CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, January 17, 2019

CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1. CFR Research Associate Patrick Alcedo's "Dancing Manilenyos" European premiere at Ethnografilm (April 16-20)

EVENTS:

1. CFR Presents: "Rethinking the Role of the Critical Intellectual" Talk by Dr. Elaine Stavro (January 17, 2019)

2. CFR and CERLAC Present: "Women's Resistance to Violence in Brazil" seminar with CFR Visiting Graduate Students Vinícius Santiago and Laura Martello (January 28, 2019)

3. The Centre for Feminist Research, Sexuality Studies, and the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies present: “Trans Necrointimacies: Race and the Chalky Affects of Memorialization” talk by CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Nael Bhanji (February 5, 2019)

COMMUNITY

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

1. New Resource: Regions Refocus Report “Intersecting Movements Resisting Authoritarianisms”

2. Announcing a New Cross-Canada Organization: Migrant Rights Network

3. New Book: “Cracking Labour’s Glass Ceiling: Transforming Lives through Women’s Union Education” by Cindy Hanson, Adriane Paavo and Sisters in Labour Education

EVENTS:

1. Nightwood Theatre: New Production “Grace” (January 8-26, 2019 at Streetcar Crowsnest)

2. The Indigenous Environmental Justice Project (York) and Great Lakes Waterworks/Water Allies (New College/University of Toronto) Present: “Stories and Sovereignty: Winter Tales of Water and Love” (March 15, 2019)

3. McGill University: Dr. Valerie Francisco-Menchavez, "Fight or Flight: Filipina Migrations, Counter-Narrative and a Call to Action" (January 18, 2019)

4. Women’s March Canada (January 19, 2019)

5. Shab-e She'r (Poetry Night) (January 22, 2019)

6. OCASI: Creating Inclusive Spaces for Immigrants and Refugees with In/Visible Disabilities: A Webinar Series for Front-Line Staff (Starting January 22, 2019)

7. Event: Building Community, Accessing Justice: In Conversation With The Author Of “Scarborough” Catherine Hernandez (January 23, 2019)

8. The City Institute’s Feminist Urban Studies Reading Group Presents: ”Feminist Methodology and the Global South” (February 8, 2019)

9. UCLA conference: Thinking Gender 2019: Feminists Confronting the Carceral State (February 22, 2019)

10. Lecture: Charmaine A. Nelson, National Gallery of Canada: “Fugitive Slave Advertisements and/as Portraiture in late Eighteenth- and early Nineteenth-Century Canada” (February 27, 2019)

11. Italian Contemporary Film Festival (ICFF) Presents: “Call the Shots: Female Power Through Film” in celebration of International Women’s Day (March 8, 2019)

12. IPEE Summer School 2019: Beyond Neoliberal Development: Thinking Economy Otherwise (June 3-14, 2019)

CALLS: 

1. Call for participants: Anti-sexual violence education research study

2. Call for Participants: The Queer Feels Study

3. Call for papers: the 2019 Annual Graduate Conference in Gender and Social Justice Studies (January 20, 2019)

4. Call for Submissions: VUSAC "Art at the Intersections" Showcase (January 28, 2019)

5. Call for Abstracts: Securing our Political Futures: Critical Social Work and Social Science Conversations on Xenophobic Nationalisms (January 31, 201-)

6. Call for Submissions: The Gathering - Submissions for the F! issue (January 31, 2019)

7. Call for Papers/Presentations: Gender, Intersectionalities, and Sustainable Development:

Food Security, Economic Equality, and Women's Empowerment Presented by Feminist Legal Studies, Queen’s University, and Faculty of Law (February 1, 2019)

8. Call for Proposals: 2019 WSIB Grants Competition (February 1, 2019)

9. Call for Nominations: Curriculum Inquiry 2019 Writing Fellows and Writers' Retreat (February 1, 2019)

10. Call for Applications: Join the City of Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee (February 8, 2019)

11. Call for Proposals: Global Affairs Canada Volunteer Cooperation Program 2020-2027 (February 20, 2019)

12. Call for Proposals: NSERC Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) Program (March 11, 2019)

13. Call for Abstracts: Binocular 2019 Graduate Student Conference (March 15, 2019)

14. Call for Papers: “Power in Southeast Asia” | 2019 Conference of the Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies (April 1, 2019)

15. Call for Participants: Institute for Peace & Dialogue Summer Programs 2019: Training, Conference & 3 Month Research, Basel, Switzerland (May 1, 2019)

16. Call for Papers: Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror (May 15, 2019)

OPPORTUNITIES:

1. Job Opportunity: Research Assistant with Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (January 18, 2019)

2. Job Opportunity: Campaigns & Advocacy Coordinator, Scarborough Campus Students' Union (SCSU) (January 24, 2019)

3. Job Opportunity: Applications and Nominations Chair of the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies (January 31, 2019)

4. Funding Opportunity: Applications open for Winter APUS UofT Student Bursaries (February 1, 2019)

5. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position Plurilingual/Multiliteracies Education, Department of Integrated Studies in Education (McGill University) (February 1, 2019)

6. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position Language and Communication in Education, Department of Integrated Studies in Education (McGill University) (February 1, 2019)

7. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position Community Engagement and Indigenous Teacher Education, Department of Integrated Studies in Education (McGill University) (February 1, 2019)

8. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position Indigenous Language Linguistics and Education, Department of Integrated Studies in Education (McGill University) (February 1 ,2019)

9. Job Opportunity: Tenure-track Position at UQAM in Sociology of Gender (February 11, 2019)

10. Job Opportunity: The Martha LA McCain Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies (February 25, 2019)

11. Job Opportunity: BIPOC Facilitator 2019 Inclusion, Diversity and Equity Facilitator (March 31, 2019)

CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1. CFR Research Associate Patrick Alcedo's "Dancing Manilenyos" European premiere at Ethnografilm (April 16-20)

CFR Research Associate Dr. Patrick Alcedo's film "Dancing Manilenyos," which had its world premiere at the Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival, will have its European premiere on April 16-20. This time it will be in Paris, at the international film festival Ethnografilm: https://www.ethnografilm.com/

About the film: In Manila, a group of young Filipinos dream of making it big in the ballet world. Victor, who comes from a poor family, and Monica from a privileged background are among them. In this city that is one of the world’s most populated, the difference between those who have and those who have not is painfully extreme. Amidst Manila’s disparate social class structure, ballet teacher Luther hopes to lift his students out of poverty through artistic and life skills one learns from dancing.

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/288229620

EVENTS:

1. CFR Presents: "Rethinking the Role of the Critical Intellectual" Talk by Dr. Elaine Stavro (January 17, 2019)

The Centre for Feminist Research Presents:

Rethinking the Role of the Critical Intellectual: Liberating or Colonizing?

Talk by Dr. Elaine Stavro, Trent University

Introduced by Dr. Jacinthe Michaud, York University

Date: Thursday, January 17, 2019

Time: 3-5pm

Location: 305 Founders College, York University

Accessibility: FREE event! Everyone is welcome. Light refreshments provided. Founders College is wheelchair-accessible. Gender-neutral bathroom on 1st floor. Single-stall, accessible bathroom on 3rd floor. Wayfinding signs will be posted. Please RSVP with dietary needs to juliapyr@yorku.ca.

During the Algerian War (1954-62), Djamila Boupacha, a member of the Algerian independence movement Front de Libération Nationale (FLN), was tortured and raped by French soldiers to gather information. In protesting her torture, Boupacha’s lawyer solicited Simone de Beauvoir’s assistance to mount her defense. De Beauvoir’s intervention raises the question of whether an intellectual can represent a marginal group or, whether it is impossible to escape appropriating minority voices and thereby contributing to their disempowerment.

Bio: Dr. Elaine Stavro is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Studies at Trent University. She has recently published “ Emancipatory Thinking: Simone de Beauvoir and Contemporary Political Thought” (2018) with McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Copies of the book available for purchase!

Co-Sponsors: Founders College, Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, and the Department of Politics at York University.

2. CFR and CERLAC Present: "Women's Resistance to Violence in Brazil" seminar with CFR Visiting Graduate Students (January 28, 2019)

CFR and CERLAC Present:

Women’s resistance to violence in Brazil Seminar with CFR Visiting Graduate Students Vinícius Santiago and Laura Martello

Chaired by Dr. Anna Agathengelou

Date: Monday, January 28, 2019

Time: 2.30-4.30pm

Location: 626 Kaneff Tower

Accessibility: Wheelchair-accessible space, gender-neutral & gender-segregated washrooms. Light refreshments provided. Please advise of allergies/dietary needs with RSVP. Kaneff is not a scent-free environment. FREE event. All are welcome.

RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca

Link to Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1161882233964775/

Young feminist protests resisting the conservative reaction and the neoliberal offensive

Massive street protests against sexual abuse and femicide and in defense of sexual and reproductive rights have taken place in the last years in Brazil, resisting the conservative reaction and neoliberal offensive that coordinated a misogynist coup and the recent election of a ultra-right wing president. Combining elements of festivity and disruption in protests deeply rooted in local popular culture, young feminists are developing self-defense strategies to deal with patriarchal, capitalist and racist violence.

Laura França Martello is a PhD candidate in Political Science at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Mothers resisting state violence in favelas of Rio de Janeiro

Black people who live in favelas are one of the main targets of military violence in Brazil. Military police invasion in favelas has been one of the most outrageous state practice through which the pacification policy has been carried out in the last years in Brazil. The murdering of black people in favelas of Rio, especially black youths, reveals the deadly racism of a country that leads the murder rate of young black

men in the world. Due to this devastating context, some mothers have come to the streets to protest this murderous state practice and to mourn publicly their sons’ lives. Public mourning has been a sign of resistance to state violence and a political tool to claim justice in face of the arbitrariness of the state.

Vinícius Santiago is a PhD candidate in International Relations at the Institute of International Relations of the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (IRI/PUC-Rio), Brazil.

3. The Centre for Feminist Research, Sexuality Studies, and the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies present: “Trans Necrointimacies: Race and the Chalky Affects of Memorialization” talk by CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Nael Bhanji (February 5, 2019)

The Centre for Feminist Research, Sexuality Studies, and the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies present:

Trans Necrointimacies: Race and the Chalky Affects of Memorialization

Talk by CFR Visiting Scholar in Sexuality Studies Dr. Nael Bhanji

Introduced by Sexuality Studies Coordinator Bobby Noble

Date: February 5th, 2019

Time: 12-2pm

Location: 280A York Lanes, York University

Accessibility: Accessible space. Wheelchair-accessible and gender-neutral bathroom nearby.

Light refreshments provided. Everyone welcome. RSVP with dietary needs to juliapyr@yorku.ca

Link to Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/581982522272955/

---

What sorts of affective worldings emerge from the spectacularization and consumption of ‘ordinary’ racialized death?  How can we read projects of memorialization as intimately entwined with the mobilization of national subjects within broader mechanisms of hypervigilance and surveillance against people of colour? What connections can we make between practices of trans memoralization, state-securitization, and counter-terrorism? Tracing the connections between necropolitical intimacy, spectacularized violence, and ‘bare life’ in the circulation of affective belonging, this talk explores the centrality of “necrointimacies” in structuring whiteness as emblematic of contemporary life.

Dr. Nael Bhanji is the 2018-2019 Visiting Scholar in Sexuality Studies at the Centre for Feminist Research at York University and a lecturer at Carleton University.  Drawing upon critical race theory, trans studies, psychoanalysis, and affect theory, his research explores articulations of necropolitics, racialization, surveillance,  and counter-terrorism within an increasingly globalized trans movement. Nael's work appears in Transgender Migrations: The Bodies, Borders, and Politics of Transition,  The Transgender Studies Reader 2, Trans Studies Quarterly 4.1, Canadian Ethnic Studies, and The Equity Myth: Racialization and Indigeneity at Canadian Universities.  He is presently working on his monograph entitled “Trans Necrointimacies: Race and the Chalky Affects of Trans Memorialization.”

COMMUNITY

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

1. New Resource: Regions Refocus Report “Intersecting Movements Resisting Authoritarianisms”

In the face of a global authoritarian surge, 31 feminist and progressive activists in 19 countries offered their reflections for a new report on their contexts, struggles, and strategies. Intersecting Movements Resisting Authoritarianisms traces commonalities and differences to tie together "threads of resistance" to conservative social, political, and economic forces.

The report finishes with a set of concrete strategies and demands as sketched by participants. These offer strategic proposals such as tracking new forms of transnational exchange between right-wing actors, or generating knowledge outside of neoliberalism by bolstering the capacity of feminist groups to apply political economy analysis.

Visit http://bit.ly/ResistingAuthoritarianisms to read the report. We hope that it is a helpful resource for your own advocacy, and that it sparks fruitful conversations and provides useful tactics. We welcome your questions and comments-- please write to team@regionsrefocus.org.

2. Announcing a New Cross-Canada Organization: Migrant Rights Network

This month, No One Is Illegal - Toronto met with 35 other migrant justice and labour organizations and joined the newly formed Migrant Rights Network. We are proud to be founding members of this network.

On December 8th and 9th, nearly 60 representatives of 35 organizations met in Huron-Wendat, Haudenosaunee, Anishinabe, Mississaugas of the New Credit territory (Toronto).

On December 18th, 2018, International Migrants Day, we are forming a new cross-Canada organization, the MIGRANT RIGHTS NETWORK, which will combat racism and fight for migrant justice. We call on allies to spread the word.

The Migrant Rights Network will carry out popular education for ourselves and for the broader public. We will launch an anti-racist, migrant justice platform before the federal elections. We call for coordinated, self-organized actions on:

March 21, 2019 (International Day for Elimination of Racism);

May 1, 2019 (International Workers Day);

June 16, 2019 (Father’s Day & International Domestic Workers Day); and

September 2, 2019 (Labour Day)]

Migrant and refugee groups, and supporters across Canada who want to take action with us - get in touch here https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf3XoEHMTvwx0EPgjGL7bWQmj9fiP2zYHR-Q--Seqqjes7TWw/viewform !

SHARE ON FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/188312381502634/posts/773188379681695/ | SHARE ON TWITTER https://twitter.com/MigrantRightsCA/status/1075015188024315905

MIGRANT RIGHTS NETWORK VISION

We prioritize the leadership and self-organization of racialized, working class, migrants, refugees and displaced people. We will do so in alliance with labour, community, faith, environmental, Indigenous, arts and media organizations. We will strive to build global alliances for migrant justice.

Immigration policies separate us. Government policies polarize and divide us. We are given different rights on the basis of the places of our birth, the colour of our skin, the accents we have, and the bodies we inhabit. We are denied labour protections, decent healthcare, the ability to change jobs, and to be with our families. We reject these categories of migrant, irregular, refugee, undocumented, citizen. We assert our humanity.

We demand permanent resident status for all migrants and refugees already here, and landed status on arrival for those that will arrive in the future. We particularly call for Landed Status Now for Care Workers. We demand an end to detentions and deportations. We demand labour mobility. We want decent work and fair wages. We want all protections and entitlements. We demand an end to discrimination and criminalization of migrants, refugees and racialized people. We particularly demand an end to anti-Black racisms.

We are here because we were forced to leave our homes. We have been pushed out by war, poverty, persecution, extraction, joblessness, social oppressions and environmental collapse. We have been displaced in the interest of profit for the few. We are courageous - we are the exodus from Central America, the boats in the Mediterranean and the many migrant caravans. Our struggle is as much for rights and protections here, as it is to create global justice so that we are not forced to migrate in the first place.

We are building a movement. Join us.

http://migrantrights.ca/en/announcing-migrant-rights-network/

Organizations that attended the December 8 & 9 Meeting to Combat Racism and for Migrant Justice

Alberta Care Workers Association, Edmonton

Butterfly (Asian Migrant Sex Worker Support Network), Toronto

Canadian Council for Refugees, National

Caregiver Connections (CCESO), Toronto

Caregivers Action Centre, Toronto

Chinese Canadian National Council - Toronto

FCJ Refugee Centre, Toronto

Fight for $15 and Fairness, Ontario

Immigrant Workers Centre, Montreal

Income Security Advocacy Centre, Toronto

Mexicans United for Regularization, Quebec

Migrant Resource Centre Canada

Migrant Workers Alliance - Student-Workers

Migrant Workers Alliance for Change*, Canada

Migrant Workers Alliance for Change - Niagara

Migrant Workers Association Quebec

Migrante Alberta

Migrante BC

Migrante Canada

Migrante Ontario

Migrante Ottawa

No One Is Illegal - Toronto

OCASI - Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants

OEERC, Toronto

OHIP for All, Ontario

Ottawa Sanctuary City Network

Parkdale Community Legal Services, Toronto

PEI Action Team for Migrant Worker Rights / Cooper Institute

PINAY Quebec

Sanctuary Health, BC

The Neighbourhood Organization, Toronto

Unifor, Canada

Urban Alliance on Race Relations, Toronto

Vancouver Committee for Domestic Workers and Caregivers Rights

Workers Action Centre, Toronto

*The Migrant Workers Alliance for Change includes individuals as well as Alliance for South Asian Aids Prevention, Asian Community Aids Services, Butterfly (Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Support), Caregiver Connections Education and Support Organization, Caregivers Action Centre, Durham Region Migrant Solidarity Network, FCJ Refugee House, Fuerza Puwersa, GABRIELA Ontario, IAVGO Community Legal Clinic, Income Security Advocacy Centre, Justice for Migrant Workers, Migrante Ontario, No One Is Illegal – Toronto, Northumberland Community Legal Centre, OCASI – Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants, OHIP For All, PCLS Community Legal Clinic, SALCO Community Legal Clinic, Students Against Migrant Exploitation, Social Planning Toronto, UFCW, UNIFOR, Workers Action Centre and Workers United.

3. New Book: “Cracking Labour’s Glass Ceiling: Transforming Lives through Women’s Union

Education” By Cindy Hanson, Adriane Paavo and Sisters in Labour Education

Cracking Labour’s Glass Ceiling: Transforming Lives through Women’s Union Education By Cindy Hanson, Adriane Paavo and Sisters in Labour Education

https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/cracking-labours-glass-ceiling

Paperback $30.00 This book will ship by April 5th, 2019.

Although the health of the trade union movement may rest on its ability to include women in membership and leadership, little attention has been paid to women-only labour education. This original collection contains vibrant example of labour education events and the women involved who develop, implement, research, evaluate and facilitate at them. All the contributors speak from first-hand experience with women-only programs in unions across Canada, the United States and the world. They identify the methods used in pursuit of learner empowerment and transformation, and frankly discuss the outcomes. These real-life examples offer practical guidance and inspiration for all who create and support activist learning within unions and other social-justice organizations.

EVENTS:

1. Nightwood Theatre: New Production “Grace” (January 8-26, 2019 at Streetcar Crowsnest)

Grace by Jane Doe – January 8-26, 2019 at Streetcar Crowsnest. A Nightwood Theatre production in association with Crow’s Theatre. Directed by Andrea Donaldson, starring Michaela Washburn, Rose Napoli, Brenda Robins and Conrad Coates.

Exquisitely told in a stunning blend of documentary theatre, striking visual projections and choreography, Grace is a searing piece that ignites a pertinent discussion on the failures and limitations of the legal system. In the wake of a young woman’s disclosure of childhood sexual assault, a family presses charges. Exquisitely told in a stunning blend of documentary theatre, striking visual projections and choreography, Grace is a searing piece that ignites a pertinent discussion on the failures and limitations of the legal system, and about the pursuit of justice at a time when provability still usurps truth in our courtrooms.

Tickets $25-$40 at crowstheatre.com.

Use promo code COMMUNITY to get 10$ off tickets

Click here to view the trailer: https://www.nightwoodtheatre.net/whats_on/grace

2. The Indigenous Environmental Justice Project (York) and Great Lakes Waterworks/Water Allies (New College/University of Toronto) Present: “Stories and Sovereignty: Winter Tales of Water and Love” (March 15, 2019)

The Indigenous Environmental Justice Project (York) and Great Lakes Waterworks/Water Allies (New College/University of Toronto) are pleased to announce a joint winter event series. In these events, we draw on stories as a way of thinking forward on questions of water and water governance, love and sovereignty. In Anishinaabek teachings, winter has traditionally been, and remains, a time for story-telling, reflection, restoration, and envisioning, towards the moment when the sap (sugar water) flows, and the ice breaks in the spring.

In “Be the Water” Dr. Debby Danard notes the need for building new relations with water.  thinking about developing a governance structure by the water and for the water: “The concept of a governance structure by the water for the water may sound impossible. However, it is within this impossibility that there is possibility….” (2013:119).  That the seemingly impossible is possible is evident by the recognition of rivers in New Zealand/Aeotera and in India as having personhood, in March 2017 (Kennedy 2012).  In “Indigenous women, water justice and Zaagidowin (love), Deborah McGregor argues: “As Indigenous peoples, we can work toward healing through loving responsibility; through caring for ourselves, our communities and the Earth (waters, forests, animals, etc.). It is not enough to heal ourselves; we are obligated to heal with the Earth to fully recover from historical trauma and reclaim well-being. Power enables us to take up our responsibilities with care and love. Loving responsibilities and obligations flow from natural laws and thus are not mandated by governments through legislation, policies, funding or programs. Instead, knowing our responsibilities gives us power to act” (Deborah McGregor).

We welcome you to come and listen, as a way of reflecting and thinking openly about questions of love, water and water governance.

*

Co-sponsored by the Indigenous Environmental Justice Project, directed by Dr. Deborah McGregor (Osgoode Hall, York University) and Great Lakes Water Works/Water Allies Project (New College, University of Toronto), directed by Dr. Bonnie McElhinny. The Indigenous Environmental Justice Project: http://iejproject.info.yorku.ca/  is a research project that aims to develop a distinctive framework that is informed by Indigenous law, concepts of justice and the lived experiences of Indigenous people. Great Lakes Water Works/Water Allies is a hub for water issues at New College within the University of Toronto. We bring together U of T scholars researching and teaching about water, and Toronto/ Great Lakes communities active in water issues. Water allies is inspired by decolonial, feminist and anti-racist approaches in the social sciences and humanities. We are guided by the Guswenta (Two Row Wampum) and other covenants of this place. We honour and are inspired by the Dish with One Spoon Treaty. We strive to work in friendship, honouring the principles of community based research (respect, responsibility, reciprocity and relevance). We work towards, and on the basis of, alliance, guided by these principles.

Walking for the Water

Date: March 7th, 2019

Time: TBA

Location: York University

Speaker or Panel: Kelsey Leonard

*

Kelsey Leonard

Kelsey Leonard is a PhD candidate from the Department of Political Science at McMaster University and the first Native American woman to earn a science degree from the University of Oxford, which she earned in 2012, she has an MSc in Water Science, Policy and Management from St. Cross College, Her master's thesis, “Water Quality For Native Nations: Achieving A Trust Responsibility”, discusses water quality regulation and how water resources on tribal land are not protected. Kelsey strives to be a strong advocate for the protection of Indigenous waters through enhanced interjurisdictional coordination and meaningful consultation. She has been instrumental in protecting the interests of Tribes with the development of the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Action Plan and building a sustainable ocean future by valuing Indigenous traditional ecological knowledge. A part of her research has been creating dialogue with the Great Lake Water Walkers to better understand the threats to water protection in the Great Lakes, representing a call to action for Indigenous water governance. Accompanying Kelsey are a panel of Water Walkers who will share their stories, struggles and experiences.

3. McGill University: Dr. Valerie Francisco-Menchavez talk, "Fight or Flight: Filipina Migrations, Counter-Narrative and a Call to Action" (January 18, 2019)

Dr. Valeria Francisco-Menchaves, Assistant Professor of Sociology, San Francisco State University

Friday, January 18 from 12 noon to 1:30 pm | McGill Education building #233, 3700 Rue McTavish, Montreal, QC

Fight or Flight: Filipina Migrations, Counter-Narrative and a Call to Action

Dr. Valeria Francisco-Menchavez, author of The Labor of Care: Filipina Migrants and Transnational Families in the Digital Age, will address common themes and challenges in Filipino migration to the United States, and address the basis and need for political organizing and movement-building towards immigrant rights and solidarity to the Philippines.

Francisco-Menchavez’s academic interests lie in the areas of global and transnational sociology, migration and immigration studies, diaspora with a special interest on the Philippine migration, gender and the family, racial and ethnic relations in the U.S., labor, transnational social movements with regard to the migrant workers, and international political economy. Francisco-Menchavez/s research is informed by the transnational activism of GABRIELA, an alliance of progressive Filipino women’s organizations in the Philippines and internationally, and MIGRANTE International, an international alliance of Filipino migrant workers.

4. Women’s March Canada (January 19, 2019)

Two years ago, on January 21, 2017, people of all backgrounds--women and men and gender nonconforming people, young and old, of diverse faiths, differently abled, immigrants and indigenous--came together, 5 million strong, on all seven continents of the world.

On January 19, 2019, we march again. The theme for the 2019 Women's Marches around the world is ENDING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that 1 in 3 women worldwide has experienced either physical or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime.

Women's March Canada recognizes that there is no true peace, freedom, or inclusion without equity for all. Events across the country on January 19th will feature music, art, community booths, and speakers in a shared voice of resistance with advocacy aligned with the national Women’s March Unity Principles: ending violence, protection of reproductive rights, LGBTQIA rights, workers’ rights, civil rights, disability rights, immigrant rights, Indigenous people’s rights and environmental justice. We look forward to sharing this experience with you and engaging our many communities even further.

2019 SISTER MARCHES

Sister Marches are solidarity events inspired by the Women's March on Washington and organized by volunteers around the world.  Information on Sister Marches is updated daily. Check back soon if you do not see a march in your area. If you don't see your city listed here, please consider becoming a Sister March organizer for your community.

For more information:  https://www.womensmarchcanada.com/2019_marches

5. Shab-e She'r (Poetry Night) (January 22, 2019)

Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXX

Toronto’s most diverse & brave poetry reading and open mic series

Featured poets: Meena Chopra & Casey Garcia

Hosts: Bänoo Zan & Terese Pierre

Time: Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Place: Tranzac Club, 292 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2M7

Main Hall

Doors open               6:15 p.m.

Open-mic sign-up     6:30 p.m.

Show                         7-10 p.m.

Admission: $5

Hana Shafi (FrizzKid) writer, artist, recipient of Women Who Inspire Award, from the Canadian Council for Muslim Women, book: It Begins with the Body

Terry Trowbridge poet, team member of the Art Bar Poetry Series, published in New Quarterly, CV2, Great Lakes Review, Dalhousie Review & 40 others

Tranzac Club is an accessible venue with no stairs (aside from the stage) and they have two accessible gender neutral washrooms.

Twitter: @BanooZan & @ShabeSherTO

Instagram: @banoo.zan

https://www.facebook.com/events/734359243593948/

6. OCASI: Creating Inclusive Spaces for Immigrants and Refugees with In/Visible Disabilities: A Webinar Series for Front-Line Staff (Starting January 22, 2019)

Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI)
invites front-line staff to participate in:

Creating Inclusive Spaces for Immigrants and Refugees with In/Visible Disabilities:
A Webinar Series for Front-Line Staff

Moving to a new country presents many challenges and opportunities for newcomers. The settlement process can be especially challenging for newcomers with in/visible disabilities. Learning who newcomers with in/visible disabilities are, how to welcome and support them is something the settlement sector is becoming more aware of.

NOTE: You have to register for each webinar separately. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining each of the webinars.

Webinar 1: Using an Anti-Racist Anti-Oppressive Framework

Learn how an anti-racist anti-oppressive framework can lead to better service delivery

DATE: January 22nd, 2019
TIME: 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2937965834050494467

Webinar 2: Rethinking Disability

Learn more about the history of disability in a Canadian context
-Understand how the social, cultural and community understandings of disability shape the experiences of newcomers with in/visible disabilities

DATE: January 29th, 2019
TIME: 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/63224513509249027

Webinar 3: Know your Rights and Responsibilities

Learn about relevant legislations including the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act and the Ontario Human Rights Code

DATE: February 12th, 2019
TIME: 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9172052727517438979

Webinar 4: Learning About Barriers

Learn about the difficulties newcomers with in/visible disabilities experience accessing settlement and disability services

DATE: February 19th, 2019 TIME: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8237065422652096771

Webinar 5: Good/Best Practices

Practical knowledge on how to support newcomers with in/visible disabilities at your agency

DATE: February 26th, 2018
TIME: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8838475193301399555

Technical guidelines:

    •    Please be prepared with a headset and mic for the best participation options (or you will be limited to using 'chat' for questions and comments).

    •    Please test your equipment BEFORE the webinar because it is quite difficult to resolve technical issues during the presentation.

    •    For optimum participation we recommend using a high speed internet cable connection (NOT Wifi) for stable access.

    •    Please turn off or move hands-free communication equipment (ie. cellphone, hands-free landline, laptop with mic) away from the computer you will be using for the webinar. We have found that other equipment nearby sometimes causes audio interference.

Sarah Jama is a community organizer from Hamilton, Ontario. She is co-founder of the Disability Justice Network of Ontario (DJNO) and holds a Social Sciences degree from McMaster University. Her lived experiences have fostered interests and a passion for: community engagement, disability justice, and activism.

Sarah has given a variety of keynotes, including for the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI), the Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario (ETFO). She has also been a speaker for a variety of organizations, such as: Start up Fest, The Broadbent Institute, the Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL), the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), the Sexual Assault Centre for the Greater Hamilton Area (SACHA), Experience Canada, The Elect more Women Conference, The Canadian Association for the Prevention of Discrimination and Harassment in Higher Education (CAPDHHE), CBC Radio One, the Ajax Diversity Conference, the Indigenous, Racialized, Migrant and People with Disabilities Solidarity Symposium, and more.

Sarah currently works at the Hamilton Centre for Civic Inclusion as an Outreach Coordinator and is also a Community Engagement Liaison to Councillor Matthew Green at the City of Hamilton. In her spare time, she acts as a consultant, and is currently working with the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board to create anti-racism training and peer support based curriculum for students at the school board.

Chavon Niles is a PhD Candidate (abd) at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. Chavon uses an anti-racist, anti-oppressive and intersectional lens in her position as the Senior Coordinator of the Accessibility Initiative at OCASI- Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants where she works to bring greater attention to the challenges and barriers immigrants and refugees with in/visible disabilities experience in Canada. Chavon’s doctoral thesis explores the migration experiences of racialized immigrant youth with disabilities living in the Greater Toronto Area. She hopes to better understand how participants’ migration experiences come to shape their identity construction and participation (non-participation) in accessibility education and health and human services.

7. Building Community, Accessing Justice: In Conversation With The Author Of “Scarborough” Catherine Hernandez (January 23, 2019)

Building Community, Accessing Justice: In Conversation with Catherine Hernandez

A conversation with the author, playwright, activist about her book Scarborough, access to justice and building community beyond institutional structures. Catherine Hernandez (@theloudlady) is the award-winning author of Scarborough (Arsenal Pulp Press). Scarborough won the 2015 Jim Wong-Chu Award, was shortlisted for the Toronto Book Award, the Evergreen Forest of Reading Award, Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction, the Trillium Book Award; and longlisted for Canada Reads 2018. It made the "Best of 2017" list for the Globe and Mail, National Post, Quill and Quire, and CBC Books.

Scarborough: a novel is published by Arsenal Pulp Press, (you can order a copy from them for 17.95$ – there’s a nice excerpt online for you to read).

Toronto Public Library have 66 hard copies and 120 e copies, so get on the list.  Yorku library has the book on reserve at Scott (2 hour loans) https://www.library.yorku.ca/find/Record/3727908

The e book is now less than 10 on Amazon (kindle) and Kobo.

8. The City Institute’s Feminist Urban Studies Reading Group Presents: “Feminist Methodology and the Global South” (February 8, 2019)

Feminist Methodology and the Global South

February 8, 2019 | 1-3pm |749 Kaneff Tower

Please join us for The City Institute’s Feminist Urban Studies Reading Group in the Winter 2019 Term

Our reading group will be hosted by Assistant Professor Sylvia Bawa & Dr. Elsa Koleth

Discussions will cover:

The politics of conducting feminist research

Conceptual challenges for feminist research

Approaches to decolonizing research

The practice of feminist urban research in the global south

To access the readings, please RSVP to city@yorku.ca

9. UCLA conference: Thinking Gender 2019: Feminists Confronting the Carceral State (February 22, 2019)

Registration now open. Free and open to the public! DATE: Friday, February 22, 2019

LOCATION: UCLA Luskin Conference Center

Conference details here https://csw.ucla.edu/event/thinking-gender-2019-feminists-confronting-the-carceral-state/

Register online here https://csw.ucla.edu/event/thinking-gender-2019-feminists-confronting-the-carceral-state/

Thinking Gender 2019 will focus on gendered regimes of incarceration, and feminist, queer, abolitionist, and intersectional interventions. The US justice system is a site of widespread gendered and race-based violence.  The U.S. currently incarcerates nearly a third of all female prisoners in the world, and between 1977 and 2004, the number of women in U.S. prisons increased by an unprecedented 757%. As a 2015 CSW co-sponsored report revealed, women suffering from mental illness in LA County jails are routinely denied treatment, medication, and reproductive hygiene products, and are disproportionately punished with solitary confinement. LGBTQ women are also disproportionately impacted: nearly 40% of incarcerated girls identify as LGBTQ, while nearly one in six transgender Americans, and one in two black transgender people, have been to prison. At Thinking Gender 2019: Feminists Confronting the Carceral State, emerging student scholars and activists will reckon with these issues through feminist and queer perspectives.

KEYNOTE PANEL: Abolitionist Feminist Futures

DATE: Friday, February 22, 2019

TIME: 3:45 PM

LOCATION: UCLA Luskin Conference Center, Centennial Ballroom A & B

Featuring:

Beth Richie  (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Alisa Bierria (UC Riverside, Survived and Punished)

Colby Lenz (USC, Survived and Punished, California Coalition for Women Prisoners)

Romarilyn Ralston (Project Rebound at CSU-Fullerton, California Coalition for Women Prisoners)

Moderator: Grace Hong (UCLA, California Coalition for Women Prisoners)

Read biographies of the Keynote Panelists

SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETATION WILL BE PROVIDED AT THIS SESSION

EXHIBIT: Abolitionist Feminism: Art and Archive

ALL DAY, Friday, February 22, 2019

LOCATION: UCLA Luskin Conference Center, Optimist B

A pop-up digital exhibit documenting histories of feminist resistance to incarceration.

Curated by Sarah Haley (UCLA).

ACCESSIBILITY

If you require accommodations in order for this event to be accessible to you (e.g., sign language interpretation, large print materials, designated seating, etc.) contact CSW at csw@csw.ucla.edu or indicate your needs on the registration form. We cannot guarantee our ability to meet requests made later than February 8, 2018.

THIS IS A FRAGRANCE-FREE EVENT.

To ensure accessibility, we ask for your help in keeping this event FRAGRANCE-FREE. Some members of our community can become very ill when exposed to synthetic fragrances. When attending, please avoid wearing products that contain perfumes, scents, or fragrances. For more information, visit our Events Accessibility Page: https://csw.ucla.edu/event-accessibility.

THANK YOU TO OUR CONFERENCE CO-SPONSORS:

Backed by Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

UCLA Luskin Endowment for Thought Leadership

UCLA Interdisciplinary & Cross Campus Affairs (ICCA)

UCLA Graduate Division

UCLA Division of Humanities

Political Theology Network

UCLA Department of African American Studies

UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs

UCLA American Indian Studies Center

UCLA Black Male Institute

Institute on Inequality and Democracy at UCLA Luskin

UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

UCLA Department of Philosophy

UCLA Department of Social Welfare

UCLA Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies

UCLA César E. Chávez Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies

UCLA Department of Asian American Studies

UCLA Department of Sociology

UCLA Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics

UCLA Department of History

UCLA Department of Public Policy

The Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law

UCLA Department of Anthropology

UCLA LGBT Campus Resource Center

UCLA Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health

Criminal Justice Program at UCLA School of Law

UCLA Division of Social Sciences

10. Lecture: Charmaine A. Nelson, National Gallery of Canada: “Fugitive Slave Advertisements and/as Portraiture in late Eighteenth- and early Nineteenth-Century Canada” (February 27, 2019) 

Fugitive Slave Advertisements and/as Portraiture in late Eighteenth- and early Nineteenth-Century Canada

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

10:30 am – 12 pm

Auditorium. In English

Buy Tickets: https://purchase.tickets.com/buy/TicketPurchase?orgid=25200&pid=8628022

This discussion analyzes the differences and similarities between “high” art representations of enslaved Africans and the textual descriptions of enslaved people’s bodies that became a staple of fugitive advertisements. Recalling fugitive slave advertisements as a form of visual culture, Charmaine A. Nelson positions them as one part of the colonial infrastructure and network (including slave owners, printers, and jailers) that sustained the racialized distinction between free and unfree populations.

Charmaine A. Nelson is a Professor of Art History at McGill University. She has made ground-breaking contributions to the fields of the Visual Culture of Slavery, Race and Representation, and Black Canadian Studies. Nelson has published six books including The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007) and Slavery, Geography, and Empire in Nineteenth-Century Marine Landscapes of Montreal and Jamaica (London: Routledge/Taylor & Francis, 2016). Most recently, she was the William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Harvard University (2017–2018).

11. Italian Contemporary Film Festival (ICFF) Presents: “Call the Shots: Female Power Through Film” in celebration of International Women’s Day (March 8, 2019)

The ICFF (Italian Contemporary Film Festival) is launching “Call the Shots: Female Power Through Film” in celebration of International Women’s Day. We would love to have the participation of students, faculty and staff members to the event, targeted to encouraging female leaders in the film industry.

The event will take place on March 8th, International Women’s Day, beginning with a pre-screening reception, followed by a panel discussion at the TIFF Bell Lightbox in Toronto, before the screening of The Name of a Woman, by Marco Tullio Giordana. Admission to the panel and the film is FREE for women under the age of 30!

The panel will see the contribution of influential and empowering women who made their mark in the film industry overcoming major challenges. Our goal is to encourage the professional development of women in the film industry, as well as to assist in the removal of barriers for women in all aspects of the cinematic experience throughout North America.

We believe that this event would be of great interest to students, faculty and staff at your Department. The film is about real-life challenges women face in the workplace, such as sexual harassment, and how they can be won. The panel discussion would be a great educational tool for students who strive to find success in the industry.

For more info on the film, visit our website at this link: https://icff.ca/the-name-of-woman/

CALLS: 

1. Call for participants: Anti-sexual violence education research study

Examining the effects of anti-sexual violence education amongst university students

Are you a student or recent graduate who has participated in anti-sexual violence education or training through your university or college? Would you like to tell us about it in a 30 to 45-minute interview? Confidentiality is assured and a 10$ honorarium is provided.

This study seeks the participation of people who…

4.  Are currently attending, or graduated for no more than one year from, a university or college program;

5. Have participated in mandatory or voluntary (i.e., by choice) programming of some kind, offered by or at your educational institution, that seeks to prevent or educate about sexual violence/assault (e.g., violence against women awareness, a talk, course, or consent workshop, self-defense class, workshop for your sports team);

6.  Are between 18 and 30 years of age.

The research will:

•  Examine the relationship between anti-sexual violence education and young people’s sexual practices;

• Provide young adults with a chance to voice their experiences of and strategies in sexual negotiations (e.g., how they articulate desires and boundaries, interest and non-interest);

• Be conducted in a non-judgmental, open-style interview that allows participants to express themselves and share their opinions (i.e., there are no ‘right answers’);

• Contribute to the development of sexual violence prevention efforts, and hopefully, better sex!

Research conducted by Dr. Tuulia Law, York University

To participate in an interview or for more information contact:

tlaw@yorku.ca or 647-809-9178

2. Call for Participants: The Queer Feels Study

Do you:

• Identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, pansexual, queer, trans, non-binary, intersex, or two-spirit?

• Encounter stigma, discrimination or microaggressions based on your sexual orientation or gender identity frequently (at least twice per week)?

• Currently live in Canada?

• Have a smartphone?

AND are you over the age of 18?

We want to hear from you. Our study involves filling out a 30 minute survey online, downloading an app on your phone, and tracking your experiences for 5 minutes per day for a 10-day period. Email oise.rainbow@utoronto.ca to participate or to learn more! The researchers for this study also identify as LGBTQI2S. We want to learn about how stigma and/or discrimination may impact your emotions. The results from this study will be used to inform anti-discrimination policy and queer and trans-informed mental health care. The first survey will take less than 30 minutes to complete and is entirely deidentified. The subsequent surveys are filled out on your phone and will take 5 minutes or less per day for 10 days. Upon completion of each survey, you will be given the opportunity to enter into a draw. For the first survey there is a chance to enter a draw for 5 $100 VISA gift cards. There is approximately a 1 in 20 chance of winning a gift card. For the daily surveys, each survey you submit will enter your name into

a draw for 10 $50 Amazon gift cards. There is approximately a 1 in 10 chance of winning a gift card.

3. Call for papers: the 2019 Annual Graduate Conference in Gender and Social Justice Studies (January 20, 2019)

Metamorphosis: Transformation and Social Justice

The Gender and Social Justice Graduate Student Association proposes continuing to host the annual Graduate Conference in Gender Social Justice Studies in March 2019 with the timely theme of transformation and social justice. The Gender and Social Justice Graduate Students will organize a full day conference, inviting both speakers and attendees from across Canada to join us in a conversation about the meaning and significance of the Change in our ever-evolving world, including topics covering climate change, Black Lives Matter, Truth and Reconciliation in Canada and beyond.

Call for Proposals:

The Gender and Social Justice Student Association (GSJSA), housed in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Alberta, invites graduate students from across Alberta and Canada to present in our 2019 annual graduate student conference. The conference, entitled Metamorphosis: Transformation and Social Justice, will bring together graduate students from across faculties and disciplines to discuss transformation (whether physical, biological, political, social and beyond) and its connection to social justice. The presentations will discuss the meaning and significance of transformation in our ever-evolving world, and its role in achieving justice for marginalized and vulnerable populations.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

•  Political transformation: Changing policy and programming following Truth and Reconciliation;

•  Social transformation: Changing attitudes following #MeToo, #TimesUp, and Black Lives Matter;

•  Physical transformation: body modification; gender identity and fluidity; biomedical and genetic engineering;

•  Transformation of space: future city planning; infrastructure design; and critica disability theory;

•  Philosophical transformation: Becoming and unbecoming; feminist metaphysics; and feminist epistemology;

•  Gender transformation: Trans identities; gender expression; gender fluidity; and drag performance and culture;

•  Climate change: The transformation of the Earth and its inhabitants in the Anthropocene; humanity and the end of the world

Please submit an abstract outlining the central argument of your paper of between 200 -250 words and a brief biography of 50 - 150 words to gsjga@ualberta.ca no later than January 20, 2019. The organizing committee will review all received abstracts through a double-blind review. Applicants will receive notifications of acceptance\rejection by February 4th, 2019. If you have an inquiry regarding the conference, please contact us at gsjga@ualberta.ca

4. Call for Submissions:  VUSAC "Art at the Intersections" Showcase (January 28, 2019)

The VUSAC Equity Commission is curating our second annual Art at the Intersections showcase featuring original works from women and trans artists of colour at the University of Toronto! All students who identify as women of colour or trans people of colour are welcome to submit.

We are looking for fine art and performed art to be showcased and performed throughout February 4th-8th, 2019 at Victoria College. All submissions must be ORIGINAL works. Artists may submit to more than one category, but only one submission per artist will be selected for the showcase. Works will be chosen by a panel of curators. All successful submissions will receive $100 honoraria.

The submission can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/m9BueTj3Ol6rdYbH2

DEADLINE: January 28th, 2019 at 11:59PM. Live auditions for performances will take place January 29th-February 3rd, 2019.

For more information, visit the facebook event page at https://www.facebook.com/events/1879195758815127/

 We can't wait for your original submissions! Please email any questions or concerns to equityartshow@vusac.ca .

5. Call for Abstracts: Securing our Political Futures: Critical Social Work and Social Science Conversations on Xenophobic Nationalisms (January 31, 2019)

As dispossessed people stake claims to a just life by challenging Settler Colonialism, forming caravans, and daring the seas, they face nationalist xenophobia and its practices of denial, dismissal, detention, deportation, and death. While manifest differently across sites (e.g., North America, Europe, global South), and also varied in their characterizations (e.g., ultra-right, ‘populist’, ‘white nationalist’), Xenophobic nationalist ideologies are typically mobilized against human desire for freedom. Thus, white nations - founded on Indigenous genocide and dispossession - are fiercely protected from ‘alien’ ‘infiltrators’. Removal of confederate and other historic monuments are virulently opposed, and along with migratory movements across borders, are taken up as internal and external ‘invasions’ of the “nation”. Border surveillance and policing become exploding economies. It is in the context of this overarching crisis of progressive political futures that the 12th Annual Social Work symposium of York University aims to engage with xenophobic nationalisms as a pressing political issue of our time. As a discipline undergoing an introspective turn in regards to its historic investment in genocidal white nationalism, yet with a long tradition of reflexive critique and commitment to emancipatory political futures, social work is particularly well-positioned to engage in such conversations. Contributions are also sought from the broader social sciences.

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

Organized by the School of Social Work at York University, the 12th Annual Social Work Research Symposium aims to foster critical social work education, research and practice that promote human rights, social justice and transformations specific to a contemporary, historical,

social, political and economical context, both locally and globally.

Topics of consideration include, but are not limited to:

• Critical social work and broader social science responses to the resurgence of xenophobic nationalisms

• Xenophobia in laws, policies, and discourses (e.g. islamophobia, imperialism)

• Impact on racialized immigrants, refugees and Indigenous populations

• Diverse creative and resurgent imaginaries (e.g. social, political epistemological) and movements challenging xenophobia

• Envisioning emancipatory futures from within the corpus of critical theory

• Lessons from cross-disciplinary dialogues and conversations

6. Call for Submissions: The Gathering - Submissions for the F! issue (January 31, 2019)

The Gathering is the Toronto Youth Food Policy Council’s biannual academic journal that aims to bring forth a progressive youth vision and voice in the food system. Our objective is to recognize youth for their contribution to sustainable food system research by creating an accessible, peer reviewed journal containing research, case studies, arguments, and more. This platform also hopes to support knowledge exchange within the broader food community.

How can we push our food system forward?

The Gathering, a peer-reviewed, academic journal on food issues, is looking for work by youth (30 and under). This year, we are looking for submissions that capture rebellion, transformation, and hope as it relates to our food systems. Send us your written work, visual documentation, photography, sketches, fieldwork, and dynamic data visualization. This is the F! Issue. Let’s fight for fairness, equality, and justice in food together.

For submission guidelines and submission form please visit

https://goo.gl/forms/ANWEQa04awe5ge5f1

Submission deadline is Thursday January 31, 2019.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to email us at journal@tyfpc.ca.

7. Call for Papers/Presentations: Gender, Intersectionalities, and Sustainable Development:

Food Security, Economic Equality, and Women's Empowerment Presented by Feminist Legal Studies, Queen’s University, and Faculty of Law (February 1, 2019)

This conference continues the Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s annual tradition of hosting a major event for International Women’s Day on March 8, 2019, and has chosen a theme that honours the UN’s theme for IWD 2019 -- ‘Think equal, build smart, innovate for change.’

The aim of this conference is to focus on three policy issues that lie at the heart of the sustainability of the earth’s biosphere and thus of human lives as they should be – equal access for all to life-nourishing food; human development that preserves and protects the sustainability of the biosphere; and equality and empowerment of women.

We are delighted to present as the conference keynote speaker this year Professor Angela Harris, the Queen’s University 2018-2019 Principal’s Development Fund Visiting Scholar (https://poverty.ucdavis.edu/profile/angela-p-harris ). Professor Harris will open the conference on March 8 with her keynote lecture ‘The Color of Farming: Food and the Reproduction of Race.’

In preparation for this conference, FLSQ is calling for papers on political, societal, cultural, and structural factors that promote gender and intersectional equality and empowerment, ensure food security for all, and secure biosphere sustainability. We invite submissions that engage with ideas of relationship and community in addressing identity politics, normative values, and hierarchies of social and governance power in order to foster fresh conceptions of development capable of innovating human and biosphere sustainability. We encourage submissions that address any and all of the Sustainable Development Goals, which, with detailed targets and evidence-based indicators, form a coherent mesh of actions and metrics that can guide human action to biosphere sustainability. (For SDGs, targets, and indicators, see https://unstats.un.org/sdgs/indicators/Global%20Indicator%20Framework%20 )

We are particularly interested in gender and diversity issues that elaborate on the SDG goals of ending hunger and poverty, gender, intersectional, and transnational economic inequalities, climate degradation, and the inadequacies of governance and revenue systems. Papers addressing how educational systems, regulatory governance, public policies, political economies, and budgetary and fiscal regimes can be transformed to counter exploitative conditions based on gender, race, Indigenous heritage, poverty, political, and economic inequalities, or that propose innovative changes that begin with the goals of substantive equality between and among all states and peoples in sustainable community with nonhuman life forms, will be particularly welcome.

Possible topics include national/international legal responsibilities for ending poverty, hunger, economic inequalities, colonial legacies; securing the basic necessities of life for all; biosustainable and equal resource, environmental, and innovation management; ethical corporate and wealth governance; and legal and political understandings of what empowerment factually entails. Examining specific issues through gender, racialization, Indigenous, poverty, and ability perspectives consistent with the United Nations’ Convention on the Eradication of Discrimination against Women, Declaration on Race and Racial Prejudice, and Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to redress all these forms of discrimination and inequalities is encouraged.

Date and Location:

The conference will be held in the Robert Sutherland Hall, the Policy Studies building, on the ground floor (room 202), located at 138 Union St., Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario on Friday and Saturday, March 8-9, 2019.

Submitting proposals for presentations or papers:

If you are interested making an individual presentation, organizing a panel, or submitting a written paper, please email a one paragraph outline to Kathleen Lahey (at kal2@queensu.ca ) and Bita Amani (amanib@queensu.ca ) by Feb. 1, 2019. Acceptances will be issued on a rolling basis beginning Jan. 15, 2019.

Travel funding:

When submitting a proposal, please indicate whether you would be able to obtain organizational or institutional support to attend, or whether you could attend only if you receive funding from Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s. If you require funding, please provide cost estimates.

Registration:

Attendance for the purpose of participating in open group discussions throughout this event is welcome, because the goal of this event is to discuss a wide variety of equality and justice issues and formulate as many creative ideas for research, equality analysis, and advocacy as possible. Contact the organizers to indicate interest and obtain registration information. Some funding is available to assist students to attend. Formal registration will open on January 15, 2019.

Accommodation:

We have secured a block of rooms at a group rate for the nights of March 7, 8, 9, and 10 at the Four Points Sheraton. Please visit Book your group rate for FLSQ Conference (OR copy and paste the following link into a web browser) https://www.marriott.com/event-reservations/%C2%A0reservation-link.mi?id=1547133344872&key=GRP&app=resvlink.This  link and group rate will only be open until February 21, 2019 – but do contact Megan Hamilton for assistance with making bookings between Feb. 21 and the conferences dates.

Childcare:

Anyone wanting childcare should contact the organizers to facilitate assistance with arrangements.

Accessibility:

The venue is fully accessible; please contact the coordinators with any questions.

For further information please contact:

Prof. Kathleen Lahey                                                    Prof. Bita Amani

Co-Director                                                                        Co-Director

Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s                                        Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s

Faculty of Law, Queen’s University                                  Faculty of Law, Queen’s University

Kingston, Ontario                                                              Kingston, Ontario

kal2@queensu.ca                                                         amanib@queensu.ca

Queen's University sits on the traditional lands of

the Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe peoples

8. Call for Proposals: 2019 WSIB Grants Competition (February 1, 2019)

The Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) is accepting research proposals for its 2019 Grants Program. A summary is provided below.

Objectives

To enhance workers’ compensation system outcomes by funding innovative proposals that are aligned with the WSIB’s strategic mandate.

The following research priorities and topic areas have been identified for the current call:

Making Ontario a safer place to work

Priority 1: Strengthen integration, accountability and effectiveness of the occupational health and safety system

Priority 2: Develop people-centric health and safety programs that encourage healthy workplaces

Priority 3: Raise awareness of rights, obligations and best practices to empower proactive health and safety planning

Improve return to work and recovery outcomes

Priority 4: Provide customized return to work services to cases that need the most support

Priority 5: Improve access and quality of care for people with illnesses and people with physical and/or mental stress injuries

Priority 6: Improve sustainable employment outcomes

Meeting the needs and expectations of WSIB’s customers

Priority 7: Make our services more convenient and compassionate through quicker decision-making based on the best available evidence and faster payment

Value

Up to $200K/year for a total maximum budget of $400K

Duration

2 years

Deadlines

Submission to ORS – February 1, 2019

Submission to agency – February 15, 2019 by 4:00pm

To obtain the Request for Proposals, instructions and application form, please visit the following link:

http://www.wsib.on.ca/WSIBPortal/faces/WSIBArticlePage?fGUID=939604048075002603&_afrLoop=3870069291935000&_afrWindowMode=0&_afrWindowId=null#%40%3F_afrWindowId%3Dnull%26_afrLoop%3D3870069291935000%26_afrWindowMode%3D0%26fGUID%3D939604048075002603%26_adf.ctrl-state%3Dp3ranhrug_4

York University researchers are reminded that all applications for external research funding must be reviewed and approved by the Office of Research Services before they are submitted to the granting agency. For internal approval, the application must be accompanied by a completed ORS Application Checklist, which requires the Chair’s and the Dean’s signatures. To ensure that the approved application is ready by the agency deadline, a complete application folder must be submitted to ORS ten (10) working days prior to the final submission date.

9. Call for Nominations: Curriculum Inquiry 2019 Writing Fellows and Writers' Retreat (February 1, 2019) 

The Editors of Curriculum Inquiry are pleased to invite nominations for the 2019 Curriculum Inquiry Writing Fellowship (CIWF) and Writer’s Retreat, to be held at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, June 17 to the 22. Up to eight Fellows will be selected to participate in a four-day writer’s retreat and workshop, culminating in a panel presentation at OISE and potential publication in a special issue of Curriculum Inquiry in 2020.

The CIWF seeks to support emerging scholars, including advanced doctoral students, recent graduates, and junior faculty (within three years of completing doctoral degree), who are contributing to new directions in curriculum studies. We are particularly interested in work that emphasizes critical, anti-oppressive, decolonizing, Indigenous, queer, disability, and other approaches that seek to “Brown” or otherwise interrupt hegemonic and normative approaches to curriculum studies. Nominations for emerging Indigenous scholars and scholars of color, as well as disability scholars are particularly encouraged. Please note that authors that have previously published in CI are not eligible.

The fellows will work with a group of established faculty mentors and members of the CI Editorial Team toward the development of an article length manuscript to be considered for publication in a Special Issue of the journal. Each selected fellow will be expected to submit an early draft of 3000 to 5000 words at least four weeks prior to the retreat. All travel expenses will be covered.

Nominations should be submitted online no later than February 1st, 2019, and must include:

1. Nomination letter from thesis supervisor, department chair, or mentor who can comment on writing skills, background, and/or scholarship potential;

2. Curriculum Vitae;

3. A fellowship application to be completed online by nominee;

4. A 250-300 word abstract and a one-page outline of the proposed article to be developed (i.e. A new and original work to be developed during the retreat);

5. A 3000-4000 word unpublished writing sample.

To submit a nomination, click here https://www.jotform.com/cioise/2019-ciwf . For questions, please contact Curriculum Inquiry at curriculum.inquiry.oise@utoronto.ca

10. Call for Applications: Join the City of Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee (February 8, 2019)

The City of Toronto is currently seeking applications from experienced and engaged Toronto residents for the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee. If you are someone with a passion for equity and inclusion of people with disabilities and are interested in serving on a committee this could be a great fit for you!

The Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee provides advice to City Council on the identification, prevention and elimination of barriers faced by people with disabilities with the goal of achieving social, cultural and economic well-being. This is a great opportunity to contribute to your city, collaborate with others, and gain valuable skills and experience. In addition to the general eligibility requirements the committee is looking for people with the following qualifications:

A strong interest in equity and inclusion of people with disabilities

A strong understanding of the needs and concerns of a broad spectrum of people with disabilities and seniors, gained through personal or professional experience

A thorough knowledge of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disability Act (AODA)

Knowledge of accessibility as it relates to one or more areas of: policy and procedure, service planning and delivery, employment, built environment and public spaces, accommodation

Experience in decision-making, communication, citizen advocacy

The Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee meets on mornings during the weekdays, six times a year or at the call of the Chair. There are also working groups which members are required to sit on at least 2. The average time commitment a month is between 5-10 hours including reviewing documents and preparing for meetings in advance.

The deadline to apply is February 8, 2019. For more information visit: https://secure.toronto.ca/pa/decisionBody/321.do or email appoint@toronto.ca or call 416-397-0088.

11. Call for Proposals: Global Affairs Canada Volunteer Cooperation Program 2020-2027 (February 20, 2019)

The total amount of funding available under this call for proposals is up to $420 million over 7 years. Global Affairs Canada may fund any number of proposals, or none, up to the maximum funding available. Global Affairs Canada intends to fund proposals of at least $3 million and no more than $50 million.

You must submit your proposal through the Partners@International portal before the deadline. We will not accept any late submissions. Please read the portal instructions carefully and plan to submit your application at least three business days before the closing date to ensure that technical difficulties do not prevent you from submitting your proposal by the deadline.

Objectives

The Volunteer Cooperation Program (VCP) will aim to contribute to the economic and/or social well-being of the poorest, most marginalized and vulnerable people, particularly women and girls, in developing countries.

Under this call, your proposed project must contribute to the achievement of these ultimate and intermediate outcomes.

Ultimate outcome

Improved economic and/or social well-being of the poorest, most marginalized and vulnerable people, particularly women and girls, in developing countries, with a view to contributing to sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Indicators:

Total number of people, women and girls from marginalized groups benefiting from initiatives improved through the efforts of the VCP and who have improved their economic and/or social well-being (Women/Men/Boys/Girls);

Impact of developing country partner projects on targeted beneficiary communities.

Intermediate outcomes

Increased engagement of Canadians in international development and key global issues in support of the action areas of Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy (FIAP).

Indicators:

Number and percentage (/total) of Canadian volunteers (women/men) who continue to actively participate in Canada's international development efforts following their volunteer mandate;

Number of Canadians (women/men) mobilized to support Canada's international development efforts through informed action and/or long-term commitment.

Increased performance of developing country partners to deliver more inclusive, innovative and environmentally sustainable development initiatives that advance gender equality, in support of the action areas of Canada’s FIAP.

Indicators:

Number and percentage (/total) of developing country partners reporting and demonstrating improved development initiatives through VCP support, according to the types of improvements (such as more effective in advancing gender equality, more inclusive, more environmentally sustainable/climate-resilient, more innovative) observed that are supported by qualitative evidence (such as case studies);

Number and types of development initiatives that advance gender equality and have been improved through VCP support, including the number of innovative initiatives, supported by qualitative evidence (such as case studies);

Number and percentage (/total) of developing country partners reporting and demonstrating improved organizational practices/capacities through VCP support, supported by organisational diagnoses and qualitative evidence (such as case studies).

You may adjust the call’s outcome statements to ensure they are grounded in the reality of your project design, making them more specific in terms of the who, what and where of your project.

Additional information

Types of skilled volunteer mandates eligible for funding under the Volunteer Cooperation Program:

North-South mandates: Canadian organizations send skilled Canadian volunteers to developing countries to increase the capacity of developing country partners to deliver development results;

Virtual Canadian volunteers or e-volunteers: These volunteers work using technology to communicate with local partners. No allowance is offered to them since they work from home;

South-North mandates: When appropriate, Canadian organizations and their developing country partners send skilled Southern volunteers to placements with organizations in Canada to increase their knowledge and abilities to strengthen their home-based organizations, while contributing to engaging Canadians on international development issues;

South-South mandates: Volunteers from one developing country undertake a placement in another developing country. These exchanges allow organizations to diversify their programs while maintaining their activities in certain countries/contexts where they cannot send Canadian volunteers. A modest South-South volunteer mandate component may be accepted as part of your proposal.

North-South mandates must represent at least 90% of the total number of volunteer mandates.

A volunteer must be a person that is considered by law to be an adult at time of travel and possesses a skill set required by the developing-country organization.

Engagement activities:

Applicants must include in their proposal up to 10% of Global Affair’s Canada’s contribution to the direct costs (see budget template for definition) of the project for engagement activities aimed at awareness raising, knowledge sharing and network strengthening in Canada. These engagement activities should promote global citizenship by encouraging Canadians to develop a deeper understanding of international development issues and to become actively involved in addressing these issues. Engagement activities that are NOT eligible for funding include:

Fundraising

Annual general meetings

Partisan political advocacy or lobbying

Activities that take place outside of Canada

Special thematic funds:

Applicants can include in their proposal up to 5% of Global Affairs Canada’s contribution to the direct costs of the project to activities that complement the work of volunteers by supporting some of the department’s priority themes: feminist approaches, innovation and experimentation, diversity and inclusion, indigenous integration, LGBTQ2 and climate change.

Gender equality:

Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy states that: “No less than 95% of Canada’s bilateral international development assistance initiatives will target or integrate gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls.” Priority will be given to proposals that meet the requirement of targeting or fully integrating gender equality and women’s and girls’ empowerment in their design. To support this, your proposal’s logic model must have gender equality outcomes. In addition to the elements in section 2.1 of the application form the theory of change must detail:

Clear alignment with at least one of the 6 action areas of Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy and at least one of Canada's specific commitments related to the chosen area(s) of action;

Key elements of gender equality analysis (gaps, barriers, institutional capacity, inequalities and existing power structures);

Key measures to advance gender equality;

Analysis of the contribution or impact of civil society, women’s rights organizations and/or research bodies working on advancing gender equality;

Assumptions underlying the advancement of gender equality;

Risks related to advancing gender equality and strategies to respond to them;

Methods to foster participation of women and girls and/or the organizations and networks that defend their interests;

Evidence, best practices or lessons learned on advancing gender equality;

A minimum of 60% of the ultimate beneficiaries of development initiatives enhanced through the efforts of the VCP should be women, girls and people from marginalized and vulnerable groups.

For more information on the program please refer to the Volunteer Cooperation Program - Information note.

Organization eligibility requirements

Carefully review the following eligibility screening requirements for submitted application packages for this particular call. Global Affairs Canada will not comment on the eligibility of specific potential applicants.

This call is open to Canadian organizations, which may submit an application alone or in consortiums with other organizations. Applicants (including all signatories in the case of consortiums) must meet the following requirements:

Your organization is legally incorporated in Canada and registered in the Partners@International portal;

Your organization must provide two separate financial statements for the most recent fiscal years from each signatory (audited statements are preferred; if these are not available, the statements must be signed by a member of each signatory’s board of directors, by the board’s delegate or by the owner[s]; note also that since financial statements usually provide comparative information from the previous year, these statements will be used to do a three-year trend analysis);

Your organization must provide the Organization Attestation dated and signed by the Organization’s Chief Financial Officer, or a duly authorised board member;

Your organization may submit only one application under this call.

If your proposed project does not conform to the above statements, it will not be assessed because it cannot be considered for funding under this call.

Required project parameters

Carefully review the points below to determine whether your proposed project is in alignment with the parameters of the call. We will not respond to questions about the eligibility of your proposal. You must be able to answer “yes” to all the following statements in order for your application to be considered for funding under this call:

You are requesting Global Affairs Canada funding contribution of at least $3 million and no more than $50 million;

Your proposed project will last 7 years, starting in April 2020;

Your proposed project is aligned with at least one of the six action areas of Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy: gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, human dignity, growth that works for everyone, environment and climate action, inclusive governance, and peace and security;

Your proposed project will take place in only one or more official development assistance-eligible countries. A list of official development assistance-eligible countries is available on the Partners@International portal. As per Section 4 of the Organization Attestation, funding must not knowingly be used, either directly or indirectly, in a manner that contravenes Canada’s economic sanctions and export and import controls regimes. Such information can be accessed at Types of sanctions and Export and Import Controls. Note: While the geographic scope of each initiative is open, Global Affairs Canada aims to allocate at least 50% of VCP funds to sub-Saharan Africa;

Your organization will provide at least 5% of the total eligible direct project costs over the life of the project in cash and/or in-kind in accordance to Global Affairs Canada’s Policy on Cost-Sharing for Grant and Non-Repayable Contribution Agreements. Your organization must attest to meeting this requirement in the Organization Attestation form, which must be signed and submitted as part of your application package;

Your proposed project includes North-South mandates that represent at least 90% of the total number of volunteer mandates;

Your proposed project includes outreach activities not exceeding 10% of Global Affairs Canada’s contribution to the direct costs of the project;

You must fill a Country Annex(s) form for every country in which the application has activities;

If applicable, your project includes Special Thematic Funds that does not exceed 5% of Global Affairs Canada’s contribution to the direct costs of the project;

You are providing proofs of partnership (letters) with each developing country partner organizations, indicating that there is a need for this initiative and that each organization has agreed to work together to implement the initiative; and that volunteers placed through the Volunteer Cooperation Program will not replace regularly staffed positions within the developing country partner organization;

You are providing a copy of your Volunteer Manual/Guidelines;

Your application package documents are complete and presented in either English or French.

If your proposed project does not conform to the above statements, it will not be assessed because it cannot be considered for funding under this call.

Please note that Global Affairs Canada will not consider projects that include new construction/physical work.

Required project experience

The applicant, in the case of a single applicant or a partnership, or the lead applicant or other signatories in the case of a consortium, must use volunteerism as a key mechanism for delivering development results abroad and provide a maximum of two examples of recent (less than 10 years ago) projects in Section 5.1 of the application form. Collectively, the examples must demonstrate a minimum of 3 years in recruiting and sending a relevant number of volunteers to developing countries.

Applicants unable to fulfill the above requirements are not eligible to apply under this call.

Additional guidance

Preference may be given to proposals that:

Demonstrate innovative approaches such as new business models, approaches, policy practices, partnerships, technologies, behavioural insights and methods of delivery, or any solution that addresses development problems more effectively than current approaches;

Increase the participation of Indigenous people, members of cultural communities or groups that have been historically marginalized, such as people with disabilities or LGBTQ2;

Include activities that take place in sub-Saharan Africa; While the geographic scope of each initiative is open, Global Affairs Canada aims to allocate at least 50% of the program’s funds to Sub-Saharan Africa;

Demonstrate that a minimum of 60% of the ultimate beneficiaries of development initiatives enhanced through the efforts of the VCP are women, girls and people from marginalized and vulnerable groups;

Offer a higher percentage of cost share.

How we assess your proposal

Please note that this call will use a one-step application process. The comparative assessment process is described below. In this call, applicants must submit a shortened full proposal.

As the first step, applications to this call will undergo an eligibility check to verify that all Organization eligibility requirements and Required project parameters listed on this call page are met by the application.

Next, eligible applications will be assessed to ensure that the Required project experience has been demonstrated. Applications that do not meet the Required project experience will not be further assessed. You will be notified if your application is not found to be eligible or if it does not meet the Required Project Experience.

Then, applications that meet this requirement will proceed to merit assessment as described in How we assess your proposal. The merit assessment assessment criteria that will be used for this call are the Full proposal assessment criteria.

Available resources

There are a number of resources available online to help develop your application package. We strongly encourage you to read all of the following tools and guidance before beginning your application process. Failure to meet the mandatory requirements, minimum standards and deadlines detailed therein will result in your application package not being considered for funding.

Call Q&As page

Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy

Canada’s Policy for Civil Society Partnerships for International Assistance - A Feminist Approach

Environmental Integration Process - Screening Tool

Funding guidance

Questions and answers about applying for funding

Advancing human rights

How we assess your proposal

Information by countries and territories- Canadian diplomatic mission websites

Development Innovation

Partners@International portal FAQ

Policy on Cost-Sharing for Grant and Non-Repayable Contribution Agreements

Results-based management for international assistance programming – How- to guide and tip sheets

Risk management

Sexual Conduct: Section 22.6 of Contribution Agreement - General Terms and Conditions

Sustainable Development Goals

The Official Development Assistance Accountability Act

Volunteer Cooperation Program

Volunteer Cooperation Program - Information note + definition

What is GBA+?

How to submit your application package

Important: If you intend to apply to this call for proposals, you must send an email to correspondance.pid@international.gc.ca by Wednesday, February 13, 2019, in order to receive the budget template for this call. Please reference the Volunteer Cooperation Program call for proposals in your email when requesting the budget template. The budget must be completed and uploaded to the portal along with all other documents, as outlined below.

In order to be considered in this call, you must upload the application form and all supporting document and submit them through the Partners@International portal of Global Affairs Canada by Wednesday, February 20, 2019, 12 p.m. (noon) ET.

If your organization is not already registered in Partners@International, register as soon as possible because it can take 10 or more business days to process a registration request.

Your application package must include all of the following documents:

Volunteer Cooperation Program  application form (completed, with Validated label showing on first page);

Letter of incorporation or proof of organization's legal status;

Two separate financial statements for the most recent fiscal years from each signatory (audited statements are preferred; if these are not available, the statements must be signed by a member of each signatory’s board of directors, the board’s delegate or the owner(s); note also that since financial statements usually provide comparative information from the previous year, these statements will be used to do a three-year trend analysis);

Completed Organization Attestation form;

Completed Declarations and Guarantees form;

Proof of partnership with each developing country partner organization, indicating that there is a need for this initiative, that each organization has agreed to work together to implement the initiative and that volunteers placed through the Volunteer Cooperation Program will not replace regularly staffed positions within the developing country partner organization;

Country annex(s) form for every country in which the application has activities;

The Local Partners - Information form;

Completed Budget spreadsheet;

A copy of your volunteer manual/guidelines; this document must be scanned into a PDF document and uploaded to the Partners@International portal.

Submission of a proposal does not guarantee funding. Funding decisions will be made on the merit assessment of your application.

Accessing and using PDF forms

Use only Adobe Reader/Adobe Acrobat to work on the standardized PDFs to be submitted with your application package. If you use other software, the data you enter may not appear once submitted to Global Affairs Canada, and the application will be considered ineligible.

If you are having difficulty downloading the proposal form, it is generally due to the type of software you have (or do not have) on your computer. Please read and follow the help instructions. If you have all the correct software installed, download the form to your desktop and open it directly in Adobe Reader 8 or above; otherwise, other software installed on your computer may try (and fail) to open the form using your default settings.

Questions on using the Partners@International portal

Please read and follow all the instructions for using the Partners@International portal (linked on the right side menu). Do not open multiple windows within the portal as this may cause technical problems.

Please do not register or submit at the last minute.

If you encounter technical difficulties while registering or trying to submit a proposal, send an email to: partners-partenaires@international.gc.ca. Please note: during the last two weeks before a call closes, the service standard for replying to your enquiry is 3 business days. Technical support for the portal is only available 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET, Monday to Friday.

Questions specific to this call

If you still have questions about this call after reading the general Questions and answers about applying for funding, please send them to correspondance.pid@international.gc.ca by Wednesday, January 16, 2019, 12 p.m. (noon) ET. We will not respond to questions received after this deadline, nor to questions on specific organizational circumstances or specific project proposals. Applicants will not receive emails with responses. Answers will only appear on the Q&As page for this call for proposals to ensure that all applicants have access to the same information at the same time.

12. Call for Proposals: NSERC Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) Program (March 11, 2019)

CREATE initiatives provide a value-added experience to the university training environment that includes the development of professional skills among students and postdoctoral fellows that complement their qualifications and technical skills, with a focus on providing an enriched training experience for graduate students.

CREATE programs are recognized for:

their innovative nature to create a rich research training environment;

the excellence of the researchers, and their success in training highly skilled and educated personnel for future employment in all sectors, including industry, government and academia;

their capacity to raise the standard for best practices in research training and development of professional skills of new researchers;

encouraging student mobility, as appropriate, either between different Canadian universities, or between the universities and potential workplaces or among participating Canadian and international institutions, thus promoting international awareness; and

strengthening equity, diversity and inclusion in research communities.

Value

$1.65M over 6 years

Application Procedure

Phase 1: Letter of Intent – Due May 1, 2019

Phase 2: Full Application (by invitation only) – Due September 23, 2019

Please see the NSERC website for more details on the CREATE program. For examples of successful CREATE programs, please review the list of competition results.

NSERC encourages applicants to submit training programs that fall within Canada’s research strengths and priorities under the following priority areas:

Environmental science and technologies;

Natural resources and energy;

Manufacturing;

Information and communications technologies.

York University Internal Selection Process

All researchers planning to submit an application to the CREATE program (Phase 1: Letter of Intent) are required to submit an internal Notice of Intent (iNOI). The iNOIs will be reviewed by the Strategic Project and Opportunity Review Team (SPORT), which will provide feedback to applicants and advice to the Vice-President Research and Innovation (VPRI) on which should be advanced to the funder.

Note that NSERC CREATE grants are institutional awards and require substantial support from researchers’ respective Departments, Faculties, and Organized Research Units. As such, proposals with institutional supports will be prioritized to move forward to the funder.

Applicants must notify their Faculty and the Office of Research Services (Maheen Hasan – mhasan@yorku.ca) as soon as possible about their intention to apply.  Doing so will both streamline the process of securing Faculty-level support for the partnership, and ensure that researchers receive adequate support in application preparation.

An information session on the NSERC CREATE program will be held in early 2019 (details to be confirmed later). For more information and to schedule a consultation, please contact Maheen Hasan, Strategic and Institutional Research Specialist, in the Office of Research Services at mhasan@yorku.ca.

The iNOIs are due no later than March 11, 2019 by email to Maheen Hasan (mhasan@yorku.ca), and include the following components:

York iNOI form (attached PDF form)

Outline of Training Program (2 pages) – attach as PDF document

Excellence of Proposed Team of Researchers (2 pages) – attach as PDF document1

NSERC Form 100 – only required for the lead applicant

Industry Partner Letters/Emails – required for Industry Stream applications

Copy of NSERC Review Comments for Resubmissions

Faculty letter of support (1 page) – attach as PDF document

The letter should detail the alignment of the project with the strategic research objectives of the Faculty, and the supports/resources that the Faculty is prepared to commit to the project. Commitments and supports from Organized Research Units (ORUs) should be included as appropriate.

IMPORTANT DEADLINES:

Stage 1: Letter of Intent

iNOI Submission to ORS: March 11, 2019

SPORT Committee Feedback: Late March 2019

ORS Deadline for Draft of Completed Letter of Intent: April 15, 2019

ORS Deadline for Completed Letter of Intent and ORS Checklist: April 25, 2019

NSERC Letter of Intent Deadline: May 1, 2019

NSERC Invitation to Apply: June 2019

Stage 2: Full Application (to be confirmed)

ORS Deadline for Complete Application for SPORT Review: Mid August, 2019

SPORT Committee Feedback: Mid to Late August, 2019

ORS Deadline for Draft 2 of Completed Application: September 9, 2019

ORS Deadline for Final Application and ORS Checklist: September 19, 2019

NSERC Application Deadline: September 23, 2019

NSERC Results: March 2020

[1] Please follow the NSERC CREATE Guidelines

All applications for external research funding must be reviewed and approved by the Office of Research Services before they are submitted to the granting agency. The application must be accompanied by a completed ORS Application Checklist. To ensure that the approved application is ready by the agency deadline, a complete application package must be submitted to ORS ten (10) working days prior to the final submission date.

13. Call for Abstracts: Binocular 2019 Graduate Student Conference (March 15, 2019)

Binocular 2019 Graduate Student Conference Call for Abstracts

Conference Date: May 3-4, 2019

Location: York University and

University of Toronto

Theme: “(in)visibilities”

Abstract submission date: March 15, 2019

What makes something invisible or visible? What are the contingencies of visibility? Who chooses to make something or someone visible or invisible and how to they become that way? Are some things necessarily or inherently visible or invisible? What is the relationship between (in)visibility and what is considered ‘real’? What causes infrastructure or institutions to be visible or not? Who does (in)visible labour? How is work in science, technology, and medicine considered or made visible? How does (in)visibility relate to our understandings of science, technology, and medicine? What role does (in)visibility play in wider understandings of science, technology, and medicine? What role does (in)visibility play in knowledge production? The fifth annual Binocular Conference, jointly organized by graduate students of York University’s Science and Technology Studies (STS) and the University of Toronto’s Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (IHPST), invites the submission of essays and other less formal scholarship on the theme of “(in)visibilities.” As an interdisciplinary graduate student conference, we invite emerging scholars from diverse disciplines to consider and share with their peers the (in)visibilities they consider and encounter, as well as the roles they may or may not play in their research, their field, the world, or within their graduate school experience more generally. We hope the topic will provoke applicants to consider not only that which is visible or invisible in their pursuit of insights into understanding science, technology, and medicine, but also the ways in which such (in)visibilities manifest and influence the work that we as interdisciplinary academics do. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

• The (in)visibilities of thoughts and thought processes

• Blackboxing and the (in)visibilities of science, technology, and medicine

• The (in)visibilities of disability and under-represented groups or entities

• The (in)visibilities of infrastructures, archives, institutions

• (In)visible labour, care, and gendered forms of visibility

• Indigenous knowledges and infrastructures

• Entity realisms and how paradigms condition (in)visibility

• The primacy of sight and other sensory apparatuses as epistemic sources ((in)audibility; (in)olfactory; (in)sensibility; (in)tangibility)

• The (in)visibilities of climate change and the ways in which disasters make the anthropocene visible

• Quantum mechanical fields and black holes

• The pace of macro-evolutionary change in biology

The Binocular Conference invites the submission of 250-word abstracts for a 15-minute

presentation on (in)visibilities addressing any of the above or related themes by end of day (EST) on Friday, March 15th, 2019. Please send all abstracts (or any questions you may have) to binocularconference@gmail.com. The conference will take place on Friday, May 3rd (at York University) and Saturday, May 4th 2019 (at the University of Toronto). The conference keynote speaker is Sergio Sismondo from Queen’s University. Sismondo’s work falls at the intersection of the philosophy and sociology of science. His most recent book is entitled Ghost-Managed

Medicine: Big Pharma’s Invisible Hands (Mattering, 2018). As a pre-conference event, Peter Galison (Harvard University) will give a talk at the University of Toronto on Thursday, May 2nd 2019. Beyond HPST/STS, we welcome submissions from graduate students of any level from a

wide cross-section of disciplines, fields, and critical approaches, including but not limited to communications and culture, critical theory, disability studies, futures studies, gender studies, women’s studies, humanities, animal studies, environmental studies, visual culture, literature studies, and beyond. Unfortunately, Binocular 2019 will not be able to reimburse or support participant’s travel costs. Please contact your department for potential funding opportunities.

For more information: binocular2019.wordpress.com

Twitter @binocular_conf

Facebook @binocularconference

14. Call for Papers: “Power in Southeast Asia” | 2019 Conference of the Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies (April 1, 2019)

Questions of power permeate virtually all social relations and social facts. Southeast Asia is an especially fertile area in which to examine the question of power. The notion of power itself invites critical inquiries from many disciplinary and ontological perspectives. How is power expressed in Southeast Asian states, societies and cultures? How do historical legacies, such as colonialism and the Cold War, affect power relations in the contemporary world? How do social forces, including class structures, ethnic groups, and religious communities, resist the exertion of power or reinforce existing powers of domination? How does power compel people to act without their knowledge? What are the channels or practices by which various forms of power are manifest? How is power understood, conceptualized, and represented in different fields of social inquiry, including the social sciences, humanities, and performing arts? Whether one is interested in transnational flows, religious movements, symbols and discourse, or gender relations, power is an important element that suffuses social and political life in Southeast Asia and beyond.

The 2019 Conference of the Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies, to be held in Montreal, invites papers and panels on the theme of power in all its manifestations. We especially encourage proposals that address the question of power from inter-disciplinary and comparative perspectives. The conference organizers will also consider panels on a variety of topics, but are especially interested in submissions that engage with the conference theme of power. The conference will be held in Montreal, jointly at McGill University and the University of Sherbrooke (Longueuil campus), on 24-26 October 2019.

Please submit your panels and paper proposals to: https://laps.apps01.yorku.ca/machform/view.php?id=220691

Submissions will be accepted from 1 December 2018 until 1 April 2019.

For more information: ccseas@yorku.ca

You may also contact the conference co-conveners:

Serge Granger, University of Sherbrooke – serge.granger@usherbrooke.ca

Erik Martinez Kuhonta, McGill University – erik.kuhonta@mcgill.ca

15. Call for Participants: Institute for Peace & Dialogue Summer Programs 2019: Training, Conference & 3 Month Research, Basel, Switzerland (May 1, 2019)

Institute for Peace & Dialogue, IPD is one of the leading organiser of several successful annual international academic trainings and research programs in Switzerland in the field of peacebuilding, conflict transformation, mediation, leadership, security, intercultural dialogue and human rights. Through these events IPD bring together academicians, state, private and public sector representatives for the sake of better and more peaceful future building via education and networking.

IPD is proud to announce the next International Summer Programs for 2019, which are to be held in Basel, Switzerland. Applicants can choose between the 1 or 2 days Basel Global Peace Conference, 10- or 20-day Summer Academy or the 3-Month Research Program, which may be combined with the 10- or 20-day Training + Conference participation, depending on the filled application.

11th Summer Academy Period: 4 - 13 August, 2019 (10 Days)

12th Summer Academy Period: 13 - 22 August, 2019 (10 Days)

1st Basel Global Peace Conference: 4 August, 2019

2nd Basel Global Peace Conference: 13August, 2019

3 Month Research Program Period: 04 August - 01 November, 2019 (90 Days)

Early Bird Application & Payment Deadline: 01 May, 2019

Late Application & Payment Deadline: 20 June, 2019

Venue: Basel, Switzerland

 https://www.ipdinstitute.ch/Summer-Programs-2019-Training,-Conference,-Research/

- The main goal of the 10 or 20 days Summer Academy is to strengthen the skills of the representatives from state institutions, business sector, INGOs/NGOs, education institutions, religious organisations, independent mediators and politicians through academic trainings in peacebuilding, mediation, conflict resolution, security, human rights, leadership and intercultural dialogue fields.

- The main goal of the 3 Month Research Program is to develop the skills of the researchers via academic trainings, reading materials, Supervisor guidance and closely acquaintance them with relevant Swiss state, public and private Institutions.

- The main goal of the Basel Global Peace Conference is to create unique global platform to bring together the leaders and activists from all over the world countries to exchange ideas, knowledge, practices and experiences on how to build a more peaceful world, how to foster dialogue between the different people and inspire people to give contribution to the global peace, security and human rights where their live and work.

To be Sending Organisation

We are inviting state, private, public and academic institutions from different countries to send their individual or group participants to our short/long term academic programs. If your organization is interested on partnership, we will gladly receive your proposals by email.

To become member of Global Peace Ambassadors Network, GPAN please contact with us by email or visit our website www.ipdinstitute.ch

We are looking forward to receive your filled application and will be glad to see you among us during coming summer programs in Switzerland.

Other IPD Programs for 2019

1. http://www.ipdinstitute.ch/3-12-Month-Visitor-Research-Program,-VRP/

3-12 Month Visitor Researcher Program, VRP

Deadline: Rolling base

2. http://www.ipdinstitute.ch/ZurichEduCa-Expo-2019/

ZurichEduCaExpo 2019 - 3rd International Education & Career Exhibition

Early Bird Application & Payment Deadline: 20th December 2018

Final Application & Payment Deadline: 15th February 2019

3. https://www.ipdinstitute.ch/Executive-Diploma-in-Conflict-Resolution-Mediation,-CRM-1-Year/

Executive Diploma Program in Conflict Resolution & Mediation, CRM (1 Year)

Application & Payment Deadline: 01 June for Winter Term & 01 November for Spring Term

Location: Basel, Switzerland

IPD Summer Academy Programs: Theory - Practice - Research - Exchange - Contribute

16. Call for Papers: Decolonial (Re)Visions of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror (May 15, 2019)

This special issue will address Black Canadian and Indigenous work in / with the genres of science fiction, fantasy and horror, both genre fiction proper and slipstream fiction. While there has been quite a bit of attention to African American SF and increasingly to the burgeoning of genre fiction on the African continent, and while Indigenous SF has been growing and attracting more attention, there has not been as much attention to the relationships between Indigenous and Black SF in Canada or to the particular ways Canada’s settler colonial past and present inform the ways Black Canadian and Indigenous writers engage with science fiction, fantasy and horror. How do Black and Indigenous writers respond to the different positions colonialism historically imposed on those who were subjected to alien abduction versus alien invasion? How do these genres re-present histories of slavery, genocide, displacement and dispossession? While the dynamic between Black and Indigenous histories is at play across the Americas, as Nalo Hopkinson’s work illustrates nicely, we ask whether there is something specific about the Canadian iteration of that hemispheric history. What does it mean to engage in a comparison of Black and Indigenous writing in the genres from this location, the settler-colonial formation called Canada? How else might we think of the relations and relays between blackness and indigeneity in modes other than the comparative? How do the genres of science fiction, fantasy and horror attend to the historically triangulated relations among settler, Indigenous and racialized immigrant peoples, including, for instance, Asian Canadians? What might be different about Asian Canadian engagement with this settler-colonial history? Whether in outer space, an alternate universe, a haunted house, or a mythic time, the worlds built in genre fiction seem to open up and provoke questions of how to both represent and transform the colonial conditions of our shared and still incommensurable world. How do Indigenous and Black Canadian writers working in or with these genres explore the possibilities for alternative kinds of social and political power--in other words, how do they take up the utopian impulses of conventional SF? This is the challenge of finding “new ways of doing things” that Nalo Hopkinson describes as the possibility in science fiction that is taken up by “the colonizee” as a form of critique.

We ask, further, how this comparative focus might allow for a critical engagement with Fredric Jameson’s claim that science fiction returns us to history by representing it as a speculative future, thus helping us to imagine ways past current political impasses. What does an Indigenous / Black novum look like? How do works of Afro- and Indigenous futurism also complicate the temporality of the novum by at times exploring what-could-have-been and what-always-has-been? In writing of recent African science fiction, Matthew Omelsky argues that it engages with a new form of biopolitics that he calls “neuropolitics,” by which he means the extension of power to “the control of memory and thought”; to what extent does Black / Indigenous SF exhibit a similar set of concerns?

Across these speculative, weird, and fantastic modes of storytelling, world-building and theorizing, how do Black and Indigenous authors grappling with the histories and the present of Canada find space to write within, persist within and demand the impossible?

For this special issue, we seek both scholarly essays on these questions and contributions from writers reflecting on their own work in / with these genres. In engaging with the questions outlined above, contributors might address, without feeling constrained by, the following specific themes:

Land and colonization

Contact and encounter

The postcolonial and the decolonial

Indigeneity and diaspora; sovereignty and belonging

Comparisons between Canadian decolonial and US / diasporic / African / antipodean (re)visions

Comparisons between Asian-Canadian and Indigenous and / or Black-Canadian SF

Contemporary ‘race science,’ scientific studies of ‘race’ and Black / Indigenous SF

Speculative / racialized revisionings of gender and sexuality

Critical utopias

Temporality: how does Indigenous and Black Canadian SF do the ‘future’ differently?

Enlightenment critique: scientific rationalism vs. non-European epistemologies

Tensions between Indigenous design / technologies and those introduced from without

Publishing media for genre fiction

Film and graphica

Monstrosity

Haunting

Possession and/or dispossession

The different modalities of fantasy, SF, horror

The apocalyptic

Special Issue editors: Lou Cornum, Suzette Mayr and Maureen Moynagh

The deadline for submissions is May 15, 2019. Please consult canlit.ca for instructions on how to submit via Open Journal System. All papers submitted will undergo a formal peer review process through Canadian Literature. Essays should follow current MLA bibliographic format (MLA Handbook, 8th ed.)

Word length for articles is 6,500- 7,000 words, which includes endnotes and works cited.

All correspondence will go through the CanLit office.

OPPORTUNITIES:

1. Job Opportunity: Research Assistant with Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (January 18, 2019)

Hiring for Research Assistant

PROJECT:

Conducting research and literature review on themes related to Internationalization in higher education for the development of a Strategic Internationalization Plan for Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

RESPONSIBILITIES MAY INCLUDE:

Working with Associate Dean, Global and Community Engagement to support the development of a Strategic Internationalization Plan (SIP) for LA&PS, the RA will be responsible for the following tasks:

• Conduct research and literature review on themes related to Internationalization in higher education;

• Organize consultations with various stakeholder groups;

• Compile and collect data from consultation meetings with various stakeholder groups;

• Assist with various administrative tasks and supportive duties.

QUALIFICATIONS:

• Masters-level and/or PhD-level research in international education or related disciplines (sociology, education, development studies, equity studies, social work, public policy, administration and law)

• Knowledge in Internationalization theories and/or programs in higher education;

• Knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research methodology

• Excellent time management and organizational skills;

• Ability to work independently;

• Excellent writing skills; good oral communication skills;

• Prior administrative experience considered an asset.

COMPENSATION:

• Salary to be discussed based on experience and qualifications

TO APPLY:

Please send your resume/CV and a cover letter to Narda Razack, Associate Dean, Global & Community Engagement at adgce@yorku.ca .

CLOSING DATE: January 18, 2019

2. Job Opportunity: Campaigns & Advocacy Coordinator, Scarborough Campus Students' Union (SCSU) (January 24, 2019)

Position Title: Campaigns & Advocacy Coordinator

Department: Scarborough Campus Students’ Union (SCSU)

Position Type: Full-time, permanent

Compensation: $50,000

Reports to: SCSU Executive Director

Job Description

The Scarborough Campus Students’ Union (SCSU) is the not-for-profit organization that represents all Full-Time and Part-Time Undergraduate Students at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) and provides to its members a broad range of advocacy work, services and events. The Student Centre is operated by SCSU and serves as the central hub of student life and services in the UTSC community.

QUALIFICATIONS

A post-secondary degree.

Current knowledge of the issues facing students in Ontario and Canada.

Knowledge of students’ unions and the representation and services provided.

Experience working on campaigns related to equity issues.

Demonstrated experience and skills in campaigns planning, development and implementation, including strategic planning and volunteer coordination

Experience working from an anti-oppression framework.

Ability to take direction and meet tight deadlines. Works well under pressure.

Strong organizational skills with the ability to prioritize multiple projects simultaneously.

Must be able to work independently with little to no supervision.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

DUTIES

Campaigns Coordination: development, coordination and implementation of campaigns relating to education quality and accessibility, environmental sustainability, equity and social justice and assisting with campaign coordination.

Issues Policy and Education: assisting with the development of SCSU Policies, assistance with research for different campaigns.

Workshops: Assist and develop workshops with Executives on various issues.

Coalition and Solidarity Work: work with various labour unions and community organizations that share common objectives of the SCSU.

General Work: engaging in collective office work, including general operational and day-to-day administrative responsibilities; performing additional duties as assigned.

Petitions and Appeals: understanding the petitions and appeals processes and supporting students.

Services Coordination: Supporting service centres such as racialized students’ collective, food bank and book exchange.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Assist the Executive Committee in increasing awareness on issues affecting post-secondary students through campaigns and programming.

Supervise the operation of the food centre, racialized students collective, volunteer network program, book exchange and any other equity service group the Union operates.

In conjunction with the Vice-President Equity work to implement an anti-oppression framework to the core of all SCSU programming in the interests of building an inclusive and discrimination-free environment

Facilitate the coordination and monitoring of all SCSU campaigns, including the finance and administration.

Responsible for advertising and overseeing promotion of campaigns through the SCSU Website and other social media platforms.

In conjunction with the Executive Committee prepares and organizes workshops and training for student groups.

In conjunction with the Graphic Designer, work with the SCSU Executives on marketing material for campaigns and programming.

Monitor and supervise social media platforms for promotions and consistency

Book rooms and pick up supplies when requested by the Executive Director or Executive Committee

Suggest and write issues-based policies where deemed necessary

Support in writing press-releases, lobby documents and other publications of the SCSU

Generally carry out all other functions as may be required from time to time by the SCSU Executive Director

Operate in accordance with the SCSU By-laws and Policies

When requested to do so attend SCSU Board of Directors and Executive Committee meetings

Protect the property of SCSU at all times

DESIRED ATTITUDES

Able to work independently or in groups with a firm understanding of SCSU and UTSC student culture.

Approaches tasks with an innovative mind-set and positive outlook in completing goals.

Ability to thrive in a fast-paced and pressured environment and must be able to shift to other functions and priorities as needed.

Open minded to the ideas suggested by students and management.

Highly organized and able to meet demands on time.

Excellent organizational and problem solving skills.

Work is driven, detailed and professional

For more information about SCSU, please visit our website at:

http://www.scsu.ca/

PLEASE NOTE: SCSU is an independently incorporated organization working within the University of Toronto community.  This position is NOT a University of Toronto staff position.

Application Process:

Interested candidates should send their résumé and cover letter to applications@scsu.ca by Thursday 24th January, 2019 @ 5pm. All applications should be received via e-mail

The Scarborough Campus Students’ Union is committed to employment equity and encourages applications from diverse communities, including: First Nations, Metis and Inuit people, racialized people, persons with disabilities, members of the queer community, lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, two-spirited or transgender people, new immigrants, and women.

We thank all who apply, but only those candidates selected for interviews will be contacted.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Francis Pineda

Executive Director

Telephone: 416-287-7063       Reception: 416-287-7047     Fax: 416-287-7088

E-mail: executivedirector@scsu.ca

Member of the Canadian Federation of Students, Local 99

3. Job Opportunity: Applications and Nominations Chair of the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies (January 31, 2019)

SEARCH ANNOUNCEMENT:

Chair of the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies

Deadline for nominations and applications: Thursday January 31st, 2019 at 5pm to the chair of the search committee, Amar Wahab at gswsupd@yorku.ca

The School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies invites nominations and applications for Chair of the School for a three-year term beginning July 1, 2019.

Celebrating its 21st year, the School is the largest degree granting unit in its field in Canada, drawing upon faculty across the York University communities and housing the pan-Faculty (both Liberal Arts and Professional Studies and Glendon) Gender and Women’s Studies and Sexuality Studies Programs, the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies, and the Bridging Program for Women.  For more information on the School, please see our website: http://www.yorku.ca/laps/gsws/index.html .

The Chair provides leadership in the School’s nationally and internationally recognized excellence in teaching and research (in both English and French) in the fields of Gender and Women’s Studies and Sexuality Studies. The Chair oversees the School’s operations, represents the School in university administrative and governance structures, chairs the School’s primary administrative committees, including the Coordinating Committee, and sits on the Executive of the Centre for Feminist Research.

Applicants are expected to be members of the full-time faculty at York University with a distinguished record of scholarship and teaching, and administrative experience. The position of Chair of the School comes with a 1.0 course release, in addition to a stipend, as stipulated in Appendix P (Category 4) of the YUFA Collective Agreement.

Applications and nominations are invited from interested York faculty who may self-nominate or be nominated, with permission, by a colleague. Applicants are asked to submit a current CV and a one-page statement of interest detailing a vision for the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies as well as relevant administrative experience.

Members of the School’s community are also invited to submit input to the search committee regarding qualities sought in the next Chair.

Following interviews with shortlisted candidates that will take place in early March, the search committee will recommend a candidate to the Council of the School and then the relevant Dean(s)/Principal for approval.

Deadline for nominations, applications, and input on qualities sought in a new Chair: By email not later than 5pm on January 31, 2019, to the chair of the search committee, Amar Wahab at gswsupd@yorku.ca. If you have any questions about the search and/or nominations process, please contact Amar Wahab.

4. Funding Opportunity: Applications open for Winter APUS, UofT Student Bursaries (February 1, 2019)

The deadline for applications for the Winter bursary program is February 1, 2019. There are several bursaries to apply for and students can apply for multiple categories that apply to them.

APUS General Bursary

APUS Indigenous Student Bursary

APUS Black Student Bursary

APUS Queer and Trans Student Bursary

Jovita Nagy Bursary (UTM & UTSC Students)

Marija Hutchison Bursary (TYP & Academic Bridging)

For more information please visit http://apus.ca/scholarships-bursaries/ or email services@apus.ca.

5. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position Plurilingual/Multiliteracies Education, Department of Integrated Studies in Education (McGill University) (February 1, 2019)

The Department of Integrated Studies in Education invites applications for a tenure-stream appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor.

Candidates must hold a doctoral degree at the time of taking up the appointment. They will demonstrate experience directly related to Plurilingual/Multiliteracies Pedagogies and Critical Sociolinguistics, and will be expected to build an active research program. The anticipated start date is August 1, 2019.

We seek a dynamic scholar and collaborative colleague with a strong background in social justice education through increasing the plurilingual competence of K-12 students across a wide range of literate practices both in and out of school and in several languages or language varieties. The successful candidate will possess a PhD (or be ABD) in plurilingual/multiliteracies pedagogies, critical sociolinguistics, and/or a related field, with a specialization in heritage, Indigenous or other minority language teaching and learning, and will be familiar with sociocultural theoretical approaches in education. Fluency in a minority language and French is a strong asset, as is elementary and/or secondary school teaching experience in Quebec and/or Canada. Familiarity with the competency-based approach of the Quebec Education Program (QEP) is also an asset. Other assets include experience in teacher preparation for the ESL or French Immersion specializations in Quebec schools; in qualitative/ethnographic approaches to research; in graduate supervision; and in teaching an additional language to learners of any age. Knowledge of and connection to ethnolinguistically marginalized communities is an essential requirement for this position, as is an awareness of the sociopolitical context of language education in Quebec in a context of increasingly globalized English.

Responsibilities will include teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels and thesis supervision of Master’s and Doctoral students, as well as service commitments to the Department, Faculty of Education and University.

Applicants for this position should submit the following documents by email: letter of application; curriculum vitae; statement of teaching philosophy (1-2 pages); research statement (1-2 pages); a sample publication; and names of three referees.

Applications should be submitted electronically to ttrecruitment.dise@mcgill.ca. Review of applications will commence February 1st, 2019 and continue until the position is filled. Inquiries concerning this position can be made to the chair of the department, Dr. Steven Jordan (steven.jordan@mcgill.ca ).

McGill University hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community. We welcome and encourage applications from racialized persons/visible minorities, women, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, ethnic minorities, and persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, as well as from all qualified candidates with the skills and knowledge to productively engage with diverse communities.

McGill further recognizes and fairly considers the impact of leaves (e.g., family care or health-related) that may contribute to career interruptions or slowdowns. Candidates are encouraged to signal any leave that affected productivity may have had an effect on their career path. This information will be considered to ensure the equitable assessment of the candidate’s record.

McGill implements an employment equity program and encourages members of designated equity groups to self-identify. It further seeks to ensure the equitable treatment and full inclusion of persons with disabilities by striving for the implementation of universal design principles transversally, across all facets of the University community, and through accommodation policies and procedures. Persons with disabilities who anticipate needing accommodations for any part of the application process may contact, in confidence, Professor Angela Campbell, Associate Provost (Equity and Academic Policies) by email or phone at 514-398-1660.

All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

For more information regarding the position or to learn more about McGill, the Faculty and the department please visit http://www.mcgill.ca/education and http://www.mcgill.ca/dise/

6. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position Language and Communication in Education, Department of Integrated Studies in Education (McGill University) (February 1, 2019)

The Department of Integrated Studies in Education (DISE) invites applications for a tenure-stream appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor with a specialisation in language and communication in intercultural education settings.

The preferred candidate will have broad methodological expertise in qualitative, ethnographic, and discourse analytic methods in education and a background in writing and rhetoric.

The ideal candidate will have a research profile that cross-references and contributes to neighboring disciplines to educational studies, including anthropology, sociology, cultural studies and studies in global education. As part of the Faculty’s effort to increase Indigenous research and community partnerships, preference will also be given to candidates whose research addresses contemporary issues in Indigenous education, Indigenous teacher education, and Indigenous/non-Indigenous reconciliation in formal and non-formal settings in Quebec/Canada. Candidates must hold a doctoral degree at the time of taking up the appointment. The anticipated start date is August 1, 2019.

DISE (Department of Integrated Studies In Education) faculty members are expected to teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels and supervise Master’s and Doctoral level students, as well as contribute to service in the Department, the Faculty of Education and the University.

Applicants for this position should submit the following documents by email: letter of application; curriculum vitae; statement of teaching philosophy (1-2 pages); research statement (1-2 pages); a sample publication; and names of three referees.

Applications should be submitted electronically to ttrecruitment.dise@mcgill.ca . Review of applications will commence February 1st 2019, and continue until the position is filled. Inquiries concerning this position can be made to the chair of the department, Dr. Steven Jordan (steven.jordan@mcgill.ca).

McGill University hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community. We welcome and encourage applications from racialized persons/visible minorities, women, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, ethnic minorities, and persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, as well as from all qualified candidates with the skills and knowledge to productively engage with diverse communities.

McGill further recognizes and fairly considers the impact of leaves (e.g., family care or health-related) that may contribute to career interruptions or slowdowns. Candidates are encouraged to signal any leave that affected productivity, may have had an effect on their career path. This information will be considered to ensure the equitable assessment of the candidate’s record.

McGill implements an employment equity program and encourages members of designated equity groups to self-identify. It further seeks to ensure the equitable treatment and full inclusion of persons with disabilities by striving for the implementation of universal design principles transversally, across all facets of the University community, and through accommodation policies and procedures. Persons with disabilities who anticipate needing accommodations for any part of the application process may contact, in confidence, Professor Angela Campbell, Associate Provost (Equity and Academic Policies) by email or phone at 514-398-1660.

All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

For more information regarding the position or to learn more about McGill, the Faculty and the department please visit https://www.mcgill.ca/education and https://www.mcgill.ca/dise/

7. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position Community Engagement and Indigenous Teacher Education, Department of Integrated Studies in Education (McGill University) (February 1, 2019)

The Department of Integrated Studies in Education (DISE) invites applications for a tenure-stream appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor with a specialisation in Indigenous Teacher Education. Working closely with the department’s Office of First Nations and Inuit Education (OFNIE) the successful candidate will have lived experience in Indigenous communities, working with Indigenous learners and/or communities and be committed to teaching and educational innovation in the field of teacher education and community partnerships. The ideal candidate would support program development, curriculum design, and pedagogical innovation for OFNIE’s new and existing Indigenous partners. The candidate will also support OFNIE in identifying new potential partnerships. The candidate’s responsibilities will include teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels, both in-community and on-campus, and the supervision of Master’s and Doctoral students involved in Indigenous education. Importantly, a new hire in Indigenous teacher education will contribute to strengthening knowledge and understanding of Indigenous culture for non-Indigenous students in DISE through teaching and awareness-related activities on campus.

The anticipated start date is August 1, 2019.

DISE (Department of Integrated Studies In Education) faculty members are expected to teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels and supervise Master’s and Doctoral level students, as well as contribute to service in the Department, the Faculty of Education and the University.

Applicants for this position should submit the following documents by email: letter of application; curriculum vitae; statement of teaching philosophy (1-2 pages); research statement (1-2 pages); a sample publication; and names of three referees.

Applications should be submitted electronically to ttrecruitment.dise@mcgill.ca . Review of applications will commence February 1st 2019, and continue until the position is filled. Inquiries concerning this position can be made to the chair of the department, Dr. Steven Jordan (steven.jordan@mcgill.ca ).

McGill University hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community. We welcome and encourage applications from racialized persons/visible minorities, women, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, ethnic minorities, and persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, as well as from all qualified candidates with the skills and knowledge to productively engage with diverse communities.

McGill further recognizes and fairly considers the impact of leaves (e.g., family care or health-related) that may contribute to career interruptions or slowdowns. Candidates are encouraged to signal any leave that affected productivity, may have had an effect on their career path. This information will be considered to ensure the equitable assessment of the candidate’s record.

McGill implements an employment equity program and encourages members of designated equity groups to self-identify. It further seeks to ensure the equitable treatment and full inclusion of persons with disabilities by striving for the implementation of universal design principles transversally, across all facets of the University community, and through accommodation policies and procedures. Persons with disabilities who anticipate needing accommodations for any part of the application process may contact, in confidence, Professor Angela Campbell, Associate Provost (Equity and Academic Policies) by email or phone at 514-398-1660.

All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

For more information regarding the position or to learn more about McGill, the Faculty and the department please visit https://www.mcgill.ca/education/  and https://www.mcgill.ca/dise/

8. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor Tenure Track Position Indigenous Language Linguistics and Education, Department of Integrated Studies in Education (McGill University) (February 1 ,2019)

Tenure-Track Faculty Position Open to rank of Assistant Professor Canada Research Chair Tier 2 in Indigenous Language Linguistics and Education Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Education Department/School: Department of Linguistics and Department of Integrated Studies in Education (Joint) The Canada Research Chair is also open to internal candidates who already hold a tenure-track or tenured faculty position at McGill University.

The Department of Linguistics (Faculty of Arts) and of Department of Integrated Studies in Education (Faculty of Education) invite applications for a joint tenure-track appointment in Indigenous Language Linguistics and Education at the Assistant Professor level, to begin August 1st, 2019.

We invite candidates broadly interested in the areas of Indigenous language linguistics and education working from a community-engagement model. Supporting both departments’ growing contributions to Indigenous language research and education, the successful candidate will bring expertise and experience to one or more of the following areas: Indigenous language description, documentation, and revitalization; Indigenous language pedagogies and curriculum design; and Indigenous language policy and planning. The ideal applicant will complement existing strengths and research interests in both Linguistics and Integrated Studies in Education, will have lived experience in an Indigenous language community, a strong record of community-engaged scholarship, and evidence of a broader engagement with Indigenous methodologies, knowledge, and research ethics. This hire is part of a larger McGill-wide initiative that prioritizes academic recruitment of Indigenous peoples in the areas of Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Education. Following the recent Provost’s Task Force on Indigenous Education and Indigenous Studies, the hire will join a growing network of faculty and staff that is committed to decolonizing methodologies and building Indigenous research capacity by supporting the culturally-responsive application of linguistics and education for revitalizing and maintaining Indigenous languages.

The successful candidate who satisfies the eligibility conditions of the Canada Research Chair (CRC) program may be supported by the University for nomination to a Tier 2 Chair in Indigenous Language Linguistics and Education, which provides protected time for research within a full-time academic appointment.

Nominees for Tier 2 Chair positions must be emerging scholars and hold the rank of assistant or associate professors, or possess the necessary qualifications to be appointed to these levels. A nominee who is more than 10 years from having earned their highest degree and has experienced legitimate career interruptions (e.g., maternity or parental leave, extended sick leave, clinical training, and family care) will be taken into consideration using the Tier 2 justification process. Eligibility conditions for CRCs are found at http://www.chairs-chaires.gc.ca/program-programme/nomination-mise_en_candidature-eng.aspx#s3

The candidate’s responsibilities will include teaching at the undergraduate and graduate level, student supervision, and research in Indigenous languages. Qualifications and Education Requirements Candidates should have or expect to have a PhD in linguistics, education, Indigenous studies, or a related field.

Candidates who do not satisfy the CRC eligibility criteria for a Tier 2 Chair are nonetheless invited to apply for the position.

JOB DETAILS

Job Classification: Tenure-track Rank: Assistant Professor Job Status: Full-time Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience Application Deadline: January 4, 2019

Applications must be submitted: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/Asstprof#12851

The following supporting documents are required: • A cover letter • Curriculum vitae • A statement of research • A teaching statement • A sample of research • Teaching evaluations • The names and contact information of three referees. For Tier 2 nominees at the rank of Assistant Professor who are within three years of their PhD, one referee must be the PhD supervisor.

For internal applicants only: Supporting documents include a recent curriculum vitae and a statement of research aligned with the designated subject area for the Chair.

COMMITMENT TO EQUITY AND DIVERSITY

McGill University hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community. We welcome and encourage applications from racialized persons/visible minorities, women, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, ethnic minorities, and persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, as well as from all qualified candidates with the skills and knowledge to productively engage with diverse communities.

McGill further recognizes and fairly considers the impact of leaves (e.g., family care or health-related) that may contribute to career interruptions or slowdowns. Candidates are encouraged to signal any leave that affected productivity, may have had an effect on their career path. This information will be considered to ensure the equitable assessment of the candidate’s record.

McGill implements an employment equity program and encourages members of designated equity groups to self-identify. It further seeks to ensure the equitable treatment and full inclusion of persons with disabilities by striving for the implementation of universal design principles transversally, across all facets of the University community, and through accommodation policies and procedures. Persons with disabilities who anticipate needing accommodations for any part of the application process may contact, in confidence, Professor Angela Campbell, Associate Provost (Equity and Academic Policies) by email or phone at 514-398-1660. All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

9. Job Opportunity: Tenure-track Position at UQAM in Sociology of Gender (February 11, 2019)

Au Département De Sociologie Poste De Professeure, Professeur En Études De Genre Et Des Sexualités

L’entrée en fonction est prévue au 1er Septembre 2019 sous réserve des autorisations budgétaires requises. L’UQAM recherche des candidates et candidats qualifiés afin de renouveler son corps professoral et assurer un développement de qualité dans tous les domaines d’activités. Le Département de sociologie recherche un ou une spécialiste en études de genre et des sexualités dans le but de contribuer au développement de ce champ de connaissances au niveau des trois cycles d'enseignement en sociologie ainsi que dans le cadre des unités de recherche pertinentes.

Le poste à pourvoir exige une connaissance approfondie :

•De la sociologie du genre / des rapports sociaux de sexe et de la ou des sexualité(s), de ses débats théoriques et épistémologiques, de ses sous-champs et de ses principaux objets

•Des méthodologies et des enjeux éthiques spécifiques aux recherches sur les pratiques, les discours et les rapports sociaux relatifs à la sexualité

SOMMAIRE DE LA FONCTION:

•Enseignement et encadrement aux trois cycles d’études

•Recherche et publications

•Services à la collectivité

•Implication dans la vie départementale, facultaire et universitaire

EXIGENCES:

•Doctorat en sociologie ou dans une discipline connexe

•Dossier de recherche et de publications scientifiques dans le domaine d'expertise

•Capacité à développer un programme de recherche structurant et des collaborations avec d'autres unités, milieux et universités

•Maîtrise du français tant à l’oral qu’à l’écrit

La personne recrutée pourrait avoir la possibilité de soumettre un dossier de candidature pour une Chaire de recherche du Canada de niveau 2 (www.chairs-chaires.gc.ca).

DATE D'ENTRÉE EN FONCTION:

1er SEPTEMBRE 2019

TRAITEMENT:

Selon la convention collective UQAM-SPUQ

L’Université du Québec à Montréal souscrit à un programme d’accès à l’égalité en emploi. De ce fait, elle invite les femmes, les autochtones, les membres des minorités visibles, des minorités ethniques et les personnes en situation de handicap qui répondent aux exigences du poste à soumettre leur candidature. Nous encourageons les personnes qui s’identifient à l’un ou l’autre de ces groupes à remplir le Questionnaire d’identification à la présente adresse et à le jo

indre à leur dossier de candidature : www.rhu.uqam.ca/visiteurs/egalite/QuestionnaireAccesEgalite.pdf

Nous encourageons toutes les candidates, tous les candidats qualifiés à postuler; la priorité sera toutefois accordée aux Canadiennes, Canadiens ainsi qu’aux résidentes, résidents permanents.

Les personnes intéressées sont priées de faire parvenir, en format PDF, une lettre de motivation, un curriculum vitae en français détaillé, daté et signé, trois exemplaires d’articles, chapitres de livre ou autres textes représentatifs de leurs travaux, trois lettres de recommandation transmises directement par leur auteur.e au Département AVANT LE 11 FÉVRIER 2019, 17 h (les dossiers incomplets ne seront pas retenus) par courriel ou par la poste à: Monsieur Marcelo Otero, directeur Département de sociologie Université du Québec à Montréal

C.P. 8888, Succursale Centre-ville

Montréal (Québec) CANADA H3C 3P8

sociologie@uqam.ca

10. Job Opportunity: The Martha LA McCain Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies (February 25, 2019)

The Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto invites applications for a one-year Postdoctoral Fellowship during the 2019-20 academic year, with the possibility of an additional one-year renewal, to support junior scholars pursuing research in sexuality studies, LGBTQ2+ studies, and other intersecting fields of critical inquiry on sexuality. Our search committee welcomes proposals that span disciplinary boundaries. Applicants from all fields of the humanities and the social sciences are encouraged to apply. The successful applicant is expected to be in residence in the Greater Toronto Area during the period of their award and will join the faculty and students who make up our intellectual community and participate in the Centre’s day-to-day activities. The Postdoctoral Fellow will offer one undergraduate class for the Sexual Diversity Studies program and, at some point during the period of their award, deliver at least one public lecture that highlights their work. They will be able to utilize the vast faculty resources, manuscript archives, and library collections available at the University of Toronto, the Bonham Centre, and in the city. The successful candidate will receive a combined research and teaching stipend of $56,000, plus benefits, to support themselves for the duration of their fellowship. To get a sense of the wide disciplinary range and diversity of the Bonham Centre’s community and academic offerings consult our website (http://sds.utoronto.ca ).

Candidates must have completed their Ph.D. within a maximum of 3 years before the appointment date (August 1, 2019). To apply submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, research project outline, writing sample, and three confidential letters of reference (submitted directly by the referees via email). At least one of the reference letters should speak to the applicant’s teaching experience and ability.

All application materials should be submitted via email by February 25, 2019 to The Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies (director.sds@utoronto.ca ). Fellowships will normally be awarded to candidates affiliated with a university other than the one that awarded the PhD. The fellowship is open to non-Canadian citizens and permanent residents.

The normal hours of work are 40 hours per week for a full-time postdoctoral fellow (pro-rated for those holding a partial appointment), recognizing that the needs of the employee’s research and training and the needs of the supervisor’s research program may require flexibility in the performance of the employee’s duties and hours of work.

Employment as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto is covered by the terms of the CUPE 3902 Unit 5 Collective Agreement.

This job is posted in accordance with the CUPE 3902 Unit 5 Collective Agreement.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from racialized persons/persons of colour, women, Indigenous/Aboriginal People of North America, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.

11. Job Opportunity: BIPOC Facilitator 2019 Inclusion, Diversity and Equity Facilitator (March 31, 2019)

We are looking to hire an experienced diversity educator who is looking for an opportunity to work at a unique boutique firm that specializes in equity leadership. We primarily seek an equity educator who has significant experience working with Black and/or Indigenous communities to offer trainings based on our award-winning Deep Diversity® methodology*.

Having said that, we are a small team and this full-time position requires you to be extremely flexible and do whatever it takes to get things done, from research and client management through to completing mundane office tasks. If this sounds of interest, read on!

About You

You already have 8-10 years experience under your belt offering adult-based education workshops/ trainings including on topics such as diversity, inclusion, anti-oppression and conflict resolution. We will be mentoring you in our Deep Diversity methodology® and facilitation approach.

You have strong experience facilitating and working with Black and/or Indigenous communities.

You are both a team player and a self-starter who wants to make a difference in the world by teaching people about what it means to build inclusive, equitable work environments.

Your formal or informal education background already provides a macro view of the world that exposes the dynamics of systemic discrimination, social power and privilege. Words like colonialism, patriarchy, White Supremacy and intersectionality don’t frighten you.

You are committed to developing your inner self and have some comfort discussing your strengths, limitations and triggers with team members in order to prevent, and resolve, inter-personal conflict. You also have a willingness to share select parts of your journey to support the learning of workshop participants.

You have excellent written and verbal communication skills in order to manage relationships with colleagues and clients.

You are (or will be) based in Toronto and have a full, unrestricted G driver’s license as well as access to a vehicle. You are comfortable travelling around Southern Ontario to meet clients for work.

Other Helpful Skills

Fluency in French, both written and spoken

Qualitative and quantitative research and writing skills

Social media talent

Ability to write RFPs, grant proposals, etc.

Starting Salary: $50-60k, plus benefits.

*Based on the book Deep Diversity: Overcoming Us vs Them.

About Anima Leadership Anima Leadership is an equal opportunity employer and we encourage equity-seeking candidates to apply, especially those who identify as racial minorities, Indigenous, people with disabilities, LGBTQ2S or women. Of course, we recognize and honour the intersectionality of equity-based identities.

Please apply online through our website: AnimaLeadership.com. To ensure consistency and fairness in the process, we will only review candidates that have submitted through our on-line application process. Only applicants selected for interviews will be contacted.