CFR Events Calendar

Mar
29
Fri
2019
CFR Presents: "'Contesting Conceptions of the LGBTQ+ Community at Hong Kong Migrants Pride" by Dr. Daniel Conway (March 29, 2019)
Mar 29 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

The Centre for Feminist Research Presents:

Contesting Conceptions of the LGBTQ+ Community at Hong Kong Migrants Pride: Queering Colonialism, Globalisation and Corporate Diversity

By Dr. Daniel Conway (Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster)

Chaired by Dr. Amar Wahab (Associate Professor, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies, York University)

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Date: Friday March 29th, 2019
Time: 10:30 am – 12pm
Location: 626 Kaneff Tower, York University
Accessibility: Accessible space. Wheelchair-accessible and gender-neutral bathroom nearby. Wayfinding signs will be posted. Everyone welcome.
Click here for directions to York University
Link to Facebook eventhttps://www.facebook.com/events/257396741875270/
RSVP tojuliapyr@yorku.ca

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This paper draws from research conducted as part of a Leverhulme Trust Fellowship exploring the contemporary global politics of Gay Pride, focusing specifically on the forms of activism and issues raised at Hong Kong Migrants Pride 2018. Migrants Pride was first held in 2015 and is organised by migrant women’s groups in Hong Kong.  Held the day after Hong Kong Pride, and separately from the Pink Dot and Pink Season LGBTQ+ festivals, the Migrants Pride Parade weaves through central Hong Kong, past the migrant women workers and their families who sit on cardboard boxes in the shadow of designer shopping malls and HSBC’s headquarters.

In 2018, Migrants Pride was held alongside HSBC’s Community Festival. This highlighted a tense and incongruous relationship between space, place and community making, which underpins the marginality and vulnerability that LGBTQ+ migrant workers face in Hong Kong. Migrants Pride represents domestic workers and sex workers who occupy a precarious and often overlooked place and status in Hong Kong. These workers are excluded from dominant constructs of LGBTQ+ community and also broader discourses of rights for privileged expatriate workers in Hong Kong.

Analysing the queering of space, vulnerability and exclusion by activists, the paper argues that Migrant Pride articulates intersectional rights and identities, enacting activist practices that engage with migrants’ inequality and precarity, while building solidarity and contesting invisibility and marginality. Combining ethnography, interviews and visual methods, this paper develops feminist and queer international relations theorisation of LGBTQ+ and women’s activism in global contexts.

Dr. Daniel Conway is the Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at the University of Westminster, and holds the Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship for his project “The Global Politics of Pride: LGBTQ+ Activism, Assimilation and Resistance”. His work has mainly focused on how modes of privilege, specifically whiteness, masculinity and heterosexuality, are constituted and the moments and possibilities for their contestation and reformulation. His work draws from and contributes to Feminist International Relations, political sociology and queer theory. Dr. Conway holds a PhD in Politics by Rhodes University, South Africa.

Co-sponsored by: The Centre for Refugee Studies, York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR) and the Sexuality Studies Program.

Apr
8
Mon
2019
Save the Date! Second Annual Indigenous Women’s Speakers’ Series Event "Politics, Knowledge, Ecology, Culture" with Deb McGregor, Cheryl Suzack, and Karyn Recollet
Apr 8 @ 2:30 pm – 4:30 pm

SAVE THE DATE!

The Centre for Feminist Research Presents:

Second Annual Indigenous Women’s Speakers’ Series Event Politics, Knowledge, Ecology, Culture

Featuring Indigenous scholars Drs. Deborah McGregor (York University), Cheryl Suzack (University of Toronto) and Karyn Recollet (University of Toronto)

Panel moderator Dr. Elaine Coburn (York University)

Each panelist will speak about her scholarship, followed by a moderated conversation on the themes of politics, knowledge ecology and culture. The panel will end with an audience Q&A.

About the event:

Date: April 8, 2019
Time: 2.30-4.30pm
Location: 519 Kaneff Tower, York University
Accessibility: Accessible space. Wheelchair-accessible and gender-neutral bathroom nearby. Wayfinding signs will be posted. Everyone welcome.
Click here for directions to York University.
Link to Facebook eventhttps://www.facebook.com/events/2037541532965752/   

RSVP tojuliapyr@yorku.ca

About the panelists:

Deborah McGregor (Anishinaabe from Whitefish River First Nationis Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Environmental Justice, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. Her research has focused on Indigenous knowledge systems and their various applications in diverse contexts including water and environmental governance, environmental justice, forest policy and management, and sustainable development. Her research has been published in a variety of national and international journals and she has delivered numerous public and academic presentations relating to Indigenous knowledge systems, governance and sustainability. She co-edited Indigenous Peoples and Autonomy: Insights for a Global Age with Mario Blaser, Ravi De Costa and William Coleman (2010) and she is co-editor (with Alan Corbiere, Mary Ann Corbiere and Crystal Migwans) of the Anishinaabewin conference proceedings series.

Karyn Recollet is Assistant Professor in the Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto.  She is an urban Cree scholar/writer whose work focuses on urban Indigenous arts praxis in relationship to complex forms of urban glyphing- expressing an understanding of land pedagogies that exceed the terrestrial. Recollet's work focuses on gestures and bundling to map out Indigenous futurist thought and relational practices of being.

Cheryl Suzack (Batchewana First Nations) is Associate Professor in the Department of English, at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on Indigenous law and literature, with a particular emphasis on writing by Indigenous women. In her book, Indigenous Women's Writing and the Cultural Study of Law, she explores how Indigenous women's writing from Canada and the United States addresses case law concerning tribal membership, intergenerational residential school experiences, and land claims. Her current project analyzes Justice Thurgood Marshall's papers in the context of Indian civil rights claims from the 1960s. She is a co-editor (with Greig Henderson and Simon Stern) of “The Critical Work of Law and Literature,” University of Toronto Quarterly (Fall 2013) and a co-editor and contributor (with Shari Huhndorf, Jeanne Perreault, and Jean Barman) to the award-winning collection, Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture (UBC 2010). Professor Suzack is cross-appointed to Indigenous Studies. In January 2018, she was a Fulbright Fellow at Georgetown University.

Co-Sponsors: Glendon Indigenous Council, the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, the Department of Politics, Faculty of Environmental Studies and the Department of Social Justice Education at OISE, UofT.

Apr
15
Mon
2019
"The Walking Dead: Necropolitics and Genealogies of Governance" Graduate Student workshop with Dr. Nael Bhanji
Apr 15 @ 2:30 pm – 4:30 pm

The Centre for Feminist Research, Sexuality Studies, and the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies present:

The Walking Dead:
Necropolitics and Genealogies of Governance

Graduate Student Workshop
With Dr. Nael Bhanji, 2018-2019 Visiting Scholar in Sexuality Studies at the Centre for Feminist Research

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Date: Monday, April 15, 2019
Time: 2.30-4.30pm
Location: 626 Kaneff Tower, York University
Accessibility: Accessible space. Wheelchair-accessible and gender-neutral bathroom nearby. Wayfinding signs will be posted. Everyone welcome.
Click here for directions to York University: http://maps.info.yorku.ca/keele-campus/keele-transit-directions/
Link to Facebook eventhttps://www.facebook.com/events/812206209131616/
To RSVP: Limited space available! MUST RSVP to attend by emailing juliapyr@yorku.ca with a brief explanation of your research topic. Please bring questions / a writing sample into which you want to incorporate necropolitics. 2 required readings will be pre-circulated.
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Monsters gave birth to modernity: those unnamable figures of horror and fascination shadow civilization as its constitutive and abjected discontent (Rai 539, 2004)

In this workshop, we will explore the centrality of Achille Mbembe's "necropolitics" to thinking through your own writing.

Open to grad students at any stage of the writing process, this reflective and relational workshop will discuss both biopolitical and necropolitical lenses as they pertain to issues of state surveillance on, for instance, race and racialization, counter-terrorism, sexuality, embodiment, settler colonialism, prison industrial complex, etc.

This workshop is a great chance to network and discuss your ideas (and perhaps find some inspiration for that pesky diss or MRP!).
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Dr. Nael Bhanji is the 2018-2019 Visiting Scholar in Sexuality Studies at the Centre for Feminist Research at York University and a lecturer at Carleton University. Drawing upon critical race theory, trans studies, psychoanalysis, and affect theory, his research explores articulations of necropolitics, racialization, surveillance, and counter-terrorism within an increasingly globalized trans movement. Nael's work appears in Transgender Migrations: The Bodies, Borders, and Politics of Transition, The Transgender Studies Reader 2, Trans Studies Quarterly 4.1, Canadian Ethnic Studies, and The Equity Myth: Racialization and Indigeneity at Canadian Universities. He is presently working on his monograph entitled “Trans Necrointimacies: Race and the Chalky Affects of Trans Memorialization.”