2016-2017 Events

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Co-Sponsored: And Social Justice For All: Human Rights in the Age of Surveillance

Conference

Date: May 11, 2016
Time: 8:30 am – 2:30 pm
Location: Founders College, York University
Event Note: Keynote: Desmond Cole, Journalist and Activist. Link to event on Facebook here: View Facebook Event.
Event Summary:

A FREE student conference and fair in Founders College that explores fundamental social justice and human rights issues featuring:

  • dynamic speakers
  • performers
  • workshops
  • campus tours

View Poster Here


Co-Sponsored: Superbutch, queer fashion show - Lets Talk About Butch

Panel

Date: May 14, 2016
Time:
6:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: The Great Hall, 1087 Queen St W
Event Note: Co-sponsored by The Centre for Feminist Research.
Event Summary:

A panel and space to discuss what “butch” is, what it isn’t, and what it might be. Panelists—including people who do and don’t identify as butch—will talk about female masculinity and trans masculinity, past and present.

Facilitated by Michèle Pearson Clarke. Panelists: Tee Fergus, Kathryn Payne, reese simpkins, and Dinah Thorpe.

Co-presented with Inside Out: Toronto LGBT Film Festival and Shameless Magazine

Thank you to our sponsors:
Alljackedup
Centre for Feminist Research, York University
CUPE/SCFP Ontario
Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto
Mayworks Festival of Working People and the Arts
McLean Clinic
School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University
Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto

View poster here


Co-Sponsored: Indigenous Environmental Justice Knowledge Sharing Symposium

 

Date: May 26, 2016
Time: 8:00 am - 7.30 pm
Location: Halliwell Centre at Osgoode
Event Note: Co-Sponsored by the Centre for Feminist Research.
Event Summary:

The Indigenous Environmental Justice Knowledge Sharing Symposium proposes to advance the theory and practice of EJ scholarship by engaging with Indigenous peoples to more fully develop the concept of “justice” and the policies and law necessary to enable just relations. The IEJ symposium creates a forum to share ideas, knowledge and experiences to help us understand what environmental justice means.

By bringing together activists, youth, women, artists, Elders, scholars, leaders, environmental practitioners, advocates and community members, the symposium is intended to initiate and invite dialogue on the following specific questions:

What does EJ mean in Canada, in an Indigenous context and from an Indigenous perspective?
What is currently known about IEJ in Canada?
Sharing and learning at the symposium will take various forms, particularly as there is no single definition of Indigenous justice, nor will there be for environmental justice. Indigenous peoples are diverse and their experiences and knowledge vary significantly across nations, yet similar principles emerge that form the basis for common understandings. One of these is the importance of the role of women and youth in expressing EJ in Canada (both the Idle No More movement and Mother Earth Walks have been led by Indigenous women). As such the symposium will provide ample room for the voices of Indigenous women and youth.

The symposium will consist of remarks and teachings shared by Elders/Grandmothers, women and youth. Knowledge will be shared via panel discussions, roundtables, formal presentations and creative expression (art). See a list of select presenters here

York and Academic/Community Collaborators

  • Dr. Deborah McGregor (Whitefish River First Nation), Osgoode Hall Law School and Faculty of Environmental Studies
  • Dr. Martha Stiegman, Faculty of Environmental Studies
  • Dr. Dayna Nadine Scott, Osgoode Hall Law School and Faculty of Environmental Studies
  • Dr. Mary Ann Corbiere (University of Sudbury)
  • Dr. Brenda Murphy (Wilfred Laurier University)
  • Kathleen Padulo (Chiefs of Ontario)
  • Sue Chiblow (Garden River First Nation), and
  • Nancy Deleary (Chippewas of the Thames)

Co-Sponsored by the Osgoode Hall Law School and the Faculty of
Environmental Studies, York University, and Faculty of Communications, Art & Design, Seneca College, Institute for Feminist Legal Studies, the Centre for Feminist Studies and the Robarts Centre.

View website here


Co-Sponsored: Black Futures Now Toronto

Conference

 

Date: Saturday, 16 July 2016
Time: 8:00 AM to 6:30 PM
Location: Technology Enhanced Learning - 88 The Pond Road, York University
Event Note: Organized by Black Futures Now. Co-sponsored by the Centre for Feminist Research.
Event Summary:

The mission of the Conference is to create a space in which Black gender nonconforming folks, youth, and women can come together to discuss and workshop ideas around social and political issues they care most about, ranging from politics around representation in creative and social justice fields. Inspired by movements like Black Girls Are Magic and Black Girls Are from the Future happening stateside, we hope to create a space to address an urgent need within Toronto’s Black communities for Black gender nonconforming folks, youth,women to creatively engage with each other across communities, generations and experiences. In creating this event, our goal is to ferment the ideas and visions needed to help create a more anti-racist and Black feminist Toronto. We also hope to provide an opportunity to develop the social and political strategies needed to realize those visions.

View media coverage of this event on Now Toronto, Toronto Star and Metro News

View poster here

View Program here


Co-Sponsored: York Sex Work Research Symposium: Sexual Economies, Politics and Positionality in Sex Work Research

Event

Date: September 30, 2016
Time: 2:00pm – 4:30pm
Location: 626 Kaneff Tower
Event Note: Co-Sponsors: Centre for Refugee Studies at York University, Institute Without Boundaries at George Brown College, Department of Political Science at York University, Department of Social Science at York University
Event Summary:
The 2016 York Sex Work Research Symposium was a one-day event that brought together leading sex work researchers in Ontario to explore the theme of positionality in sex work research. This theme responded to the need for sex work researchers, sex workers, and sex worker-led organizations to enter into a conversation that critically examined the politics and power dynamics inherent within the research process. This reflected the current moment in sex work studies wherein the lines between feminist movements, sex worker self-representation, and the practice of sex work research are increasingly blurred, and often highly contested. Participants included sex work researchers, but also sex workers, sex working researchers, and activists spanning York, Ryerson, the University of Toronto, Western, Carleton, and Ottawa Universities, as well as representatives and affiliates from Maggie’s: The Toronto Sex Workers Action Project and Butterfly, Migrant Sex Worker Project. 25 persons participated, including six York graduate students (from the Departments of Political Science, Gender, Feminist and Sexuality Studies, Social Science, and Geography), a post-doctoral fellow at the Centre for Refugee Studies and several LA&PS faculty members. Visiting CERLAC fellow, Professor Adriana Piscitelli of the University of Campinas, Brazil delivered keynote remarks and participate in the symposium.

In order to encourage meaningful dialogue, the symposium was structured around three roundtable discussions examining the sub-themes of intersectionality, sexual economies, and new technologies in relation to participants’ subject positions and research agendas. Therefore, this event provided the unique opportunity to share diverse perspectives across disciplines, sectors, and communities on knowledge production and research practice in sex work studies today. The symposium also offered a forum to present recent research findings, foster new research collaborations, and provide a platform to both showcase and strengthen the sex work research cluster in LA&PS here at York. By challenging participants to more critically engage with questions of positionality and inviting participants to publish the proceedings of this event, the symposium itself contributed to collaborative and innovative knowledge production in contemporary sex work research.

Speakers: Professor Kamala Kempadoo, Adriana Piscitelli (Visiting CERLAC Fellow & Professor at University of Campinas), Elya M. Durisin (PhD. Candidate in the Department of Political Science), Dr. Magdalena Sabat (Independent Researcher), Dr. Megan Lowthers (Post-Doctorate Fellow at the Centre for Refugee Studies)


Co-Sponsored: GIRL POSITIVE

Book launch with authors Tatiana Fraser and Caia Hagel

 

Date: October 3, 2016
Time: 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Location: Penguin Random House of Canada, 320 Front St W, Toronto, ON M5V 3B6
Event Note: Free event. Co-sponsored by the Centre for Feminist Research and Penguin Random House Canada. Link to event on Facebook here: View Facebook Event. Register for event here: View Event Registration. Link to Event on CFR Calendar here: View CFR Event.
Event Summary:

“SOCIAL INNOVATION & GIRLS ON THE FRONTLINES OF BOLD NEW MEDIA”

A book launch & signing with panel discussion led by Girl Positive authors Tatiana Fraser & Caia Hagel on how, armed with smartphones and smarts, girls are using media as a tool for innovative change and transforming the cultural and political landscape.

Featured panelists:

View Poster Here


Women in Sudan: Negotiating Power on the Margins

Talk with Dr. Asha El-Karib

 

Date: October 5, 2016
Time: 2:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Location: 305 Founders College, York University
Introduced by: Rita Morbia, Executive Director, InterPares
Event Note: Light refreshments served. RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. Co-Sponsored by Inter Pares, Centre for Refugee Studies and The Harriet Tubman Institute. Link to event on CFR Calendar here: View CFR Event.
Event Summary:

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Asha El-Karib about the current strategies and interventions of the Sudanese women’s movement to negotiate and advance their agenda for women’s rights, peace and democracy, in the context of a strong history of feminist activism in Sudan to combat gender oppression.

Dr. Asha El-Karib is a leading feminist activist, human rights defender, researcher and proud grandmother based in Khartoum, Sudan. She is currently the Senior Strategic Advisor for the Sudanese Organization for Research and Development (SORD).

Dr. El-Karib began her activist journey as a young woman engaged in the Sudanese Women’s Union. She has worked for the Agency for Cooperation and Research in Development (ACORD) and was a founder of the Gender Centre for Research and Training. Dr. El-Karib is also the co-founder of a civil society initiative in Sudan which endeavours to bring democratic civil society actors together to work jointly on issues of democracy, peace building and good governance. She also works closely with women from Darfur and on the issues relating to women and peace processes.

View Poster Here


CFR Meet N Greet and Graduate Caucus

 

Date: October 19, 2016
Time: 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Location: 305 Founders College, York University; 303 Founders College, York University.
Event Note: Please RSVP to Julia at juliapyr@yorku.ca by Monday, October 17. Link to event on CFR Calendar here: View CFR Event.
Event Summary:

You are invited to the CFR meet n greet on October 19!

The Centre for Feminist Research is delighted to invite you to our meet and greet on Wednesday, October 19, 1:30-3:00pm, in the Founders Senior Common Room (FC305). Come and meet members of our Executive, as well as our visiting scholars, graduate assistants, and associates, hear about upcoming events, projects and research cluster activities, and propose new projects. Graduate students are invited to stay for the Graduate Caucus meeting, 3-4:30pm in the Founders Brian Craig Room (FC 303).

Light refreshments will be provided. Everyone is welcome!


Co-Sponsored: Women and the Challenge of a Socialist Jewish Voice to the Canadian State

Book Launch for “A Future Without Hate or Need” by Ester Reiter, Senior Scholar in the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University

 

Date: Thursday, October 20, 2016
Time: 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Location: Nexus Lounge, OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, 12th Floor
Event Note: Organized by the Department of Social Justice Education, OISE, University of Toronto. Co-Sponsored by the Centre for Feminist Research and the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University. Light refreshments will be provided.
Event Summary:

A Future Without Hate or Need brings to life the rich and multi-layered lives of a dissident political community. Many of the women in this secular Jewish community were activists who attempted to weave together their ethnic particularity – their identity as Jews with their internationalist class politics. They created lives filled with song, dance, literature, culture, politics, and concern for working people all over the world in their commitment to a just world and lasting peace.

View Poster Here


Mom and Me

Film screening and discussion with Director Lena Macdonald

 

Date: October 25, 2016
Time: 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Location: 626 Kaneff Tower, York University.
Introduced by: Dr. Lilia Topouzova, 2014-15 Visiting Scholar, Centre for Feminist Research
Event Note: Light refreshments served. RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca.
Event Summary:

“Mom and Me” (58 min) is a deeply personal feminist film which took 15 years to make. It follows the complicated relationship between director Lena Macdonald and her mother, who was once a filmmaker herself, but ended up homeless, crack-addicted and on the streets. For ten years Lena filmed in Toronto’s inner city and her story is complicated and honest. The film is about addiction, prostitution and despair but it is also a story about family, the power of hope and the tenacity of love. The film also raises pertinent questions on ethnographic research ethics.

Lena Macdonald is a Toronto based director, writer and producer. She has produced a diverse body of work from stage to broadcast, notably: The Greatest Team That Never Won and Stonethrower, both a part of TSN’s Engraved On A Nation, which won a Canadian Screen Award for Best Documentary Series and a production of Hugh Garners Cabbagetown, which she co-directed with Michael Ondaatje and Paul Thompson.

View Poster Here


Co-Sponsored: Biotechnology, Bio-Economies, Law, Translations and Cosmopolitics

Event

Date: November 3-5, 2016
Time: 8:30pm – 5:30pm
Location: Schulich Executive Learning Centre and Ross South, York University
Event Note: Co-Sponsors: SSHRC, Vice-President Academic & Provost, LAPS Associate Dean Research, Naomi Adelson, York Centre for Asian Research, Office of the Vice-President Research & Innovation, Department of Political Science, Faculty of Graduate Studies, Department of Social Science, Bethune College, Centre for Feminist Research
Event Summary:
This workshop explored the constitutional nature of profound biotech change at the fundamental level of constitutional rights and the political structures of individuals and collectives. The organizers and attendees focused on cosmopolitan and biocapital perspectives on translation, exploring how tacit reliance on certain notions of value, epistemology, and global governance institutions transform, as science and reason travel between lab and market, lab and universities, market and society and vice versa. Another concern was the translation of biocapital and making value out of biomedical research, including its translation from lab to benchmark and benchmark to society, attending to the co-production of moral cosmopolitan worlds. Participants engaged with how programmes and agendas of restructuring (i.e., austerity, precariousness, growth) as well as new experiments with different publics globally are changing the very institutions of capital including the way certain publics are experimented with and mobilized and research and innovation (R&I) is carried out. Participants examined the ways certain cosmopolitan visions and proposals are made and not others, how they compose themselves, and through what kinds of translation, invention and ethical attention (Jasanoff 2016). Finally, they examined geopolitical translations with links to the cosmopolitan argument: What happens when science and reason travel between different sites and in different parts of the world? In a conversation about the interfaces between biotech, capital, law and among different sites of knowledge production (i.e., international relations, politics, anthropology, business, geography and STS (science and technology studies)) and innovation, the participants explored the multiple interfaces as sites where entanglements are also sites of difference where publics, practices, groupings, ideas, valuation processes (i.e., biocapital), values, analytical grammars, overlap and also exceed each other composing links in deliberations that sometimes either produce ethical closures or connections.

Speakers: Welcome Address by Dr. Anna M. Agathangelou, Dean Ananya Mukherjee-Reed, welcoming comments and introduction of Dr. Jasanoff, opening plenary by Dr. Sheila Jasanoff, and other panel speakers


Scholarship & Cultural Production

A Workshop on the Intersection of Academic Research and Documentary Film Practices & Closed Screening of kiskisiwin/remembering with Martha Stiegman & Jesse Thistle

Date: November 9, 2016
Time: 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Location: 305 York Lanes, York University
Event Note: Light refreshments served. RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. Limited space available – you must RSVP in order to attend this event. Brief pre-circulated readings will be provided to participants.
Event Summary:

This interdisciplinary workshop examines the interactions between documentary filmmaking and scholarly inquiry. Participants will scrutinize the ways in which scholarship and non-fiction film seek to represent knowledge and foster an understanding of stories being told within and beyond the academe. The workshop comprises brief pre-circulated readings and the screening of kiskisiwin/remembering by York scholars and filmmakers Martha Stiegman and Jesse Thistle. Workshop participants may elect to have their own projects, be they written or visual, incorporated in the discussion.

Film Synopsis: A young Métis historian takes down Canadian pioneer mythology, with a very personal account of the impacts that version of history has played in his life. In kiskisiwin/remembering, a jingle dress dancer, an 1850s blacksmith and a troop of defiant urban Indians assert Toronto as Indigenous territory and challenge Canadians to re-write their nation’s history.

Dr. Lilia Topouzova is a historian and a documentary filmmaker, whose interdisciplinary practice addresses the representation of trauma and forms of remembrances across different historical and contemporary settings. She is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling (COHDS) at Concordia University.

Dr. Martha Stiegman is a documentary filmmaker and Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto, Canada. Indigenous struggles and settler solidarity have been the focus of Martha’s film work, and scholarship for more than a decade. She holds a joint doctorate in Communications Studies and Political Science from Concordia University examining Mi’kmaq Treaty and Inherent Rights.

Jesse Thistle is Métis-Cree from Saskatchewan. He is a Trudeau-Vanier Scholar and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. at York University. Jesse’s work centres on trauma and memory within populations of Métis and Cree in Northern Saskatchewan, and the Algonquin of Timiskaming, Ontario.

View Poster Here


Co-Sponsored: Transnational Filipinx Studies

Workshop

Date: November 14, 2016
Time: 9:30 am – 5:00 pm
Location: Founders 152, York University
Event Note: Co-Sponsored by the Centre for Feminist Research. Organized by Dr. Ethel Tungohan and the York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR). Link to event on Facebook here: View Facebook Event. Register for event here: View Event Registration. Link to Event on CFR Calendar here: View CFR Event. Event in YFile here: View YFile story
Event Summary:

During this workshop, which will be held at York University at Ross S802, we will:

1. Explore the similarities and differences in the immigration histories, life trajectories, and experiences of (un)settlement and (un)belonging of different groups of Filipino im/migrants in the United States and in Canada.

Undertaking these cross-national comparisons will enable us to come to a better understanding of the divergent effects on the Filipino diaspora of the Philippines’ labour migration policies and the United States’ and Canada’s labour recruitment strategies, and trace the impacts of imperialism and neoliberal globalization on the lives of migrants in different national settings.

2. Examine the range of community-engaged research projects across Canada.

We will assess the collaborative research projects undertaken by academics and community organizations on at-risk and marginalized Filipino youth in Vancouver (Kababayan Mentorship Program), second-generation Filipino youth across Canada (Filipinos Youth in Transition- Canada), current and former live-in caregivers across Canada (Gabriela Transition Experiences Survey), current and former caregivers based in Ontario who have left their children behind (Caregivers Journey), and Filipino seniors in the Greater Toronto Area (Filipino Elderly Well-Being Project). In doing so, we will explore answers to the question of how we can best foster collaborative research and advocacy partnerships between academics and community members.

Robyn Rodriguez will be our keynote speaker and will be speaking on, " Alternative Genealogies and Trajectories of 'Community Engaged Scholarship': A Critical Filipinix Studies Agenda."

Speakers:

  • Robyn Rodriguez (UC-Davis)
  • Allan Isaac (Rutgers University)
    Valerie Francisco (San Francisco State University)
  • Patrick Alcedo (York University)
  • Robert Diaz (University of Toronto)
  • John Paul Catungal (University of British Columbia)
  • Conely De Leon (York University)
  • Philip Kelly (York University)
  • Jennilee Austria (Filipino Youth in Transition Survey)
  • Petronila Cleto (Gabriela-Ontario)
  • Rupa Banerjee (Ryerson University)
  • Fritz Pino (University of Toronto)
  • Monica Batac (McGill University)
  • Marissa Largo (University of Toronto)
  • Maureen Mendoza (KAMP)
  • Zenee Maceda (UFCW)
  • Ysh Cabana (Anakbayan)
  • Kim Abis (Anakbayan)
  • Nicole Cajucom (Kapisanan)
Sponsors:
  • York University Liberal Arts & Professional Studies
  • York Centre for Asian Research
  • Global Labour Research Centre
  • Centre for Feminist Research

View Poster Here


Co-Sponsored: New Frontiers Graduate History Conference 2017

Dates: Thursday 23 to Saturday 25 February 2017
Event Summary: New Frontiers is Canada’s largest and longest-running graduate history conference. Over the years, hundreds of graduate students from Canada, the United States and Europe have presented their research on a range of issues ranging from the social influence of football to the coevolution of environment and culture, from the broader ramifications of movement itself to images of youth in popular culture. Once again this year, New Frontiers allows both national and international graduate students the opportunity to share their research with their peers on any geographic location and on a wide range of themes and topics including but not limited to:

  • History and Theory
  • Public Memory and Commemoration
  • Law, Politics, and Protest
  • Science, Medicine, Technology and Environment
  • Sovereignty and the State
  • Religion and Society
  • First Nations, Métis, and Inuit
  • Race, Ethnicity, and Identity
  • Gender, Sexuality, and the Body
  • Empire and Nation
  • Popular Culture and Consumerism
  • Migration and Diaspora
  • Work, Class, and Community

View Conference Website Here


Contesting Neoliberalism, Relinquishing Respectability: “Working Families,” Wisconsin, and What’s Left

Talk

Date: Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Time: 1:00pm-2:30pm
Location: 626 Kaneff Tower
Event Note: Talk by Visiting Scholar, Sexuality Studies and the Centre for Feminist Research David K. Seitz. Introduced by Sexuality Studies Coordinator Dr. Allyson Mitchell. RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. Light refreshments provided. This event counts towards GFWS seminar requirements.
Event Summary: For a few short weeks in February 2011, global attention turned to Madison, Wisconsin, where over 100,000 people took to the streets to protest Governor Scott Walker's harshly anti-union austerity measures. On the heels of the Arab Spring and just before the dawn of the Occupy Movement, the Wisconsin protests inspired many progressive-Leftists as a refreshingly bold "no" to neoliberalism. Yet in the past six years, Walker has cruised to two statewide electoral victories, and in 2016, the longtime union stronghold state was key to the deindustrialized bloc that catapulted Donald Trump to the presidency.

What happened? Rather than retreading exhausted and unproductive debates about putative impasses between class politics and identity politics, this paper suggests that a careful, intersectional analysis of the cultural politics of neoliberalism in Wisconsin points to the limits of liberal and even progressive-Left investments in respectability politics, broadly conceived. In particular, I track the trope that suffused the imagery generated by Democratic Party and mainstream union activists and ordinary people: the “working Wisconsin family.”
Co-sponsored by: Sexuality Studies Program, York University.
Bio: David K. Seitz is a Visiting Scholar in Sexuality Studies and the Centre for Feminist Research at York University. He is a Lecturer in Sexual Diversity Studies, Women and Gender Studies and Human Geography at the University of Toronto. His writing appears in Society and Space and the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.

View Poster Here


Co-Sponsored: Migrant Exclusion - The Case of Domestic Workers

Event

Date: March 3, 2017
Time: 2-4pm
Location: 305 Founders College, York University
Event Summary: Most migrant workers confront conditions of non-citizenship, discriminatory policies and exclusionary contexts of reception. This joint keynote will compare the experiences of Filipino and Indonesian domestic workers in the Middle East as they negotiate the conditions of their labour and migration. Dr. Parreñas and Dr. Silvey will discuss their ongoing collaboration that considers patterns of serial labour migration and migrant exclusion - including ineligibility for permanent residency, absence of labour market flexibility and denial of the right to family reunification - mediating the lives of temporary labour migrants in the region.

Speakers: Rhacel Salazar Parreñas (Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies, University of Southern California and Fulbright Scholar, Institute on Globalization and the Human Condition (IGHC), McMaster University) has conducted extensive research on labour, gender, migration, and economic sociology. Her current work examines the intersections of human trafficking and labour migration. She has written five monographs, co-edited three anthologies, and published numerous peer reviewed articles. Her latest book is a revised edition of Servants of Globalization (Stanford University Press, 2015). At McMaster she is working on her next book which compares migrant domestic workers in Singapore and the United Arab Emirates, highlighting the vulnerable status of domestic workers in unregulated workspaces.

Rachel Silvey (Associate Professor, Geography and Planning at the University of Toronto and Interim Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) is perhaps best known for her research on women’s labour and geographies of gender, inequality and migration in Indonesia. She has published widely on critical development studies, migration and immigration politics, feminist geography and diaspora/transnational studies. Her current work examines Indonesian and Filipino domestic workers’ employment in Singapore and the UAE (US National Science Foundation), and she leads the project on migrant workers’ labour conditions for the SSHRC Partnership Project, “Gender, Migration and the Work of Care: Comparative Perspectives,” led by Professor Ito Peng.

Presented by the York Centre for Asian Research and the Centre for Feminist Research, York University.

All are welcome!

View Poster Here


Deleuze and Guattari, Feminism and Queer Theory

An Introductory Workshop

Date: Tuesday, March 7th, 2017
Time: 12:30-2:30pm
Location:
626 Kaneff Tower, York University
Event Note:
Facilitated by Dr. reese simpkins, 2014-15 Visiting Scholar, Centre for Feminist Research & Sexuality Studies. RSVP to: reese simpkins at reese.simpkins@gmail.com and Julia Pyryeskina at juliapyr@yorku.ca by February 28 with a brief explanation about your interest in the topic. Two suggested readings will be provided. Limited space available.
Event Summary: Ever wanted to name drop Deleuze and Guattari? Or even incorporate their work into your own? Well, now you can!

In this introductory workshop, we will discuss the basics of Deleuzo-Guattarian theory in an accessible manner, and assess their potential for feminism and queer theory. We will focus on Deleuze and Guattari’s work A Thousand Plateaus, including their discussion of rhizome and becoming. We will also cover topics of embodiment and affect, as well as the political implications of Deleuzo-Guattarian based frameworks.

Already familiar with Deleuze and Guattari?

This workshop is a great chance to come and discuss your ideas, as participants at all levels of familiarity are welcome to have their writing incorporated into the discussion.
Bio: reese simpkins received his PhD in Political Science from York University in 2012. His work uses a Deleuzo-Guattarian framework to explore the intra-relation of matter, space, and time within the context of trans* politics.
Co-sponsored by: Sexuality Studies.

View Poster Here


Co-Sponsored: Empowering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique

Talk by Terezinha da Silva

Date: Monday, March 20, 2017
Time: 2:00pm – 4:30pm
Location: Kaneff Tower 519
Co-sponsors: The Harriet Tubman Institute, African Studies, Global Labour Research Centre, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Law and Society (LASO), The Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode (IFLS),Centre for Feminist Research.
Event Summary:

The last decade has seen a coal mining boom in northern Mozambique with the arrival of Riversdale, Rio Tinto, Vale and Jindal. The Mozambican government has welcomed these investments as the guarantee of economic growth, jobs and poverty alleviation. Brazil has given strong backing to its corporations in Africa, within an upbeat narrative of South-South solidarity. For the mining communities, it has been a story of unfulfilled promises. There have been forced resettlements of traditional farmers without prior consultation or respect for land rights. Vale has relocated them in a rural area with houses, schools and a health post but no land or means of livelihood. The influx of miners has exacerbated already scarce social and infrastructure in the region, overcrowding roads, schools and hospitals and creating social problems. While there have been many general studies of impacted communities, WLSA’s research project is the first study looking specifically at the impact on women and girls from a gender perspective. The study analyses, in context of resettlements, how women and men produce their responses as a result of mining actions. Terezinha da Silva will talk about the community workshops based on the research and the challenges of taking up these issues in communities with patriarchal traditions still deeply embedded.

Speaker’s Bio: Terezinha da Silva (Mozambique) is currently the national coordinator of WLSA Mozambique (Women and Law in Southern Africa), a regional NGO working on women human’s rights. She is also the board member of different NGO’s working on themes related to community development, social studies, children, gender and women issues and ageing. Her other professional experiences are related to management and institutional development. She worked for many years at the Ministry of Health and Social Action. She also has a wide range of experiences in teaching planning and management, including curriculum development of national courses. Her research experience include areas related to public policies, gender and development, integrity of the judiciary, unpaid care work, gender audit and ageing. She holds a Masters degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics.


Queer Ethnography?: Theory, Practice And Ethics

Graduate Student Workshop

Facilitated by: Drs. Dai Kojima & David K. Seitz
Date: Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Time:
12-2pm
Location:
626 Kaneff Tower, York University
Introduced by Dr. David AB Murray, Department of Anthropology
Event Notes: Please RSVP at juliapyr@yorku.ca to receive the readings. Light refreshments provided. This workshop counts towards GFWS seminar requirements.
Event Summary: This dialogue-based workshop will consider the implications and possibilities of adding “queer” to “ethnography”:

  • What do queer epistemology and sensibility do to ethnographic ways of documenting and representing others’ experiences and cultural practices?
  • How does such a methodological move change the ways in which we seek and understand the evidence of our theorizing?
  • What kinds of strategies does queer ethnography require? (Queer is, after all, about an insistence in finding pleasure and joy where they “should not” belong!)

We will discuss a few exemplary texts and case studies that will assist us in order to grapple with these questions and ethical challenges, followed by sharing our own field notes and experiences in order to consider practical implications and strategies as a group.

This workshop is open to everyone, but is best suited for MAs and PhDs at all stages of designing and conducting fieldwork or writing their theses.

Participants are encouraged to bring their research/field notes. Suggested readings and case studies will be provided.
Bios: Dr. Dai Kojima is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Anthropology and a Research Associate for CFR and YCAR at York University. His work appears in Anthropologica, Reconstruction and most recently, Topia (forthcoming in Fall 2017).

Dr. David K. Seitz is the Visiting Scholar in Sexuality Studies and the Centre for Feminist Research at York University. His writing appears in Society and Space and the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.
Co-Sponsored by: the Department of Anthropology.

View Poster Here


Co-Sponsored: 100 Years After Indenture

Event

Date: March 22, 2017
Location: HNES Main Lounge, York University
Event Note: Co-Sponsors: Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, Department of Sociology, Global Labour Research Centre, Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Centre for Feminist Research and Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada
Event Summary:
Transnational Reflections with Poet- Scholars Ramabai Espinet and Khal Torabully
Speakers: Ramabai Espinet and Khal Torabully


Gender Differences in Unpaid Work, Paid Work And Discretionary Time In Turkey

Talk

By: CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Burca Kizilirmak
Introduced by: Dr. Meg Luxton, Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies
Discussion Chaired by: Dr. Leah Vosko, Gender and Work Database
Date: Monday, March 27, 2017
Time: 11.30-1.00pm
Location: 280A York Lanes
Event Notes: RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. Light refreshments provided. This talk counts towards GFWS seminar requirements.
Event Summary: Marked with low female labor market participation rates and strong patriarchal relations, Turkey ranks low in gender equality. In recent years, with more and more women entering the labor force, comes the question of ‘second shift’ and the problem of high total work load of women. How free are women in Turkey in using their time and what are the gender differences in temporal autonomy? These questions are addressed in this research by measuring and analyzing women’s and men’s ‘discretionary time’, that is the time left after the necessities of life (personal care, unpaid work, paid work) are met. This framework is also used to understand the effects of different policies on gender differences in discretionary time.
Bio: Dr. Burca Kizilirmak is a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Feminist Research at York University, and a Professor of Economics at Ankara University in Turkey. Her research focuses on gender economics, time use, international trade and income inequality. She has done research on women in labor markets, intra-household distribution of work time and the effects of global trade patterns on women's employment.
Co-sponsored by: Gender and Work.

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DigiQueer Cinema

Talk and screening with filmmaker Kami Chisholm

Date: Wednesday, March 29, 2017
Time: 3-5pm
Location: 305 York Lanes
Event Note: RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. Light refreshments provided. This talk counts towards GFWS seminar requirements.
Event Summary: In 1992, B. Ruby Rich coined the term “new queer cinema” to capture in part the breakout of a wave of queer independent feature films on the international film festival circuit. Many of these films subsequently also became financial successes, setting a precedent for the film industry to view queer cinema as potentially commercially viable. Today, LGBT characters abound in mainstream and independent film and television, and hundreds of LGBT themed film festivals have been established around the globe. But as LGBT representations and politics have gone increasingly mainstream and assimilationist in the US and Canada via movements such as marriage equality and inclusion in the military, so too has the programming at many of the LGBT themed festivals. This is especially true of the largest and most established LGBT festivals, which increasingly serve as gatekeepers to the queer circuit, leaving many filmmakers and audiences, especially queer and trans people of color, marginalized or shut out of representation even on alternative screens.

In this talk, filmmaker Kami Chisholm will discuss the economics and curatorial practices that have simultaneously led to the proliferation of the making of work alongside the rise of gatekeeping and other practices that privilege certain types of stories and technical proficiency over formal experimentation and overtly political content that challenges homonormativity and assimilation. Drawing from clips from her own films as well as from projects she has curated for the Toronto Queer Film Festival, Dr. Chisholm will discuss the aesthetics and politics of making, curating, and exhibiting new digiqueer cinema in the age of homonationalism.

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CFR Trans Studies Conference Preliminary Meet and Greet

Event

Date: Wednesday, April 12, 2017
Time: 11am-1.30pm
Location: 626 Kaneff Tower, York University
Event Notes: If you have any questions, please contact the Conference Coordinator, Evan Vipond, at transgradconference@gmail.com.

Event Summary: The CFR will be holding a Meet ‘n Greet on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 from 11-1:30pm, featuring a talk by Dr. reese simpkins, who was a 2014-2015 Visiting Scholar at the CFR. The event will also include brief presentations of current graduate students’ research. Further, this will serve as an opportunity for those interested in joining the committee to meet one another and begin a conversation on what we envision for the conference.

If you would like to give a 10 min presentation on your work at the Meet and Greet, please send an email to transgradconference@gmail.com, by Friday, March 3, 2017, introducing yourself and include an abstract or brief description of what you wish to present on. We welcome a range of topics that connect to trans studies, including, but not limited to: whiteness and racism, sex work, prisoners and the prison-industrial-complex, imperialism, (settler) colonialism, nationalism, citizenship, rights and the law, crip theory, sexualities, political economy, and cultural production.

All those interested in the 2018 conference are encouraged to attend the Meet and Greet!

Please note, anyone interested may apply, but preference will be given to trans-identified students, particularly trans people of colour, Two Spirit persons, disabled trans persons, trans sex workers, trans feminine persons, non-binary people, and others who are underrepresented and marginalized within the trans community.*

*This is not an exhaustive list. If you are interested in participating, please reach out.

View Call for Participants Here


CFR Annual Council of Associates Meeting

Event

Date: Wednesday, April 12, 2017
Location: 626 Kaneff Tower, York University
Event Summary: The Council of Associates meeting was an opportunity to members to meet one another, hear about CFR’s activities over the past year, and learn more about the research projects we currently house and others that are in development. It was also an opportunity for the CFR community to have a conversation and a community consultation in anticipation of the re-chartering process that CFR will be embarking on in Fall 2017.


Co-Sponsored: Forty Years of LGBTQ+ History Collection Launch

Event

Date: April 23, 2017
Location: Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives, 34 Isabella Street, Toronto
Event Note: Co-Sponsors: Inside-Out LGBTQ+ Film Festival, V-Tape, and Centre for Feminist Research
Event Summary: The Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives, the world’s largest independent LGBTQ+ archives, celebrated the launch of the Nancy Nicol digital video collection. Over many years documentary film director, author and activist, Nancy Nicol, interviewed activists, community leaders, and human rights lawyers across Canada, and documented a rich resource of rarely seen events and demonstrations. The collection includes the original interviews filmed by Nicol, and showcases shorts and excerpts from Nicol’s award-winning documentary series From Criminality to Equality, that brings to life 40 years of lesbian and gay movement history in Canada. This acquisition is part of the CLGA’s longer-term strategy to become a more active resource for the Canadian and LGBTQ+ communities and to help increase access to LGBTQ+ heritage.

About the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives:

The Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives (CLGA) is the largest independent LGBTQ+ archives in the world. With a focus on Canadian content, the CLGA acquires, preserves and provides public access to information and materials in any medium. By collecting and securing important historical records, publications, magazines, newspapers, photos, films and other paraphernalia, the CLGA cares for LGBTQ+ histories now and for generations to come.

View Their Site Here


CFR Co-Sponsored: Letter writing campaign - protest violence against gay Chechen men

Campaign

 

Date: May 11, 2017
Time: 10:00 am- 300 pm
Location: Vari Hall, York University
Contacts: Joanna Pearce  & Julia Pyryeskina
Event Note: Pens, paper, envelopes, stamps and letter templates provided!Coffee & snacks will be served!
Event Summary:

Since April 2017, independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta and other international newspapers and human rights organizations have confirmed the disturbing reports of the persecution of men based on their real or presumed homosexuality in the Chechen Republic, including harassment, violence, the imprisonment of over 100 men in concentration camps, and murder. (Source 1) The Russian LGBT Network is organizing the financial and logistical support and evacuation of the victims, as it is unsafe to remain in Chechnya, with the ultimate aim of evacuating them from Russia. (Source 2)

Despite these reports, the Canadian government has been slow to take action or to make a commitment to welcome and support the refugee claims of the gay Chechen men. (Source 3)

On May 11, we will host a drop-in letter writing campaign at York University urging the investigation of the disappearances of Chechen men, demanding that their human rights and safety be respected, and condemning the violence, imprisonment, and murder of the victims.

The letters will be sent to Russian investigation committees and international human rights organizations.

We will also send separate letters and emails to the Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrysia Freeland, and the Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen demanding that the Canadian government take material action by opening the refugee process to the Chechen men’s claims.

Other ways to get involved:


Outside the Lines: An art exhibition exploring the blurring genres of gender, body, disability and racialization

Art Exhibition

Date: May 15, 2017
Time: 12:00 pm
Location: Eleanor Winters Gallery, 129 Winters College, York University
Artists: Yvonne Singer, Naz Rahbar, Martha Newbigging, Lindsay Fisher, Joann Purcell, Erin Vincent, Estée Klar, Ellen Bleiwas, Eli Howey, Diana Meredith.
Event Note: Contacts: Martha Newbigging, curator; Dr. Eva Karpinski.
Event Summary:
Lines have been drawn to mark difference - to keep difference in line. The exhibition Outside The Lines features 10 artists who represent the beyond and within of lines through their artistic practices. This exhibition brings together diverse ways of working with materials to show qualities of living that sit outside of mainstream perception and narrative.

These artists collaborate with autistic experience to challenge notions of independence and care narratives; explore the daily experiences of living with disability that are uniquely humorous, difficult, or lovely; draw queer sexuality and gender through memory fragments; investigate the lived experience of existence with queer and immigrant identity; question the fragmentation of gender, feminism and the body; and challenge the dominant medical and pharmaceutical narratives of experience with cancer.

This exhibition is held in conjunction with the international conference “Lives Outside the Lines: Gender and Genre in the Americas, A Symposium in Honour of Marlene Kadar.” Kadar is a noted Canadian feminist studies and life writing scholar whose research interests clustered around issues of gender and genre with special attention given to trauma and illness studies, archival methodologies, and transnational themes in the Americas. For more information, visit the conference website at https://iaba-americas.org/future-conferences/

Free event - no RSVP necessary.

Sponsors: With generous support from a Connection Grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), a/b Auto/Biography Studies and York University: Faculty of Graduate Studies, Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; Department of Humanities, Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist, and Women's Studies, School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies, the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies Research Event Fund, the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies Canada @ 150 Fund, and the Centre for Feminist Research.

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Texts in Crisis: Esmeralda Santiago, Judith Ortiz Cofer, and the Case for Rereading Identity

Fulbright Specialist Lecture

Date: May 24, 2017
Time: 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Location: 519 Kaneff Tower, York University
Speaker: Ricia Anne Chansky
Event Note: Ricia Anne Chansky is Associate Professor of literature at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. She is coeditor of the journal a/b: Auto/Biography Studies, and of The Routledge Auto/Biography Studies Reader; and editor of Auto/Biography Across the Americas: Transnational Themes in Life Writing and Auto/Biography in the Americas: Relational Lives.
Event Summary:
The ongoing fiscal and humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico has made me rethink my obligations as a reader of auto/biographical narratives. While it is an established tenet in auto/biography studies that the self in the narrative is not and cannot be a unified, singular self, much less work in this field attends to readers of narrated lives as mutable participants in life stories. This presentation examines the diasporic memoirs of Esmeralda Santiago and Judith Ortiz Cofer as a means of building the case for rereading identity as analytical practice. This case for rereading as practice considers the diasporic subject found in (and across) serialized autobiographies; the fluid reader as witness; the gendered self existing between texts, nations, and identities; and, rereading in/as pedagogy.

Free event - no RSVP necessary.

Co-sponsored by CERLAC.

Light refreshments provided.

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Pedagogy and The Perverse In Toni Morrison’s 'God Help The Child' - Public Lecture by Dr. Aparna Mishra Tarc

Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017:
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory

Date: June 5, 2017
Time: 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Location: 519 Kaneff Tower, York University
Introduced by: Toby Wiggins
Event Note: Dr. Aparna Mishra Tarc is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Education at York University. Her scholarship examines the dynamic place of pedagogy in the ongoing subject formation of person. She is the author of Literacy of the Other: Renarrating Humanity (SUNY Press) and is currently working on the book Pedagogy in the Novels of J.M. Coetzee (Routledge).
Event Summary:
Aligned with queer scholarship recuperating perversion from its pathological treatment in the social sciences, Dr. Aparna Mishra Tarc theorizes the perverse in a turn to Melanie Klein’s treatment of Freud’s polymorphous perverse baby subject to the adult (m)other’s sexual drives. This lecture will examine how infantile sexuality is expressed and repressed in sexual and racial markers of identity through a psychoanalytic reading of Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child. Dr. Mishra Tarc will discuss how Morrison’s novel investigates personal, legal and societal responses to perverse expressions of the child’s sexuality generating, degenerating and regenerating the self. Subject to the other with sexual drives of their own, this text highlights the profound role of pedagogy in the care of the child’s polymorphous perverse existence.

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Race as Kink: Reading Transracial Fetishism - Public Lecture by Dr. Trish Salah

Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017:
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory

Date: June 6, 2017
Time: 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Location: DB 0014 (Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building, formerly Technology Enhanced Learning [TEL] Building), York University
Introduced by: Dr. John Greyson
Event Note: Dr. Trish Salah is Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Queen’s University and the author of two poetry collections, the Lambda award-winning Wanting in Arabic and Lyric Sexology, Vol. 1.
Event Summary:
In what sense might we speak or think about race as libidinally charged? How do we understand racial identity as erotically invested and in what ways do we see object choice as racially inflected? To what extent are such libidinal economies of identity formation and object choice both ubiquitously alluded to and routinely disavowed? And what are the circumstances under which they present themselves as an occasion for scandal, crisis and conflict?

Drawing upon Freud’s discussion of the place of disavowal in the constitution of desire, this talk is an attempt to think about the persistence, and affective charge, with which analogies between transgender identities and forms of racial passing or cross-identification, increasingly named as “transracialism,” are made.

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Co-Sponsored:FAG Art Exhibit And Reception

Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017:
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory

Date: June 6, 2017
Time: 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Curated by: Allyson Mitchell & Deirdre Logue with Emelie Chhangur, Jennifer Chan, and Jesika Joy
Co-Sponsored by: the Centre for Feminist Research & Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017.
Event Summary:
Emelie Chhangur Quenched, 2003
6 minutes
In a breathless performance work, Chhangur places redemption squarely on the side of perversion and the line to be crossed.
Jesika Joy Subject to Subject, 2006
4:24 minutes
Joy uses her body as both palette and tool, controlling what the viewer can and can't see, despite her objectification through their gaze.
Jennifer Chan Young Money, 2012
7 minutes
Chan explores Internet fetish communities, focusing on the tension between mediated sexual fantasies and corporeal desires.

For more information, please visit siss.info.yorku.ca.
For All SISS public events, View Event Page Here

The gallery is wheelchair accessible but there are no accessible washrooms

With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.

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Roundtable - Performing Perversion

Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017:
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory

Date: June 7, 2017
Time: 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Location: 519 Kaneff, York University
Chaired by: Dr. Allyson Mitchell
Event Summary:
Dr. Amber Jamilla Musser & Dr. Trish Salah in conversation with Dr. John Greyson, Dr. Sheila Cavanagh and Emelie Chhangur

This roundtable is free.

For more information, View Event Page Here

With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.


Carrie Mae Weems and the Question of Brown Jouissance - Public Lecture by Dr. Amber Jamilla Musser

Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017:
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory

Date: June 7, 2017
Time: 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
Location: 519 Kaneff, York University
Introduced by: Dr. Sheila Cavanagh
Event Note: Dr. Amber Jamilla Musser is Assistant Professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research interests include critical race theory, queer theory, and sexuality studies. Her monograph Sensational Flesh: Race, Power, and Masochism was recently published by NYU Press, and she is currently at work on another project tentatively titled "Brown Jouissance: Feminine Imaginings."
Event Summary:
Carrie Mae Weems’ 1995-1996 installation “From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried” provides an opportunity to meditate on the discourses of woundedness that permeate much thinking on race, affect, and masochism while also allowing us to theorize brown jouissance. Following Lacan, Dr. Musser takes jouissance to be the experience of being a body, “‘something’ lived by a body when pleasure stops being pleasure”. This lecture dwells on jouissance in order to retain the ambivalence of emotion that is provoked by Weems' invocation of tears. Brown jouissance offers to consider this opacity as strategic, masochistic, and deeply connected to the flesh, and enables a rethinking of the relationship between psychoanalysis, femininity, and race.

With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.

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Race as Relation - Public Lecture by Dr. David L. Eng

Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017:
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory

Date: June 8, 2017
Time: 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Location: 519 Kaneff, York University
Introduced by: Dr. David Murray
Event Note: Dr. David L. Eng is Richard L. Fisher Professor and Graduate Chair in the Department of English at the University of Pennsylvania. Eng is author of The Feeling of Kinship: Queer Liberalism and the Racialization of Intimacy (Duke, 2010) and Racial Castration: Managing Masculinity in Asian America (Duke, 2001). His forthcoming book Reparations and the Human investigates the relationship between political and psychic genealogies of reparation in Cold War Asia.
Event Summary:
Race is not a “thing” as it is commonly understood—an unchanging biological trait, a bodily attribute, a difference of blood quantum or color, a static identity. Rather, race is a relation—a continuous, modulating relationship among subjects mediating processes of social inclusion and exclusion.

This talk investigates “race as relation” in law and psychoanalysis. It begins with the idea of race as it emerged from the Transatlantic slave trade and the objectification of the slave as property. How did property, as a relationship and a set of rights and privileges, shape histories of racial inclusion and exclusion in U.S. law and society? In turn, how do psychoanalytic theories on subject-object relations rework fundamental assumptions about race and property? Finally, how do histories of race challenge ideas of the universal subject in psychoanalysis?

With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.

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Roundtable - Thinking Perversion Transnationally

Summer Institute in Sexuality Studies (SISS) 2017:
Perversion at the Crossroads of Critical Race Studies, Psychoanalysis, and Queer Theory

Date: June 9, 2017
Time: 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Location: 519 Kaneff, York University
Chaired by: Dr. Dai Kojima
Event Summary:
Dr. David Eng & Dr. Aparna Mishra Tarc in conversation with Dr. David Murray and Dr. David Seitz

This roundtable is free.

For more information, View Event Page Here

With support from a SSHRC Connection Grant and York University: Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost; Office of the Vice President Research and Innovation; the Faculty of Education; the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies; the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies; the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies; Glendon Gender and Women’s Studies Program; the Sexuality Studies Program; Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall Law School; Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Department of Political Science; Department of Social Science; and the Centre for Feminist Research.