CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, September 12, 2019

CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH

CALLS:
1. Call for Abstracts: Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women's Studies Master's Symposium (September 13, 2019)
2. Call for Applications: 2019-20 Graduate Student Positions on CFR Executive Committee (October 10, 2019)
3. Call for Nominations: Mary McEwan Memorial Award 2018-2019 (November 25, 2019)

EVENTS:
1. CFR Research Cluster: Girls' Studies Research Network Launch: Snapshots From the Field (September 13, 2019)
2. CFR Co-Sponsored: Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women's Studies Master's Symposium (October 1, 2019)

COMMUNITY
ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

1. New book 'All We Knew But Couldn't Say' by Joanne Vannicola
2. Pam Palmater's Reconciliation Book Club
3. Intersectionality and Political Economy - Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society
4. New Teaching and Learning Resource - Advancing Gender Equality in Media Industries
EVENTS:
1. Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community & Diaspora, York University: “Celebrating Ms. Lou” (September 17, 2019)
2. LGBT Youthline: Peel 2SLGBTQ+ Youth Sharing Circle (September 17, 2019)
3. Graduate Programme in Social and Political Thought: “Partisan Universalism: Interdisciplinary and Global Imperatives” conference (October 2-4, 2019)
4. Socio-Legal Studies Speakers Series event: “Politicised Homophobias and Resistance in Africa" by Dr. Emma Paszat (October 7, 2019)
5. IFLS/LawArtsCulture: "Tell all the truth but tell it slant" Is Gender Sensitive Transitional Justice the Feminism we were Aiming for?” by Dr. Vasuki Nesiah (October 18, 2019)

 CALLS:
1. Call for Papers: How we work together: ethics, histories and epistemologies of artistic collaboration (September 15, 2019)
2. Call for Papers: Remembering and Memorializing Violence: Transnational Feminist Dialogues (September 19, 2019)
3. Call for Papers: Sexual, Racial &(Trans)Gender Violence Prevention in Higher Education (September 30, 2019)
4. Call for Abstracts: IV ISA Forum of Sociology “RC05 Racism, Nationalism, Indigeneity and Ethnicity” panel (September 30, 2019)
5. Call for Contributors: Canadian Feminist Judgments Project (September 30, 2019)
6. Call for Proposals: The 2020 Conference on Life stories/Oral history : Newsletter #1 (October 1, 2019)
7. Call for Papers: Women in Academia Canada (October 1, 2019)
8. Call for Submissions: Dark Matter issue #9: HOW DO WE KNOW?? (October 4, 2019)
9. Call for Submissions: Contingent Horizons: The York University Student Journal of Anthropology Volume 6 Issue 1 (October 11, 2019)
10. Call for Abstracts: MAI: Feminism and Visual Culture (November 25, 2019)
11. Call for Articles: Journal of Screenwriting, Special Issue: Female Screenwriters (January 2020)
12. Call for Participants: The Tattoo Project, Photographing Memory: A York-Seneca Collaboration

OPPORTUNITIES:
1. School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies: Academic Bridging Course for Women
2. Job Opportunity: Political Science - Assistant Professor (Canadian Politics), University of Alberta (September 30, 2019)
3. Funding Opportunity: York University Indigeneity in Teaching and Learning Fund 2019/20 (October 1, 2019)
4. Job Opportunity: Academic Hiring -Assistant Professor Discipline/Field: Indigeneity and Decolonization, York University (October 11, 2019)
5. Job Opportunity: Tenure-Track Appointment in International Relations / Security Studies, Department of Politics, York University (October 13, 2019)
6. Job Opportunity: York University position in Department of Anthropology, Anthropology of Race, Racisms, and Racialization (October 15, 2019)
7. Funding Opportunity: CIHR-NSERC-SSHRC Healthy Cities Research Training Platform (HCRTP) (November, 2019)
8. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream - Narrative and Writing, University of Toronto Mississauga (December 2, 2019)
9. Funding Opportunity: $1,000 Viv Nelles Essay Prize (January 30, 2020)

CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH

CALLS:
1. Call for Abstracts: Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women's Studies Master's Symposium (September 13, 2019)
Co-sponsored by the Centre for Feminist Research:
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS:
Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women's Studies Master's Symposium
With support from the Gender, Feminist, and Women's Studies Department and the Centre for Feminist Research, this symposium will highlight the theoretical adventures and scholarly interventions of GFWS MA students as they work through their MRP or thesis.
Purpose of this symposium is to provide Master's students with:
- experience presenting in an academic setting
- feedback for their research projects
This symposium is open to past or present MA students with relevant work related to gender, feminist, and women's studies.
If interested, please submit a 250 word paper abstract + title to mawomensymposium@gmail.com by Friday September 13th. The conference date is Tuesday October 1st.

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2. Call for Applications: 2019-20 Graduate Student Positions on CFR Executive Committee (October 10, 2019)
The Centre for Feminist Research is looking for two Graduate Students to join its Executive Committee for the 2019-20 year.
Position Description
The Executive Committee is responsible for matters of regular management of the Centre and serves in a consultative and monitoring capacity in relation to the Director (and any Associate Directors).
The Executive meets at least once a month in the Fall and Winter Terms and when necessary in the Summer Term. Its meetings are called by the Director, but it may also be convened by a majority of the Executive Committee and it may be required to meet by the Council. The term of office for graduate student members is 12 months.
Application
If you are interested, please send a 1-page letter of application that includes:
-A statement of interest explaining why you would like to join the CFR Executive
-Your past involvement with the Centre for Feminist Research
-Your past involvement in departmental committees or other Research Centres
Please also attach a copy of your resume/CV
Please email all applications and any and all questions to the CFR Coordinator Julia Pyryeskina at juliapyr@yorku.ca.
Deadline for applications is 3.30pm on Thursday, October 10, 2019.

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3. Call for Nominations: Mary McEwan Memorial Award 2018-2019 (November 25, 2019)
DESCRIPTION OF AWARD
Named in honour of Dr. Mary McEwan, a feminist psychiatrist, this annual award of $1,000.00 will be awarded to one PhD dissertation produced in 2018-19 at York University in the area of feminist scholarship. An Awards Committee of faculty affiliated with the Centre will choose the winners.
If you have dissertations that were recommended for awards in 2018-19 (dissertations defended between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019 are eligible), please consider putting them forward for this award. The submission deadline is Monday, November 25, 2019.
CRITERIA OF ELIGIBILITY
1. Must be a graduate student who has successfully defended a dissertation during the 2018-19 academic year.
2. The nominee's dissertation must concern feminist theory and/or gender issues.
3. The examining committee for the dissertation must unanimously recommend it for an award.
PROCEDURE FOR NOMINATION
Each nomination must include:
1. A copy of the dissertation and no more than a one-page statement from the nominee about the contribution the dissertation makes to feminist scholarship.
2. A letter of recommendation from the student's Supervisor commenting on the nominee's dissertation or thesis.
3. A statement from the Graduate Program Director noting that the nominee's dissertation was recommended as one that should be considered for a prize.
4. A copy of the external examiner’s report.
PROCEDURE FOR SUBMISSION
Nominations must be received by Julia Pyryeskina, Coordinator, Centre for Feminist Research, 611 York Research Tower no later than Monday, November 25, 2019.
Submissions and questions can be made via email to juliapyr@yorku.ca.

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EVENTS:
1. CFR Research Cluster: Girls' Studies Research Network Launch: Snapshots From the Field (September 13, 2019)
CFR Research Cluster:
Girls' Studies Research Network Launch: Snapshots From the Field
At conferences, we often meet other York colleagues working on girls and girlhood, but rarely have the chance to chat about the intersections of our research at length. What is happening in girls' studies at York University? Come to the Girls' Studies Research Network's inaugural launch event and find out!
We invite you to come share a small snapshot of your research with other girls' studies scholars on Friday, September 13, 2019 between 2 - 4 PM in 626 Kaneff Tower, York University.
3 POWERPOINT SLIDES, 3 POINTS, 10 MINUTES MAX
Instead of formal paper presentations, we invite participants to highlight three succinct main points. Our goal is to get a sense of what we are researching, across career stage, department, and discipline! Examples of this structure might include:
- past, current, and future research goals
- 3 problems you've encountered in your research
- 3 new questions your research raises
- 3 texts or case studies you are working with
- 3 different real life girls that your research engages
If you don't want to present, no problem! Please come join us for the afternoon and enjoy talks from our confirmed speakers: Natalie Coulter, Deanne Williams, Clara Chapdelaine-Feliciati, Anuppiriya Sriskandarajah, Marlis Schweitzer, Sarah Flicker, Mary Grace Lao, and Lisa Sandlos.
To also present, please fill out this form by September 6, 2019: http://comn.apps01.yorku.ca/machform/view.php?id=38504

Co-Sponsored by: Department of English and the Institute for Research on Digital Learning (IRDL) at York University.

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2. CFR Co-Sponsored: Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women's Studies Master's Symposium (October 1, 2019)
  Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women's Studies Master's Symposium
With support from the Gender, Feminist, and Women's Studies Department and the Centre for Feminist Research, this symposium will highlight the theoretical adventures and scholarly interventions of GFWS MA students as they work through their MRP or thesis.
Purpose of this symposium is to provide Master's students with:
- experience presenting in an academic setting
- feedback for their research projects
This symposium is open to past or present MA students with relevant work related to gender, feminist, and women's studies.
If interested, please submit a 250 word paper abstract + title to mawomensymposium@gmail.com by Friday September 13th. The conference date is Tuesday October 1st.

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COMMUNITY

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1. New Book 'All We Knew But Couldn't Say' by Joanne Vannicola
Joanne Vannicola is an Emmy Award–winning actor who has worked in theatre, film, and television. She is the chair of the first LGBTQ+ committee of the actors union in Toronto, Canada; She is also the recipient of the AFBS Leslie Yeo Award for volunteerism (2019), and the founder of Youth Out Loud, an organization raising awareness about child abuse and youth rights. All We Knew But Couldn’t Say, is her first memoir.
Joanne Vannicola, the youngest of four children, grew up in a violent home with a physically abusive father and a mother who had no sexual boundaries.
After fifteen years of estrangement, Joanne learns that her mother is dying of cancer. Compelled to reconnect, she repeatedly visits with her, unearthing a trove of secrets and dark memories. She looks back at her journey from child performer to Emmy Award-winning actor, from the closet to coming out and embracing her own identity as a lesbian, from conflicted daughter and sibling to independent woman. Along the way she explores all the consequences of an abusive and volatile childhood, as she searches for the strength to let go and take control of her own way forward: a solitary path of survival, redemption, and love. All We Knew But Couldn’t Say is Joanne’s journey out of the dark, and an expression of Joanne’s fundamental belief that it is possible to love the broken and to love fully — even with a broken heart.
Bustle considered it one of the top 21 memoirs to read this summer.
https://www.bustle.com/p/21-new-memoirs-that-will-inspire-motivate-captivate-you-this-summer-18140555
The book was endorsed by President and CEO of GLAAD, Sarah Kate Ellis, Linda Riley of DIVA magazine in the UK, Roland Emmerich (filmmaker), and authors David Layton and Farzana Doctor.
I will be at Word On The Street this September, as well as the Literary festival in Edmonton in October.
I would be happy to send you a copy of my book. To learn more, you can visit: www.joannevannicolaauthor.com
What people are saying:
"Joanne Vannicola's ALL WE KNEW BUT COULDN'T SAY is good, honest and powerful, and probably — no, definitely-- going to save someone's life." (Norm Wilmer, NOW magazine )
Joanne Vannicola weaves a compelling narrative about hardship, survival, and resilience that reminds all of us about the enduring importance of forgiveness, family acceptance, and love. (Sarah Kate Ellis, President & CEO, GLAAD)
Joanne will be appearing at “In Her Voice: Healing, Resistance, and Resilience” at Ben McNally books in Toronto on October 4th as part of the series to discuss her book.

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2. Pam Palmater's Reconciliation Book Club
In case you missed it, Dr. Pam Palmater has started a Reconciliation Book Club on her YouTube channel. Each month, Palmater selects a new book and discusses it in the following month's video. Participants and allies are encouraged to join the conversation by using the comments section.
"According to Pam Palmater, the government isn’t doing the work for reconciliation. It’s up to the people – 'the true government' – to do that work," NOW Toronto wrote about Palmater's initiative.
Up next in the Club is An Act of Genocide: Colonialism and the Sterilization of Aboriginal Women, by Karen Stote. We're offering it for 25% off from our website until Aug. 31. Just use coupon code stote on our site during checkout.
So if you're not following Pam's crucial, important work, do yourself a favour and subscribe to her video series, listen to her podcast, Warrior Life, and read her book, Indigenous Nationhood.

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3. Intersectionality and Political Economy - Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society
Putting together a syllabus on intersectionality? Through the Feminist Public Intellectuals Project, we offer a FREE virtual archive on Intersectionality and Political Economy, featuring Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw's work and intersectionality in the media
http://signsjournal.org/currents-identity-politics/intersectionality-political-economy/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=planned

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4. New Teaching and Learning Resource - Advancing Gender Equality in Media Industries
A short note from the members of the Advancing Gender Equality in Media Industries - AGEMI project<https://www.agemi-eu.org/>. As some of you may know, the AGEMI team have been busy curating and developing a large set of teaching, learning and information resources which we hope will be of interest and use to anyone interested in exploring and better understanding the topic. We are now ready to invite you to explore the fruits of our endeavours.
Check the AGEMI website<https://www.agemi-eu.org/> to discover:
*  Resources Bank of Good Practices<https://www.agemi-eu.org/mod/page/view.php?id=3>
*  Teaching and Learning Resources<https://www.agemi-eu.org/mod/page/view.php?id=4>
*  mobile APP<https://www.agemi-eu.org/mod/page/view.php?id=8> which is an easy-to-use tool to test the gender sensitivity of news stories and will be available on Google Play at the end of August and the iOS app store by mid-September
*  GEMTalks<https://www.agemi-eu.org/mod/page/view.php?id=485>, a brilliant collection of interviews with journalists, gender and media experts, media managers, and more
*  'how-to-use-the-AGEMI-resources' guide which will be available on the website by the end of August.
This is also an invitation to collaborate to make sure AGEMI has real impact from today onwards, and we need your help!
If you are aware of good practices to promote gender equality in and through the media and ICT, please fill in this Google form (it includes guideline for completion in English, French and Spanish.)
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd4iAfYe17n9tc7iu7eeFapKovGN7FvZoK53YR5zuw4Fvf1jw/viewform
If you want to suggest organizations or networks - such as civil society, media professionals, intergovernmental or multi-stakeholder - that are active in the field and deserve to appear on our GEMap, please go to this Google form and insert the basic data required.https://forms.gle/JR3hHepxC54iNSMfA
If you have a good idea to share for future academic/educational collaborations, please write to: agemi.eu@gmail.com<mailto:agemi.eu@gmail.com>
We look forward to continuing the conversation.
The AGEMI team

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EVENTS:
1. Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community & Diaspora, York University: “Celebrating Ms. Lou (September 17, 2019)
6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Founders College, Senior Common Room (305 Founders College)
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Showing of the film Miss Lou at Bathurst Heights Secondary School
7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Panel discussion on “The Life and Legacy of Louise Bennett Coverley”
featuring:
Honor Ford-Smith Lillian Allen
Olive Senior Pamela Appelt
Clive Forrester
Moderated by Michele A. Johnson
Please RSVP by Friday, September 13th at
http://bit.ly/30KxWoC
Note from the organizers: Ms. Lou was a Jamaican poet and folklorist who is often regarded as the "mother of Jamaican culture".  She moved to Canada in her senior years and continued to contribute to Caribbean culture in the diaspora, eventually earning a honorary doctorate from York. This year would have been her 100th birthday, and we are hosting one of a series of celebratory events being held in Jamaica and across the diaspora.

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2. LGBT Youthline: Peel 2SLGBTQ+ Youth Sharing Circle (September 17, 2019)
Are you 29 and under?
Do you identify as 2SLGBTQ+ ?
Do you have dreams about the future of our communities?
Circle: For 2SQTBIPOC Youth, September 17
Tuesday, September 17 // 6:00 - 7:30 pm
Eclypse Youth Centre
60 West Drive, Suite 101, Brampton
You will receive a $20 gift card for your time!
Need more information? pyap@youthline.ca
Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1132301366971221/
Do you have dreams of what the future of queer and trans communities looks like? Do you have ideas on how to make safer and more inclusive spaces? Do you have thoughts on how to improve social services? Then this space is for you!
During this session, Youth Ambassadors  from the Provincial Youth Ambassador Project (PYAP) will be facilitating a community sharing circle to talk about the needs of queer and trans young people! We believe that young people hold the most important knowledge and have the most magical ideas on how the future can be transformed to be a world that  loves  an d celebrates all people. Come dream with us! The knowledge that is shared during this time will contribute to the PYAP Needs Assessment.
A 20$ gift card will be provided as a thank you for your time.
PYAP is hosted by LGBT YouthLine, which is a youth-led organization that affirms and supports the experiences of youth (29 and under across Ontario), which is done by (1) providing anonymous peer support and referrals, (2) training youth to provide support to other youth, and (3) providing resources so youth can make informed decisions.
For more information about YouthLine and PYAP, please visit: www.youthline.ca/pyap/
Or reach out to use directly: pyap@youthline.ca
Thanks so much for Eclypse Youth Centre for collaborating with us!

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3. Graduate Programme in Social and Political Thought: “Partisan Universalism: Interdisciplinary and Global Imperatives” conference (October 2-4, 2019)
Partisan Universalism: Interdisciplinary and Global Imperatives: A conference in honour of Ato Sekyi-Otu, October 3-4, 2019 Founders College, York University. Dinner Oct. 2, 2019.
The Graduate Programme in Social and Political Thought is pleased to announce it will be hosting a conference to honour the contributions of Ato Sekyi-Otu both to the Graduate Programme and to the larger discipline of social and political thought.
The conference, which will feature presentations by alumni, current and emeritus faculty and graduate students from York and beyond, will ask participants to broadly discuss a renewed “partisan” universalism in light of York University emeritus professor (Graduate Programme in Social and Political Thought) Ato Sekyi-Otu’s two main pieces of work: Fanon’s Dialectic of Experience (1996) and Left Universalism: Africacentric Essays (2018). It should be noted that the latter work was recently awarded the prestigious Frantz Fanon award of the Caribbean Philosophical Association (2019).
Confirmed Speakers:
Patrick Taylor, York University, Emeritus
Himani Bannerji, York University, Emeritus
David McNally, University of Houston
Esteve Morera, York University
Olufemi Taiwo, Cornell University
Catherine Kellogg, University of Alberta
Lewis Gordon, University of Connecticut
Stefan Kipfer, York University
Jeff Noonan, University of Windsor
Nigel Gibson, Emerson College
Sophie McCall, Simon Fraser University
Negis Canefe, York University
Pablo Idahosa
Jeremey Glick, Hunter College, CUNY
Zahir Kolia, Ryerson University
Samir Gandesha, Simon Fraser University
Firoze Manji, Carlton University
Susan Brophy, St. Jerome’s University
Opening remarks by Gamal Abel-Shehid, York University
Closing Plenary by Ato Sekyi-Out
Event will take place in Founders College, York University. Registration is free at https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/partisan-universalism-interdisciplinary-and-global-imperatives-tickets-71080927969
Further information, including an up-to-date schedule, can be found at: http://spth.gradstudies.yorku.ca/2019/09/2019-graduate-student-conference/

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4. Socio-Legal Studies Speakers Series event: "Politicised Homophobias and Resistance in Africa," by Dr. Emma Paszat (October 7, 2019)
Socio-Legal Studies is delighted that Dr. Emma Paszat will be delivering the first talk in the SLST Speaker Series this fall. Her presentation, entitled "Politicised Homophobias and Resistance in Africa," is both important and timely. Please join us:
Date: Monday, October 7th
Time: 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Place: 701 South Ross
Dr. Paszat has a PhD in Political Studies from Queen’s University and is currently a SSHRC postdoc working with Dr. Miriam Smith in the Department of Social Science. Dr. Paszat’s work analyses politicized homophobias in Africa and domestic and transnational activism against them. Dr. Paszat has published in Third World Quarterly and Sexualities, and is currently working on a book manuscript based on her doctoral work.
Abstract - Politicised Homophobias and Resistance in Africa
In recent decades there have been significant changes in rights for lgbt people globally, but there have also been backlashes in states where rights have been won and where they have not. These backlashes include politicized homophobias, actions states take to dehumanize and police gender and sexual diversity. I analyse how resistance occurs against these politicized homophobias, even in contexts where they appear to be highly popular amongst political leaders and the public. I demonstrate that the perception that politicized homophobias can be used to gain cheap popularity for a government can be altered. I argue that activism can change political processes on politicized homophobia legislation, specifically analysing cases in Uganda, Burundi, and Rwanda.

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5. IFLS/LawArtsCulture: "Tell all the truth but tell it slant" Is Gender Sensitive Transitional Justice the Feminism we were Aiming for?” by Dr. Vasuki Nesiah (October 18, 2019)
Institute for Feminist Legal Studies & Law Arts Culture
PROFESSOR VASUKI NESIAH, NYU
"Tell all the truth but tell it slant": Is Gender Sensitive Transitional Justice the
Feminism we were Aiming for?
ALL WELCOME Lunch Served (please RSVP so there is lunch for all)
FRIDAY OCTOBER 18 2019 1230-2PM  [add to your calendar]
FACULTY LOUNGE | IKB 2027
OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL
Link for sharing: https://ifls.osgoode.yorku.ca/nesiahtellallthetruth/

Vasuki Nesiah is a legal scholar with a focus on public international law. Her main areas of research include the law and politics of international human rights and humanitarianism, with a particular focus on transitional justice. She has published widely on the history and politics of human rights, humanitarianism, international criminal law, international feminisms and colonial legal history. These continue to be areas of research and writing but the primary focus of her current research is reparations. A volume which she co-edited with Luis Eslava and Michael Fakhri, A Global History of Bandung and Critical Traditions in International Law will be published by Cambridge University Press later this year. This work reflects her continued interest in critical approaches to international law that find their intellectual and political home in the global south and in the grappling with decolonization. She is one of the founding members of the Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL) and has continued as an active participant in this global network of scholars for over two decades. Nesiah teaches human rights, law and social theory, and the politics of war and memory at NYU. She also continues as core faculty in Harvard Law School’s Institute for Global Law and Policy (IGLP); In this capacity she has taught for six years in the IGLP summer and winter workshops in Cambridge, Doha, Capetown, Madrid and Bangkok. Currently, she is also a Senior Fellow at Melbourne Law School where she taught a course on human rights, gender and development in a visiting capacity. Prior to joining Gallatin, Professor Nesiah taught in the International Relations and Gender Studies concentrations at Brown University where she also served as Director of International Affairs. Formerly, she taught at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. She serves on the international editorial committees of the journals Feminist Legal Studies and the London Review of International Law and on the International Advisory Board of the Institute of International Law and the Humanities at the University of Melbourne; she is also an Associate Fellow with the Asia Society in New York. Before entering the academy full time, Professor Nesiah spent over seven years in practice at the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ), where she worked on law and policy issues in the field of post-conflict human rights for over seven years. Originally from Sri Lanka, she earned her BA in Philosophy and Government at Cornell University, was a visiting student in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program at Oxford University, and earned her JD and SJD, an interdisciplinary doctorate in public international law, at Harvard Law School. She was awarded a fellowship for a post-doctoral program in human rights at Columbia Law School. Professor Nesiah's publications can be accessed at http://nyu.academia.edu/VasukiNesiah.

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CALLS:
1. Call for Papers: How we work together: ethics, histories and epistemologies of artistic collaboration (extended deadline of September 15, 2019)
Dr. phil. Franziska Koch, Assistant Professor of Global Art History, Heidelberg Centre for Transcultural Studies, Heidelberg University
Call for Papers
“How we work together: ethics, histories and epistemologies of artistic collaboration”
November 8, 2019, panel chaired by Franziska Koch (Heidelberg University) in the framework of the TrACE Academy “Worlding the Global: The Arts in an Age of Decolonization,” organized by the Centre for Transnational Analysis (CTCA) of Carleton University, Ottawa; panel venue: Korean Cultural Centre Canada, Ottawa.
This funded panel will critically engage with issues of collaboration within the larger framework of the 1st TrACE Academy (Transnational and Transcultural Arts and Cultural Exchange) “Worlding the Global: The Arts in an Age of Decolonization,” November 7-9, 2019, Carleton University, Ottawa. This international Call invites researchers at every career stage, from early career to senior, to share new research on collaboration, which stresses transnational and/or transcultural perspectives and complicate existent (master) narratives of collaboration. Although the conference itself focuses on the age of decolonization, the panel is open to include earlier case studies as well.
Collaboration is fundamental to and characteristic of many artistic endeavors not only in our contemporary, technologically wired and heavily mediated times, but has also marked artistic practices throughout the ages and in many places of the world. Indeed, we might argue that artworks – shaped as objects, performances, or concepts alike – more often than not come into being by engaging many hands and relating more than one (master) mind. Still, the modern European romantic notion of the singular (white, male) genius who “fathers” and authoritatively signs a masterpiece continues to inform art historical narratives, serves as a strong identitarian figure in the art market and haunts curatorial practices. However, post-colonial, feminist, queer, Indigenous and network theoretical discourses have successfully questioned this convention in the last decades, while artists have taken collaboration more seriously than ever.
This becomes particularly evident in the field of socially engaged art practices as demonstrated in catalogues such as “Get together” (Kunsthalle Wien 1999), “Collaborative Practices in Contemporary Art” (Tate Modern, London 2003), “Kollektive Kreativität” (Kunsthalle Friedericianum Kassel 2005), “Living as form” (Thompson, 2012) or the “Coop” exhibition at Bangkok Biennale 2017. Yet, the cultural implications of this seemingly global “participatory” (Kravagna 1998) or “collaborative turn” (Lind 2007 and 2009) have only recently come under scrutiny. Critically building on a debate that discussed activist versus antagonist strategies as characteristic for the turn (Bourriaud 2002 and 2006, Bishop 2004 and 2012, see summary by Miller 2016). Grant Kester’s “The one and the many” (2011) deliberately introduced case studies from the “global South” to the debate in order to un- pack and undermine the prevailing theoretical approaches and regional specific genealogies.
Significantly, he questioned the deconstructivist paradigm, which pervades the debate and ignores the cultural as well as historical specificity of an originally French strand of aesthetic discourse that has increasingly been taken as universal.
The panel aims to bridge earlier inquiries into cultural and historical differences and entanglements with more recent transcultural and transnational perspectives (e.a. Juneja 2018 and 2017, Tomii 2016, D’Souza 2014, Kravagna 2013) when discussing artistic collaboration in an age of decolonization and globalization. As part of the TrACE Academy “Worlding the Global” which seeks to relate long separated discourses of settler-colonial, Indigenous, migrant, diasporic, and other transnational and transcultural histories and ways of knowing in art, the panel aim is to understand how these perspectives enact and (co-)constitute the global when “we work together.” The panelists are asked to move towards understanding decolonization as a multi-sited and collaborative engagement with histories, epistemologies, power, migration, capital, and culture.
International Indigenous Art Exhibition (Àbadakone / Continuous Fire / Feu Continuel) at the National Gallery of Canada as a starting point, the four speakers should engage at least with one of the following questions:
• How to write and present art history in ways that critically acknowledge and distinguish collaborative authorship (auctorialités) and local as well as global cultural entanglements?
• How do collaborative artists/works address issues of situatedness in spatial as well as temporal regards? In other words: how do collaborative strategies contribute to “worlding the global” beyond dominant binary narratives?
• Does artistic collaboration serve particular functions in the process of decolonization? What roles do collaborative practices play in the expression of Indigenous voices?
• What are the conditions and limits of artistic collaboration?
• How are ethics, epistemologies and histories of collaboration (in-)formed by cultural contexts? What role does transculturality play in artistic collaboration?
The funding of most of the travel and accommodation costs is secured by the organizer thanks to a grant from the Baden-Württemberg Stiftung. To receive the grant, selected applicants need to provide a short presentation of 15 min. length based on a longer manuscript, which will be circulated among the speakers one week before the panel. They have to commit to submitting the revised full paper (ca. 5.000- max. 8.000 words) before the end of February 2020. Together with other written contributions selected by means of this call, the panel organizer will publish a theme issue in the peer reviewed and open access journal Transcultural Studies (Heidelberg University).
Applicants should send an abstract of max. 500 words and a short CV to Franziska Koch (koch@asia- europe.uni-heidelberg.de) until 10 September 2019. The selected applicants will be informed by 12 September 2019. *the application deadline has been extended to September 15*
Dr. phil. Franziska Koch
Assistant Professor of Global Art History
Heidelberg Centrum for Transcultural Studies
Voßstr. 2, Building 4400, R. 105
D-69115 Heidelberg, Germany
E-Mail: koch@hcts.uni-heidelberg.de
References
Bishop, Claire (2004), “Antagonism and Relational Aesthetics,” in: October, vol. 110, The MIT Press, New York, pp. 51-79.
Bishop, Claire (2012), “Participation and Spectacle: Where are we now” in: Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art From 1991-2011, The MIT Press, New York, pp.34-45.
Block, René and Angelika Nollert, eds. (2005), Kollektive Kreativität. Collective Creativity, (exh. cat.), Kunsthalle Fridericianum, Revolver.
Bourriaud, Nicolas (2002), Relational Aesthetic, Les Presses du Réel, France, pp.11-24.
Bourriaud, Nicolas (2006), “Relational Aesthetic//1998”, in: Documents of Contemporary Art: Participation, The MIT Press, Cambridge, pp. 160-171.
d’Souza, A. (2014), “Introduction”, in: Art History in the Wake of the Global Turn, ed. by J. H. Casid and A. d’Souza, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA, pp. vii–xxiii.
Green, Charles (2001), The Third Hand: Collaboration in Art from Conceptualism to Postmodernism, New South Publishing.
Juneja, Monica (2018), “‘A very civil idea...’: Art History, Transculturation and World-Making – with and beyond the Nation”, in: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte, vol. 81, issue 4, pp. 461–485.
Juneja and Kravagna in Conversation (2013), “Understanding Transculturalism”, Transcultural Modernism, ed. by Christian Kravagna et al., Sternberg Press, Berlin, pp. 23-33.
Kester, Grant (2011), The One and the Many: Contemporary Collaborative Art in a Global Context, Duke University Press, Durham and London.
Kravagna, Christian (1998), Models of Participatory Practice, http://republicart.net/disc/aap/kravagna01_en.htm.
Lind, Maria (2007), “The Collaborative Turn”, in: Taking the Matter lnto Common Hands: On Contemporary Art and Collaborative Practices, ed. by Johanna Billing and Lars Nilssonszerk, Black Dog Publishing, London, pp. 15-31.
Lind, Maria (2009), “Complications: On Collaboration, Agency and Contemporary Art”, in: New Communities, ed. by Nina Möntmann, The Power Plant and Public Books, Toronto, pp. 52-73.
Miller, Jason (2016), “Activism vs. Antagonism: Socially Engaged Art from Bourriaud to Bishop and Beyond”, in: FIELD, A Journal of Socially Engaged Art Criticism, issue 3, winter, pp. 165-183.
O’ Neill, Paul (2010), “Beyond Group Practice”, in: Manifesta Journal—Collective Curating 8, Amsterdam, pp. 37-45.
Reiko, Tomii (2013) “Introduction: Collectivism in Twentieth-Century Japanese Art with a Focus on Operational Aspects of Dantai”, in: Positions Asia Critique, Vol. 21, Issue 2, Spring, Duke University Press, pp. 225-267.
Roberts, John and Wright Stephen, eds. (2004), “Art and Collaboration”, Third Text, Vol. 18, Issue 6, London.
Thomson, Nato (2012), “Living as Form”, in: Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art From 1991-2011, The MIT Press, New York, pp. 16-33.

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2. Call for Papers: Remembering and Memorializing Violence: Transnational Feminist Dialogues (September 19, 2019)
Call for Papers for Edited Volume
Remembering and Memorializing Violence: Transnational Feminist Dialogues
**EXTENDED DEADLINE**: September 19, 2019
Editorial Committee: Alison Crosby, Malathi de Alwis, Heather Evans, Honor Ford-Smith, Shahrzad Mojab, Carmela Murdocca
Contact Information: memorializingviolence@gmail.com
Introduction and Scope:
In recent decades, a growing body of feminist scholarship has attended to the ways that we remember and memorialize our collective pasts, particularly those inscribed with political violence and social injustice (Doss 2010; Hirsch & Smith 2002; Lehrer et al. 2011; Radstone & Schwarz 2010). Feminist scholars from diverse disciplines and positionalities have illuminated how remembrance and memorialization practices are spaces of contestation over racially gendered histories, ideologies, subjectivities and imaginaries (Dean 2015; de Alwis 2009; Edkins 2003; Jacobs 2010; Razack 2012; Sturken 1997).
Such contributions have made important interventions in a predominantly white Euro-American and liberal feminist canon of cultural memory literature that has burgeoned since the 1970s. They have called attention to the exclusionary and hegemonizing tendencies of traditional memorials, while also accounting for remembrance and memorialization through storytelling, oral histories, filmmaking, testimonies, photography, poetry, performance, artistic productions, rituals, ceremony, monuments, and archives, etc. as dynamic spaces through which communities affected by political violence resist, mobilize and enact agency (Ford-Smith 2014; Gómez-Barris 2009, 2016; Riaño-Alcalá 2015; Suarez & Suarez 2016; Taylor 2003).
These interventions are unfortunately often siloed, precluding broader theoretical and methodological conversation. And although there exist a number of regional investigations of remembrance and memorialization initiatives in the aftermath and afterlife of political violence (Bilbija & Payne 2011; Jelin 2003; Taylor 2003), rarely do they center intersectional feminist analyses of Indigeneity, racialization, gender, sexuality and class in theorizing how those initiatives formulate within and move through complex transnational flows and circuits.
The volume will offer timely insight into how established and emerging feminist artists, activists and scholars are thinking transnationally about the remembrance and memorialization of racially gendered colonial, imperial, militarized and state violence. We invoke a broad and critical understanding of the transnational that attends to the particularities and specificities of place-based struggles and different experiences as the grounds from which to explore connections, similarities and coalitional possibilities (Alexander 2005; Alexander & Mohanty 2010; Grewal & Kaplan 2000; Trotz 2006). We ask what a transnational feminist lens might reveal about the contested space of remembrance and memorialization, and its role in shaping our social and political realities. We also ask what the lens of remembrance and memorialization may conversely illuminate about our transnational feminist engagements and commitments, scholarly, artistic, activist and otherwise.
Call for Papers:
We welcome chapter proposals and creative work (that can be in print form) on a range of themes and topics, including but not limited to:
Forgetting, silence and silencing;
Performance as a framework for understanding remembrance and memorialization practices;
How experiences of mourning, grief and loss can mobilize political communities locally and transnationally, and/or reveal inherent interconnections among and through seemingly disparate contexts;
The complexities that arise as memorials and related narratives travel;
What subjectivities are produced through memorialization practices, and what happens as they move across time and space;
Ways that communities and activists generate anti-colonial, anti-imperial, anti-capitalist critiques through remembrance and memorialization practices, and the intergenerational dimensions of such;
Representing the unrepresentable, and the ethical considerations therein;
How to confront violence through the lenses of remembrance and memorialization while resisting, subverting and transforming its fetishization and spectacularization;
How artistic and curatorial practices function as forms of remembrance and memorialization, and/or challenge what it means to memorialize violent pasts;
How transitional justice and human rights regimes shape and constrain the global remembrance and memorialization landscape.
Those whose submissions are selected for the volume will be invited to participate in a workshop in May or June 2020 at York University in Toronto, Canada (funding permitted). The workshop will be an opportunity to receive and offer feedback on paper drafts prior to final submission. It will also serve as a venue through which to collaboratively build our conceptions of transnationalism, and in particular how they inform our theorizations of remembrance and memorialization, and of memory more broadly.
By putting into dialogue contributions from a variety of locations, contexts, disciplines, and methodological approaches, we hope to begin mapping genealogies of critical transnational feminist theoretical engagements with remembrance and memorialization, to generate innovative conversations and to facilitate ongoing collaborations.
Submission Instructions:
Please submit a 500-word abstract (including a working title for the proposed chapter), along with a short biography (250 words max.) to memorializingviolence@gmail.com  with the subject line “Edited Volume Submission.” Final chapters will be approximately 8,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography.
This call for proposals has been developed in consultation with a leading academic publisher. Following the initial selection of proposals, a full book proposal will be sent to the publisher for review. Upon acceptance, chapter authors will be sent detailed guidelines. Chapters must be original and should not be submitted for publication elsewhere.
Deadline for Proposal Submission: September 19, 2019
Notification of Acceptance: September 30, 2019
For any further questions, you may contact memorializingviolence@gmail.com.

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3. Call for Papers: Sexual, Racial &(Trans)Gender Violence Prevention in Higher Education (September 30, 2019)
The Centre for Media, Culture and Education (CMCE) at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education is hosting a conference dedicated to violence prevention in higher education. The intertwined issues of sexual, racial and (trans)gender-based forms of violence are urgent issues locally and globally, calling for knowledge exchanges, research, and actions exploring the relational, intersectional, interdisciplinary, and globalized aspects of these phenomena.
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
DEADLINE: September 30, 2019. Midnight EST
PLEASE SUBMIT TO: preventiontoronto2019@gmail.com
This call for proposals invites explorations of the limitations and possibilities of violence prevention. By possibilities, we mean both practiced and yet to be imagined prevention approaches that stop sexed, (trans)gendered, and raced violence on college and university campuses world-wide. What can we learn from these successful practices? Are they transferable, expandable, and sustainable? By limitations, we mean those local, global, social, cultural, political, educational and institutional factors that inhibit, curb, or counter violence prevention initiatives rendering their aims unattainable. What are such inhibiting forces or structures? How can we overcome them?
The full call for proposals can be found at:
https://www.oise.utoronto.ca/cmce/violenceprevention/
Please submit a proposal including:
1. Name, contact information, and institutional affiliation
2. Proposed format
3. Abstract of 200-250 words including the title of the presentation and a summary of the argument(s) or ideas.
Submissions can be papers, panels, workshops, posters, or creative and other arts-based presentations. Multiple submissions are welcome! For example, you may submit a group panel and a piece of art. Please email preventiontoronto2019@gmail.com if you have further questions.
REGISTRATION (through EventBrite):
https://www.oise.utoronto.ca/cmce/violence-prevention-conference-registration-page/
FEATURED SPEAKERS:
Suzanne Smoke
Dr. Hijin Park
Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez
**The full program will be released in October, 2019**

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4. Call for Abstracts: IV ISA Forum of Sociology “RC05 Racism, Nationalism, Indigeneity and Ethnicity” panel (September 30, 2019)
We are sharing our session for the IV ISA Forum of Sociology (Porto Alegre, Brazil, July 14-18th 2020) that may be of interest below:
Call for abstracts for:
RC05 Racism, Nationalism, Indigeneity and Ethnicity
Abstract Deadline:
September 30th 2019 24:00 GMT
Session Organizers:
Beatrice Anane-Bediakoh, Jade Da Costa, Nadiya Ali
Session Title:
Breaking Apart the Margins: Unpacking the Politics of Exclusion
This session will cover sociological works that address the divergent ways in which processes of exclusion operate within and across various racialized and indigenous communities. There is a lack of specificity in the ways in which racial exclusion is conceptualized within academic scholarship. Typically, the varied tactics and methods of exclusion used to subjugate, erasure, and marginalize non-white populations are flattened into one singular archetype of racialization that is thought to homogeneously mark the subjectivities and experiences of all non-white subjects. However, different racial, ethnic, and/or cultural identities threaten the stability of whiteness in distinct ways and are therefore subject to varying degrees and forms of political and social violence. The tendency within academia to conflate divergent experiences of and with racial exclusion obscures this fact. Consequently, academic notions of exclusion tend to be constrained to monolithic categories of racial “otherness” that limit the possibility of enacting precise strategies of resistance within and across different racial-ethnic groups.
In this session, we contend that understanding the complex and divergent processes of exclusion that operate to subjugate different racialized and indigenous communities is an important step towards the eradication of racial violence and injustice. Accordingly, this session will focus on sociological works that shed light on the racial-colonial-imperial structures that function to order non-white people in general, while still drawing attention to the particular ways in which these logics operate in relation to distinct racial-cultural formations.
Submit an Abstract to this Session:
https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session14612.html

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5. Call for Contributors: Canadian Feminist Judgments Project (September 30, 2019)
We are seeking scholars to contribute to a national feminist judgments project. Contributors need not identify with a particular kind of feminism, nor as female, but must have a working sense of what feminism means in relation to their work and be willing to commit to a research endeavour that will challenge them to think and write about the law in a different way.
This is a dynamic and innovative project in which scholars will write alternative judgments across a broad range of legal issues. These new judgments will operate as both a critique of common law method as well as a practical demonstration of how different ways of approaching a decision making task are possible. Judgments may be written either by individual authors or jointly by two or more authors. The cases need not be recent but must be important decisions that would benefit from a feminist analysis, or from an Indigenous feminisms perspective. The cases can be from any level, including decisions of tribunals.
We would also welcome contributions which take a more creative approach to rewriting Canadian decisions and reimagining decision making structures, including rewriting statutes, or imagining future legal decisions or structures.
Feminist judges will be free to choose the constraints on their decision making.  One option, followed in many other FJPs, is to work with established legal method that existed at the time the decision was originally made, including customary legal perspectives, and simulated practical constraints on decision-making (such as the social-science research available at the time and the prevailing rules of precedent) to produce “authentic” judgments.
Writers who choose not to work in the idiom of “judicial decision” can explain their own approach and the boundaries they set.
Some contributions will require a “commentary”, designed to situate the contribution. For those working in the “alternative judgment” mode, the reader will need to know about the original judgment in its legal, social and political context, and they will need to know about the rules which bound the author of the rewriting.
This project is inspired by the groundbreaking work of the Women’s Court of Canada [WCC] rewriting Canadian equality jurisprudence.1 Since that project, expanded versions which branched out from equality law to all areas of law have been undertaken in other jurisdictions, including England, Australia , Northern/Ireland, Aotearoa New Zealand, Scotland, India, and the United States.
This uniquely Canadian project must be one in which the contributions of Indigenous scholars, and francophone scholars can be heard, one which includes the voices of BIPOC authors, and represents an array of sexualities – despite being situated within a profession and a part of the academy that continues to be inaccessible to many. Our unique legal landscape(s) and contemporary social, political and legal struggles are at the core of this feminist project.
Leading the initial stage of the project is Professor Estair Van Wagner (Osgoode).  The CFJP will be supported in a variety of ways by the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode (Director Professor Sonia Lawrence), the Centre for Feminist Legal Studies at Allard Law (UBC)  (Director Professor Debra Parkes), and Professor Angela Cameron, Shirley Greenberg Professor of Women and the Legal Profession at University of Ottawa Faculty of Law.  Professor Van Wagner’s experience participating in the Feminist Judgments Project Aotearoa New Zealand inspired her interest in pushing for an expanded Canadian version. Preliminary phases have included making contact with people involved in most if not all of the other FJPs.
Outcome: One outcome of the project will be an edited collection of judgments, published as a book or special edition in 2022. Other likely or possible outcomes include dissemination events and a website. We are committed to an open access form of publication.
Offers to contribute: Please let us know if you would like to contribute in any of the following ways:
Judgment author/s: If you would like to write a judgment (5-7,000 words) please fill out the form at this link https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfZGtZ6pcMSKniGKvP-FNCrKE77_lBNZKzoF3dYd8IiroZW_Q/viewform .
You will be asked to indicate the name of the case you propose to write on, and provide a brief explanation (max 150 words) of your interest in this case, and why the work would be feminist. We will ask you to identify the substantive subject area(s) of the work you will be doing, and whether you will need a commentator in order to set your work in context for a reader. If you do, please indicate if you have a commentator in mind.
If you would like to write something which is NOT a judgment, please fill out the same form and provide an explanation of what you would like to do.
These authors will form the core of the project and therefore are expected to be able to actively engage, including participating alongside other writers at in person and virtual events.
Conceptual or editorial contributors: If you would like to contribute to the development of the conceptual and theoretical aspects of the project, or would like to offer your assistance with peer reviewing or editing any of the work as part of an editorial collective, please indicate (max 150 words) the nature of the contribution you would be able to make.
Assistance: Once the scope of the project becomes clearer, we will be applying for funding for this project both to support participant meetings (virtual and in person) and for limited research assistance for contributors. If you have suggestions about funding opportunities that might be less known in the academic context, please feel free to provide these to Professor Van Wagner.
Contact:
Please send your offer to contribute using this form https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfZGtZ6pcMSKniGKvP-FNCrKE77_lBNZKzoF3dYd8IiroZW_Q/viewform .
Questions can be sent to EVanWagner@osgoode.yorku.ca.
Proposed timetable:
30 Sept 2019: Deadline for offers of contributions
1 October 2019: Project convenors advise on outcome of offers; project proposal drafted
Winter 2020: School meetings
TENTATIVE
May 2020: Judgment writing workshop, authors of judgments to attend.
Summer 2020: Regional and subject area group meetings
October 2020: Draft contributions due and circulated to other subject-area contributors
TENTATIVE
May 2021: Workshop 1 discussing draft judgments (held regionally?)
June 2021: Workshop 2 discussing draft judgments (held regionally?)
August 2021: Second drafts of judgments and all commentaries due
December 2021: Manuscript to publishers
TENTATIVE
Winter/Summer 2022  Dissemination Activities?

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6. Call for Proposals: The 2020 Conference on Life stories/Oral history : Newsletter #1 (October 1, 2019)
Hello to all of those interested in the international and bilingual conference on life stories and oral history to be held in Montreal (UQAM) from May 19 to 22, 2020;
I am pleased to inform you that important elements concerning the conference program (the panels) are now available on the conference website:
https://sites.grenadine.uqam.ca/sites/hv/fr/hv2020/schedule
In addition, I would like to remind you that the deadline for submitting a contribution proposal(3 ways to contribute are specified on the site) is October 1st, 2019:
https://sites.grenadine.uqam.ca/sites/hv/en/hv2020/about/pages/4/Call+for+contribution
This deadline provides all those working with life stories/oral history (researchers, educators and practitioners) with the opportunity to submit a proposal for a contribution (alone or with members of their team or research group, etc.,in a symposium, for example) and send it by email to the following address, which is also specified on the site : contribution2020@histoiresdevie.ca.
Finally, you may be interested in widely disseminating the content of this newsletter.
In the coming months, we will come back to you as deadlines approach or as we have new information to share.
In short, we invite you to diffuse this information in your networks and to post it on your website and/or social media ; on the conference website, you will find graphic elements to support the diffusion: https://sites.grenadine.uqam.ca/sites/hv/en/hv2020/about/pages/16/Graphic+Elements.
If you need more info on this event, please do not hesitate to write!
We thank you in advance.
On behalf of the organizing committee of the conference entitled
Life Stories in a Changing World: At the Crossroads of Research, Education and Intervention

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7. Call for Papers: Women in Academia Canada (October 1, 2019)
Gender in the Canadian Academy
Book Workshop – Call for Chapters
Deadline for Submission: October 1, 2019
Dr. Rachael Johnstone (University of Waterloo) and Dr. Bessma Momani (University of Waterloo) are pleased to invite chapter proposals for a peer-reviewed book on gender in Canadian academia. This collection will feature evidence-based, Canadian focused work on all aspects of gender in academia, from undergraduate degrees through to high level administration. The aim of the book is to create a pool of Canada-specific data to lay the groundwork for substantive policy change in this area. This interdisciplinary collection will feature the work of prominent academics, including Malinda Smith (University of Alberta), Sandra Acker (University of Toronto), and Louise Forsyth (University of Saskatchewan). We are looking for additional chapters to workshop at a two-day conference at the Balsillie School of International Affairs in Waterloo, Ontario, on May 6-7, 2020. Selected participants will be provided with two nights of accommodation, food, and return, in-Canada flights to attend the workshop.
We are especially interested in chapters looking at:
• Gender in STEM
• EDI (Equity, Diversity & Inclusion) Programs
• Representation
• Allyship
• Gender in undergraduate and graduate education
• Gender in university administration and management
• Gender and teaching evaluations
• Gender in job applications
• Gender and tenure
• Gender and university provosts and/or presidents
• We also welcome innovative topics not mentioned above.
To apply, please submit the following documents by October 1, 2019 to our project manager, Kersty Kearney (kkearney@balsillieschool.ca), in one PDF document with the subject header “Gender in Academia”:
• CV
• An abstract of 500-700 words (If selected, we will ask you to submit a draft 6000-7000 word
chapter by April 15, 2020)
Keynote Speaker: Nobel Laureate Dr. Donna Strickland
On Wednesday, May 7th, 2020, Dr. Strickland will sit down for a public interview to discuss a range of issues affecting women in academia. This interview will be an open event for the public, with reserved seating for workshop participants.

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8. Call for Submissions: Dark Matter issue #9: HOW DO WE KNOW?? (October 4, 2019)
Her blue body/everything we know
Alice Walker, We Have a Beautiful Mother
The rectangular shape of his book of knowledge, bending…
Susan Griffin, Woman and Nature
D.H. Lawrence famously said that it was by loving his characters that he came to know them. For corn geneticist and Nobel-Prize winner Barbara McLintock it was intimacy with the plants she studied that led to her astonishing discoveries.*
In the first issue of Dark Matter: Women Witnessing Miriam Greenspan wrote: “The heart’s way of knowing opens the door to the stars, to non-limited seeing and healing. This form of perception and cognition is not recognized in our culture and is often pathologized.” The same can be said of other forms of embodied knowing like dreams, divination, intuition, altered states, ancestral knowing and communing with nonhuman intelligences. Honored in indigenous traditions around the world, these ways of knowing are today subject to ridicule in most higher learning and other institutions in the West, even as conscious, rational human knowing is increasingly revealing its limits.
“What exactly is knowledge? Is it a thing, an event, a practice, a movement toward? What does it mean to be intelligent? What is the nature of knowledge? What is worth passing on?” So asks Manulani Meyer in her book on Hawaiian epistemology Hooulu: Our Time of Becoming. Dark Matter issue #9 HOW DO WE KNOW?? will be devoted to these questions.We believe they are crucial at a moment where habitual ways of knowing and assessing knowledge are proving inadequate to the enormous risks and challenges facing all life on Earth. We welcome material that addresses them in the form of critical essay, theory, poetry, narrative prose, visual art or any combination thereof.

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9. Call for Submissions: Contingent Horizons: The York University Student Journal of Anthropology Volume 6 Issue 1 (October 11, 2019)
Contingent Horizons: The York University Student Journal of Anthropology is currently accepting submissions for its sixth volume, to be published Spring 2020. As a peer-reviewed, open-access journal, we aim to showcase scholarly and creative works of academic excellence by graduate and undergraduate students. We invite prospective contributors to submit their original, unpublished works for consideration. Selected submissions will be published online with complimentary print copies provided to the authors.
1) Submissions
We are accepting submissions of original works that pertain to the discipline of anthropology, including ethnographic research articles, reviews (book reviews, ethnographic film reviews, exhibit reviews, album reviews), and creative works (photo essays, creative non-fiction, pedagogical tools, fieldwork reflections, interviews, and other pieces). In particular, we encourage submissions that engage a decolonial and intersectional approach to anthropological scholarship. Graduate and undergraduate students of anthropology and related disciplines are encouraged to submit their work.
Please review the submission guidelines on our website prior to completing your submission through the online system.
The deadline for submissions is Friday, October 11th, 2019.
2) Peer Reviewers
We are recruiting both undergraduate and graduate students who are willing to act as peer reviewers for the journal. Peer reviewers will be asked to provide substantial and constructive feedback about the content of no more than one submission per year. If you are interested in being a peer reviewer, please email us at contingenthorizons@yorku.ca (specifying your institutional affiliation, degree program, year of study, and areas of scholarly interest) and register online as a reviewer.
For more information, please visit our website at ch.journals.yorku.ca and follow us on Twitter @continghorizons
Questions? Email the Editors at: contingenthorizons@yorku.ca

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10. Call for Abstracts: MAI: Feminism and Visual Culture (November 25, 2019)
Dr Isabelle McNeill and Dr Anna Backman Rogers invite abstracts for a special issue of MAI: FEMINISM AND VISUAL CULTURE dedicated to the topic of women's craft work.
Artistry of exquisite skill and creativity has often been belittled by the label of ‘craft’. In the West we have developed a distinction between art - the result of individual (male) genius - and craft, seen as a collective, anonymous and possibly even monotonous activity: women’s work. While there have been many revivals of interest in crafts, from the Arts and Crafts Movement in the late nineteenth-century to the Etsy-powered ‘mumpreneurs’ of our contemporary moment, craft has conserved associations with the domestic rather than with public space, consigned to the private, feminine realm and barred from the value and status of art.
In the 1970s, feminist artists turned to craft precisely in order to overturn this association, using women’s work in protest: ‘feminists in their embroidery showed that the personal was the political - that personal and domestic life is as much the product of the institutions and ideologies of our society as is public life’ (Parker 1984: 205). In so doing, artists such as Kate Walker and Judy Chicago drew upon a history of craft as protest that includes the banners stitched by suffragettes (Hunter 2019: 128-9). Surrealist artists, such as Dorothea Tanning and Louise Bourgeois had also incorporated textiles and sewing into unnerving, surrealist pieces that explored unconscious desire through the wry use of ‘women’s work’. Faith Ringgold’s narrative quilts used African American quilting techniques to give voice to stories of slavery and racial oppression.
More recently, feminist scholars (Cvetkovich, Berlant et al) have argued that many of the personal pathologies of our age should be understood political, a way of thinking the personal as political in a neoliberal age that undermines the binary between private and public: ‘what if depression could be traced to histories of colonialism, genocide, slavery, legal exclusion and everyday segregation?’ asks Ann Cvetkovich (2006: 115), arguing that, ‘the intimate rituals of daily life, where depression is embedded, need to be understood as a public arena … a location that doesn’t always get recognised as public but which nonetheless functions as such’ (156).
Cvetkovich further advocates for ‘crafting’s redefinition of what counts as politics to include sensory interactions with highly tactile spaces and with other people - or, in other words, feelings’ (177). Craft, with its repetitive gestures, inscribing itself always in a collective history and movement, could form the basis of a ‘utopia of everyday habit’, countering slow death, with slow living.
This resonates with the notion of ‘craftivism’, advocated by activists such as Betsy Greer and Sarah Corbett, who conceive of craft as a gentle, thoughtful mode of activism that replaces unthinking quick reactions with thoughtful, slow gestures, and helps to preserve the maker from the violence of activism fatigue.
Might we rethink our scholarly and critical approach to visual culture through such concepts of craft?
Essays and creative responses might address:
*   Critical approaches to visual culture made with traditional ‘craft’ techniques such as sewing, quilting, knitting, crochet, etc.
*   Film as craft - montage, editing, animation (e.g. Lotte Reiniger), set design,
*   Craft as protest, collective crafting
*   Craft as healing, repair, mending
*   Women artists who work with crafting techniques such as Judy Chicago, Frida Hansen, Else-Marie Jakobsen, Eva Hesse, Tracey Emin - to name a few…
*   Feminist recuperations of traditional crafting techniques such as knitting, weaving and embroidery.
*   Interviews with practitioners
PLEASE SEND ABSTRACTS OF 300 WORDS FOR THE ATTENTION OF DR ISABELLE MCNEILL AND DR ANNA BACKMAN ROGERS TO CONTACT@MAIFEMINISM.COM BY NOVEMBER 25TH.
Works cited:
Berlant, Lauren (2008), The Female Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture, Durham & London: Duke University Press.
Corbett, Sarah (2017), How to Be A Craftivist: The Art of Gentle Protest, London: Unbound.
Cvetkovich, Ann (2012), Political Depression: A Public Feeling, Durham & London: Duke University Press.
Greer, Betsy (2014), Craftivism, Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press.
Hunter, Clare (2019), Threads of Life, London: Sceptre.
Parker, Roszika (1984), The Subversive Stitch: Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine, London: I. B. Tauris.

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11. Call for Articles: Journal of Screenwriting, Special Issue: Female Screenwriters (January 2020)
The Journal of Screenwriting is calling for articles for a special issue with a focus on female screenwriters, to be published in August/September 2020.
The Journal wants to emphasize the importance of female screenwriters across eras, genres, mediums. This importance may arise from an analysis of bodies of work, from individual scripts written by women, or from case studies where female screenwriters have worked collaboratively to express screen stories. Articles may also include women’s work behind the scenes in advocating for/promoting greater gender equality within screenwriting milieux. Articles on female screenwriters from diverse cultural backgrounds are encouraged.
Articles may include (but are not limited to) the following topics:
*   Female screenwriters in silent cinema
*   The influence of female writer(-directors) in contemporary culture
*   Case studies on individual screenwriter’s work, collaborations between women, or on how women-centred stories have been brought to the screen
*   Historiography of manuals and screenwriting pedagogy where this reflects the work of female screenwriters
*   National and global tendencies with regard to women within screenwriting – relations, influences, cultural transfers
*   Censorship and women’s stories and women’s writings
*   Biographies of female screenwriters of any era
*   Female screenwriters within writing partnerships
*   The work of female screenwriters within script production (e.g. as showrunners, script editors or consultants)
*   The question of a female voice within screenwriting
In the first instance, please email abstracts of up to 400 words and a short biography, no later than Friday October 4, 2019 to both of the editors of this special issue:
Rosanne Welch: rosanne@welchwrite.com<mailto:rosanne@welchwrite.com>
Rose Ferrell: rosieglow@westnet.com.au<mailto:rosieglow@westnet.com.au>
Completed articles of between 4000 and 8000 words should be sent by end January 2020 via the Journal of Screenwriting’s web page, where you can also access information on the journal’s house style:
https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-journal,id=182/
Peer review and acceptance/rejection will be completed by end of May 2020. Rewrites will be due by end of July 2020.
The Journal of Screenwriting is an international peer-reviewed journal published three times annually by Intellect, and is abstracted and indexed by Thomson Reuters: ISI Web of Knowledge, MLA and FIAF. It explores the nature of writing for the screen image; this includes not only writing for film and television but also computer games and animation. The journal highlights current academic and professional thinking about the screenplay and intends to promote, stimulate and bring together current research and contemporary debates around the screenplay whilst encouraging groundbreaking research in an international arena. The journal is discursive, critical, rigorous and engages with issues in a dynamic and developing field, linking academic theory to screenwriting practice.

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12. The Tattoo Project, Photographing Memory: A York-Seneca Collaboration
ARE YOU TATTOOED?
Looking for Participants!
The Tattoo Project, Photographing Memory: A York-Seneca Collaboration.
Are you a member of the York-Seneca community (student, faculty, or staff at either institution) who has a tattoo that means something important to you? If so, please consider participating in The Tattoo Project, Photographing Memory: A York-Seneca Collaboration.
The purpose of the study is to discuss your tattoo/s before and after being photographed by a professional photographer from Seneca at York. For your participation in two short interviews and a photo session, you will receive an emailed file of the photograph. The pre and post interviews will take about 10 minutes each and the photography session about 30 minutes.
If you would like to be considered for participation, please contact me debd@yorku.ca, Dr. Deborah Davidson, a tattooed sociologist at York and the Principal Investigator for the project. Please put The Tattoo Project in the subject line. For more information about my research on tattoos, please see http://thetattooproject.info/

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OPPORTUNITIES:
1. School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies: Academic Bridging Course for Women (September 18, 2019)
York University’s Academic Bridging Course for Women
Sponsored by the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies
• Learn in a supportive group environment
• Improve reading, writing and speaking skills
• Explore your education options and potential
• Prepare for future university study
To qualify: Course participants must be 20 years of age or over, permanent resident of Ontario, and comfortable in both spoken and written English. A grade of  ‘B’ or better offers admissions to mature students to York University. The Bridging course is n0ot appropriate if you require ESL instruction. If you have completed one full year or more of university or academic college studies, you may not need a Bridging course as an admissions credential.
Classes run on Wednesdays, 6-9pm:      and are located at:
Orientation: September 18, 2019           1900 Sheppard Ave. West, North York (Jane&
First class: September 25, 2019     Sheppard intersection) in the Multipurpose Room
Last class: November 27, 2019     (main floor)
And
Thursdays, 6-9pm     and are located at:
Orientation: September 26, 2019     Applegrove Community Complex, 60 Woodfield Road,
First class: October 3, 2019     Toronto (Coxwell & Queens) in the Archive Room
Last class: December 12, 2019     (basement)
To get in touch with us, call the School of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at 416-736-2100 ext. 77818
About the program: This program is subsidized by York University as part of its community outreach program.

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2. Job Opportunity: Political Science - Assistant Professor (Canadian Politics), University of Alberta (September 30, 2019)
Location: Alberta
Date posted: 2019-07-09
Advertised until: 2019-10-08
Competition No. - A111139340
Closing Date - Sep 30, 2019
The Department of Political Science, Faculty of Arts, invites applications for a full-time tenure track position in Canadian Politics. The Department seeks candidates with an excellent record of scholarship in Canadian Politics, especially those whose area of expertise concerns institutions and/or policy studies, broadly conceived.
Areas of focus include, but are not limited to: energy/environmental politics, Indigenous politics and policy, the politics of gender and sexuality, the politics of the North, migration studies, and citizenship and human rights. An ability to teach courses in qualitative or quantitative methodologies, and experience with experiential learning are assets.
All qualified candidates are invited to apply. This position is restricted to those with a PhD in Political Science, or a related cognate discipline. Evidence of collaboration with the public sector and/or a policy community, broadly conceived is particularly welcomed.
To assist the University in complying with mandatory reporting requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (R203(3) (e)), please include the first digit of your Canadian Social Insurance Number in your application. If you do not have a Canadian Social Insurance Number, please indicate this in your application.
The Department of Political Science is one of the most diverse, critical and well-regarded departments of Political Science in Canada, and has a strong international record of research and teaching. We currently have 23 full time faculty, 3.5 full time administrative staff, over 400 majors and 60 graduate students. Faculty members work in the cognate fields of Political Science (Canadian Politics, International Relations, Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and Gender and Politics) and Indigenous Politics is an emerging field and strength. Scholars interested in knowing more about our department are invited to view our Home Page (https://www.ualberta.ca/political-science) or to contact the Chair, Catherine Kellogg (ckellogg@ualberta.ca).
Interested applicants may apply to: https://www.careers.ualberta.ca/Competition/A111139340/
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.
The University of Alberta is committed to an equitable, diverse, and inclusive workforce. We welcome applications from all qualified persons. We encourage women; First Nations, Métis and Inuit persons; members of visible minority groups; persons with disabilities; persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity and expression; and all those who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas and the University to apply.

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3. Funding Opportunity - York University Indigeneity in Teaching and Learning Fund 2019/20 (October 1, 2019)
The Office of the Vice Provost Academic invites applications from York community members that incorporate Indigenous knowledge and perspectives in York’s teaching and learning.
Projects must address one of the following thematic areas:
Exploration and/or establishment of new ways of supporting Indigenous faculty, undergraduate and/or graduate students
Incorporation of Indigenous knowledge and perspectives in academic programming and curricular offerings for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students
Enhancement of a more inclusive campus environment that values the plurality of Indigenous knowledge and scholarship
Please note that funding is limited, and the University may not be able to support all projects.  Priority will be given to projects that strengthen relationships between York and Indigenous communities (including Indigenous peoples in the Greater Toronto Area) and/or projects from new applicants. Requests that exceed $2,000.00 must demonstrate commitments from additional sources.
Those interested in submitting a brief project proposal should consider logistical feasibility (e.g. timing, availability of space/additional resources) and are encouraged to consult their relevant administrative unit prior to proposal submission.
Proposals (1 –2 pages) should include the following:
•      Project lead, title and affiliation (e.g. Faculty/Program, Research Centre)
•      Contact information –email and telephone
•      Project title
•      Project description to include target audience (including number of faculty/students reached) and timeline.  Project description and timeline should not exceed 500 words.  Projects must be completed by June 2020.
•      Project budget (including clear indication of amount of funding requested and funding requested and/or available from other sources)
Proposals should be submitted by October 1, 2019. Funding decisions will be made by November 1, 2019. After that proposals will be accepted on an on-going basis contingent on remaining funds and ability to complete the project by June 2020.
Please email questions and proposals to Lorna Schwartzentruber, Associate Director Access Programs and Community Engagement (Office of the Vice Provost Academic) at lornas@yorku.ca or x44576.

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4. Job Opportunity: Academic Hiring -Assistant Professor Discipline/Field: Indigeneity and Decolonization, York University (October 11, 2019)
The Department of Sociology, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies invites applications for a tenure-track professorial-stream appointment in Indigeneity and Decolonization at the Assistant Professor level, to commence July 1, 2020.
A PhD in hand or near completion in Sociology or a related field is required by the start of the appointment. Candidates must demonstrate excellence or promise of excellence in scholarly research, teaching and service, and to have produced publications appropriate to their career stage.
Sociology at York has a long tradition of critically informed, community-engaged and public sociological research and teaching driven by efforts to challenge social inequalities. We recognize that the strength of our program emanates from the diversity of our faculty and student body and we seek a candidate who can enhance our critical reach in the area of Indigeneity and Decolonization.
We seek applicants whose research is grounded in Indigenous sociological perspectives attentive to one or more of the following areas: processes of de/colonization in Canada; indigenous survival, resistance, resurgence, refusal, futurity; the colonizing potential of the practices of research itself. The substantive area of research specialization is open and may include Indigenous governance and sovereignty; land, knowledges, and extraction; urban Indigeneity; Indigenous cultural production; digitalization and Indigenous worlds; Indigenous activism and/or futurity; Indigenous research paradigms; and processes of decolonization. A record of engaged collaboration with, and commitment to, working with Indigenous communities and organizations in Canada is strongly desired.
The successful candidate must be suitable for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The position will involve graduate teaching and supervision, as well as undergraduate teaching. We seek a candidate who can develop new courses in the department that mobilize critical Indigenous content, theories, ontologies and/or methodologies. Pedagogical innovation in high priority areas such as experiential education and technology enhanced learning is preferred.
York University is situated on the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation; the University also acknowledges other Indigenous nations who have longstanding relationships with this territory, such as the Huron-Wendat, the Haudenosaunee, and the Métis nations. York University supports Indigenous research and education through its Indigenous Framework for York University, the Centre for Aboriginal Student Services, Indigenous Council for York, and Skennen'kó:wa Gamig, a space for Indigenous faculty, staff, and students. York is committed to fostering understanding and respect for and connections with Indigenous communities; and the University is working to support the recruitment and success of Indigenous undergraduate and graduate students, the integration of Indigenous knowledges, approaches and perspectives into curricular offerings and research, collaboration with indigenous communities, and recruitment and retention of Indigenous faculty and staff.
York University has a policy on Accommodation in Employment for Persons with Disabilities and is committed to working towards a barrier-free workplace and to expanding the accessibility of the workplace to persons with disabilities. Candidates who require accommodation during the selection process are invited to contact Professor Lesley Wood at socchair@yorku.ca.
This selection will be limited to candidates who self-identify as Aboriginal (Indigenous) peoples. York University values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA program applies to women, visible minorities (members of racialized groups), Aboriginal (Indigenous) people, and persons with disabilities. Applicants are encouraged to self-identify in all categories that are applicable. The AA Program can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/ or by calling the AA line at 416-736-5713. Applicants wishing to self-identify as part of York University’s Affirmative Action program can do so by downloading, completing and submitting the form found at: http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/self-identification-form/. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens, permanent residents and Indigenous peoples in Canada will be given priority. No application will be considered without a completed mandatory Work Status Declaration form which can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/work-authorization-form.
Applicants should submit a signed letter of application outlining their professional experience and research interests, an up-to-date curriculum vitae, a sample of their scholarly writing (maximum 30 pp.), a teaching dossier, and arrange for three signed confidential letters of recommendation (one letter may speak to the candidate’s work with Indigenous communities or organizations) to be sent to: Professor Lesley Wood, Chair, Department of Sociology, 2060 Vari Hall, York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M3J 1P3. Email: socitsa@yorku.ca (Subject line: Position in Indigeneity and Decolonization).
The deadline for receipt of completed applications is October 11, 2019. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

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5. Job Opportunity: Tenure-Track Appointment in International Relations / Security Studies, Department of Politics, York University (October 13, 2019)
The Department of Politics, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies invites applications for a professorial stream tenure-track appointment in International Relations / Security Studies at the Assistant Professor level, to commence July 1, 2020. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.
A PhD by the start of the appointment in Political Science, International Relations, or a related field is required. Candidates must show excellence or promise of excellence in teaching, scholarly research and publication and service.
The Department of Politics is internationally recognized as one of the leading sites of International Relations scholarship informed by a diverse range of critical intellectual approaches. Applicants should have an ongoing program of research and specialize in International Security understood broadly. The successful candidate’s research should complement the present scholarly profile of the Department of Politics in the study of International Security, and develop it in new and innovative ways.
The successful candidate must be suitable for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The position will involve graduate teaching and supervision, as well as undergraduate teaching. Pedagogical innovation in high priority areas such as experiential education and technology enhanced learning is preferred. The successful candidate will also be expected to participate actively in Department and University-level service.
York University has a policy on Accommodation in Employment for Persons with Disabilities and is committed to working towards a barrier-free workplace and to expanding the accessibility of the workplace to persons with disabilities. Candidates who require accommodation during the selection process are invited to contact Professor Elizabeth Dauphinee, Chair of the Search Committee at polsjobs@yorku.ca.
York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA Program, which applies to women, members of visible minorities (racialized groups), Aboriginal (Indigenous) people and persons with disabilities, can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/ or by calling the AA line at 416-736-5713. Applicants wishing to self-identify as part of York University’s Affirmative Action program can do so by downloading, completing and submitting the form found at: http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/self-identification-form/. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens, permanent residents and Indigenous peoples in Canada will be given priority. No application will be considered without a completed mandatory Work Status Declaration form which can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/work-authorization-form .
The deadline for receipt of completed applications is 13 October 2019. A letter of application with an up-to-date curriculum vitae, a statement of research and teaching interests, three letters of reference and teaching evaluations should be sent to: Professor David Mutimer, Chair, Department of Politics, Email: polsjobs@yorku.ca – (Subject line: Assistant Professor – International Security).
Posting End Date: October 13, 2019

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6. Job Opportunity: York University position in Department of Anthropology, Anthropology of Race, Racisms, and Racialization (October 15, 2019)
The Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies invites applications for a professorial stream tenure-track appointment in Anthropology of Race, Racisms, and Racialization at the Assistant or Associate Professor level, to commence July 1, 2020. The area of specialization is open, with preference for candidates whose ethnographically grounded research and expertise is in the Global South. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.
The Department of Anthropology at York University is committed to decolonial methodologies and pedagogies and we encourage applicants who are actively building solidarity with historically marginalized groups. Applicants must have scholarly training and teaching experience in Anthropology. A PhD in Anthropology by the start of the appointment or shortly thereafter is required. Successful applicants will demonstrate excellence or the promise of excellence in scholarly research, teaching and service, and have publications appropriate to their stage of career. Pedagogical expertise and innovation in teaching community-oriented courses that will enhance Department’s focus on engaged anthropology is an asset as is expertise in experiential education and technology enhanced learning.
The successful candidate must be suitable for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The position will involve graduate teaching and supervision, as well as undergraduate teaching.
York University has a policy on Accommodation in Employment for Persons with Disabilities and is committed to working towards a barrier-free workplace and to expanding the accessibility of the workplace to persons with disabilities. Candidates who require accommodation during the selection process are invited to contact Professor Shubhra Gururani by email at chranth@yorku.ca.
York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA Program, which applies to women, members of visible minorities (racialized groups), Aboriginal (Indigenous) people and persons with disabilities, can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/ or by calling the AA line at 416-736-5713. Applicants wishing to self-identify as part of York University’s Affirmative Action program can do so by downloading, completing and submitting the form found at: http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/self-identification-form/. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens, permanent residents and Indigenous peoples in Canada will be given priority. No application will be considered without a completed mandatory Work Status Declaration form which can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/work-authorization-form.
Applicants should submit the application package including a signed letter of application outlining their professional experience and research interests, an up-to-date curriculum vitae, a sample of their scholarly writing (maximum 50 pp.), and a teaching dossier in PDF format with the subject heading “Anthropology of Race, Racisms, and Racialization” via email to Professor Shubhra Gururani, Chair, Department of Anthropology at jobsanth@yorku.ca . The applicant should arrange to have three letters of reference sent to the Chair by email. The letters should arrive by the deadline from referees’ professional email address.
The deadline for receipt of completed applications is October 15, 2019.

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7. Funding Opportunity: CIHR-NSERC-SSHRC Healthy Cities Research Training Platform (HCRTP) (November, 2019)
The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) are jointly funding a national Healthy Cities Research Training Platform (HCRTP) to develop an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral training initiative that will generate cutting-edge knowledge and build capacity for implementation science and solutions-based research.
This funding opportunity will support a team in designing and delivering a national research training initiative focused on how to create, implement, and scale innovative, solution-based interventions in a variety of urban contexts focused on promoting healthy, resilient, sustainable and equitable cities. Accomplishing this goal will require experts from diverse disciplines including public health, epidemiology, economics, sociology, law, ethics, engineering, environmental science and urban planning, which is why partnership across the three research funding agencies is essential.
The application process for the HCRTP will consist of a Letter of Intent (LOI) stage, where up to six successful applicants will receive developmental grants, and a Full Application stage where one application will receive the full grant. The HCRTP is a major component of the CIHR Healthy Cities Research Initiative (HCRI).
Value
Up to $25K in development funds if invited to Full Application stage
$4.95M over 6 years
Application Procedure
Phase 1: Letter of Intent – Due December 10, 2019
Phase 2: Full Application (by invitation only) – Due August 27, 20
Webinars
In support of this funding opportunity, CIHR, NSERC and SSHRC will be holding a webinar to provide more information on the scope of the training platform and the application process.
The English webinar will be held on Monday, September 23, 2019, from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. EDT.
The French webinar will be held on Friday, September 26, 2019, from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. EDT.
Applicants must register to participate.
York University Internal Process
All researchers planning to submit an application to the HCRTP program (Phase 1: Letter of Intent) are required to submit an internal Notice of Intent (iNOI). The iNOIs will be reviewed by the Strategic Project and Opportunity Review Team (SPORT), which will provide feedback to applicants.
Applicants must notify their Faculty and the Office of Research Services (Diana Frasca – dfrasca@yorku.ca) as soon as possible about their intention to apply.
The iNOIs are due in early November, and to be e-mailed to Diana Frasca – (dfrasca@yorku.ca), and include the following components:
•        Research Proposal (up to a maximum of 3 pages, not including references). The Research Proposal should clearly outline each of the elements presented in the Letter of Intent evaluation criteria section.
To support the strategic objectives of this funding opportunity, at the LOI stage, the following evaluation criteria will be used:
1.      Vision and strategic framework: the three co-leads clearly articulate a vision for what the training initiative will achieve and a high-level strategic framework for achieving this vision.
2.      Leadership team and capacity: the three co-leads represent all three Agency’s (CIHR, NSERC and SSHRC) thematic areas and demonstrate their capacity to lead and deliver a national, pan-Canadian, Tri-Agency training initiative (evidence of experience in training, partnerships with national, provincial and local research or implementation partners etc.).
3.      Experience in implementation science and solution-based research: the three co-leads have demonstrated experience in planning, implementing and evaluating innovative, solution-based interventions in a variety of urban contexts.
4.      Equity, diversity, and inclusion: Appropriate considerations related to equity, diversity and inclusion in the research, training, and knowledge translation activities.
5.      Gender and sex considerations: Appropriate incorporation and justification of sex as a biological variable and/or gender as a social determinant of health where applicable.
6.      Research themes: Challenges to be addressed are associated with healthy cities research priorities.
•     A CIHR Academic CV for the Nominated Principal Applicant
•     Participant Table:
o   In table format, list all participants (including Collaborators) with the type of participant (e.g. Nominated Principal Applicant, Principal Applicant, Knowledge User, Co-applicants, Collaborators, etc.), their affiliations, region, role (e.g. co-lead, application partner) and expertise (the list need not be final at the Letter of Intent stage).
See website and below for details on what to include.
IMPORTANT DEADLINES:
Stage 1: Letter of Intent
iNOI Submission to ORS: Early November 2019 (date TBA)
SPORT Committee Feedback: Mid November 2019
ORS Deadline for Draft of Completed Letter of Intent: November 28, 2019
ORS Deadline for Completed Letter of Intent and ORS Checklist: December 9, 2019
CIHR Letter of Intent Deadline: December 10, 2019
CIHR anticipated notice of decision: January 31, 2020
Stage 2: Full Application (to be confirmed)
ORS Deadline for Complete Application for SPORT Review: Early July 2020
SPORT Committee Feedback: Mid to Late July 2020
ORS Deadline for Draft 2 of Completed Application: August 12, 2020
ORS Deadline for Final Application and ORS Checklist: August 26, 2020
CIHR Application Deadline: August 27, 2020
CIHR Results: November 29, 2020
All applications for external research funding must be reviewed and approved by the Office of Research Services before they are submitted to the granting agency. The application must be accompanied by a completed ORS Application Checklist. To ensure that the approved application is ready by the agency deadline, a complete application package must be submitted to ORS ten (10) working days prior to the final submission date.

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8. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream - Narrative and Writing, University of Toronto Mississauga (December 2, 2019)
Job Field: Teaching Stream
Faculty / Division: University of Toronto Mississauga
Department: UTM: Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology
Campus: Mississauga
Job Posting: Aug 16, 2019
Job Closing: December 2, 2019, 11:59pm EST
Description:
The Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology (ICCIT) at the University of Toronto Mississauga invites applications for a full-time teaching stream appointment in the area of Narrative and Writing, at the rank of Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream. The position start date is July 1, 2020, or shortly thereafter.
Candidates must have a PhD in communication, education, literature, narrative-related arts or journalism or related fields by the appointment start date, or shortly thereafter. Excellence in teaching and pedagogical inquiry is required and can be demonstrated through teaching accomplishments, awards and accolades, presentations at significant conferences, the teaching dossier (outlining experience and accomplishments) submitted as part of the application including a strong teaching statement, sample syllabi, course materials, and teaching evaluations, as well as strong letters of reference.
Candidates should have demonstrated excellence in teaching creative nonfiction narrative, expressive writing, and narrative-based research. Narrative, as we think of it here, involves the application of tools and techniques developed mainly through fiction and the arts applied to the purposes of nonfiction and journalism—that is, telling true story with imaginative power and expressive skill. Successful candidates must demonstrate commitment to excellent pedagogical practices in the areas of writing pedagogy and narrative with publications that include scholarly, creative, and journalistic professional writing. Candidates should also demonstrate experience in facilitating and providing guidance for undergraduate student publications.
Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
ICCIT focuses on teaching and research excellence in its three undergraduate programs: Communication, Culture, Information and Technology, Digital Enterprise Management and Professional Writing and Communication. The successful applicant will join a vibrant intellectual community of world-class scholars at Canada’s leading university. For information, please visit www.utm.utoronto.ca/iccit.
To be considered for this position, all application materials must be submitted online by December 2, 2019. Submission guidelines can be found at http://uoft.me/how-to-apply.
Applications must include the documents listed below, formatted as 3 attachments with naming convention 1902282_LastnameFirstname_CV_Statement.pdf, LastnameFirstname_Writing.pdf, etc.:
Attachment 1: Cover Letter, CV and Statement of Pedagogy.
Attachment 2: Writing Sample demonstrating experience with creative nonfiction or journalistic prose
Attachment 3: Writing sample demonstrating experience with the scholarship of teaching (optional)
Attachment 4: Teaching Dossier (Max. 20 pages, may include list of courses taught, sample syllabi, course evaluation data summary, statement of teaching philosophy.
Applicants must have three referees send letters of recommendation directly to Professor Rhonda McEwen, ICCIT Director, University of Toronto Mississauga via email (on letterhead, signed, dated and scanned) to iccit.utm@utoronto.ca by the closing date, December 2, 2019.
The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from racialized persons / persons of colour, women, Indigenous / Aboriginal People of North America, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.
As part of your application, you will be asked to complete a brief Diversity Survey. This survey is voluntary. Any information directly related to you is confidential and cannot be accessed by search committees or human resources staff. Results will be aggregated for institutional planning purposes. For more information, please see http://uoft.me/UP.
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

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9. Funding Opportunity: $1,000 Viv Nelles Essay Prize (January 30, 2020)
The Wilson Institute for Canadian History at McMaster University is proud to, once again, award the $1,000 Viv Nelles Essay Prize. This prize is awarded to the graduate student term paper that best places Canada in a transnational framework. To be considered for the award, a paper must be nominated by a graduate student or his/her instructor and submitted electronically, to the institute (wilsonCH@mcmaster.ca), no later than 30 January 2020. The winner will be selected by the Institute’s Director, in consultation with Wilson fellows and associates. Each winner will receive a $1,000 award. A plaque with their name engraved commemorating the achievement will also be displayed at the Wilson Institute.  We will present the award in Spring 2020 at the annual meeting of the Canadian Historical Association in London.
Wilson Institute for Canadian history
L’Institut Wilson d’histoire canadienne à l’université McMaster est fier de décerner, encore une fois, le Prix de l’essai Viv Nelles de $1,000. Ce prix est décerné à l’étudiant(e) qui produit le meilleur travail de recherche plaçant le Canada dans un contexte transnational écrit dans le cadre d’un cours de niveau diplômé. Pour être considéré pour ce prix, tous travaux nommés par l’étudiant(e) ou son instructeur(e) doivent être soumis, par courriel (wilsonCH@mcmaster.ca), à l'institut, au plus tard le 30 Janvier 2020. Le gagnant sera sélectionné par le directeur de l'institut, en consultation avec ses boursiers et associés. Le gagnant recevra une récompense financière de $1,000. Son nom sera également gravé sur une plaque commémorative qui sera affichée à l’Institut Wilson. Ce prix sera décerné au printemps 2020 lors du congres annuel de la Société historique du Canada à London.