CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, March 14, 2019

-----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

  1. CFR Research Associate Roberta Buiani: Superorganism City - A Lecture, A Workshop and a Collective Experiment Exploring Art, Biology and Urbanism (March 27, 2019)
  2. CFR Research Associate Roberta Buiani: Evolution- Exhibition and Panel Discussion (March 29, 2019)

EVENTS:

  1. CFR Co-Sponsored: Ontario MENA Network Presents: Ethnographies and Political Terrain in the MENA (March 15, 2019)
  2. CFR Presents: Twenty Years of "Looking White People in the Eye" Lecture by Dr.Sherene H. Razack, Distinguished Professor and Penny Kanner Chair in Gender Studies, UCLA (March 18, 2019)
  3. CFR Presents: "Contesting Queer Exclusion: Intersectionality and Marginality in Hong Kong (LGBTQ+) Migrants Pride” By Dr. Daniel Conway (March 29, 2019)
  4. CFR Presents: Second Annual Indigenous Women’s Speakers’ Series Event "Politics, Knowledge, Ecology, Culture" with Deb McGregor, Cheryl Suzack, and Karyn Recollet (April 8, 2019)

-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

  1. IWD Release of new research findings by CRIAW
  2. 2019 MIRCI Conference Now Open for Attendee Registration (April 11-14, 2019)

EVENTS:

  1. Osgoode’s Journal of Law and Social Policy: "Detained: From Supporting Prisoners to Abolishing Prisons" Symposium (March 15, 2019)
  2. Soma Chatterjee and Sultana Jahangir present: Real Jobs, Living Wages Forum (March 16, 2019)
  3. Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies: Film Screening "1945" (March 17, 2019)
  4. OPIRG Toronto/Students for Reproductive Justice/LEAP/$15 & Fairness UofT Co-Sponsored: 20:20 A Summit for the Students, By the Students (March 17, 2019)
  5. Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies of Leiden University Book Launch: “Confronting Apartheid” by Prof. John Dugard (March 18, 2019)
  6. YorkU English Department presents: Anna Chatterton- Adapting Gertrude Stein for the Stage (March 19, 2019)
  7. UTGSU Race and Ethnicity Caucus Presents: Safe Space for Race (March 19, 2019)
  8. Rise Up Feminist Archive Party (March 19, 2019)
  9. UofT Divest and SAIA: Israeli Apartheid Week (March 19-27, 2019)
  10. School of Social Work, YorkU Social Action 4 Social Change Committee Presents: Anti Fascism, White Supremacy and the ‘New’ Right Teach In (March 19 & 21, 2019)
  11. UofT LGBTOUT Presents: Stevie Boebi at the University of Toronto (March 20, 2019)
  12. Students Walkout On Uoft (March 20, 2019)
  13. Chair in Transgender Studies, University of Victoria: "From Kathoey to Trans*: History, Politics and Activism in Thailand" (March 20, 2010)
  14. Department of Social Justice Education at UofT Colloquium 2019: “The University and the Traditions of Radicalism” by Dr. Roderick A. Ferguson (March 20, 2019)
  15. OISE, UofT and York University's Peripheral Vision Speaker Series Present: Crip Commitments: Disability, Theory, Politics A Lecture by Prof. Kelly Fritsch (March 21, 2019)
  16. OISE, UofT and York University's Peripheral Vision Speaker Series Present: Masterclass @ York University Crip Technoscience for Disabled Cyborgs: Access, Community, Politics with Prof. Kelly Fritsch (March 21, 2019)
  17. CUPE 3902 Flying Squad Contingent for Unite Against Racism Rally (March 21, 2019)
  18. Toronto: #UniteAgainstRacism Rally, Performances, and Speeches (March 21, 2019)
  19. World Water Day Event: Feasting the Forgotten Rivers (March 22, 2019)
  20. World Water Day Event: Film Viewing: Water Warriors (March 22, 2019)
  21. Muslim Justice Collective & Pakistan Development Foundation Presents: Social Justice Mixer (March 22, 2019)
  22. Carleton University: Anti-69: Against the Mythologies of the 1969 Criminal Code Reform conference (March 23, 2019)
  23. Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community and Diaspora; Resource Launch for Black Student Success (March 23, 2019)
  24. A Bald Ego Theatre production in association with Nightwood Theatre: “A Blow In The Face” (March 26- April 14, 2019)
  25. Dandelion Initiative and UTSU Present: We Need to Talk: Community Accountability and Safety (March 26, 2019)
  26. KORE Event: Voices from Below: Socially Engaged Art in Contemporary China with Meiqin Wang (March 26, 2019)
  27. Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) Nowruz 2019 Celebration (March 26, 2019)
  28. agYU and YCAR Present: “This Is Our Ecosystem” A Talk By Ruangrupa: A Jakarta-Based Art Collective (March 27, 2019)
  29. OPIRG/CWTP/SBA: Redefining Masculinity Workshop (March 29, 2019)
  30. Refugee Rights Day 2019: Panel Discussion, Syria Response and Refugee Initiative Reception & “The Road Less Travelled” Exhibit Launch (April 4, 2019)
  31. YCAR: Merging Asian Urbanisms - Reading Discussion Session and Year-End Social (April 12, 2019)
  32. Digital Humanities Summer Institute @ Congress Workshops at UBC (June 5, 2019)

 CALLS: 

  1. Call for Participants: Anti-Sexual Violence Education
  2. Call for Submissions: Action Speaks Louder Callout for Submissions and Editors
  3. Call for Volunteers: Get Involved with Students for Barrier-Free Access (SBA) At UofT
  4. Department of Politics, The New School for Social Research Call for Papers: Radical Democracy Conference 2019 (March 15, 2019)
  5. Call for Applications: Summer 2019 Work/Study, YES, CLAY and ISEF Programs (March 22, 2019)
  6. Call for Applications: The Lillian Robinson Scholars Program, Simone de Beauvoir Institute (April 1, 2019)
  7. Call for Applications: Toronto Queer Film Festival: IndigiQueer and Trans Applications Callout (April 10, 2019)
  8. Call for Papers: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies - Issue # 5 Theme: Disability and Desire Submissions (April 15, 2019)
  9. Call for Submissions: Canadian Disability Studies Association Student Paper Competition (April 15, 2019)
  10. Call for Papers: Feminist Explorations of Urban Futures International Conference (May 1, 2019)
  11. Call for Proposals: The (re)Making of a Movement: New Perspectives on the 1960s Counterculture with Keynote Speaker Angela Davis (May 30, 2019)

OPPORTUNITIES:

  1. Job Opportunity: Program Officer - International Gender, Racial and Ethnic Justice at Ford Foundation
  2. Job Opportunity: Philanthropic Engagement Manager at Urgent Action Fund for Women's Human Rights
  3. Job Opportunity: Deputy Director at Fuller Project for International Reporting
  4. Job Opportunity: Program Associate for Knowledge Management and Technology at Women's Learning Partnership (WLP)
  5. Job Opportunity: Feminist Evaluator at RESURJ (March 15, 2019)
  6. Job Opportunity: Communication and Strategic Information (CSI) Unit Manager at Sonke Gender Justice (March 15, 2019)
  7. Job Opportunity: Lecturer Position in Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies at Stony Brook University (March 15, 2019)
  8. Job Opportunity: Consultant for Development Justice Video at Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (March 20, 2019)
  9. Job Opportunity: Program and Development Assistant at JASS (March 21, 2019)
  10. Job Opportunity: Quantitative Research Associate at Promundo-US ( March 22)
  11. Job Opportunity: Executive Assistant to Regional Director at The Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa (SIHA) (March 22, 2019)
  12. Job Opportunity: Consultant for a Mid-term Review - MENA Regional Strategic Framework at Kvinna till Kvinna (March 24, 2019)
  13. Job Opportunity: Senior Vice President, Global Legal Program at Center for Reproductive Rights (March 28, 2019)
  14. Scholarship Opportunity: AEBC/ T-Base Scholarship Program (March 29, 2019)
  15. Job Opportunity: Communications Assistant at The Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa (SIHA) (March 29, 2019)
  16. Job Opportunity: Team Leader: Stopping Abuse and Female Exploitation at Ecorys (March 29, 2019)
  17. Scholarship Opportunity: Chair in Transgender Studies' 2019 Scholarship & Fellowship Program (March 31, 2019)
  18. Scholarship Opportunity: Trans Oral History Post-Doc Fellowship (March 31, 2019)
  19. Job Opportunity: Assistant in the Latin America and Caribbean Team at Girls not Brides: The Global Partnership to End Child Marriage Secretariat (April 1, 2019)
  20. Job Opportunity:  Director, Humanitarian Action and Resilience at Action Aid International (April 17, 2019)
  21. Scholarship Opportunity: Killam Research Fellowship (May 1, 2019)
  22. Scholarship Opportunity: GRAGOPEAN Scholarship Trust - Bursaries for Students With Spinal Cord Injuries Studying in British Columbia (May 3, 2019)

-----CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

  1. CFR Research Associate Roberta Buiani: Superorganism City- A Lecture, A Workshop and a Collective Experiment Exploring Art, Biology and Urbanism (March 27, 2019)

We are pleased to invite you to a series of events featuring interdisciplinary artist Heather Barnett and Physarum polycephalum: during her visit, Barnett will present her recent research, will conduct a workshop, and will explore the city of Toronto, inspired by the nonhuman perspective of this organism, also known as slime mould.

The slime mould (Physarum polycephalum) is a bright yellow amoeba that possesses primitive intelligence, problem solving skills and memory. It is highly efficient at forming networks between given points and has been used to map the worlds’ transport networks, migration routes and desire paths. Most notably, in 2010 it accurately replicated the Tokyo suburban rail network. The slime mould is also quite beautiful, the branching patterns reminiscent of forms seen at varying scales within nature, from blood vessels to tree branches, from river deltas to lightning flashes. It can learn about its environment, remember where it’s been and navigate through complex territories – all without any sensory organs and not a single neuron to its name.

Join us to these events:

RESEARCH TALK

March 27 2:00-3:00 PM

Sensorium (YORK U) *

WORKSHOP (by invitation)

March 28 1:00-4:00 PM

Wilson Hall (UofT) *

COLLECTIVE EXPERIMENT

March 30 1:00-5:00 PM

Wilson Hall (UofT)

*  Sensorium Research Loft

Level 4

Joan & Martin Goldfarb

Centre for Fine Arts

York University

4700 Keele Street

Toronto, ON M3J 1P3

https://sensorium.ampd.yorku.ca/research-loft/

**  Wilson Hall

Student Lounge

(2nd floor)

University of Toronto

40 Willcocks street

Toronto, ON

M5S 1C6

Biography:

Heather Barnett’s art practice engages with natural phenomena and complex systems. Working with live organisms, imaging technologies and playful pedagogies, her work explores how we observe, influence and understand the world around us. Recent work centres around nonhuman intelligence, collective behaviour and knowledge systems, including The Physarum Experiments, an ongoing ‘collaboration’ with an intelligent slime mould; Animal Collectives collaborative research with SHOAL Group at Swansea University; and a series of publicly sited collective interdisciplinary bio/social experiments, including Crowd Control and Nodes and Networks.

This event has been possible thanks to the support of the School of Cities and New College (UofT), and is a collaboration between ArtSci Salon, Sensorium, the Research Centre for Creative inquiry and Experimentation, the Departments of Computational Art and Visual Art & Art History at York University

Research for this event was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

ArtSci Salon is an interdisciplinary program hosted by the Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences. LASER - Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous is a project of Leonardo® /ISAST

  1. CFR Research Associate Roberta Buiani: Evolution - Exhibition and Panel Discussion (march 29, 2019)

Evolution - Exhibition and Panel Discussion March 29, 2019

What is nature and the evolution of living beings is an inevitable issue. While searching for the answer to this and other questions around Nature and its variations, we find what we are and how we stand among all organisms and in the world. Charles Darwin offered the world a simple scientific explanation for the diversity of life on Earth: evolution by natural selection. Countless scientists have found that Darwin’s work is fundamental to their own. Contemporary scientists can now answer questions about the natural world in ways Darwin never could. New tools and technologies, such as DNA analyses, can reveal unexpected relationships between seemingly dissimilar groups.

This event consists of an exhibition (part of FACTT-TO) and a panel discussion. Together, they interrogate the meaning, the relevance and the implications of evolution from different vantage points, including perspectives from a range of scientific disciplines, technological approaches, and artistic practices. We wish to reflect on the condition of co-habitation and co-existence of human and non-humans in this world (and beyond?) and pose questions about transformation; forced or elective mutation and survival; agency and decision making; conservation and intervention.

Join us at the opening and tour of FACTT-Toronto, followed by a panel discussion.

5:00 pm Opening Tour

Meet us in Sidney Smith (University of Toronto), 100 St George street (enter from Huron street)

Stop#1 – Sidney Smith Commons (Huron Street side)

Stop#2 – McLennan Physics Labs (60 St. George street)

Artists: André Sier; Elaine Whittaker; Felipe Shibuya & Pedro Cruz; Gunes-Helene Isitan; Jenifer Wightman; Jennifer Willet; Jude Abu-Zaineh; Kathy High; Maria Francisca Abreu-Afonso; Maria Manuela Lopez; Nicole Clouston; Nigel Helyer; Suzanne Anker; Tarah Roda; Tosca Teràn

6:00-8:00 pm Panel Discussion

The Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences, Rm 230

Guests:

Marta DeMenezes – Artistic Director, Ectopia; Director, Cultivamos Cultura

Gary Smith – Artist and landscape architect, Visiting Artist at Santa Clara University

Boris Steipe – Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Department of Molecular Genetics

Jenifer Wightman – Research Associate (Cornell) and Lecturer (New School/Parsons)

Biographies

Marta DeMenezes is a Portuguese artist (b. Lisbon, 1975) with a degree in Fine Arts by the University in Lisbon, and a MSt in History of Art and Visual Culture by the University of Oxford. She has been exploring the interaction between Art and Biology, working in research laboratories demonstrating that new biological technologies, DNA, proteins and live organisms can be used as an art medium. Her work has been presented internationally in exhibitions, articles and lectures. She is since 2005 artistic director of Ectopia – Experimental Art Laboratory and from 2009 director of Cultivamos Cultura – Association. http://martademenezes.com

Gary Smith lectures frequently at botanical gardens, art museums, and professional conferences. In his work he examines the basic patterns in nature, finding ways they form a visual vocabulary for human cultural expression. Formerly an Associate Professor of Landscape Design at the University of Delaware, Smith has also served as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Texas. In 2012, Smith was the Nadine Carter Russell Chair in the School of Landscape Architecture at Louisiana State University. He is currently Visiting Artist in the Department of Art and Art History at Santa Clara University, in Santa Clara, California.  www.wgarysmithdesign.com.

Boris Steipe is Director of the Specialist Program in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology and an

Associate Professor at the Department of Biochemistry and Department of Molecular Genetics. He is interested in recurring patterns in molecular structure: the computational methods of pattern discovery, their characterization regarding features, context and distribution, their association with function in proteins, and their utility for protein engineering and design. http://biochemistry.utoronto.ca/person/boris-steipe/

Jeni Wightman. Trained as a Toxicologist, Jenifer Wightman is a research scientist specializing in greenhouse gas inventories and life cycle analysis of agriculture, forestry, waste, and bioenergy systems at Cornell University, funded by DoE, USDA, NYS DA&M, and NYSERDA. Her art practice began in 2002 and employs scientific tropes to incite curiosity of biological phenomena and inform an ecological rationality. Her art has been commissioned by NYC parks, featured at the Lincoln Center, BAM, and Imagine Science Festival, and is held in collections such as the Morgan Library, Library of Congress, Gutenberg Museum, Bodmer Museum, and the Danish Royal Library http://www.audiblewink.com/

RSVP here https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/evolution-tickets-58459441764

EVENTS:

  1. CFR Co-Sponsored: Ontario MENA Network Presents: Ethnographies and Political Terrain in the MENA (March 15, 2019)

Friday March 15, 2:00-4:30 pm

626 Kaneff, York University

Agenda:

2-3 pm: ONM meeting

3-4:30 pm: Presentations by Azar Masouni and Ronak Ghorbani, York University

Enghelab Shod (the revolution happened): Remembering the 1979 Iranian Revolution

Emilio Dabed, Toronto

Palestinian Legal Activism: Between Liberation and the desire of Statehood

Ozgun Topak, York University

Authoritarian Surveillance in Turkey

  1. CFR Presents: Twenty Years of Looking White People in the Eye- Lecture by Sherene H. Razack, Distinguished Professor and Penny Kanner Chair in Gender Studies, UCLA (March 18, 2019)

In honour of Dr. Sherene Razack's ground-breaking book Looking White People in the Eye: Gender, Race and Culture in Courtrooms and Classrooms (now in its fourth edition), and her important and on-going contributions to critical race feminisms and socio-legal studies.

Introduced by co-editors of the special issue of Canadian Journal of Women and the Law celebrating the book’s 20th anniversary: Dr. Gada Mahrouse (Concordia), Dr. Leslie Thielen-Wilson (Nipissing) and Dr. Carmela Murdocca (York).

Date: Monday, March 18, 2019.

Time: 2.30-4.30pm.

Location: Founders Assembly Hall (152 Founders College), York University.

Accessibility: Accessible space. Wheelchair-accessible and gender-neutral bathroom nearby. Wayfinding signs will be posted. Everyone welcome. Click here for directions to York University: http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/keele-transit-directions/ .

Click here for directions to Founders Assembly Hall: https://goo.gl/maps/aMuFEXNMJ2U2

Link to Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/316853445694446/

RSVP to: juliapyr@yorku.ca .

Dr. Sherene Razack is one of Canada’s leading critical race feminist theorists and is especially known for developing an analytic that shows how racial violence is often legally and socially authorized and is integral to the making of states, and how racial violence is gendered and sexualized. Dr. Razack is the founder of the virtual research and teaching network Racial Violence Hub (RVHub).

Co-sponsored by: Department of Social Science, Department of Sociology, Institute for Feminist Legal Studies, the Graduate Program in Socio-Legal Studies, the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies, the Department of Equity Studies, the Office of the Vice-President Research and Innovation, Office of the Dean, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

  1. CFR Presents: "Contesting Queer Exclusion: Intersectionality and Marginality in Hong Kong (LGBTQ+) Migrants Pride” By Dr. Daniel Conway (March 29, 2019)

The Centre for Feminist Research Presents:

“Contesting Queer Exclusion: Intersectionality and Marginality in Hong Kong (LGBTQ+) Migrants Pride”

By Dr. Daniel Conway (Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster)

Chaired by Dr. Amar Wahab (Associate Professor, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies, York University)

Date: Friday March 29th, 2019

Time: 10:30 am – 12pm

Location: 626 Kaneff Tower, York University

Accessibility: Accessible space. Wheelchair-accessible and gender-neutral bathroom nearby. Wayfinding signs will be posted. Everyone welcome.

Click here for directions to York University

Link to Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/257396741875270/

RSVP to: juliapyr@yorku.ca

This paper draws from research conducted as part of a Leverhulme Trust Fellowship exploring the contemporary global politics of Gay Pride, focusing specifically on the forms of activism and issues raised at Hong Kong Migrants Pride 2018. Migrants Pride was first held in 2015 and is organized by migrant women’s groups in Hong Kong.  Held the day after Hong Kong Pride, and separately from the Pink Dot and Pink Season LGBTQ+ festivals, the Migrants Pride Parade weaves through central Hong Kong, past the migrant women workers and their families who sit on cardboard boxes in the shadow of designer shopping malls and HSBC’s headquarters.

In 2018, Migrants Pride was held alongside HSBC’s Community Festival. This highlighted a tense and incongruous relationship between space, place and community making, which underpins the marginality and vulnerability that LGBTQ+ migrant workers face in Hong Kong. Migrants Pride represents domestic workers and sex workers who occupy a precarious and often overlooked place and status in Hong Kong. These workers are excluded from dominant constructs of LGBTQ+ community and also broader discourses of rights for privileged expatriate workers in Hong Kong.

Analyzing the queering of space, vulnerability and exclusion by activists, the paper argues that Migrant Pride articulates intersectional rights and identities, enacting activist practices that engage with migrants’ inequality and precarity, while building solidarity and contesting invisibility and marginality. Combining ethnography, interviews and visual methods, this paper develops feminist and queer international relations theorisation of LGBTQ+ and women’s activism in global contexts.

Dr. Daniel Conway is the Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at the University of Westminster, and holds the Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship for his project “The Global Politics of Pride: LGBTQ+ Activism, Assimilation and Resistance”. His work has mainly focused on how modes of privilege, specifically whiteness, masculinity and heterosexuality, are constituted and the moments and possibilities for their contestation and reformulation. His work draws from and contributes to Feminist International Relations, political sociology and queer theory. Dr. Conway holds a PhD in Politics by Rhodes University, South Africa.

Co-sponsored by: The Centre for Refugee Studies, York Centre for Asian Studies (YCAR) and the Sexuality Studies Program.

  1. CFR Presents: Second Annual Indigenous Women’s Speakers’ Series Event "Politics, Knowledge, Ecology, Culture" with Deb McGregor, Cheryl Suzack, and Karyn Recollet (April 8, 2019)

SAVE THE DATE!

The Centre for Feminist Research Presents:  Second Annual Indigenous Women’s Speakers’ Series Event “Politics, Knowledge, Ecology, Culture” Featuring Indigenous scholars Drs. Deborah McGregor (York University), Cheryl Suzack (University of Toronto) and Karyn Recollet (University of Toronto)

Panel moderator Dr. Elaine Coburn (York University)

Each panelist will speak about her scholarship, followed by a moderated conversation on the

themes of politics, knowledge ecology and culture. The panel will end with an audience Q&A.

About the event:

Date: April 8, 2019

Time: 2.30-4.30pm

Location: 519 Kaneff Tower, York University

Accessibility: Accessible space. Wheelchair-accessible and gender-neutral bathroom nearby.

Wayfinding signs will be posted. Everyone welcome.

Click here for directions to York University: http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/keele-transit-directions/

Link to Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2037541532965752/

RSVP to: juliapyr@yorku.ca

About the panelists:

Deborah McGregor (Anishinaabe from Whitefish River First Nation) is Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Environmental Justice, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. Her research has focused on Indigenous knowledge systems and their various applications in diverse contexts including water and environmental governance, environmental justice, forest policy and management, and sustainable development. Her research has been published in a variety of national and international journals and she has delivered numerous public and academic presentations relating to Indigenous knowledge systems, governance and sustainability. She co-edited Indigenous Peoples and Autonomy: Insights for a Global Age with Mario Blaser, Ravi De Costa and William Coleman (2010) and she is co-editor (with Alan

Corbiere, Mary Ann Corbiere and Crystal Migwans) of the Anishinaabewin conference proceedings series.

Karyn Recollet is Assistant Professor in the Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. She is an urban Cree scholar/writer whose work focuses on urban Indigenous arts praxis in relationship to complex forms of urban glyphing- expressing an understanding of land pedagogies that exceed the terrestrial. Recollet’s work focuses on gestures and bundling to map out Indigenous futurist thought and relational practices of being.

Cheryl Suzack (Batchewana First Nations) is Associate Professor in the Department of English, at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on Indigenous law and literature, with a particular emphasis on writing by Indigenous women. In her book, Indigenous Women’s Writing and the Cultural Study of Law, she explores how Indigenous women’s writing from Canada and

the United States addresses case law concerning tribal membership, intergenerational residential school experiences, and land claims. Her current project analyzes Justice Thurgood Marshall’s papers in the context of Indian civil rights claims from the 1960s. She is a co-editor (with Greig Henderson and Simon Stern) of “The Critical Work of Law and Literature,” University of Toronto Quarterly (Fall 2013) and a co-editor and contributor (with Shari Huhndorf, Jeanne Perreault, and Jean Barman) to the award-winning collection, Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture (UBC 2010). Professor Suzack is cross-appointed to Indigenous Studies. In January 2018, she was a Fulbright Fellow at Georgetown University.

Co-Sponsors: Glendon Indigenous Council, the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, the Department of Politics, Faculty of Environmental Studies and the Department of Social Justice Education at OISE, UofT.

-----COMMUNITY-----

ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

  1. IWD Release of new research findings by CRIAW

New research shows women’s organizations need more core funding for advocacy

OTTAWA, March 8, 2019 - Recent research conducted by the Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women (CRIAW-ICREF) found that most Canadian women’s organizations want to do more advocacy work but are prevented by inadequate resources and uncertain funding. Today, on International Women’s Day, CRIAW-ICREF has released these preliminary findings in their Fact Sheet: Women’s Organizations’ Capacity for Action.< https://www.criaw-icref.ca/en/product/womens-organizations-capacity-for- >

“This International Women’s Day we want to call attention to the importance of advocacy for women. Women’s reproductive rights, employment rights, funding for social services, policies and legislation that support women are the result of advocacy -- concerted, collective efforts to make systemic change” said CRIAW-ICREF’s Executive Director, Jackie Neapole.

“CRIAW’s national survey shows how inadequate, unstable funding for women’s organizations hurts all women. Women’s organizations could, and want to, do more to improve services and conditions for all women, to change discriminatory policies and programs for women, to educate, to make legal reforms and to make systemic change.”

CRIAW President Amber Fletcher noted that “Most women’s organizations said they want to do more advocacy but can’t because they have only a few, if any, paid staff. Staff struggle to meet women’s needs and have to let some issues go, like advocating for improvements. Inadequate funding and insufficient human resources were identified as major barriers to their work.”

“The survey also shows how important government funding is for women’s organizations. This International Women’s Day we call on governments to increase funding for services that women rely on and to provide long-term, stable, core funding to the women’s organizations across the country that strive to improve women’s lives.”

For more information about CRIAW’s national survey of women’s organizations please contact:

Jackie Neapole, CRIAW Executive Director, Ottawa, 613- 422-2188

Amber Fletcher, CRIAW President & Associate Professor at University of Regina 306-502-0115

  1. 2019 MIRCI Conference Now Open for Attendee Registration (April 11-14, 2019)

We are thrilled to announce that attendee registration is now open for MIRCI'S herstoric four day conference on Maternal Health and Well-Being,

April 11-14, 2019 at York University Toronto, Canada. Full four day and one day attendee options at both regular and students rates are available.

We hope to see you at the conference and please share widely!

Thank you for your support of MIRCI!

100 + Presenters

Eight Keynote Panels, Reception & Book Launch!

Cost: Options from $50-300

When: April 11-14, 2019

Where: York University, more room details to follow

More Info: motherhoodinitiative.org

Register here http://motherhoodinitiative.org/product/maternal-health-and-well-being-conference/

EVENTS:

  1. Osgoode’s Journal of Law and Social Policy: "Detained: From Supporting Prisoners to Abolishing Prisons" Symposium (March 15, 2019)

"Detained: From Supporting Prisoners to Abolishing Prisons."

Date & Time: Friday March 15, 2019; 9:00am - 5:00pm

Location: Room 1014, Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building

Website: https://detained.osgoode.yorku.ca/

Recent news stories, inquests, and human rights tribunal decisions have highlighted the harmful impacts of incarceration on individuals and communities.

Hosted by Osgoode’s Journal of Law and Social Policy, this day-long symposium brings together people with lived experience, legal and academic experts, community organizers, harm reduction workers, and students.

Topics to be addressed will include:

specific forms of incarceration such as pre-trial remand, solitary confinement, immigration detention, and psychiatric detention

the disproportionate impact of incarceration on racialized and Indigenous peoples

the place of prison law in law schools

legal and non-legal strategies for reducing the harms of incarceration; and

looking ahead to prison abolition.

Students, professionals, activists, and community members are all encouraged to attend. We hope that this day will present an opportunity to create connections, foster continued mobilization, identify key research questions, and develop concrete initiatives to respond to the issues raised by incarceration in settler-colonial Canada.

The editors plan to publish a special issue of the JLSP on prison law, justice, and abolition arising from this symposium and other interested contributors (submissions are due August 1, 2019 and more information about the special issue will follow after the event).

REGISTER HERE https://abstract.osgoode.yorku.ca/advancement/osgadvregs.nsf/eventreg.xsp

  1. Real Jobs, Living Wages Forum (March 16, 2019)

Real Jobs, Living Wages Forum

Saturday, 16 March 2019 | 4 to 7pm | Oakridge Community Centre | 60 Pharmacy Avenue, Scarborough

The labour market challenges skilled immigrants, especially women. This community conversation highlights a project conducted by South Asian Women’s Rights Organization (SAWRO) in partnership with COSTI Immigrant Services. The conversation will bring together Bangladeshi community leaders and allies who contributed to the project to discuss the recommendation and to envision tangible next steps.

Hosted by Soma Chatterjee, School of Social Work, York University and Sultana Jahangir, Director of SAWRO.

This event is supported by SAWRO, the York Centre for Asian Research and the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, York University.

  1. Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies: Film Screening "1945" (March 17, 2019)

Dear Friends of the Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies,

We would like to invite you to the annual Leonard Wolinsky Lectures on Jewish Life and Education on Sunday, March 17, 2019 at 1:30pm. The event will be held at the Tribute Communities Recital Hall, Accolades East Building, York University.

The Wolinsky Lectures this year will be dedicated to the Hungarian film "1945". One of the most important Jewish movies of recent years, "1945" looks at the effect the return of two Jews to their hometown in Hungary following the Holocaust has on the non-Jewish population. Secrets are revealed, and lives are forever changed.

The movie will be introduced by Peter Reich, one of its producers. Following a viewing of the film, Mr. Reich will joining a panel of experts to debate it and engage with the audience in a discussion of "1945."

You will not want to miss this fascinating program!

With best regards,

Prof. Carl S. Ehrlich

Director

Israel and Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies

RSVP here https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/2019-wolinsky-lectures-1945-film-screening-tickets-57102141041

  1. OPIRG Toronto/Students for Reproductive Justice/LEAP/$15 & Fairness UofT Co-Sponsored: 20:20 A Summit for the Students, By the Students (March 17, 2019)

Date: Sunday, March 17th, 2019

Time: 10am - 9pm

Location: 27 King's College Circle

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/405748953520528/

This academic year marks the 20th anniversary of the Equity Studies department’s founding.

This hard-won milestone can prompt worthwhile discussions and celebrations of the critical equity work that has shaped our communities in recent decades. Simultaneously, many students see this as an invitation to look 5, 10, and 20 years into our futures.

Climate experts have made it clear: humanity shares a roughly 11-year-long window before climate change reaches an irreversible, catastrophic tipping point. Every person at the University is part of a decades-long, transnational descent into artificial scarcity and lived austerity, wherein lands and peoples are becoming depleted at unprecedented rates. Ever-widening wealth disparities and elites-driven resistance to wealth redistribution seem equally unbelievable. The exhaustion, isolation, and material deprivation of young people is increasingly marketed as a natural byproduct of our personal failings.

Against this backdrop, it’s unsurprising that many students and student groups work in silos. Even those pursuing similar community-building and justice-oriented goals have often lacked the infrastructure through which they can easily share ideas, resources, and support.

The Equity Studies Students’ Union (ESSU) and its collaborators recognize that our acceptance of these silos has contributed to recent increases in anti-student and anti-equity leadership and policies within our administrations. Many of us have played our parts in the enabling of lateral violence, ineffective governance, and the burnout of local activists as we’ve overlooked an urgent need for compassionate accountability across our fights for climate and social justice.

This is why the ESSU, in collaboration with an emerging coalition of equity-seeking students from across UofT, would like to invite you to attend an inaugural students’ summit: “20:20: A Summit For the Students, By the Students”.

Regardless of your background in activism or organizing, we encourage any and all equity-seeking students to participate in the day's programming, including a panel discussion, performances, meals, workshops, and more. In particular, we encourage as many equity-seeking students as possible to engage in the strategizing portion of the summit, where we’ll be sharing and creating plans for future organizing at the University.

SCHEDULE

A partial outline of the summit's schedule is as follows:

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM: registration opens, light refreshments

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM: introductions

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM: lunch, panel

1:10 PM - 2:20 PM: workshops

2:30 PM - 5:00 PM: brainstorming, strategizing sessions

5: 10 PM - 6:00 PM: closing discussions, statements

6:00 PM - 9:00 PM: dinner, performances

REGISTRATION

Registration and applications for bursaries will both open on Wednesday, February 20th. Registrants will be followed up with via email within 3 business days.

Registration link: bit.ly/2020-reg

Bursary applications: bit.ly/2020-funds

Our finalized schedule will be made available the week of March 4th. Further details (e.g. regarding locations; accessibility; food) will be included in emails containing registration confirmations.

Please note that due to the goals of the event as well as resource constraints, summit organizers may have to limit registration for part or all of the summit, and may wish to prioritize UofT students and applicants from marginalized communities. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns? Interested in volunteering? Please get in touch and email uoft.essu@gmail.com!

  1. Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies of Leiden University Book Launch: "Confronting Apartheid" by Prof. John Dugard (March 18, 2019)

The Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies of Leiden University cordially invites you to the book launch of:

Confronting Apartheid by Prof. John Dugard

In Confronting Apartheid, John Dugard reflects on his experiences with apartheid as a human rights lawyer in South Africa and Namibia and as UN Special Rapporteur in Palestine. The book serves as a timely reminder of the lessons of history and the importance of not repeating the wrongs of the past.

Discussants:

Prof. John Dugard, Judge Ad-hoc International Court of Justice and Emeritus Professor of Public International Law, Leiden University

Prof. Liesbeth Zegveld, Human Rights Lawyer and Professor of War Reparations, University of Amsterdam

Moderator:

Prof. Larissa van den Herik, Vice Dean Leiden Law School and Professor of Public International Law, Leiden University

Date & Time: Monday 18 March @ 17.30 hrs. The discussion will be followed by a drinks reception.

Venue: Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies

Address: Wijnhaven building room 2.02, Turfmarkt 99, The Hague

Registration: Please register for this event before 11 March 2019 by sending an email to grotiuscentre@law.leidenuniv.nl.

  1. YorkU English Department presents: Anna Chatterton- Adapting Gertrude Stein for the Stage (March 19, 2019)

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

2:30-4:00 pm

Curtis Lecture Halls H

Anna Chatterton is a librettist, playwright and performer. She is a two-time finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama. Anna’s plays have been produced by Tarragon Theatre, Nightwood Theatre, Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, The Theatre Centre and upcoming the Shaw Festival and Alberta Theatre Projects. Anna has been n0oinated for five Dora Mavor Moore Awards, winning Outstanding Production of an Opera.

In this Talk Anna Chatterton will speak to the process of creating the Governor General’s Literary Award nominated play Gertrude and Alice (co-written with Evalyn Parry and devised with director Karin Randoja).

  1. UTGSU Race and Ethnicity Caucus Presents: Safe Space for Race (March 19, 2019)

Date: March 19th

Time: 6:30pm - 8:30pm

Location: 569 Spadina Crescent (Multi-Faith Centre - Koffler House Room 207)

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/382157312367549/

The UTGSU's Race and Ethnicity Caucus presents "Safe Space for Race", a monthly workshop and social gathering space to build community and empower racialized students and allies. In this space, we will share experiences and engage in dialogue that is geared toward enhancing community-building, empowerment, and mental health.

Join our second session focusing on sharing personal experiences of racism and resilience through storytelling on March 19th from 6:30-8:30 pm at the Multi-Faith Centre (569 Spadina Ave, Room 207). Save the date for additional sessions on April 23 and May 21 from 6:30-8:30 pm.

Refreshments and beverages will be served. TTC tokens will be provided to UofT students. ASL interpretation will be provided upon request to the organizers (provided one month notice). Venue is wheelchair accessible.

More information about this and future events can be found on our website: www.utgsu.ca/rec

  1. Rise Up Feminist Archive Party (March 19, 2019)

THE RISE UP PARTY!

Tuesday, March 19, 2019 from 7:30 PM - 10:30 PM

@ The Bluebird Bar in Toronto

Please join us in celebrating the first years of building the Rise Up archive and our plans for the future!

This party is to celebrate what we've accomplished so far and to thank our supporters, like you, who've made it possible for us to get it done.

Live music, drinks, food, speakers!

There will be a fantastic all-female band playing all your favourite woman positive hits, stories from the past by speakers (including Judy Rebick!), singing, performances and delicious refreshments.

One free drink on arrival! Snacks and nibbles.

YOU MUST GET A FREE TICKET TO ATTEND

Tickets are limited so sign up fast before they are all gone! The link below will get you to the Eventbrite page where you can get your ticket.

Please remember to bring your ticket with you.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/rise-up-party-tickets-57940106418?aff=mcivte&utm_campaign=27c5e83a2b-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_03_03_08_50&utm_term=0_7bfb2f8be7-27c5e83a2b-33191933&utm_source=Rise+Up+Newsletters&utm_medium=email&mc_eid=0d0890efad&mc_cid=27c5e83a2b

Donate your old women's movement stuff

We are would be grateful for any donations of materials for us to scan and put online. If you'd like to bring it to the party, that would be wonderful - any materials donated will be passed along to a physical (not online) archive to add to their collection.

  1. UofT Divest and SAIA: Israeli Apartheid Week (March 19-27, 2019)

Date: March 19th, 2019

Time: See Each Event Page Listed Below

Location: See Each Event Page Listed Below

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/2178548098901797/

Israeli Apartheid Week 2019: Stop Arming Colonialism

University of Toronto, March 19th - March 27th

#IsraeliApartheidWeek #StopArmingColonialism

Tues 19 Mar @ 6:30pm - Dr. Ruba Salih: De-colonial and intersectional alliances in the Palestinian struggle for justice with No One Is Illegal @ University College Rm 144

https://www.facebook.com/events/840425602964421/

Thurs 21 Mar @ 6:30pm - Dr. Nahla Abdo: Palestine in Our Hearts, Palestine a Thorn in the Flesh of Imperialism @ University College Rm 52

https://www.facebook.com/events/398202580971760/

Tues 26 Mar @ 7pm - Film Screening: A Stone's Throw from Prison @ Lash Miller Rm 158

Wed 27 Mar @ 6:30pm - Wala3at Indigenous Interactive Musical Dance Performance opened by Sto: Loh Elder Lee Maracle @ Multi-Faith Centre, Main Activity Hall

https://www.facebook.com/events/422162235186056/

divest@utgsu.ca / saia.opirg.uoft@gmail.com / www.uoftdivest.com / UofT Divest / Students Against Israeli Apartheid UofT St.George

First launched in Toronto in 2005, Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW) has grown to become one of the most important global events in the Palestine solidarity calendar. This year, IAW will take place in more than 150 cities across the globe. This year’s IAW is an international series of events that aims to raise awareness of Israel’s apartheid regime over the Palestinian people and build support for the growing global Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement. IAW 2019 at UofT is a collaborative effort of the UofT Graduate Student Union BDS Committee, the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 3902 BDS Committee, No One Is Illegal, UofT’s Ontario Public Interest Research Group, UofT’s Students Against Israeli Apartheid, UofT’s Independent Jewish Voices, Faculty for Palestine and the Coalition Against Israeli Apartheid. JOIN US on March 19 to 27th, as we continue to build momentum on campus for the main BDS campaign at UofT that calls on the University of Toronto administration to divest from companies which are directly complicit in the violation of Palestinian human rights, and that profit from the illegal occupation of Palestinian land and the construction of the Apartheid Wall. These companies include Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin and Hewlett Packard -- all of which help maintain the Israeli apartheid military infrastructure.

This year’s theme, Stop Arming Colonialism, highlights that ending the arms trade, military aid and cooperation with Israel will undercut financial and military support for its regime of apartheid. It is also an important platform for building the campaign for a military embargo on Israel. The demand for a military embargo on Israel has been reinforced by Israel’s recent violent repression of the Great March of Return in Gaza. Israel is able to maintain its illegal occupation and apartheid regime over Palestinians partly due to its arms sales and the military support it receives from governments across the world. The United States alone is the single largest supplier of arms and military aid to Israel, followed by several European states. These directly sustain Israel’s oppression and human rights violations. In the Global South, Israel has been known to supply weapons to genocidal regimes in Rwanda, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and elsewhere.

This year’s program includes four events which explore these themes: March 19th features Dr. Ruba Salih from SOAS University of London on “De-colonial and intersectional alliances in the Palestinian struggle for justice.”; March 20th will be a Film Screening of A Stone's Throw from Prison, March 21st features Dr. Nahla Abdo from Carleton University on “Palestine in Our Hearts, Palestine a Thorn in the Flesh of Imperialism;” and March 27th is Wala3at Indigenous Interactive Musical Dance Performance for our annual cultural program featuring Palestinian-Indigenous art, music, and dance sessions that will be opened by Sto: Loh Elder Lee Maracle.

We thank our generous sponsors and endorsers. IAW 2019 would not be possible without the support of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 1281 and the Association of Part-time Students Association (APUS), CUPE 3903 (UofT), We Are UofT 89.5 FM, Salaam Canada, No More Silence, The Socialist Project, OPIRG UofT, Upping the Anti, Jamhoor, Canadian Friends of Sabeel and Actions4Palestine (A4P).

  1. School of Social Work, YorkU Social Action 4 Social Change Committee Presents: Anti Fascism, White Supremacy and the ‘New’ Right Teach In (March 19 & 21, 2019)

Week long in class discussions on connecting liberalism, settler colonialism, fascism, white supremacy and the “new” right.

Tuesday March 19 2019

5-8 pm

South Ross 802

Artivism annual art festival and “Sorry to Bother You” film screening

Thursday March 21 2019

2:30-5:30 pm

South Ross 802

Arun Kundnani: Anti-Muslim racism and the politics of empire

What is anti-Muslim racism, where does it come from, and what are its consequences? This talk examines the historical origins of anti-Muslim politics in the US, the systems of state surveillance and violence that have been constructed through it, and how scholars and activists should respond. Drawing on the scholarship of Stuart Hall, Aimé Césaore. And Frantz Fanon, it is argued that Islamophobia is intertwined with the history of racism and empire- and was central to the election of Donald Trump.

  1. UofT LGBTOUT Presents: Stevie Boebi at the University of Toronto (March 20, 2019)

You probably know her from the Internet... but now she's coming to a university near you, Toronto!

LGBTOUT is very excited to announce that YouTuber, activist, and sex educator Stevie Boebi will be coming to give a talk at the University of Toronto on Wednesday, March 20th, 2019! Join us for a night of discussing identities such as queerness, disability and polyamory, coming out, activism, sex education, and more! See the facebook event for more information and tickets at https://www.facebook.com/events/2467128303507207/

ABOUT STEVIE

Stevie Boebi is a disabled lesbian sex educator on YouTube, best known for her queer, educational, and sex-positive videos about sex, dating, and relationships. Her YouTube channel has amassed over 700,000 subscribers, with a social reach of over 1 million and views totalling over 50 million!

ACCESSIBILITY INFO:

ASL interpretation will be available.

The theatre is accessible to mobility devices.

We encourage folks to come scent-free.

There is one all-gender accessible washroom on the main floor. There will be all-gender washrooms in the basement.

  1. Students Walkout On UofT (March 20, 2019)

Date: Wednesday, March 20th, 2019

Time: 10am - 1pm

Location: 100 St George (Sid Smith Building)

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/565152223978818/

Over the last several weeks, we have been calling upon U of T administration to take a bold stance and stand with us as we advocate against the reckless changes to post-secondary education that will negatively impact students across the province.

The changes to OSAP includes eliminating the six month interest-free grace period post-graduation, changing the definition of an “independent student” to someone who has been out of high school for six years rather than four years and narrowing family income eligibility on top of changing the ratios so that students receive more loans than grants. In the long run, students from low and middle-income families will be forced to take on more debt while paying more for their education.

What’s more, the small fraction of fees that are earmarked directly for student societies, levies and clubs which are re-distributed to students through events, programming, and support will be reduced to an opt-out which directly interferes with students’ right to organize, make informed, collective decisions on campus and hold their institutions accountable.

Finally, because the Ontario government will not be providing additional funding to institutions that would alleviate the financial pressure of a tuition cut, this can only lead to larger class sizes, employment instability for both staff and faculty, as well as a reduction in institutional student services.

We are calling on all U of T students, staff and faculty to join us in this walk-out because enough is enough.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

1) If you haven’t already signed onto our petition calling on the University to say no, sign here: http://bit.ly/2H0HG6S

2) Sign up for volunteer training - we will provide you with outreach tools needed. Email advocacy@apus.ca with the Subject Line: UofT Walk Out.

3) Commit to walking out - we are asking for two hours of your time.

4) Share your stories on what student life means to you!

We are working to ensure as many students can participate as possible without threat of penalty. We will be posting updates as quickly as we receive them.

Building Access Information for Sid Smith:

-Accessible ramp to the left of the Huron Street entrance.

-Single user washroom on main level.

ST GEORGE WALK OUT

10am: Sid Smith, Breakfast and Banners

12PM: Sid Smith, Walk Out

1PM: Rally at Simcoe Hall

UTM WALK OUT

11:00am UTM Student Centre, Free Brunch

12:00pm UTM Student Centre, Walk Out Start

1:00pm: March through Campus

This action is being sponsored and endorsed by the following groups (if your group would like to be added as a co-sponsor please get in touch with Rachele at opirg.toronto@gmail.com):

APUS - Association of Part-Time Undergraduate Students

Cinema Studies Student Union

CUPE Local 3902

OPIRG Toronto

University of Toronto, Graduate Students' Union – UTGSU\

  1. Chair in Transgender Studies, University of Victoria: "From Kathoey to Trans*: History, Politics and Activism in Thailand" (March 20, 2010)

ESTHER SUWANNANON

Scholar in Residence from Thammasat University, Bangkok, Thailand

"From KATHOEY to TRANS*:

History, Politics and Activism in Thailand"

FREE PUBLIC TALK (bring your lunch)

Wed. Mar. 20th, 2019

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

UVic Cornett A317

Accessibility Information

Esther C. Suwannanon, is presently an M.A. student in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Thammasat University, Bangkok, Thailand. She is currently researching Kathoey history through the analysis of her personal formal/informal archives and living in Canada as a graduate visiting research student at University of Victoria where she is a Canada-Asian Scholarship and Education Exchanges for Development Scholar.

"Thailand has been known by outsiders as a land of tolerance for gender-variant people. The existence of the word ‘Kathoey’ to describe gender-variant people can be traced back over a long period in Thai history, and has long been called a ‘third sex/gender’ category (Phet thi-sam, เพศที่สาม) within public and academic discourses.  In this presentation, I re-examine what Kathoey meant in the past, and what Kathoey means nowadays, and consider the limitations of “Thirdness” in Thai society."

  1. Department of Social Justice Education at UofT Colloquium 2019: “The University and the Traditions of Radicalism” by Dr. Roderick A. Ferguson (March 20, 2019)

2019 SJE COLLOQUIUM

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 | 5:30 – 7:30 P.M.

OISE LIBRARY, GROUND FLOOR | REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

The University and the Traditions of Radicalism

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: DR. RODERICK A. FERGUSON

University of Illinois at Chicago

This lecture investigates the role that minoritized communities have had on the epistemic changes within the North American academy. Refusing to read those communities as simple demographic entities having little bearing on the life of the mind, the talk interrogates communities minoritized by race, gender, sexuality, indigeneity and nationality as generators of intellectual transformations that challenge the primacy of disciplinary and canonical knowledges.

In addition to challenging the sanctioned intellectual traditions of the academy, those transformations have also accounted for some of the most dynamic revisions to progressive politics and analyses, redefining such categories as “anti-racism,” “feminism,” “socialism,” and “liberation.” Using historical and personal narratives, the talk addresses the academy as a heterotopic space comprised of disciplinary and vernacular knowledges, a composition that bears upon the worlds within and outside the university.

Prof. Ferguson is faculty in the Department of African American Studies and the Gender and Women’s Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is the co-director of the Racialized Body research cluster at UIC.

Prior to his appointment at UIC, he was professor of race and critical theory in the Department of American Studies at the University of Minnesota, serving as chair of the department from 2009 to 2012. In the fall of 2013, he was the Old aDominion Visiting Faculty for the Council of the Humanities and the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University.

He is the co-editor with Grace Hong of the University of Minnesota Press series Difference Incorporated. Also with Hong, he is the co-editor of the anthology Strange Affinities: The Gender and Sexual Politics of Comparative Racialization (2011). In addition, he is the author of We Demand: The University and Student Protests (2017), The Reorder of Things: The University and Its Pedagogies of Minority Difference (2012), Aberrations in Black: Toward a Queer of Color Critique (2004), and over 20 articles on race, social theory, cultural formations, sexuality, and feminism. Ferguson is currently the Chair of the American Studies Association.

From 2007 to 2010, he was associate editor of American Quarterly.

ORGANIZED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL JUSTICE EDUCATION (SJE)

SUPPORTED BY VISITING SCHOLARS FUNDING PROGRAM, OISE

www.oise.utoronto.ca/sje/

  1. OISE, UofT and York University's Peripheral Vision Speaker Series Present: Crip Commitments: Disability, Theory, Politics A Lecture by Prof. Kelly Fritsch (March 21, 2019) 

Public Lecture @ the University of Toronto (OISE)

The New College Disability Studies Speaker Series presents

In collaboration with York University's Peripheral Vision Speaker Series

Crip Commitments: Disability, Theory, Politics A Lecture by Prof. Kelly Fritsch (Carleton)

Thursday March21st 2019

6-8pm

OISE Library

252 Bloor St. West

(Above St. George Subway)

All Welcome – Free

Wheelchair accessible

ASL

Refreshments

For accessibility or additional information, please contact uoftdisabilitylistserve@gmail.com

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2297999143573247/

Engaging the frictions of crip and disability theory, Kelly Fritsch non-innocently considers the possibilities of radical social change that emerge through knowing and making disability differently.

Kelly Fritsch is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University in unceded Algonquin territory. Her research broadly engages crip, queer, and feminist theory to explore the relations of disability, health, technology, risk, and accessibility. She is co-editor of Keywords for Radicals: The Contested Vocabulary of Late-Capitalist Struggle (AK Press, 2016 with Clare O’Connor and AK Thompson), and has co-edited special issues of Somatechnics (on “Sexuality in Canada” with reese simpkins, 2017), Feminist Formations (on “The Biosocial Politics of Queer/CripContagions” with Anne McGuire, 2018), and Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience (on “CripTechnoscience” with Aimi Hamraie, Mara Mills, and David Serlin, forthcoming March 2019). Fritsch was a 2015-2018 Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the Women & Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto.

Event sponsors: The Peripheral Visions Speakers series is sponsored by Sensorium Centre for Digital Arts and Technology, VISTA: Vision Science to Application, The Departments of Theatre and Cinema and Media Arts, the Performance Studies (Canada) Speaker Series, the Graduate Program in Critical Disability Studies, the Canada Research Excellence Fund and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). The series is curated by Mary Bunch, Laura Levin and Lauren Sergio. With thanks to U of T's Equity Studies Program, the New College Innovation Fund and the Department for Social Justice Education at OISE for their continued support of the Disability Studies Speaker Series.

  1. OISE, UofT and York University's Peripheral Vision Speaker Series Present: Masterclass @ York University Crip Technoscience for Disabled Cyborgs: Access, Community, Politics with Prof. Kelly Fritsch (March 21, 2019) 

Public Lecture @ the University of Toronto (OISE)

The New College Disability Studies Speaker Series presents

In collaboration with York University's Peripheral Vision Speaker Series

Masterclass @ York University Crip Technoscience for Disabled Cyborgs: Access, Community, Politics with Prof. Kelly Fritsch

Thursday March 21st 2019

11am -1pm

Sensorium Loft

4th Floor of Goldfarb Centre for Fine Arts

York University

For accessibility or additional information, please contact uoftdisabilitylistserve@gmail.com

Kelly Fritsch engages with the emerging field of crip technoscience, exploring what it means for disability politics, community, and access. Taking up Alison Kafer’s provocation that disabled people are cyborgs because of their politics rather than their impairments, Fritsch explores the ways in which disabled community forms out of frictional and ambivalent relations to technoscience, marking out the implications of these relations for social justice practices. For accessibility and to RSVP please contact pvl@yorku.ca

Kelly Fritsch is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University in unceded Algonquin territory. Her research broadly engages crip, queer, and feminist theory to explore the relations of disability, health, technology, risk, and accessibility. She is co-editor of Keywords for Radicals: The Contested Vocabulary of Late-Capitalist Struggle (AK Press, 2016 with Clare O’Connor and AK Thompson), and has co-edited special issues of Somatechnics (on “Sexuality in Canada” with reese simpkins, 2017), Feminist Formations (on “The Biosocial Politics of Queer/CripContagions” with Anne McGuire, 2018), and Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience (on “CripTechnoscience” with Aimi Hamraie, Mara Mills, and David Serlin, forthcoming March 2019). Fritsch was a 2015-2018 Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the Women & Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto.

Event sponsors: The Peripheral Visions Speakers series is sponsored by Sensorium Centre for Digital Arts and Technology, VISTA: Vision Science to Application, The Departments of Theatre and Cinema and Media Arts, the Performance Studies (Canada) Speaker Series, the Graduate Program in Critical Disability Studies, the Canada Research Excellence Fund and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). The series is curated by Mary Bunch, Laura Levin and Lauren Sergio. With thanks to U of T's Equity Studies Program, the New College Innovation Fund and the Department for Social Justice Education at OISE for their continued support of the Disability Studies Speaker Series.

  1. Cupe3902 Flying Squad Contingent for Unite Against Racism Rally (March 21, 2019)

Flying Squad Contingent for Unite Against Racism Rally

Date: March 21st

Time: 5:15pm - 7:30pm

Location: 569 Spadina Crescent (Multi-Faith Centre - Koffler House Room 207)

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/718852265178937/

The Migrant Workers Alliance for Change is preparing for their Toronto: #UniteAgainstRacism rally which will take place at Nathan Philips Square on Thursday March 21, the International Day for the Elimination of Racism. The Flying Squad is organizing a contingent to join the rally and will be meeting at the Bedford entrance of the St George Station at 5:15PM. Rally organizers are asking attendees to bring a pair of used shoes is possible. Tokens will be provided.

  1. Toronto: #UniteAgainstRacism Rally, Performances, and Speeches (March 21, 2019)

Rally, performances, speeches

5:30pm, March 21, 2019

Nathan Phillips Square

Join on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/events/901206490049658/ | RSVP https://actionnetwork.org/events/toronto-rally-uniteagainstracism-2

On March 21, the International Day for the Elimination of Racism, celebrate the power of our communities, and say no to racism and xenophobia in Toronto. We will be joining with people across the country who are taking action wherever they are.

* Please bring a pair of shoes that represents migrant and refugees crossing borders, working in the fields, shops and homes, living in fear, facing exploitation and police violence. These shoes could represent your own experience or someone that you know who has had to overcome many struggles in working or migrating. The shoes will contribute towards an action that will take place during the rally. * Refugees, migrants and allies are encouraged to join with performances and installations. To support, and to be invited to a planning meeting, please email info@migrantworkersalliance.org

For event in other cities, visit www.migrantrights.ca

++++

Migrants and refugees are being forced out from their homes in unprecedented numbers globally. Here in Canada, anti-immigrant protests and racially motivated attacks are on the rise. Meanwhile, right wing politicians who use anti-immigrant and racist rhetoric are getting rewarded with thousands of votes. If we simply stand still, there is a real danger for further rise in populist racisms in the lead up to the federal election in October.

Now, more than ever, we must bring together people across the country from all walks of life around an anti-racist, migrant justice vision. Let us #UniteAgainstRacism and demand #MigrantJusticeNow!

On March 21st, we will #UniteAgainstRacism to insist on:

STATUS FOR ALL, STATUS NOW: Permanent resident status and family unity for all migrants and refugees here, and landed status on arrival for those that arrive in the future. No detentions and no deportations!

DECENT WORK & FAIR WAGES: $15 minimum wage! Full labour rights! No closed permits

ACCESS FOR ALL: Universal access to public services including healthcare, education, income security, settlement services, childcare, pensions, and more.

JUST SOCIETY: Indigenous self-determination, gender justice, and an end to racism, particularly anti-Black racisms

NO DISPLACEMENT: An end to practices of displacement and persecution that force us to move including climate change, wars, and economic exploitation.

  1. World Water Day Event: Feasting the Forgotten Rivers (March 22, 2019)

World Water Day Event: Feasting the Forgotten Rivers

March 22 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Date: Friday, March 22nd, 2019

Time: 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Location: Beginning at Evergreen Brickworks (550 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON, M4W 3X8) then walk down to Queens Park to Daniel’s School of Architecture and then finally to Queens Quay.

Finding our way through water paths and life paths, streaming love without end, uncovering ancient waters in Toronto. Please join us in honoring the lost and found waters. Walk with us on World Water Day: Friday, March 22nd, led by traditional life practitioner, Dr. Debby Wilson Danard.

Dr. Debby Danard, an Anishnaabe-kwe from Rainy River First Nation, in North Western Ontario. She is a PhD graduate from University of Toronto, a water walker, advocate and water ambassador who speaks and performs water ceremonies to raise awareness of the spiritual nature and rights of water. She is also a traditional life practitioner and life promotion ambassador and shares these teachings in schools and community organizations.

Agenda:

1) Begin and gather at Brick works at 10:00 AM and Territory acknowledgement, ceremonial collection of water from there. Leave at 10:30 AM

2) Walk to Queen’s Park from Brickworks (1 hour/ 3.9 km) approximate time of arrival: 11:30-12:00 PM

3) Take break at Queen’s Park (half an hour) Debby does food offering. Leave at 12:30 PM

4) From Queens Park walk to Spadina and stop at Daniel’s school of Architecture and do food offering. (1.1 km/ 15 mins)

5) Walk down to Lake Ontario at Queen’s Quay to return the water we gathered from the Brickworks and do the final food offering and closing words (45 minutes/3.4 km) 2:00 PM

6) Come back to New College around 3:00-3:30 PM at Wilson Hall Rm. 2007D (40 Willcocks Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 1C6) where people can convene, watch “Water Warriors” and have something to eat.

Ceremony Protocols:

All are welcome.

No dogs. No bikes/skateboards.

Traditionally women wear long skirts and men long pants to show respect in ceremony.

When we walk, this is a time for prayer or songs for the water and life.

Pregnant women and women on their moon-time will not carry the water during this time, as they are already in ceremony.

Men carry the Eagle Feather Staff, in balance with the water, when there are no male participants, then women will carry the staff.

Gchi’miigwech Grandmother Josephine Mandaamin, for teaching us the protocols and leading the way forward honouring the water.

  1. World Water Day Event: Film Viewing: Water Warriors (March 22, 2019)

Film Viewing: Water Warriors

March 22 @ 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Date: Friday, March 22nd, 2019

Time: 3:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Location: Room 51A Wetmore Hall, New College, University of Toronto St. George Campus

In honor of World Water Day please join us for the viewing of “Water Warriors” by filmmaker Michael Premo.

“Water Warriors” is film about a community’s successful battle against the oil and gas industry in New Brunswick, Canada. When an oil industry starts searching for natural gas, Indigenous and white families get together to send away the company in a campaign to defend their water and traditional way of life.

This film viewing is following the Feasting on Forgotten Rivers water walk. Everyone is welcome to rest and gather and engage in discussion and contemplate ways of thinking about water and resistance. Refreshments will be served

Miigwetch!

  1. Muslim Justice Collective & Pakistan Development Foundation Presents: Social Justice Mixer (March 22, 2019)

Date: March 22nd, 2019

Time: 6:30pm - 10:30pm

Location: Junior Common Room at University College

Facebook Event Page: N/A

Every year the Pakistan Development Foundation hosts Jhoom Le, an end of the year social that is catered towards a primarily South Asian audience. This year, however, Pakistan Development Foundation is inviting multiple groups on campus to join us on Friday March 22nd for a night full of music, socializing, opportunities for networking and good food! The purpose of this event is to bring together folks who are already doing work rooted in radical politics on the UTSG campus. It is important to acknowledge that such groups are working in various capacities, they have varying levels of experience when it comes to organizing, and they come from different contexts and backgrounds. We hope, however, that this event will create space for people to meet each other, build community with each other, and learn from each other. We hope this space will also attract those who are looking to get involved in organizing on campus but haven’t yet figured out how to do so. We want to emphasize that even though this event will be unapologetically political in nature, you are not expected to be the most knowledgeable or politically informed person in order to attend/collaborate. Our intention is simply to have a fun night with everyone - the stakes are low and we hope nobody feels overwhelmed by this!

  1. Carleton University Anti-69: Against the Mythologies of the 1969 Criminal Code Reform conference (March 23, 2019)

When: Saturday, March 23rd, 2019 — Sunday, March 24th, 2019

Time:   1:00 pm — 5:30 pm

Location:         Richcraft Hall, Second floor conference rooms and atrium

Audience:        Anyone, Carleton Community, Current Students, Faculty

Cost:    Varies

Contact:          Lara Karaian, lara.karaian@carleton.ca, 613-520-2600 ext. 1458

More Information here https://anti-69.ca/

Anti-69 is being organized to provide a forum for scholarly and activist work critical of the mythologies and limitations of the 1969 Criminal Code reform.

In June 1969, amidst the rhetoric of the “Just Society,” the White Paper on the extinguishing of Indigenous sovereignty, and the early years of the initiation of state ‘multiculturalism,’ the Canadian government passed an omnibus Criminal Code reform bill. The Omnibus Bill is often celebrated based on the idea that it legalized or entirely decriminalized homosexuality, that Pierre Elliott Trudeau was trying to bring about equality for lesbians and gays, or that the reform established the right of women to access abortion and reproductive rights. None of these claims are true. To be sure, the legislation covered a wide range of changes including: reforms to the ‘homosexual’ offences of ‘gross indecency’ and ‘buggery’ that removed the criminal prohibition from acts committed in ‘private’ and involving only two people aged 21 and over; the decriminalization of limited access to abortion on ‘health’ grounds, if approved by a therapeutic abortion committee; and, in a related bill, the decriminalization of contraceptive information. However, after the reform, police charges against ‘homosexual’ sex increased, access to abortion and reproductive rights continued to be severely restricted, and barriers to accessing birth control continued.

2019 is the 50th anniversary of the Omnibus Bill and a series of public events and installations are being organized to celebrate it. This event offers alternative perspectives and critical responses to the 1969 reform and its implications. Although focused on the Criminal Code, we intend to look at the reform—and the struggles around it—in its broader social, historical, colonial, classed, racialized, gendered and sexualized contexts.

The conference program will be available soon.

Register here https://payments.carleton.ca/anti-69/anti-69-registration/

  1. Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community and Diaspora: Resource Launch for Black Student Success (March 23, 2019)

You are cordially invited to the launch event of The Engaged Parent: Navigating the School System for Black Student Success at York University on Saturday, March 23, hosted by the Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community and Diaspora.

1:00 pm- 3:00 pm

Martin Family Lounge, Accolade East Building, York University

During the consultations for the Towards Race Equity in Education report, educators, parents, and students recommended that resources be developed to help Black parents engage with their students’ education. They felt that an engaged parent was critical to the success of Balck students in Ontario’s education system.

The series of information sheets- The engaged Parent: Navigating the School System for Black Student Success- are designed to support parents to be partners in their children’s education, from JK through to high school. These resources will help parents effectively and confidently engage with the school system to support the academic success and well-being of Black Children.

Event is free and open to the public. RSVP here https://eduforms.apps01.yorku.ca/machform/view.php?id=78923.

Please RSVP by Wednesday, March 20th.

  1. A Bald Ego Theatre production in association with Nightwood Theatre: “A Blow In The Face” (March 26- April 14, 2019)

A Blow In The Face – March 26-April 14, 2019 at The Theatre Centre (1115 Queen Street West)

A Bald Ego Theatre production in association with Nightwood Theatre

Written by Lisa Ryder, Directed and choreographed by Monica Dottor

Starring Tess Degenstein, Jordan Pettle, Selina Martin and Lisa Ryder

Alice’s life is perfect. She has a wonderful husband and a gorgeous new baby. The only thing is: her husband has left on a work trip and the baby is colicky. Alice cannot sleep. Into her chaotic world arrive two fantastical creatures who take an unnatural interest in her child. In a play described as Rosemary’s Baby meets Fight Club, playwright Lisa Ryder explores the taboo subject of postpartum depression and the extreme places the mind can go. A Blow in the Face is a searing and irreverent take on a subject to which every parent will relate.

“A Blow in the Face is a play I have been birthing for a long time - 13 years in fact,” explains playwright Lisa Ryder. “I had just finished five years as an action hero on a sci-fi show. Within a year and a half I got married, moved to the suburbs of Vancouver, and had a baby. Within three days of the baby's birth, my then husband left town for work. I was alone; in a house with a leaky roof; with a brand new baby. It rained a lot. The baby cried a lot. I entered a period I now refer to as The Cave. I now know that many women experience The Cave, but very few talk about it. I think it's time we talked about it.”

Tickets $25-$40 – click here to book https://tickets.theatrecentre.org/TheatreManager/1/tmEvent/tmEvent253.html.

Use the promo code PARENT for $10 off tickets on Wednesday matinees on April 3 and 10 at 1:30pm!

  1. Dandelion Initiative and UTSU Present: We Need to Talk: Community Accountability and Safety (March 26, 2019)

Join the UTSU and the Dandelion Initiative for our workshop on community accountability and safety.

This workshop centres discussions and practical tools and applications all people can use to develop safer individual and collective practices. Recognizing privilege, understanding allyship and developing meaningful relationships with diverse communities and groups strengthens our spaces and makes them safer. We will work to dismantle and unlearn unhealthy behaviors and beliefs through self reflection practices, group discussion and community based practices. We all have a role to play in creating safer spaces that are inclusive to all people. (Registration will be limited to 30 people)

To learn more about The Dandelion Initiative, please visit: https://www.dandelioninitiative.ca/

To register, please complete this form: https://goo.gl/forms/krAwiZl4sDzYakUl1

The venue and room are physically accessible spaces for mobility devices, and the building is connected to the St. George subway station. The building has single-user washrooms on the 1st, 5th, and 12th floors, and has prayer/reflection space on the 4th floor. If you need any other accommodations (ASL, TTC tokens, etc) please contact vpuniversityaffairs@utsu.ca as soon as possible. Light refreshments, including vegan/gluten free options, will be provided.

  1. KORE Event: Voices from Below: Socially Engaged Art in Contemporary China with Meiqin Wang (March 26, 2019)

Voices from Below: Socially Engaged Art in Contemporary China

Tuesday, 26 March 2019 | 11:30am to 1:30pm | Room 626, Sixth Floor, Kaneff Tower, York University

The lecture concerns the potential of socially engaged art as a critical and creative response to the many downsides of China’s top-down, pro-urban, and profit-driven social transformations. By analyzing various projects of engagement and intervention launched by contemporary Chinese art professionals, it demonstrates the possibility of individuals as agents of social critiques and changes by carrying out small-scale work at grassroots level. The lecture highlights the practical, transformative and activating power of art for social criticism, place construction and personal development.

Meiqin Wang is professor of Art at California State University Northridge. Her research focuses on contemporary art from China in the context of commercialization and urbanization of the Chinese world. She has written numerous articles on topics of art and cultural industries, art and urbanization, and socially engaged art. She is an author of Socially Engaged Art in Contemporary China: Voices from Below (Routledge 2019) & Urbanization and Contemporary Chinese Art (Routledge 2016).

This talk is organized by Hong Kal (Department of Visual Art and Art History, York University).

This talk is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), funded by the Academy of Korean Studies. It is co-presented by the York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR) at York University.

Please send inquiries to kore@yorku.ca

  1. Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) Nowruz 2019 Celebration (March 26, 2019)

Toronto’s most diverse & brave poetry reading and open mic series

Featured poets: Jade Wallace & Stedmond Pardy

Featured Musicians: Padideh Ahrarnejad & Ali Massoudi

Time: Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Place: Tranzac Club, 292 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2M7

Main Hall

Doors open               6:15 p.m.

Open-mic sign-up     6:30 p.m.

Show                         7-10 p.m.

Admission: $5

Jade Wallace  poet, fiction writer, essayist, published internationally, chapbook: Rituals of Parsing, forthcoming collaborative chapbook, Test Centre, member of the band The Leafy Greens

Stedmond Pardy self-educated left-handed poet, performances on the radio and on stages in Toronto, Montreal, and Washington State, working on his first full length volume of poetry

Padideh Ahrarnejad musician, arranger, composer, and educator, member of Kuné, Canada's Global Orchestra, album released by Universal Music Canada, teacher of Tar and Setar

Ali Massoudi percussionist with Tehran Symphony Orchestra and traditional ensembles, author of training books for Tonbak, Daf and Udu, leader of Navaye Kimia ensemble

Tranzac Club is an accessible venue with no stairs (aside from the stage) and they have two accessible gender neutral washrooms.

Twitter: @BanooZan & @ShabeSherTO

Instagram: @banoo.zan

https://www.facebook.com/events/2260705357540016/

  1. agYU and YCAR Present: “This Is Our Ecosystem” A Talk By ruangrupa: A Jakarta-Based Art Collective (March 27, 2019)

This is our ecosystem

A talk by ruangrupa: A Jakarta-based art collective

Wednesday, 27 March 2019 | 1 to 3pm | Room 280A, Second Floor, York Lanes | York University

ruangrupa is a contemporary art organization founded in 2000. It works to advance art ideas in the urban context through exhibitions, festivals, art laboratories, workshops, research and publications. In 2008 together with two other Jakarta-based collectives, Grafis Hura Hura and Serrum, ruangrupa founded Gudskul, a fully functioning alternative school for the pedagogical development of collective practice and the generation of new “ecosystems” for artistic production and exchange. Ruangrupa was just announced as the curators of the next Documenta (Kassel, 2022) and is the AGYU’s 2019-20 artists-in-residence.

This event is co-presented by the Art Gallery of York University (agYU) and the York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR).

All are welcome.

This event is presented with the support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

  1. OPIRG/CWTP/SBA: Redefining Masculinity Workshop (March 29, 2019)

Date: March 29th, 2019

Time: 5:30pm - 8pm

Location: Exact Location TBA

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/877178302645795/

*2S/Trans/NB people referred to below includes but is not limited to people who identify as Genderqueer, Two spirit, Trans women, Trans men, Non binary, intersex, Agender, Demigender, Twin-gendered, Bigender, Gender-Questioning people and people who have experienced cissexism.

Join us for a workshop exploring the concept of masculinity as embodied by 2S/Trans/NB people. We will engage in knowledge sharing and dialogue around the ways in which 2S/Trans/NB people on the masculine spectrum embody masculinity outside the limits of the white colonial heteropatriarchal system. How have other intersections of our identities (race, disability), the ways we present ourselves and the ways we are viewed by others impacted our expression of masculinity? We will also focus on critical conversations regarding how we engage with femininity and femme identified people. How do we actively support the creation of safer spaces with femme identified members of our community? How can we critically look at femme burnout and how we as people on the masculine spectrum contribute to this burn out?

Although this workshop centers 2S/Trans/NB people on the masculine spectrum 2S/Trans/NB people who do not identify with masculinity are welcome to join us. This space will include both BIPOC and white identified 2S/Trans/NB people, however, we will be prioritizing BIPOC people in this space. We ask white people who attend this workshop to be mindful of how much and the ways in which you are take up space. We ask cis identified people to please respect the fact that this is a closed space and not come. If you would like to support you may show it by sharing this event with your networks.

Facilitator Bio: Makai Imani is an Afro-Caribbean community educator and facilitator. His work includes anti-oppression trainings, trans inclusion education, identity based facilitated discussion spaces around gender, sexuality, masculinity, community and connections to culture. Makai has worked in post-secondary equity spaces in campaigns, peer support and group facilitation roles, and currently works at a community health organization in programming for masculine identified youth.

Date: Friday March 29, 2019

Time: 5:30 p.m. -8: 00 p.m.

Exact Location: TBA

Registration is required. Please follow this link to register https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScmWeDI3FHOdRwBo3NKZbsL9ft19M5D52xjpg66TgkarHvjZg/viewform?usp=sf_link

Access Information

Refreshments will be provided! Vegan, gluten-free options available.

Wheelchair accessible. Accessible all-gender washroom located on the same floor as the event room.

TTC Tokens available upon request.

If you require ASL interpretation to attend this workshop please contact us by March 15th.

We politely request that attendees refrain from wearing scented products as this will be a scent-free space.

BIPOC and NB/Trans identified (peer) active listeners will be available throughout the workshop

For more information and access need please contact Nadia at sba.advocacycoordinator@gmail.com

  1. Refugee Rights Day 2019: Panel Discussion, Syria Response and Refugee Initiative Reception & “The Road Less Travelled” Exhibit Launch (April 4, 2019)

McLaughlin College, the Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS) and its Syria Response and Refugee Initiative, with co-sponsors the Department of Sociology and Centre for Public Policy (Osgoode Hall Law School), York University, are proud to present: Refugee Rights Day 2019 Panel Discussion, Syria Response and Refugee Initiative Reception and “The Road Less Travelled” Exhibit Launch

April 4, 2019

12:00-2:30pm

McLaughlin College Junior Common Room (014)

https://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/

**Light lunch and refreshments will be served**

Please RSVP to https://goo.gl/forms/4i9fiI1IgdIGxFWf1

This event and day of reflection marks Refugee Rights Day in Canada (April 4th) and a reception to recognize the efforts of York-based refugee sponsors and mark the formal conclusion of York’s Syria Response and Refugee Initiative (SRRI), a Syrian refugee resettlement and education project (2015-2019) hosted by its Centre for Refugee Studies.

Speakers will discuss the origins and contemporary relevance of Refugee Rights Day, refugee policy in Canada and reflect upon their York-based engagement in refugee issues.

This event will also mark the formal launch of a mixed media exhibition “The Road Less Travelled,” (at 2pm) by Professor Nergis Canefe of York University’s Centre for Refugee Studies and Department of Politics, which will be displayed in the McLaughlin College Art Gallery (001 McLaughlin College) throughout the month of April.

Discussion Chair: Professor Michaela Hynie, Faculty of Health & Centre for Refugee Studies, York University

Welcome and Opening Remarks: Professor James C. Simeon, Head of McLaughlin College, School of Public Policy and Administration, LA&PS, York University

Panelists:

Geraldine Sadoway, Human Rights and Refugee Lawyer (LLM), Author and Instructor

John Carlaw Project Lead, York University Syria Response and Refugee Initiative, Graduate Fellow, Centre for Refugee Studies

Humaima Ashfaque, Student Ambassador, Syria Response and Refugee Initiative, Student Refugee Program Coordinator- WUSC Keele Campus Committee

Edwar Dommar, Amnesty International at York, WUSC Keele & Ryerson University Lifeline Syria Challenge Volunteer

Refugee Rights Day highlights the 1985 Supreme Court Singh decision, which found that anyone on Canadian soil is covered by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Bill of Rights. This paved the way for all refugee claimants in Canada to have the right to an oral hearing of their case and the establishment of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB).

In addition to refugee claims, refugees also obtain protection in Canada through resettlement. Amidst a changing policy environment, since Fall, 2015 ten York-based refugee sponsorship teams have been part of the pan-GTA Ryerson University Lifeline Syria Challenge and York’s Syria Response and Refugee Initiative. These efforts have been combined with ambitious educational programming and community engagement, including work with more than 18 different student groups as well as campus and community partners. For its part, York’s Keele Campus World University Service of Canada Committee was recently recognized by WUSC as its 2018 National Committee of the Year. York’s Glendon and Keele Campus WUSC committees collectively sponsor five new refugee students each year to study and live in our university community.

Please join us to reflect upon refugee rights in Canada, including the contemporary relevance of the Singh decision and state of contemporary refugee policy in Canada and mark some of York’s recent contributions!

www.yorku.ca/refugees

  1. YCAR: Merging Asian Urbanisms - Reading Discussion Session and Year-End Social (April 12, 2019)

Reading Discussion Session and Year-End Social

Friday, 12 April 2019 | 1 to 3pm | Room 857, Eighth Floor, Kaneff Tower | York University

Join Emerging Asian Urbanisms on the final reading discussion session for the academic year. We will be discussing Anna Tsing's Friction, followed by some inter-mingling over food.

Reading: Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing (2004), Friction: An Ethnography of Global Connection.

New members and readers are welcome!  Snacks and refreshments served.

Please RSVP here so we can plan for food: https://goo.gl/forms/HnF8IhO6wSJavgyC2

The Emerging Asian Urbanisms series at the York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR) explores the diverse processes and practices of urbanism and urbanization in Asia. It draws upon calls made by Ananya Roy and Jennifer Robinson, among others, to investigate “new geographies of theory” as fertile sources of uncovering new ways of understanding urbanism everywhere. In 2018-2018, we started a reading group, hosted guest speaker events and organized graduate writing workshops. For questions, please email Amardeep Kaur (Doctoral Candidate in Geography) amarkaur@yorku.ca

  1. Digital Humanities Summer Institute @Congress Workshops at UBC (June 5, 2019)

DHSI@Congress

Are you looking to learn some new DH skills? Would you be glad to refresh some old ones?  If you are attending the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Vancouver, join us for Digital Humanities Summer Institute @ Congress.   We invite Congress attendees to register for any and all workshops that engage their interest. At $25 each, the workshops are modular and no previous Digital Humanities experience is required. Participants must be registered with a association or society that is meeting at Congress.

Schedule

9:00-10:15 Opening plenary: Decolonial DH?: Maker Ethics Across Indigenous Studies and the Digital Humanities (David Gaertner)

10:30-1:00 Session 1

- CWRCshop (Susan Brown)

- DH Pedagogy (Laura Estill and Diane Jakacki)

1:00-2:30 Lunch

- Special Graduate Student lunch event for registered students

"What I Wish I Knew as a Grad Student/New Scholar in the Digital Humanities" (Kim Martin and Chelsea Miya)

2:30-5:00 Session 2

- Introduction to the Command Line (Megan Meredith-Lobay)

- Best Practices for Data Visualization (Alison Hedley)

Registration details and workshop descriptions are up at http://bit.ly/DHSICongress (click “read more")

CALLS: 

  1. Call for Participants: Anti-Sexual Violence Education

Examining the effects of anti- sexual violence education amongst university students

Are you a student or recent graduate who has participated in anti- sexual violence education or training through your university or college? Would you like to tell us about it in a 30 to 45-minute interview? Confidentiality is assured and a 10$ honorarium is provided.

This study seeks the participation of people who…

  • Are currently attending, or graduated for no more than one year from, a university or college program;
  • Have participated in mandatory or voluntary (i.e., by choice) programming of some kind, offered by or at your educational institution, that seeks to prevent or educate about sexual violence/assault (e.g., violence against women awareness, a talk, course, or consent workshop, self-defense class, workshop for your sports team);
  • Are between 18 and 30 years of age.

The research will:

  • Examine the relationship between anti-sexual violence education and young people’s sexual practices;
  • Provide young adults with a chance to voice their experiences of and strategies in sexual negotiations (e.g., how they articulate desires and boundaries, interest and non-interest);
  • Be conducted in a non-judgmental, open-style interview that allows participants to express themselves and share their opinions (i.e., there are no ‘right answers’);
  • Contribute to the development of sexual violence prevention efforts, and hopefully, better sex!

Research conducted by Dr. Tuulia Law, York University

To participate in an interview or for more information contact:

tlaw@yorku.ca or 647-809-9178

  1. Call for Submissions: Action Speaks Louder Callout for Submissions and Editors 

Action Speaks Louder Mag is a semi-autonomous collective funded and operated by OPIRG Toronto and a team of dedicated volunteers.

We publish articles on a regular basis through our website and print off a limited number of physical copies of the best articles from each year. We are now soliciting submissions for the Spring and Summer, and are searching for new volunteers to sit on our Editorial Collective!

Are you interested in getting involved with

alternative media

learning web design

layout

editing

taking a piece from pitch to publication?

Join Action Speaks Louder! Collective members do not need prior editorial experience We also want you to write for us! Please send us a pitch about your experiences, analysis, and ideas around social and environmental justice issues and movements!

We offer authors an honoraria of between $25 - $50 per published article depending on length.

Action Speaks Louder is the long running magazine of the Ontario Public Interest Research Group at the University of Toronto.

We work to create space for students and community organizers to reflect on pressing issues within current struggles for social and environmental justice. If you would like to join our editorial collective, please write to us at actionspeaksloudertoronto@gmail.com.

If you would rather just write for us, submit a pitch! Submit your articles, interviews, poetry, short stories and art to actionspeaksloudertoronto@gmail.com

  1. Call for Volunteers: Get Involved with Students for Barrier-Free Access (SBA) At UofT

Interested in getting involved with the SBA community and the work that we do on campus?

Have ideas and skills you want to share and expand on?

Looking for experiences and training that will provide you with transferable skills and CCR recognition?

SBA welcomes you to get involved with our campaigns, advocacy work, outreach, programming, resource library, graphic design for posters and media, and so much more!

Volunteers will be provided with anti-oppression and volunteer training, as well as CCR recognition for their work!

Want to start the ball rolling? Here are some different ways you can apply to volunteer with us:

Fill out the volunteer application form by clicking the following link: http://uoftsba.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Volunteer-Application-Form-2019.doc - this will allow you to download the file as a word document to fill out and email as an attachment to uoftsba@gmail.com

Phone the Volunteer Coordinator, Annanda, at the centre 416-967-7322 if phone calls work better for you

visit the SBA centre during drop-in hours (Monday through Thursday, 11:00am - 5pm) to get a feel for the space and make a time to speak to Annanda in person

We look forward to your questions, ideas and to working with you!

  1. Department of Politics, The New School for Social Research Call for Papers: Radical Democracy Conference 2019 (March 15, 2019)

Confirmed Conference Speakers: Nancy Fraser, Cinzia Arruzza, Miriam Ticktin

Keynote: Jack Halberstam

CFP WHAT IS FEMINIST POLITICS?

The Department of Politics at The New School for Social Research is sponsoring its 8th Annual graduate student conference on the concept, history, practices and implications of radical democracy. This year, we invite abstracts and panel proposals that deal with the questions of feminist and radical democratic theory. The last couple of years gave rise to new democratic movements. This new stage of grassroots democratic protests in countries such as US, Brazil, Argentina, Spain or Poland has been centered around feminist issues including sexual harassment, abortion law, domestic violence, and gender inequality. The Women’s March against Trump and International Women’s Strike present only two examples of the recent and global feminist wave. Why does the current wave of political mobilization in the US, Argentina, or Brazil have a feminist face? How does it differ from earlier democratic movements, including the movements of Occupy Wall Street and Black Lives Matter? What distinguishes this new wave from other feminist struggles from the past? Finally, what issues, reactions, and obstacles do contemporary feminists face in various places around the world? Our conference aims to address this set of questions. We welcome papers that engage with the concept of feminism and its meaning, discuss the role of feminist and gender issues within the democratic tradition, as well as elaborate on the history of feminist politics. We particularly invite papers that propose a critical analysis of contemporary feminisms, elucidating their issues, dangers, and political potential. Proposals should not be limited to this list, on the contrary, we encourage interdisciplinary papers and panels utilizing or critiquing the concepts of feminism and radical democracy from the point of view of post- anti- or de-colonialism, queer theory, indigenous studies, disability studies, or critical race theory

Please submit your paper or panel abstracts by March 15, 2019, to radicaldemocracy@newschool.edu. More information about our past Radical Democracy conferences here http://www.radicaldemocracy.org/

  1. Call for Applications: Summer 2019 Work/Study, YES, CLAY and ISEF Programs (March 22, 2019)

Guidelines for Work/Study Job Postings (includes Work/Study, CLAY, YES and ISEF)

The integration of Becoming YU into the Work/Study program strengthens its goals by ensuring that student learning and experiential outcomes focus on:

  • mentorship opportunities,
  • professional and personal skills development,
  • application of knowledge,
  • an expanded network,
  • ownership and responsibility of work,
  • self-awareness,
  • reflection, and
  • contribution to York University as a whole.

Job requests will be approved based on how well the described work meets the above learning and experiential outcomes. As such, you will need to address the following categories when submitting your job request through Experience York.

  1. Job Description
  • What are the student’s duties?
  • How does this role relate to the goals of your unit/program?
  • What is the level of supervision provided to the student? Who will the student report to?
  1. Student Learning Outcomes (please include this in the “Job Description” section of the Experience York job posting form):
  • Include at least 4 of the following:

o What kind of orientation and training will the student receive?

o What kind of feedback and on-going support will the student receive?

o What mentorship opportunities will be available for the student?

o What kinds of encouragement and support for reflection will the student receive?

o How does this position complement classroom learning? How will students be able to apply their knowledge?

o What opportunities are available for the student to expand their network?

o How does this position contribute to York University as a whole?

  1. Qualifications
  • What are the previous skills/knowledge that the student must possess in order to be successful in this position?
  • What are the elements needed for a student to be a great fit for this position?
  • Which of the Becoming YU competencies are required for this role? You may wish to consult the Becoming YU: Dictionary to help you identify which skills and competencies students must possess to be successful in this role.
  1. Personal and Professional Development (please include this in the “Additional Application Information” section of the Experience York job posting form)
  • Which competencies will the student develop and/or enhance through this role? You may wish to consult the Becoming YU: Dictionary to help you identify which skills and competencies students can develop through their Work/Study position.
  • How does this position enhance the student’s skills development? Work/Study supervisors/coaches are welcome to insert the text below to their job descriptions:

As part of your work study experience, you will be asked to participate in Becoming YU designed to support students in creating meaningful goals and objectives, recognize the value of your experiences, identify the leadership and career competencies you gain through these experiences and confidently articulate your skills and experiences, whether it’s for a future job or further education opportunity. Throughout your Work/Study experience you will have the opportunity to meet regularly with your coach to set goals and objectives, report and reflect on your progress and get valuable feedback.” You will also be asked to complete additional information about salary, position start/end dates, preferred education level and programs of study, and application procedures on the Experience York job posting form. Information about how to post a job request through Experience York can be found on the Work/Study Employment website at http://sfs.yorku.ca/employment/

  1. Call for Applications: The Lillian Robinson Scholars Program, Simone de Beauvoir Institute (April 1, 2019)

Lillian Robinson Scholar’s Program https://www.concordia.ca/artsci/sdbi/research/visiting-scholars.html

Lillian Robinson

Dr. Lillian Robinson, a feminist scholar whose career spanned over 35 years, was Principal of the Simone de Beauvoir Institute, home of the first Women’s Studies program in Canada, from 2000 to 2006. She was widely recognized as one of the leading feminist theorists of the twentieth century, and her essays and books have inspired feminist scholarship around the world. Dr. Robinson was the author of the ground-breaking collections of essays on literature and culture, Sex, Class, and Culture (1978) and In the Canon’s Mouth: Dispatches from Culture Wars (1997); a chapbook of poetry, Robinson on the Woman Question (1975); Wonder Women: Feminisms and Superheroes (2004), a study of feminist superheroes and the comics; and a murder mystery, Murder Most Puzzling (1998). She was co-author of Feminist Scholarship: Kindling in the Groves of Academe (1984) and Night Market (1998), a book about the Thai sex trade. She also edited a four-volume reference book, Modern Women Writers (1996). Prior to joining the Concordia University faculty, Dr. Robinson taught at the State University of New York at Buffalo, the Sorbonne, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Hawaii, and East Carolina University.

The Lillian Robinson Scholars program honours her memory by bringing distinguished Visiting Scholars to the Simone de Beauvoir Institute at Concordia to enhance the intellectual vitality of the institution.

Program Information

The Lillian Robinson Scholars Program is designed to attract a series of distinguished visiting scholars working on a range of feminist research topics to the Simone de Beauvoir Institute of Concordia University. The program supports stays of varying lengths for scholars with PhDs. The Program does not pay salary costs, but a small stipend is available. Independent scholars with PhDs are welcome and encouraged to apply. Final decisions about Lillian Robinson scholars are made by the Lillian Robinson Scholars Program Committee at the Simone de Beauvoir Institute. Lillian Robinson scholars are expected to take an active role in daily life at the Institute, conducting research, presenting their work (completed or in-progress), and participating in Institute events and research seminars. Scholars receive support from the Institute during their stay: office space, access to a computer and the Internet, and library privileges.

Program Advisory Board

Yolande Cohen, Professor of History, Université du Québec à Montréal; Shelley Fisher Fishkin, Professor of English and Director of American Studies, Stanford University; Estelle Freedman, Professor of History, Stanford University Shirley Geok-Lin Lim, Professor of English, University of California, Santa Barbara; Sneja Gunew, Professor of English and Women’s Studies, Centre for Research in Women’s Studies and Gender Relations, University of British Columbia; Louis Kampf, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Literature and Women’s Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, Professor of Women’s Studies, The University of Arizona at Tucson; Paul Lauter, the Allan K. Smith and Gwendolyn K. Miles Professor of English, Trinity College, Hartford; Jane Marcus, Distinguished Professor

of English, CUNY-Graduate Center, and City College of New York; Viviane Namaste, Associate

Professor, Simone de Beauvoir Institute, Concordia University; Lisa Rhodes, Assistant Professor of American Studies, Temple University; Greg Robinson, Associate Professor of History, Université du Québec à Montréal; Hortense Spillers, Professor of English, Vanderbilt University; Mary Helen Washington, Professor of English, University of Maryland, College Park; Marilyn Yalom, Senior Scholar, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Stanford University.

Lillian Robinson Scholars Program

Application Instructions for Residency

The Simone de Beauvoir Institute (SdBI) of Concordia University has created the Lillian Robinson Scholars Program as a living memorial to Dr. Lillian Robinson, the late Principal of the Institute. The program provides one or two awards to help offset travel, living, and research expenses for a scholar in residence at the SdBI. Please note that priority will be given to applications for residencies during the academic year at a time when students and professors are most present (September to April). The award is in the amount of 1000$. It is designed to grant support to scholars (junior or senior) who are interested in spending a minimum of 2 weeks at the SdBI. Applicants for an award from the Lillian Robinson Scholars Program must be pursuing scholarship with a feminist orientation, and applications are accepted for work in any field(s) of inquiry. Applicants must have a Ph.D. or equivalent, but need not be employed academics. During their residency, the scholar will have access to office space, a computer, the SdBI reading room, the university libraries, plus the SdBI’s community of feminist intellectuals and activists. The visiting scholar is expected to take an active role in SdBI life, and to present their work in a public forum while in residence.

Application Materials

  • Up-dated curriculum vitae;
  • Summary of research project to be worked on while at the SdBI (1-page maximum);
  • Names, institutional affiliation, and email addresses of two (2) referees;
  • Indication of the Scholar’s planned dates of residence, if selected (dates of the arrival to, and departure from, the Simone de Beauvoir Institute).

The Lillian Robinson Scholars Program

This program is designed to attract distinguished visiting scholars working on a range of feminist research topics to the SdBI. The program supports stays of varying lengths for scholars with a PhD.

PLEASE NOTE: The deadline to apply for 2020 is April 1, 2019.

Please see the application instructions for more information: https://www.concordia.ca/content/dam/artsci/sdbi/docs/2019-2020%20Application%20Instructions%20(002).pdf

Send Application Materials to: Gada.Mahrouse@concordia.ca

(Chair, L. Robinson Selection Committee)

  1. Call for Applications: Toronto Queer Film Festival: IndigiQueer and Trans Applications Callout (April 10, 2019)

Date: April 10th, 2019

Time: Deadline is 7pm on April 10th

Location: Online

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/415588259247333/

We are pleased to begin accepting applications to the second Indigiqueer and Trans Video Workshop Series! Come learn to make a video with Thirza Cuthand and Fallon Simard over four Saturdays this spring. We give access to equipment and technical support and pay a $400 honorarium for completed videos, and a screening fee when we premiere them at this year's Toronto Queer Film Festival! To apply please send a short treatment of the video you would like to make, along with a short bio outlining your previous creative work and experience. Beginners encouraged to apply! Must be over 18 due to content and identify as IndigiQueer/2 Spirit/Trans. Workshops will be held on the afternoons of Saturday, April 20, 2019, May 4, May 25, and June 8, 2019. Send your applications to indigiqueer@torontoqueerfilmfest.com by April 10th, 2019.

In partnership with Trinity Square Video and imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival and funded by the Ontario Art Council.

(Still from “Noolíhkamun” by Zephyr McKenna, 2018 workshop participant)

  1. Call for Papers: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies - Issue # 5 Theme: Disability and Desire Submissions (April 15, 2019)

Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies

Call for Papers – Issue #5

Theme: Disability and Desire

The Knots Editorial Collective is pleased to announce that they are accepting submissions for the fifth issue of Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies. The submission deadline is April 15th 2019.

About Knots:

Knots is a peer-reviewed journal that highlights high-calibre work by undergraduate students and undergraduate alumni*, work that moves beyond normative biomedical conceptions of disability and contributes to the development and growth of disability studies as a field. The editors are open to the widest array of topics that contribute to disability studies and to the continued examination and deconstruction of ableism. Submissions in the forms of essays, creative writing, book and film reviews, as well as art pieces are welcome. Submissions are not limited to students from the University of Toronto.

Thinking with Disability and Desire:

For the fifth issue, we are especially interested in work that explores the complex relationship between disability and desire. Disabled, mad and sick bodies and minds are often treated as inherently undesirable. The presumed association between disability and undesirability can be seen with the pathologization of disabled sexualities, where disabled people are routinely cast either as hypersexual or else devoid of sexuality (Shakespeare, 1996; Siebers, 2008; Erickson, 2015). Disability is also commonly framed as socially undesirable, an assumption that is enshrined in a variety of institutional practices and state policies (e.g., segregated educational environments, sheltered workshops, forced institutionalization, immigration restrictions, etc.). Disability studies has long contested the presumed undesirability of disability, inviting us instead to recognize disability as an essential and valuable way of being in the world.

The work produced by disability justice scholars, activists and artists shows us how the association between disability and desire is profoundly complicated by intersecting and hierarchical relations of power (Berne, 2016; Mingus, 2011; Bailey and Mobley, 2018; Erickson, 2015; Minich, 2016; Erevelles, 2008). Disability, Nirmala Erevelles (2008) reminds us, is often “acquired under oppressive conditions,” conditions that often target Black, Indigenous and People of Color communities in particular (i.e, disability as an effect of poverty, occupation, economic exploitation, state and police violence, lack of access to nutritious foods, clean air and water, healthcare and education, etc.) (119). Thinking with disability and desire alongside and in tandem with critical race theory, queer and feminist epistemologies and indigenous studies means desiring to dismantle ableist structures of racism, colonialism, sexism and transmisogyny that continue to leverage disability as harm. To borrow the words of Knots #4 contributor Vania González Tanamachi, we ask: how might “desiring disability represent an opportunity to build an intersectional coalitional disability studies that fights for liberatory futures that meet the needs and desires of all bodies”? (52).

We invite written and creative submissions that engage broadly with the theme of disability and desire.

Submission might address the following questions and themes:

What is the relationship between disability and (mental) health to Western standards of beauty and desirability?

How do disabled, sick and/or mad bodies express and embody desire/desirability?

How does disability desire act as a form resistance and rejection of ableist norms?

What radical possibilities are released through mad, sick and disabled sexual desire?

How can we understand disability justice, radical access and anti-oppression work as a kind of desire?

How might disability desire change or impact activism and community organizing?

How does disability/crip art disrupt normative understandings of beauty and desire?

How can disability desire help us to imagine and build more accessible futures?  What might these futures look/feel/be like?

How do we make room for different or conflicting desires for (our) bodies, minds and futures?

Submission Procedure & Information

The submission process is electronic:

all manuscript submissions can be made online to knots.contact@gmail.com by no later than April 15, 2019.

The author’s name and the title of the work should both appear in the subject line of the email; the full manuscript should be attached as a PDF file to the editors. Please check the full guide for details. Any questions regarding content, submission or accessibility requests should be directed to knots.contact@gmail.com

The Editorial Collective looks forward to receiving your submissions and to together producing Knots issue #5!

Knots is also seeking peer reviewers for the editorial board! If you are interested, send the journal an email.

*All submissions must be work produced in the context of an undergraduate degree. We recognize that the contributor may no longer be an undergraduate at the time of submission.

References:

Bailey, Moya and Izetta Autumn Mobley (2018). “Work in the Intersections: A Black Feminist Disability Studies Framework.: Gender and Society.

Erevelles, Nirmala (2011). “Color of Violence: Reflecting on Gender, Race and Disability in Wartime”. In Kim Q. Hall (ed.), Feminist Disability Studies. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. pp. 117—135.

Erickson, Loree (2015). (Un)Breaking our Hearts: Cultures of Un/Desirability and the Transformative Potential of Queercrip Porn. PhD Dissertation. York University.

Fritsch, Kelly (2015). “Desiring Disability Differently: Neoliberalism, Heterotopic Imagination and Intra-corporeal Reconfigurations”. Foucault Studies, no. 19: 43-66.

González Tanamachi (2019). “Confronting the Neocolonial Production of Disability: An Examination of Mexican Migrant Farm Workers’ Experiences and Understandings of Disability.” Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies. Issue 4.

Mingus (2010). “Changing the Framework: Disability Justice”. Leaving Evidence.

Minich, Julie (2016).”Enabling Whom? Critical Disability Studies Now”. Lateral

Shakespeare, Tom (1996). Sexual Politics of Disability: Untold Desires. New York: Continuum

Siebers, Tobin (2008). Disability Theory. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Sins Invalid (2016) “Disability Justice: A Working Draft” Skin, Tooth, and Bone

  1. Call for Submissions: Canadian Disability Studies Association Student Paper Competition Student Paper Competition (April 15, 2019)

16th Annual Conference of the Canadian Disability Studies Association

Association canadienne d’études sur le handicap

June 1-3, 2019

University of British Columbia

Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

ELIGIBILITY:

Students must be currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate program at any Canadian college or university

SUBMISSIONS:

Students must be the sole author of the submission

Students may only submit one entry

Submissions must be original and unpublished

Both essays and research papers are accepted

Students who are already accepted to present at this year’s conference may submit to the student paper competition either with work relating to their accepted presentation or with different work

Submissions should not exceed 7,000 words including references

Referencing should follow standard APA, MLA, or Chicago guidelines

JUDGING:

Papers will be anonymously peer-reviewed by a panel of undergraduate and graduate students.

Students should demonstrate how their work is situated within the discipline and existing literature.

Paper will be assessed on the following:

Writing and communication

Clarity of purpose

Argument development

Paper structure

Critical analysis

Writing style and flow

Relevance

Engagement with the field/s of Disability Studies, Mad Studies, and/or Deaf Studies

Evidence of a nuanced understanding of these disciplines and/or related politics

Contribution

Originality

Demonstrates importance of the topic explored

Contribution to questions, knowledge, and/or understandings related to Disability/Mad/Deaf studies and/or disability justice

AWARDS:

First placee:

Monetary reward of $200

Reserved spot to present at the 2019 CDSA-ACÉH conference in Vancouver, BC, either in person or remotely *Please note this spot is only reserved for papers that have not already been accepted for presentation through the CDSA-ACÉH Call for Papers. If the student is already accepted to present at the conference but submits a paper to this competition on a separate topic, they will still be eligible for a second reserved spot to present. Please note students are not required to attend or present at the conference. Please see the website www.cdsa-aceh.ca for more information about available conference bursaries.

Two one-hour consultations with Leslie Kern Coaching on how to begin to prepare the paper for submission to peer-reviewed journals (https://lesliekerncoaching.com/)

First, second, and third place:

Acknowledgement on the CDSA-ACÉH website and Facebook page.

*Note: should there be no suitable entries, prizes will not be awarded.*

DEADLINE:

Deadline for Paper Submission: April 15, 2019

Please e-mail your submission with the subject line “Student Paper Competition” to cakovesi@yorku.ca

Please direct any inquiries to the current CDSA-ACÉH Student Representative, Caroline Kovesi, at cakovesi@yorku.ca

Winners will be announced by the last week of May 2019.

Source:

http://english.cdsa-aceh.ca/student-awards/student-paper-competition/?fbclid=IwAR2_raxeiMfcClwFonFuAvbKA3QlcgKc2fNGqqw3eHRC4c6meF9FQHanuXo

https://www.neads.ca/en/about/media/index.php?id=749

  1. Call for Papers: Feminist Explorations of Urban Futures International Conference (May 1, 2019)

Call for Papers

Feminist Explorations of Urban Futures International Conference

26-28 September, 2019

York University, Toronto, Canada

The research project, Urbanisation, gender and the global south: A transformative knowledge network (GenUrb) is pleased to issue the first call for papers for the Feminist Explorations of Urban Futures International Conference.

The purpose of this conference is to advance feminist thinking on urban research across the global south.

With social reproduction in crisis and people increasingly making a living outside the wage, the urban is being reshaped in ways that are no longer captured in twentieth century conceptualizations of urbanisation. In those countries labelled the ‘global south’ urbanization, driven both by natural increase and rural to urban migration, is where over 90 per cent of urban growth (between 2000 – 2050) is expected to occur. Our aim in this conference is to explore how feminist scholars, activists and policy makers understand the gendered nature of urbanization, women’s place-making strategies, and to rethink the urban from the perspective of “the global south,” not least comparatively and relationally.

Through a series of roundtable, panels, workshop, and research paper sessions the ‘Feminist Explorations of Urban Futures’ conference will create a global dialogue on the following themes: comparative feminist research, critical policy dialogues on gender and the urban, feminist activism and the city, and social reproduction and women’s place-making in cities. The conference will bring together leading feminist urban scholars, shapers of urban policy, activists working on gender and the urban at various scales, as well as new and emerging scholars working on feminist approaches to the urban.

This call for papers invites researchers, policy makers, artists, and practitioners to submit proposals for research papers on topics including, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • Social reproduction/production/financialization
  • Everyday life: housing and habitus
  • Mobility, migration, debt, networks
  • Infrastructure
  • Violence
  • Grassroots mobilisation and advocacy
  • Global urban policy frameworks and local contexts.

Submission process: Abstracts of no more than 250 words are due to be submitted to https://bit.ly/2IFV578 by 1 May 2019. Applicants will be notified of our decision by May 15, 2019.

For further information on the conference, visit https://bit.ly/2BX0qB6.

  1. Call for Proposals: The (re)Making of a Movement: New Perspectives on the 1960s Counterculture with Keynote Speaker Angela Davis (May 30, 2019)

Abstract Submission: https://www.humber.ca/liberalarts-ifoa/call-proposals

Contact: daniel.hambly@humber.ca, jennifer.marotta@humber.ca

Submission Deadline: May 30, 2019

Conference Date: October 26-27, 2019

Location: Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens’ Quay West, Toronto, Canada.

Host: Faculty of Libeal Arts and Sciences, Humber College and the Toronto International

Festival of Authors (TIFA)

Keynote Speaker:

Angela Davis Activist, Author, Educator, and Scholar

It’s been 50 years since 400,000 people descended on Bethel, New York, for an event that became one of the most important cultural touchstones for a generation: Woodstock. As participants in an amorphous social movement the Woodstock Generation came to be defined in opposition to previous generations. Despite growing up in an era of incredible privilege, widespread government social programs, post-war housing and education, and increasing affluence, they rejected, or attempted to redefine traditional values. In theory, supporters of the counterculture rejected individualism, competition, and capitalism. Rejection of monogamy and the traditional nuclear family gave way to a communal ideal—disavowing individualism and private property in favour of shared food, work, sex. As historian Michael Doyle points out, the myth of Woodstock holds that “in a time of military conflict abroad, racial and ethnic strife at home, when a deep social division known as the ‘generation gap’ separated parents from children, nearly half a million young people removed themselves from proximity to these conflicts and went ‘back to the garden’ to try to ‘set their souls free’.” As such, Woodstock carries a certain symbolic weight for participants in the 1960s and 1970s counterculture movement and for anyone who looks back on the past fifty years with a critical eye. The counterculture movement encompassed: the Civil Rights Movement, Free Speech, the New Left, Anti-war, Anti-nuclear, Feminism, Free school movement, Drug Culture, Environmentalism, Student Activism, Producerism, Gay liberation, the Sexual Revolution, and the rise of Hippies to innovations in fashion, music, film, and literature. The American poet John Perry Barlow once said: “I started out as a teenage beatnik and then became a hippie and then became a cyberpunk. And now I’m still a member of the counterculture, but I don’t know what to call that.” How have the various movements within the counterculture evolved over the past 50 years? What did hippies become? Who was the Sexual Revolution scripted for? How did the Civil Rights movement evolve? How did a generation that “dropped out” re-engage? How was this fringe culture appropriated by marketers? How challenging was it to live an ideal especially in light of the Cold War and rise of Reaganism?

Our conference committee welcomes individual presentation proposals of 300 words, and panel proposals (3 people max) of 900 words, based on any of the above themes.

This will be the sixth annual interdisciplinary conference held by Humber College’s School of Liberal Arts and Sciences of Toronto in association with the Toronto International Festival of Authors (TIFA), one of the most celebrated literary festivals in the world. It is located at the Harbourfront Centre, one of downtown Toronto’s major cultural and artistic venues.

Submit your proposal online: https://www.humber.ca/liberalarts-ifoa/call-proposals

OPPORTUNITIES:

  1. Job Opportunity: Program Officer - International Gender, Racial and Ethnic Justice at Ford Foundation

Deadline: Until filled

Location: New York City, NY, USA

Organization: Ford Foundation

Ford’s new International GREJ Program will specifically focus on a Global South intersectional feminist perspective to addressing violence against women and girls in innovative ways that serve to empower women and girls as agents of change (not victims).

This new Program Officer will develop and manage a grant portfolio and related activities—with a particular focus on the Global South; and serve as a thought leader leveraging partnerships on issues related to violence against women and girls within various public and private settings.

The ideal candidate:

has at least 10 years of Global South experience working in the women’s rights, violence against women and girls, and/or social justice philanthropy space

has extensive networks and demonstrated Global South feminist perspective on women and girls’ power

is a highly respected thought leader on intersectional feminist analysis on women’s rights issues (with an excellent understanding of tensions/debates within the feminist movement in relation to race, class, sexual orientation and gender)

has the ability to navigate U.S. and global South feminist movements and women’s right stakeholders.

Desired skills:

proven experience devising, monitoring and leading impact driven-strategies

exceptional communications skills

abilities as supportive team player

MA or equivalent experience in a relevant field of study. How to apply:

Please apply online here https://fordfoundation.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/FordFoundationCareerPage/job/New-York-USA/Program-Officer_R565

  1. Job Opportunity: Philanthropic Engagement Manager at Urgent Action Fund for Women's Human Rights

Deadline: Until filled

Location: Oakland or New York City, USA

Organization: Urgent Action Fund for Women's Human Rights

Organization:

Centered on a groundbreaking model of rapid response grantmaking, Urgent Action Fund for Women’s Human Rights (UAF) supports courageous women and transgender human rights defenders (WHRDs) around the world. Our model protects and advances the civil, political and social rights of women and LGBTI people, and invests in the resilience of social justice movements, including environmental, feminist, anti-corruption, land rights, youth, and LGBTI movements. Founded in 1997, Urgent Action Fund has grown from a single organization into a network of four independent Sister Funds that collectively support frontline women’s rights activists around the world. With an annual revenue of $5 Million, UAF’s work within this network centers on support for activists and social movements in Central Asia, the Middle East, Western and Eastern Europe, the South Caucuses, Turkey, Russia, Canada, and the United States.

Position Description:

The Philanthropic Engagement Manager leads visibility and engagement strategies with UAF’s external stakeholders, particularly major individual donors. They play a vital role in advancing Urgent Action Fund’s work for women’s human rights. This position reports to the Executive Director and also works closely with the Partnerships Manager and the Development & Communications Officer. The position can be based in Oakland, California or New York City, with a preference for Oakland.

Core Responsibilities:

Develop overall visibility and donor engagement strategy, implement workplans, and monitor, assess, and adjust progress and development strategies.

Raise the organization’s visibility among external stakeholders through events, publications, and other messaging and engagement strategies.

Support the Executive Director in her personal outreach, solicitations, and stewardship of donors.

Steward and cultivate major gifts, with emphasis on West Coast donors.

Manage reporting to private family foundation donors, supervising the work of grantwriting consultants as needed.

Participate in the organization’s annual budgeting process, advising on revenue streams and new sources of support.

Work with the Development & Communications Team on the development of print and online communication materials and online fundraising campaigns, gifts processing, and donor stewardship.

Work with members of UAF’s Board of Directors to raise UAF’s visibility and engage donors.

Work with Program Team and Operations Team to ensure coordination with our work and our funders.

Core capacities:

Share the values of the organization: integrity, feminisms, wellbeing, justice, courage, and mindful engagement.

Work collaboratively and respectfully with multiple stakeholders including program staff, grantees, donors, Board members, and external consultants.

Work with attention to detail and sensitivity to confidential information.

Build relationships that connect others to Urgent Action Fund and that nurture a community of donor-activists.

Highly driven, energetic, detailed, enjoys a small company atmosphere with lean staffing, has the ability to wear a number of different hats.

Qualifications:

Minimum 5-7+ years of experience with fundraising, communications, or development work.

Experienced in fundraising campaign planning and execution.

Comfort with and demonstrated interest in outreach to donors, securing meetings, and soliciting gifts.

Engaging public speaker.

Strategic thinker experienced in developing the case for support for social justice or human rights-oriented work.

Superior communication and interpersonal skills.

Comfortable working across cultures and time zones.

Passion for social justice and human rights, including women’s rights and LGBTQI equality.

Job Specifics & Work Environment:

This position is full time (40 hours per week) and is exempt. Position pay range is $80,000 to $97,500 annually, depending on qualifications and experience and includes a strong benefits package (Health, Dental, retirement, Flex Spending for medical and transit). Position location is Oakland, California although we will consider New York applicants.

Urgent Action Fund is an equal opportunity employer that does not discriminate in its hiring practices and, in order to build the strongest possible workforce, actively seeks a diverse applicant pool

How to apply:

Please submit cover letter, and resume to employment@urgentactionfund.org, with “Philanthropic Engagement Manager” in the subject line.

Cover letters may be addressed to the hiring manager: Kate Kroeger, Executive Director. Applicants must be eligible to work in the United States. The position is open until filled. No phone calls please.

  1. Job Opportunity: Deputy Director at Fuller Project for International Reporting

Deadline: 1 May 2019

Location: New York City, NY, USA

Organization: Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice

This is an outstanding opportunity for an experienced leader with a solid financial background and a proven track record of creative problem-solving and change management to join in a high-growth, high-impact, well-respected, mission-driven organization.

Reporting to the Executive Director (ED) and directly supervising a four-person Fiscal and Administrative Team, the Deputy Director (DD) serves as an integral member of Astraea’s senior management team. The DD will work closely with the ED to create an environment for success that inspires staff and provides holistic, adaptive systems to support the organization’s mission and values.

How to apply:

Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice has engaged Koya Leadership Partners to help in this hire.

Please submit a compelling cover letter and resume online here https://ats.k2-app.com/jobPosting/apply/3434

  1. Job Opportunity: Program Associate for Knowledge Management and Technology at Women's Learning Partnership (WLP)

Deadline: Until filled

Location: Bethesda, USA

Organization: Women's Learning Partnership

The position will support two key areas of WLP’s work:

as a partner liaison, providing communications, program coordination, and evaluation support to WLP partner organizations, and

supporting the development and maintenance of technology to support WLP’s digital assets, including its Archives, Oral Histories, and online Learning Center.

We are looking for a creative team-player and self-starter, with excellent writing skills, a strong background in using technology, and commitment to advancing women’s rights and gender equality.

Responsibilities include:

Partner Programs Liaison

Liaise with select WLP partner organizations and assist with coordinating the implementation and evaluation of WLP trainings, curriculum development, advocacy, and capacity building programs. Work closely with WLP team members to coordinate activities across program areas.

Monitor relevant developments in the country/regional context and in relation to the partner. Work closely and maintain positive relationships with global partners.

Support partner organizations in program planning, monitoring and evaluation.

Write reports based on program results from the field and assist with writing grant proposals.

Knowledge Management and Technology

Assess, strategize, and implement processes, tools, and/or technology capabilities to support information gathering and knowledge-sharing across the organization.

Help enforce IT guidelines and standards through ongoing education.

Orient new staff to IT systems and policies.

Liaise with technology vendors and provide research and testing of technical processes/products as needed.

Maintain documentation of WLP’s technology assets.

Qualifications:

Commitment and dedication to women's empowerment.

Graduate degree in a related field (Library Science, English Literature, International Relations, Women’s Studies, etc.)

Minimum 3 years relevant professional experience, preferably with at least 2 years in the non-profit sector.

Experience with program coordination.

Excellent writing skills and ability to communicate with individuals from diverse backgrounds.

Proficiency with standard professional software for word processing, database management, multimedia editing, etc.

Excellent organizational skills and attention to detail and ability to manage multiple tasks.

familiarity with WordPress, Drupal 8, or other CMS.

Applicant must have permission to work in the US, if not a US citizen or permanent resident.

How to apply:

Please submit your cover letter, resume, writing sample, and a list of three references to: jobs@learningpartnership.org with the subject line “Program Associate: Knowledge Management and Technology.”

  1. Job Opportunity: Feminist Evaluator at RESURJ (March 15, 2019) 

Deadline: 15 March 2019

Location: Flexible

Organization: RESURJ

RESURJ is seeking an experienced feminist evaluator to conduct an in-depth assessment of global, cross-regional, and regional feminist convenings and dialogues hosted by RESURJ over the last few years.

Background

Since 2010, RESURJ has convened a series of dialogues as part of our strategic plan, at a time when the need for further organizing has been clear and urgent. As a connector, RESURJ opens spaces and build bridges for and with younger feminists from the Global South to collaboratively assess, reflect, and create strategies for advancing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. Young feminists that have come together in RESURJ’s hosted dialogues in Latin America and Caribbean and Africa, and cross-regionally have continued to work and strategize together, in some cases creating and continuing to strategize informal and more formal collective and networks within their own contexts.

To sharpen, widen, and further concretize RESURJ’s strategies in hosting sexual and reproductive justice dialogues moving forward, the Alliance is conducting a convenings evaluation, to assess the ways our efforts of bringing young feminists together have contributed to sustainable feminist organizing, knowledge building, connection, leadership strengthening, and meaningful participation of our members and other young feminists in diverse spaces and over time in advancing Sexual and Reproductive Justice.

Objectives

To further evaluate and understand the ways these spaces have contributed to the growth, learning, connection, leadership, and meaningful participation of RESURJ members and other young feminists in diverse spaces and over time, in advancing sexual and reproductive justice;

Develop recommendations for the revision, renewal, and revisiting of our convening activities towards the next strategic planning phase in 2020;

Provide external recommendations to allies, funders, and the wider feminist community on the possible shifts and changes that are urgent in approaches to funding for and implementation of South feminist convenings;

Offer a catalyst for a wider conversation in the community and sharing of best practice amongst South Feminist movements.

Scope and deliverables

Conduct an internal and external assessment of convenings reports, evaluations and survey results; identify and interview participants as relevant, RESURJ members, advisors, allies and Friends, grantmakers, and collaborators. We hope to build time for focused group discussions taking advantage of global and regional gatherings, such as CSW and HLPF, where participants of RESURJ convened spaces are attending.

Key tasks will include:

Development of a research and evaluation methodology plan

Desk review/mapping of RESURJ convenings objectives, outcomes, feedback, evaluation and follow up from RESURJ convenings 2010-2018

Focus group discussion/s with RESURJ convening participants, at least one global space in early 2019 (this may require travel)

Interviews and survey with diverse stakeholders, including RESURJ convening participants, RESURJ members, co-conveners, funders, and allies

Synthesize key findings: develop a report with a concise executive summary and sections outlining key findings; analysis and recommendations (Draft to be presented to RESURJ membership)

Prepare a short presentation for RESURJ members and allies

Regular check in with RESURJ secretariat and team members February – September 2019, including

The Evaluator

We expect the consultant to have strong, demonstrable experience of feminist and/or social justice monitoring and evaluation, reporting and documentation, as well as a strong background in feminist movements and organizing in the Global South.

The evaluator should have knowledge and experience of best practice in participatory evaluation,

Familiarity with feminist movement building, human rights mechanisms, feminist organizing, and advocacy at various levels

Ability to synthesize and distill diverse qualitative information into objective recommendations

Fluency in English and either Spanish or French needed

Timeline

March 30th – August 30th, 2019

All Deliverables due by August 30th, 2019

Reporting Requirements

The consultant will report to the RESURJ Secretariat and provide regular updates on the status of the project, and any challenges encountered in moving the project forward.

How to apply:

Interested parties are invited to submit a proposal outlining:

Their understanding of the objectives and deliverables of the proposed project

Proposed approach and methodology and what type of data they would gather

Overview of your approach to feminist evaluation

Proposed project fee quoted in US dollars and detailed budget

And any additional resources/ support required to carry this consultancy forward

A full proposal should include:

A cover letter, your approach to the project and responses to the above

A resume or CV that highlights relevant experiences in carrying out evaluations of convenings on young feminist organizing, sexual and reproductive justice and advocacy

At least one example of similar work

The names of two references

Send your proposal to info@resurj.org with subject line reading: Feminist evaluator by 15 March, 2019.

  1. Job Opportunity: Communication and Strategic Information (CSI) Unit Manager with Sonke Gender Justice (March 15, 2019)

Deadline: 15 March 2019

Location: Cape Town or Johannesburg, South Africa

Organization: Sonke Gender Justice

Main Responsibilities

Manage the organisation’s identity and image (including the production of Annual Report, newsletter, social media and website management);

Contribute actively to national, regional and global advocacy campaigns;

Use communications as a tool to share news about Sonke’s Community Action Team members to inspire community activism locally and nationally;

Develop media advocacy training and facilitate workshops when required;

Manage media relations, including community media, social media, and mass media;

Support materials development and dissemination;

Manage internal communications; and

Proactive fundraising for CSI Unit

Qualifications and skills:

Applicants must hold a minimum of a Masters Degree in the social sciences, with a strong preference for Journalism, Public Health, or Human Rights degrees, and must be fluent in spoken and written English.

At least 3 years experience in journalism (political journalism an advantage) and have active contacts amongst media institutions in South Africa and across the continent.

Experience having worked in complex human rights, public health and/or development environment.

Proven ability to respond quickly to unexpected opportunities and challenges.

Expertise in any of the following areas: gender equality, gender-based violence, sexual and reproductive health and rights, democracy, human rights; peace and conflict; men and masculinities, community mobilisation, local government.

Experience convening media briefings.

Ability to speak indigenous South African languages; French or Swahili would be a significant advantage.

How to apply:

Interested applicants should submit their Curriculum Vitae (not more than 5 pages), motivation letter and contact details of two referees, and this one-page application form:  to Sonke’s H.R. Department via email to hiring@genderjustice.org.za

For non-South Africans attaining of the work permit from the Department of Home Affairs is the responsibility of the applicant and employment will depend on a valid work permit being in place

EE candidates are encouraged to apply.

  1. Job Opportunity: Lecturer Position in Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies at Stony Brook University (March 15, 2019)

The Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Stony Brook University (SUNY) is searching for a full-time lecturer with expertise in black feminist studies, transnational sexuality studies, disability studies, and/or the global politics of health. This position is part of an initiative supported by Presidential and Provostial diversity funds.

Additional Information: This is a 2-year lecturer position with the possibility of transitioning into a tenure-track position, budget pending. To support the lecturer's research agenda, the position comes with research funds and teaching assistant support. There will also be opportunities for working with graduate students (if the candidate so desires). Applications are due March 15, 2019. Required Qualifications:

Candidate must have a PhD in hand by the start date of August 26, 2019.

Preferred Qualifications:

PhD in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies or other interdisciplinary field. In particular we are looking for interdisciplinary scholars whose work is focused in one or more of the following areas: Black feminist studies, transnational sexuality studies, global politics of health, disability studies. We are especially interested in scholars trained in ethnography or interdisciplinary social science methods. Additionally, we welcome applications from individuals who have followed nontraditional career paths, who have pursued careers outside the academy, and/or who have taken time off for personal reasons (e.g. disability or care taking).

Responsibilities & Requirements:

The Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) at Stony Brook University is searching for a full-time Diversity Lecturer in WGSS as part of an initiative supported by Presidential and Provostial diversity funds. The lectureship position begins fall 2019 and is for two years with the possibility of the position transitioning into a tenure-track position, budget pending, after two years. Teaching load is 3/3 with opportunities to teach at all levels of our curriculum, including upper-level undergraduate and graduate seminars. In the interest of supporting the lecturer’s research agenda, this position will have access to annual research funds and teaching assistant support. Preliminary phone or video interviews will take place in late March, and finalists will be invited to campus in mid-April.

WGSS at Stony Brook has a major, minor, MA, PhD, and graduate certificate. Stony Brook prides itself on attracting an incredibly diverse student body, including many first generation immigrants and first generation college students. Recent studies have shown that Stony Brook is one of the top universities in the U.S. for supporting the upward mobility of its students.

Special Notes:

This is a non-tenure track position. FLSA Exempt position, not eligible for the overtime provisions of the FLSA. Internal and external search to occur simultaneously. Anticipated Start Date: August 26, 2019

Pursuant to Executive Order 161, no State entity, as defined by the Executive Order, is permitted to ask, or mandate, in any form, that an applicant for employment provide his or her current compensation, or any prior compensation history, until such time as the applicant is extended a conditional offer of employment with compensation. If such information has been requested from you before such time, please contact the Governor’s Office of Employee Relations at (518) 474-6988 or via email at info@goer.ny.gov.

Stony Brook University is 100% tobacco-free as of January 1, 2016. See our policy and learn more at stonybrook.edu/tobaccofree. The selected candidate must successfully clear a background investigation. Application Procedure

Applications are due by March 15, 2019 and must be submitted online through www.AcademicJobsOnline.org (Position ID# 13314). Please address all applications to: Search Committee, Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5356.

Applicants must include the following:

A letter of application

A full curriculum vitae

A State Employment Application

The names and contact information for three reference letters, written, to be contacted by the search committee after initial review of applications.

Questions should be directed to the Assistant to the Department Chair, Jacqueline Donnelly via email at wgss@stonybrook.edu

View the full listing at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/13314.

  1. Job Opportunity: Consultant for Development Justice Video at Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (March 20, 2019)

Deadline: 20 March 2019

Location: Flexible

Organization: Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD)

Terms of Reference

Background:

APWLD is Asia Pacific’s leading feminist, membership driven network. Our membership represents diverse women from 27 countries in the region and provides the strength and expertise that drive and execute our programmes. For over 32 years APWLD has been empowering women to use law as an instrument of change for equality, justice, peace and development. We use capacity building, research, advocacy and activism to claim and strengthen women’s human rights.

APWLD along with other civil society organisations from the Asia Pacific region have been advocating for a transformative development framework that departs from the market – driven development architecture and proposes a people drive alternative development model rooted in its five foundational shifts of

Redistributive Justice,

Economic Justice,

Gender and Social Justice,

Environmental Justice, and

Accountability to Peoples.

Development Justice is a transformative development architecture that aims to reduce inequalities of wealth, power, and resources between countries, between rich and poor, and between men and women.

This framework is based on the principles of common but differentiated responsibility and respective capacity and the right to development; embraces a holistic right-based approach; is grounded in international human rights obligations and peoples ‘sovereignty; and ensure that the human rights principles of equality, equity, non-discrimination, inclusive participation and decision-making, non-retrogression, and respect for universal and indivisible human rights underpin its policies and practices. Such an approach ensures that the most marginalised both benefit from development and become active agents of change.

Objectives:

Building on the first part of the Development Justice Video:

To highlight the continued worsening inequality and climate crises globally, and why it is more urgent than ever for us to advance alternatives to the current market-driven development architecture.

To expand on the five foundational shifts of the Development Justice framework – through concrete examples of alternative solutions developed and led by and women and communities.

To use this video as an advocacy tool to promote Development Justice at the various spaces that APWLD’s members and partners engage in.

Content Focus:

The consultant’s primary role would be to produce the Road to Development Justice Part 2 video (5-7 minutes) which will contain three key parts: Anger, Hopes and Action. Within these three, Hope will be the main focus. Each part will focus on the following:

Anger: Will reflect on the current alarming situation of increasing inequality and climate change.

Hope: Will further and briefly unpack the concepts of the five foundational shifts of the Development Justice framework using real examples of women and community-led development initiatives.

Action: Will deliver a key message calling onto people to take action to promote Development Justice as an alternative model to replace the current ‘unjust’ development paradigm.

The Consultant

The consultant will be preferably be a woman from Asia Pacific, with a combination of skills which should include:

Experience in producing an animated video such as whiteboard video, 2D vector animation or stop-motion videos.

Experience in video scripting and creating storyboards.

Excellent command of English language.

A good sense of pace and timing.

A good sense of music to complement images.

Ability to edit a video or work with editors.

Experience in conducting interviews with grassroots women from diverse backgrounds is an advantage;

Knowledge and experience of women’s rights, movement building and structural and political issues in Asia Pacific is an advantage.

Main tasks

Produce a 5-7 minute video. The production work shall include developing the script and storyboard with APWLD, and creating and editing the video accordingly.

Include subtitles of the voice over in the video.

Use or create custom work for the audio-visual of the video. Coordinate a voice-over service where required, including voice-over artists for the professional service delivery.

Collaborate with APWLD Secretariat in editing and otherwise reviewing the video prior to the completion.

Communicate regularly with APWLD Secretariat to share progress of the work, check details of the script, clarify queries and obtain further information.

Submit to APWLD Secretariat the final video together with script for the voice over, subtitles, infographic images, an audio file(s) of the voice recording, and other raw files needed for editing in the future.

Time-frame

Consultant should be available to start immediately, with the final video to be completed by no later than 20 June 2019.

How to apply:

The deadline for submitting proposals is 20 March 2019 via email to Ms. Hien Nguyen at hien@apwld.org with the subject line ‘Application for Consultancy Service_DJ video Part 2’.

  1. Job Opportunity: Quantitative Research Associate at Promundo-US ( March 22)

Deadline: 22 March 2019

Location: Washington, DC, USA

Organization: Promundo-US

The Research Associate will be based in Washington, DC and join a dynamic team of about 20 staff and consultants.

Promundo partners with civil society organizations, UN agencies, and the public and private sector to conduct cutting-edge and comprehensive research in more than 40 countries globally. Our research is designed for impact and has been used to inform national policy change, to shape media narratives on gender equality and masculinities, and to develop evidence-based programs and advocacy initiatives.

We are looking for an enthusiastic, detailed-oriented researcher with a passion for promoting (and measuring change in) gender equality to support Promundo's research and evaluation initiatives, including contributing to all stages of quantitative and qualitative research projects.

How to apply:

To apply, please send a 1) resume, 2) cover letter addressed to Ruti Levtov, and 3) writing sample of no more than 3 pages no later than March 22, 2019 to: jobs@promundoglobal.org.

Submission of all application materials in one PDF file preferred. Please write "Research Associate" as the subject heading.

Please indicate if you are legally authorized to work in the United States, and note how you came across our job posting (e.g. through which job board, listserv, type of communication). Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

  1. Job Opportunity: Program and Development Assistant at JASS (March 21, 2019)

Deadline: 21 March 2019

Location: Washington, DC, USA

Organization: JASS (Just Associates)

Are you a budding social justice advocate looking to build your experience and gain mad skills? If your answer is yes, we want you to join our team! The bonus is that you get to work alongside some of the smartest and coolest women in the world.

JASS is seeking an energetic, creative and motivated person to support key areas of our work including operations, communications and fundraising, and programs. The Program and Development Assistant will report to the Resource Mobilization Manager and work closely with members of our team in Washington, DC office, as well as virtually with our wider teams in Southern Africa, Southeast Asia, and Mesoamerica and beyond. This is great opportunity to contribute your special powers to helping us stay on top of things, while picking up new skills.

Key responsibilities:

Programmatic support

Provide logistical support for events and activities, including making travel and accommodation arrangements, maintaining participant lists, drafting budgets, corresponding with participants, and liaising with vendors

Maintain organizational calendars, schedule calls and meetings (coordinating across multiple time zones), and managing virtual communications tools (i.e. Gmail, Zoom, Wire, etc)

Support during meetings and take notes when needed

General office support, including answering phones, maintaining office files and supplies, and completing expense and credit reports

Liaise with building management, IT support, translators, etc.

Fundraising and communications support

Support the management of donor database, including adding new entries, tracking donor communications, and assisting with the transition to a new CRM

Support individual donor fundraising appeals (eblasts and mailings)

Assist with social media and help promote JASS publications and events

Support grants management, including updating the grants schedule, maintaining grant documents on the central drive, and collating regional monthly reports.

Qualifications:

Bachelor’s Degree required

Demonstrated experience and/or interest in our mission and in women’s rights and social justice

Solid logistics skills; experience coordinating events a plus

Outstanding time management and organizational skills with meticulous attention to detail

Flexibility to work on multiple priorities with colleagues from various regions and time zones

Willingness to take initiative and comfort sharing your own ideas for how to get things done

CRM experience or confidence to learn a new skill

Proficiency with Microsoft Office Suite

Strong communication skills

Basic graphic design and website content management (WordPress or Drupal) skills, a plus

Spanish proficiency ideal, but not required

How to apply:

If this sounds up your alley, then we would love to hear from you! Send your resume with a cover letter explaining your interest in JASS and why you are the best candidate for the role to info@justassociates.org.

Writing sample (no more than 5 pages) optional but encouraged. No phone calls please.

JASS is an equal opportunity employer that values and is enriched by diversity.

  1. Job Opportunity: Executive Assistant to Regional Director at The Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa (SIHA) (March 22, 2019)

Deadline: 22 March 2019

Location: Kampala , Uganda or Flexible

Organization: The Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa (SIHA)

The ‘EA’ is to provide professional-level administrative, operational and policy services as well as direct administrative assistance to the Regional Director, which may involve highly sensitive and/or confidential matters using independent judgment, tact and discretion . This is a position that requires comprehensive administrative, organizational and strategic support to the Regional Director maximizing effectiveness at the secretariat office and country offices.

Key Responsibilities

Maintain, update and manage an accurate electronic diary, mail and computer databases, clearly indicating priority of appointments, arrange and organize appointments, meetings and conferences which may include taking meeting notes , pre-meeting debriefs to the Regional Director and coordinating venues and arranging travel itineraries

Coordinate the Regional Director’s mission travel to the country offices, and ensure that all necessary documentation is in place.

Ensure that all incoming correspondence and communication is dealt with in a professional and timely manner as directed by the RD.

Undertake research for specific information using electronic resources and/or networking relationships with internal and external key stakeholders and also assisting the Regional Director in researching and following up with action on matters which fall within the Regional Director’s responsibility – constantly following up and acting immediately;

Ensure the Regional Director is fully briefed on, or prepared for, any engagements she is involved in through keeping and maintaining an accurate record of papers and electronics correspondences on behalf of the Regional Director;

To be the first point of contact for enquiries related to the Regional Director and ensuring that they are acted upon efficiently and to a high standard of effectively were necessary;

Provide full administrative and secretarial support to the Regional Director, including editing reports, letters, articles and speeches where appropriate and Draft and/or prepare correspondence on behalf of the Director;

Ensure that SIHA’s membership and Board members are given timely appointments, and communication shared effectively on behalf of the Regional Director;

Facilitated the Regional Director’s timely communication with SIHA’s Board of directors/advisors and, program advisory and SIHA management teams;

Availability to work (occasionally) unsociable hours, evenings, weekends and public holidays when required;

Profile

Tactful, diplomatic, responsive and self-confident, with excellent communication and Strong writing and research Skills and abilities

Interpersonal skills, including knowledge of etiquette and ability to think on one’s feet,

Including the ability to prioritize and re-prioritize.

Flexible, committed and mature with ability to show initiative and common sense, plan own work, work unsupervised, handle multiple tasks, meet deadlines and work in a fast-paced environment under pressure and to tight deadlines

Excellent administrative and time-management skills, with excellent attention to detail and accuracy, and capacity to lead on specific initiatives

Knowledge of Health and Safety standards;

Possession of valid travel documents;

Ability to lead by example and demonstrate desire to share expertise, knowledge and skills with other team members;

Friendly and professional demeanor;

How to apply:

Interested Candidates are asked to provide their current CV and Cover Letter, expressing her/his motivation in applying and relevant experience/expertise, to SIHA’s Human Resources Department humanresourcesiha@gmail.com before 22nd of March 2019.

Please enter “Application Materials: Executive Assistant to Regional Director”.

Due to the anticipated volume of applications, please note that SIHA will contact only shortlisted candidates. We thank you for your interest in joining SIHA! 'SIHA is open to equality and inclusiveness in employment'

  1. Job Opportunity: Consultant for a Mid-term Review - MENA Regional Strategic Framework at Kvinna till Kvinna (March 24, 2019)

Deadline: 24 March 2019

Location: Flexible

Organization: Kvinna till Kvinna

The purpose of the mid-term review is to examine whether the current strategies need to be reformulated to improve the relevance of Kvinna till Kvinna’s support in the region and if the country programmes are relevant and applicable to the contexts in which they operate.

It is also to study the programmes in relation to their Theories of Change (ToCs) and to consider if they are in line. The two programmes should be reviewed separately as they are operating independently.

The review should have a strong focus on lessons learned and identify and recommend relevant adjustments to the programmes to achieve their intended results.

Required Qualifications

Solid experience of mid-term review and analytical evaluation work in the context of international development cooperation and civil society, preferably with proven knowledge of the MENA region and the Syria context

Expertise in gender and civil society; in particular women’s movements

Proven experience of evaluating projects built on a Rights-based approach

Fluency in English and Arabic

Master’s degree or equivalent knowledge in social sciences or other field relevant for the assignment

Required information

CV(s) of the consultant(s) involved in the mid-term review

Brief methodology and work plan for implementation of the mid-term review (approximately 4-5 pages)

Timeframe of the mid-term review in accordance with the points specified in this ToR

Assignment budget with fees incl. VAT with all expenses in accordance with notes under cost frame

References to previous assignments similar to the mid-term review presented in this ToR

How to apply:

The tender must be submitted to Kvinna till Kvinna no later than 24 March 2019 to: Marianne.Boqvist@kvinnatillkvinna.se

Feel free to send any questions and requests for clarifications as well.

  1. Job Opportunity: Senior Vice President, Global Legal Program at Center for Reproductive Rights (March 28, 2019)

Deadline: 28 March 2019

Location: Geneva, Switzerland

Organization: Center for Reproductive Rights

The Center for Reproductive Rights seeks a Senior Vice President, Global Legal Program, a role that is critical for the success of The Center for Reproductive Rights. Reporting directly to Chief Strategy and Operating Officer (CSOO) and working closely with the CEO, the SVP Global serves as a member of the Center’s Executive Team and provides a strategic vision for the Center’s global leadership role. The SVP Global is specifically responsible for leading and overseeing the Center’s global legal, policy, and capacity-building teams, and is primarily responsible for harnessing and coordinating their power to drive transformational social change and monitoring and evaluating impact.

Along with the CEO and CSOO, the SVP Global is accountable for the achievement of all key programmatic goals and objectives. The SVP Global is also responsible for enhancing the reputation and vision of the Center by staying abreast of global human-rights developments and speaking publicly and serving as a thought leader on critical global issues affecting the work of the Center.

The SVP Global oversees a department with 55 staff based in 4 regional offices and New York that is targeted to grow to 86 by FY21 under the Center’s current Strategic Plan.

This position will lead the Executive Team in envisioning, implementing, and coordinating a sweeping portfolio of programs in service of the organization’s ambitious goals for the continued transformation of the human rights landscape with respect to reproductive rights, health, and justice.

The SVP Global will have the benefit of the Center’s many strengths:

A compelling global human rights mission and an outstanding reputation for quality and excellence that has won the respect of policymakers, legal, governmental, and NGO partners, opinion leaders, journalists, and clients.

Membership on a dynamic Executive Team, including a partnership with the CEO whose visionary leadership has guided the Center’s extraordinary growth trajectory.

An unsurpassed legal team with a track record of boldness, innovation, and success.

An organization dedicated to strategic growth, impact, and global presence, with a commitment to utilizing cutting-edge approaches and best practices, including recruiting and investing in its top-flight staff.

An organizational philosophy that supports innovation, transparency, and accountability as well as a commitment to monitoring and evaluating the impact to ensure the highest program quality and effectiveness.

A strategic, creative, and multi-faceted communications program.

A strong balance sheet and funding base, with 7 straight years of budget growth.

Pro bono support of leading global law firms valued annually at more than $17 million that augments the Center's $35 million operating budget.

An engaged and experienced Board of Directors.

Investment in enterprise information systems and platforms and forward-thinking management of processes, technology, and data.

Main Responsibilities:

The Senior Vice President’s primary job responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

With the Executive Team, provide strategic vision and direction for the Center’s role as a global leader on the advancement and protection of reproductive rights—playing a leading role in the development of both the organization’s long-term strategic plans and shorter-term tactical plans for achieving key objectives.

In consultation with the CSOO, establish key organizational and program goals, priorities, benchmarks, and timetables, and ensure they are met in a timely and effective way. Generate ideas and develop systems for fostering innovative thinking and robust partnerships in support of strategic plan implementation.

Provide strategic guidance, oversight, and support to regional and UN advocacy programs in developing and implementing annual plans in support of the Center’s strategic objectives and priorities.

Ensure alignment and effective implementation of program activities across the institution.

As appropriate, represent the Center with senior levels of government, UN and regional bodies, foundations, NGOs, and media.

Foster positive, strategic and effective collaborations with NGOs, policymakers, private-sector lawyers, and other strategic partners around the globe.

Main required Qualifications:

The ideal candidate will hold a Law degree and expertise in international law and global governance mechanisms.

Minimum 15 years of substantial, strategic, senior-level experience working with and leading global programs, including management of remote staff, relocation, and expansion of offices, and change management.

Experience with documentation of human rights violations a plus.

A highly sophisticated understanding of and substantial experience with the role of legal strategies in transformational social change; a track record in conceiving and implementing a progressive change agenda encompassing impact litigation, legislative and administrative reform, public education, advocacy campaigns, and human rights strategies. Political experience a plus.

Excellent political skills, judgment, and credibility in the legal field, as well as the vision and ability to effectively manage challenges and opportunities, identify priorities and implement a creative, actionable program with strategic partners.

An extensive and robust network of contacts among decision-makers and organizations in the field of law reform globally.

Effective and persuasive communications and presentation skills, both written and verbal.

Ability to strengthen the Center’s relationships with partner organizations around the world and with current and potential donors.

Critical Position Behaviors:

The ideal candidate will be:

A high-profile leader on sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Skilled at recruiting, developing, and retaining a diverse team.

A collaborative and team-oriented leader who can take charge, build support, act decisively, and effect change.

Outgoing and straightforward; able to actively listen and communicate concisely, respecting colleagues' strengths and expertise, and eliciting their best ideas and decisions and able to compromise effectively when necessary.

Able to act with a sense of urgency and turn things around quickly.

Emotionally mature and confident, with good judgment and a sense of humor.

Highly ethical and committed to exceptional work quality and standards; an individual of unquestioned integrity with the ability to inspire the trust of Board members, executives, and staff at all levels.

How to apply:

Apply online here https://boards.greenhouse.io/centerforreproductiverights/jobs/4218464002?gh_src=b7b8bd1a2

A cover letter, résumé, legal writing sample, and contact information for three references must be included in your application in order to be considered for this position. Please include these application materials as attachments.

  1. Scholarship Opportunity: AEBC/ T-Base Scholarship Program (March 29, 2019)

The 2019 AEBC (Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians)/T-Base Scholarship Program is now accepting applications.

Two AEBC Scholarships (worth $1,000 each) will be offered. We are honoured that, for the third year in a row, an anonymous donor has made these two awards possible.

The application deadline for the 2019 AEBC and T-Base Communications scholarship program is Friday, March 29th, 2019. All applications and supporting materials must be received by AEBC by 11:59 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time on Friday, March 29th, 2019, in order to be considered.

For more information and links to application forms in English and French, please visit the following link: http://www.blindcanadians.ca/programs/scholarship

  1. Job Opportunity: Communications Assistant at The Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa (SIHA) (March 29, 2019)

Deadline: 29 March 2019

Location: Kampala , Uganda or Flexible

Organization: The Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa (SIHA)

Profile

SIHA is looking for a savvy Communications Assistant to come aboard our organization for a dynamic employment opportunity. The Communications Assistant will ensure effective implementation of SIHA’s communication and advocacy strategy, media relations and organizational outreach efforts. Central to this function will be the provision of communications support to Advocacy and Communications Division and curation of SIHA’s social media interaction across a multitude of platforms under the direct supervision of the Regional Advocacy and Communications Officer.

If you've got your finger on the pulse of communications trends, social media, research and/or advocacy, you're exactly what we're looking for.

Duties & Responsibilities:

Assist the SIHA Network Communications and Advocacy Working Group in the following tasks:

Assist with the preparation and production of communication materials, including fast facts brochures, newsletters and publications;

Update SIHA Network social media on a regular basis with relevant material, highlighting key events and achievements;

Assist in conducting any campaigns and events that the SIHA Network Communications and Advocacy division undertake;

Provide support in developing press and public statements capturing key messages of SIHA Network’s work;

Contribute towards the development of new vectors of communication to support the Communications and Advocacy division;

Assist in planning and implementing new initiatives from the division;

Assist in writing press releases and feature articles related to activities/events;

Assist the RACO with any other duties as may be assigned;

Key Competencies

Proactive and practical-minded

Team Player

Excellent writing skills

Quick learner

Self-reliant

Good computer skills

Creative

'SIHA is open to equality and inclusiveness in employment' How to apply:

Interested Candidates are asked to provide their current CV and Cover Letter, expressing her/his motivation in applying and relevant experience/expertise, to SIHA’s Human Resources Department humanresourcesiha@gmail.com before 29th of March 2019.

Please enter “Application Materials: Communications Assistant”. Due to the anticipated volume of applications, please note that SIHA will contact only shortlisted candidates. We thank you for your interest in joining SIHA!

  1. Job Opportunity: Team Leader: Stopping Abuse and Female Exploitation at Ecorys (March 29, 2019)

Deadline: 29 March 2019

Location: Harare, Zimbabwe

Organization: Ecorys

Ecorys is seeking a Team Leader to oversee the upcoming Stopping Abuse and Female Exploitation (SAFE) programme in Zimbabwe. SAFE is a four year programme jointly funded by the UK and Swedish governments to reduce gender based violence in Zimbabwe and protect the safety, rights and choices of women/girls and men/boys. The programme will deliver this by using an adaptive approach that will include research and evidence, capacity building, GBV prevention and social norms programming.

The Team Leader, who will be based in Harare, will be responsible for the overall leadership of the programme, covering both technical and operational delivery.

Responsibilities will include:

Maintaining strong relationships with the programme's key counterparts, including the Government of Zimbabwe and DFID

Overseeing the deliverables of the programme and quality assuring all outputs. Ensuring budgetary, client and stakeholder expectations are met and are contractually compliant.

Overall responsibility for managing the team, including long and short term consultants

Alongside the Technical Director, support with programme’s strategy including work plans and budgets; staffing plans and performance improvement plans

Desired Team Leader Requirements:

Extensive experience in tackling child marriage, GBV, modern day slavery, sex trafficking or related fields

Considerable experience in leading community prevention and response interventions in Zimbabwe or similar contexts

Held leadership positions on large-scale donor funded (preferably DFID) community response and prevention programmes

Has been responsible for programme budgets of £5 million or over

Strong expertise in building and managing relationships with high level stakeholders from government, civil society and donors

Proven ability to employ an adaptive management approach to respond to the changing needs and evolving nature of this type of programme

Ability to quickly analyse, understand, interpret and convey complex scenarios and to strategize suitable and effective solutions

Excellent written and oral communication and presentation skills. Excellent written and spoken English

Advanced degree in gender, international development or another relevant discipline

Zimbabwean nationals are strongly encouraged to apply

About Ecorys

Ecorys is a global consultancy firm with 20 offices worldwide and over 80 years of experience. In this time, we have worked in more than 100 countries with a particular geographic focus on sub-Saharan Africa. We advise governments, multinational organisations, NGOs and civil society groups, and private sector clients on a wide range of economic and social issues. Our work includes evidence-based research, technical assistance, training and education programmes, monitoring and evaluation, project management and tailor-made advice. We aim to foster sustainable economic and social development by supporting our clients with sound analysis, inspiring ideas and immediately implementable policy solutions.

How to apply:

Please send a CV and statement of interest to daniela.schofield [at] ecorys.com

  1. Scholarship Opportunity: Chair in Transgender Studies: 2019 Scholarship & Fellowship Program (March 31, 2019)

CLOSING SOON!

SCHOLARSHIPS & FELLOWSHIPS

Apply today to the Chair in Transgender Studies' 2019 Scholarship & Fellowship Program! Closes March 31, 2019.  For full details, and to download the PDF application, visit our website here https://www.uvic.ca/research/transchair/what-we-do/apply/index.php.

  1. Scholarship Opportunity: Trans Oral History Post-Doc Fellowship (March 31, 2019)

The Transgender Archives at the University of Victoria and The LGBTQ Oral History Digital Collaboratory (University of Toronto, ON), will award one six-month Postdoctoral Fellowship. Apply by March 31, 2019. The six-month fellowship includes a salary of $30,000 CAD and enrolment in the University of Toronto employee benefits program. For full details, visit our website here https://www.uvic.ca/research/transchair/research/post-doc/index.php

  1. Job Opportunity: Assistant in the Latin America and Caribbean Team at Girls not Brides: The Global Partnership to End Child Marriage Secretariat (April 1, 2019)

Deadline: 1 April 2019

Location: Mexico City, Mexico

Organization: Girls not Brides: The Global Partnership to End Child Marriage Secretariat

The Girls Not Brides secretariat is seeking an Assistant to provide research and administrative support to the LAC Team for an initial period of one year (subject to potential renewal).

The LAC Team is responsible for ensuring effective implementation of Girls Not Brides’ strategy in the Latin American and Caribbean region, and informing Girls Not Brides‘ global perspective and work with knowledge and understanding of the regional context. Reporting directly to the Head of LAC Engagement, the successful candidate will be based in Mexico City. This is initially a home-based role, with all necessary equipment and technology provided by Girls Not Brides.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

Research, policy and external relations

Support the LAC Team in its development and implementation of advocacy strategies for the Girls Not Brides

Draft written materials to support the Partnership’s work in the region, including research briefs, website content, advocacy materials and social media content.

Assist in managing region-specific communications to members, including advocacy opportunities, potential newsletter, and similar.

Contribute to other varied learning and communications products as appropriate.

Help to develop and implement regional information-sharing practices between member and potential member organisations and relevant stakeholders.

Monitor regional or national research and share via the Girls Not Brides Resource Centre, website, and similar.

General team support and administration

Provide administrative support, including logistical and travel arrangements for the LAC team.

Support internal and external communications.

Ensure effective calendar management, including the organisation, recording and follow-up on internal and external meetings and events using Float and other Girls Not Brides

Assist in drafting, editing and proof reading of briefing papers.

Regularly update contacts and meeting notes in the Girls Not Brides shared databases such as Salesforce and Dropbox.

Assist with monitoring and reporting on internal evaluation frameworks and strategic plans.

Wider responsibilities of Girls Not Brides team members

Commit to the mission and vision of Girls Not Brides, putting them at the forefront of all planning, work and actions.

Uphold the core values of Girls Not Brides in all areas of work and interactions with colleagues, members, partners and other stakeholders.

Comply with Girls Not Brides policies and processes, with particular note for safeguarding, the code of conduct and data protection.

Ensure that internal databases and monitoring information are kept fully up-to-date.

Commit to ongoing personal development and learning.

Fulfil any other reasonable requests for the advancement of the Girls Not Brides.

PERSON SPECIFICATION

Essential

Masters degree in a relevant area (such as public policy, development studies, Latin American studies, international relations, human rights or gender issues) or proven experience in a related field.

Fluent in English and Spanish (written and speaking)

Ability to develop effective working relationships in a multicultural environment.

Ability to resolve problems and adapt plans as required.

Willingness to work in a collaborative team and with diverse alliances.

Highly reliable, proactive and capable of independent judgement.

Ability to work with minimal supervision, and with a keen eye for accuracy and detail and potential implementation challenges;

Willingness to travel.

Desirable

Sound knowledge of policy and advocacy processes in Latin America

Knowledge of the child marriage field highly desirable.

At Girls Not Brides we are committed to the wellbeing, empowerment and rights of children, and to safeguarding children from harm in all of our activities. Girls Not Brides aims to promote an environment of trust and understanding where the welfare of children is paramount. You will be expected to adhere to the Girls Not Brides Child Safeguarding Policy and its Code of Conduct and report any concerns relating to the safeguarding of children in accordance with agreed procedures. We are an equal opportunities employer and we welcome applications from all suitably qualified persons.

How to apply:

Please send your CV and a brief cover letter demonstrating how you meet the criteria for this position to recruitment@GirlsNotBrides.org by 23:00 GMT on Monday 1st April 2019 clearly stating “Assistant in the Latin America and the Caribbean Team” and your name in the subject line.

Eligibility: All applicants must be able to provide proof of eligibility to work and reside in Mexico. This is initially a home-based role, with all necessary equipment and technology provided by Girls Not Brides. First round Skype interviews will take place on Monday 8th April and final interviews will take place on Monday 15nd April in Mexico City.

We regret that due to the large number of applications anticipated, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

  1. Job Opportunity:  Director, Humanitarian Action and Resilience at Action Aid International (April 17, 2019)

Deadline: 17 April 2019

Location: Johannesburg, South Africa; Nairobi, Kenya or London, UK

Organization: Action Aid International

The Director, Humanitarian Action and Resilience will lead the delivery of ActionAid’s humanitarian signature, ensuring the organisation’s feminist leadership principles are at the core of its delivery. You will manage the AAI Federation surge funding and capacity while ensuring that this programme is articulated clearly and implemented across the country offices and regions.

As the global leader of the AAI Federation-wide Humanitarian and Resilience Platform, you will bring countries together to design and implement programmes collectively. You will ensure the organisation is visible in all relevant decision making and agenda setting space, while influencing the humanitarian community to shift power towards a more feminist approach and achievement of gender equality and social justice even in humanitarian settings. You will lead your team to support and strengthen AAI members’ capacities to deliver stronger humanitarian responses and build communities’ resilience.

DUTIES RESPONSIBILITIES:

Lead AAI’s programming at times of major emergencies and support preparedness and resilience building, ensuring AAI’s humanitarian signature, anti-Sexual Harassment, Exploitation and Abuse and safeguarding policies and approaches are implemented.

Develop global policy positions on specific emergencies and a global humanitarian response.

Lead on innovation and change by establishing a culture of excellence.

Ensure all of AAI’s values are integrated into programmes and operations.

Manage and build the capacity of the International Humanitarian Action and Resilience Team, by assigning clear roles and responsibilities and conducting regular reviews and appraisals to ensure high-quality staff performance.

Establish and lead “Oversight Groups” to ensure consistent and coordinated responses with the deployment of key support personnel as necessary.

Ensure effective monitoring, evaluation and learning during and after emergency responses.

Lead fundraising and resource mobilisation for major emergency responses and key International Humanitarian Action and Resilience global programmes.

Support and develop the internal AAI Humanitarian and Resilience International Platform for the purpose of collective programme design and implementation.

Coordinate the Federation’s strategic contribution to movement building, in line with AAI’s humanitarian signature.

Articulate clear and well-evidenced alternatives that challenge dominant policies and paradigms.

Represent AAI in relevant external spaces and high-level meetings.

Liaise with other Global Secretariat Heads to ensure intersectional analysis and collective delivery of AAI’s mission.

SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE

Experience leading humanitarian programming in a multicultural environment.

A passionate and committed feminist leader.

Strategic thinker with the ability to challenge dominant paradigms and policies.

Committed to and familiar with safeguarding approaches including anti-sexual harassment, exploitation, and abuse.

Excellent advocacy and networking skills with experience of high-level organisational representation.

Dynamic, participatory leadership style; able to build and inspire high-performing multi-cultural teams.

Strong negotiation skills.

Experience in fundraising and resource mobilisation.

Excellent verbal and written communication skills in English.

Another language (French, Spanish, Portuguese or Arabic) is an advantage.

How to apply:

Please prepare your CV (in English) and a motivation letter (one page) that summarises how your profile aligns with the key requirements, skills and abilities of this role.  Both files should be submitted as Word documents via this form www.mis.tl/CV.

After submitting your application, you will receive an automated confirmation.

If you do not receive this or have general questions about submitting your application, please write to enquiry@missiontalent.com.

  1. Scholarship Opportunity: Killam Research Fellowship (May 1, 2019)

THE KILLAM RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP

Objective

To support outstanding scholars (normally full professors at Canadian universities and research institutes) to carry out groundbreaking projects in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences, engineering and interdisciplinary studies within these fields.

Killam Research Fellowships provide two years of release time from teaching and administrative duties to individual scholars who wish to pursue independent research. The fellowships are awarded to individuals, but the funds are paid to and administered by universities or research institutes.  Please note that this award is not intended as a subsidy for the overall research or teaching program of a department, institute or centre, and it is not offered for work undertaken as part of a degree program.  An individual may win this award only once.

Value

Killam Research Fellowships provide release time and are valued at $70,000 per year for a two year period. The funds are paid to the university or research institution which employs the Fellow.  Fellowship recipients must obtain support for research and laboratory costs from other sources.  The university or research institution that employs the Killam Research Fellow is expected to relieve the researcher of all teaching and administrative responsibilities, and to continue to pay the Fellow’s full salary and benefits during the full tenure of the fellowship. The fellowship funds assist the university or research institution in defraying the costs of replacing the Fellow, and in paying the Fellow’s salary and benefits during the two-year fellowship period.

Required Overhead

N/A

Duration: Two full years

Deadlines

ORS deadline to provide a full review of your application – Wednesday May 1, 2019

ORS final deadline – Monday May 13 2019 by 9:00am

Agency deadline – Wednesday May 15, 2019

NOTE: Please submit a hardcopy of your application and ORS checklist to the Office of Research Services (ORS) AND submit your application through the Killam online portal by Monday May 13th 2019, 9:00am, so that ORS can electronically approve your application and mail your paper format documents to the agency by the Wednesday May 15th 2019 deadline.

Paper format documents include:

  • The cover letter (signed).  The cover letter can only be generated/printed after you have electronically submitted your application through the Killam online portal.
  • For permanent residents only, evidence of your intention to stay in Canada after the period covered by the award. If you are a permanent resident, you must present a confirmation from your university or research institute that you have a firm appointment.

Specific inquires can be sent to:

Luiza Pereira, Program Officer, Prizes Canada Council for the Arts

  1. killam@canadacouncil.ca
  2. 1-800-263-5588 (toll-free) or 613-566-4414, ext. 4086

TTY. 1-866-585-5559 / PRG7025E 02-19

For complete information on the Killam Research Fellowship, please consult Canada Council's web site at: https://canadacouncil.ca/funding/prizes/killam-research-fellowships.

  1. Scholarship Opportunity: GRAGOPEAN Scholarship Trust - Bursaries for Students With Spinal Cord Injuries Studying in British Columbia (May 3, 2019)

Spinal Cord Injury British Columbia (SCI BC), in partnership with the Vancouver Foundation, is offering bursaries for college and university students with spinal cord injuries studying in British Columbia. This fund was created by anonymous donors to assist persons with spinal cord injuries attending post-secondary schools in BC with their tuition, books and/or other learning aids, and other expenses related to their disability that will support education such as housing, transportation, in class assistance including notetaking, etc.

The application deadline for the Fall 2019 semester is May 3rd. There is over $250,000 available this year for disbursement.

Please direct any queries to scholarships@sci-bc.ca

Apply now!

https://sci-bc.ca/about-us/scholarships-bursaries/?fbclid=IwAR1lE1dIitJgR_j7heV_odSDUELvzj0mLKH7hprDalH05yD_-ZyEqwnsUwM

https://sci-bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/gragopean-scholarship-application-form-full-web.pdf

https://www.neads.ca/en/about/media/index.php?id=752