visiting SSHRC's web site at the following link:
http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/programs-programmes/insight_development_grants-subventions_de_developpement_savoir-eng.aspx
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6.    Research Opportunity: Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships - Summer 2019 at The University of Chicago Library (March 4,2019)
The University of Chicago Library is pleased to announce a call for applications for the 2019 Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships.
Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships - Summer 2019
Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library
The University of Chicago Library invites applications for short-term research fellowships for the summer of 2019.  Any visiting researcher, writer, or artist residing more than 100 miles from Chicago, and whose project requires on-site consultation of University of Chicago Library collections, primarily archives, manuscripts, and rare books in Special Collections, is eligible.
The Special Collections Research Center is the principal repository of rare books, manuscripts, and archives in the University of Chicago Library:  https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/scrc/.
Rare books and early manuscripts in Special Collections include Homer, Byzantine Gospels and liturgical texts, Renaissance humanism, court and manorial documents of the Bacon family, history of science and medicine, printed works of Frederick Chopin, historical children’s books, European Jewish life and culture, and English and American modern poetry.
Archives and modern manuscript strengths include early Ohio River valley history; Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Civil War era; social sciences and social welfare policy; physics, astrophysics, and geophysical science; theology and history of religions; Poetry magazine and modern poetry; post-World War II nuclear policy, Cold War intellectual politics, and world constitutionalism; urban history; Chicago medical history; and Chicago jazz.
Up to $3,000 of support will be awarded to help cover estimated travel, living, and research expenses.  Support for beginning scholars is a priority of the program. Applications from underrepresented groups are encouraged.
The deadline for applications is March 4, 2019.  Notice of awards will be made by March 29, 2019, for use between June 10, 2018, and September 27, 2019.
Complete information about applying for a Platzman Fellowship is available on the Special Collections Research Center web site.