CFR Newsletter: Upcoming Events and Opportunities, January 22, 2020

CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1. CFR welcomes CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Maud Perrier to York University
2. New Book "Inside Killjoy's Kastle" Edited by CFR Research Associate Allyson Mitchell and Cait Mckinney Available for Use in Courses
3. Julia Pyryeskina’s departure & introducing CFR interim Events and Finance Coordinators

EVENTS:
1. CFR Presents: Spotlight on Islamophobia Series Event, "Islam, Sexuality and Islamophobia" Panel (January 29, 2020)
2. CFR at Organized Research Units (ORU) Open House (January 29, 2020)
3. CFR Co-Sponsored Event: Book Launch for Leah F. Vosko ‘Disrupting Deportability: Transnational Workers Organize’ (January 31, 2020)
CFR and Sexuality Studies Program present: "QueerEdge: From Gay to Queer Liberation" film screening (February 6, 2020)

OPPORTUNITIES:
1. Coordinator, Centre for Feminist Research at York University (open until filled)

COMMUNITY

EVENTS:
1. Institute for Feminist Legal Studies (IFLS) Speaker Series: Workplace Sexual Harassment: Assessing the Effectiveness of Human Rights Law in Canada (January 23, 2020)
2. Betinho Project Meeting (January 23, 2020)
3. Department of Anthropology Job Talk: Anthropology of Race, Racisms, and Racialization
by Matthew Chin (January 24, 2020)
4. HIDDEN Art Exhibition at Tangled Art Gallery (January 24, 2020)
5. UofT: Private Q&A Session with Paul B. Preciado - Night of Ideas (January 25, 2020)
6. Indo-Canadians for Humanity Presents: Rally to save Indian Constitution and Democracy (January 26, 2020)
7. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Post-Doctoral Fellows Workshop: Brownbag Lunch with Tatiana Klepikova (January 27, 2020)
8. Urgent Call to Action! Support Free Speech on Palestine Against the Alt Right (January 27, 2020)
9. Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought Presents: “Black Bag Speaker Series” (January 28, 2020)
10. Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXXXI (January 28, 2020)
11. Department of Anthropology Job Talk: Uprooting Origins: Racial Self-Making and Diasporic Cultural Production in West Africa by Celina de Sá (January 29, 2020)
12. Indigenous Environmental Justice Project and Water Allies Present: Zoe Todd Speaking on Disrupting the Weaponization of Fossil Kin: Collaborative Scholarship for Rewriting Alberta’s Petrocolonial Chemistry (January 30, 2020)
13. 2020 Centre for Refugee Studies Summer Course: Early Bird Registration (February 1, 2020)
14. Institute for Feminist Legal Studies (IFLS) Speaker Series: Debt by Another Name (February 3, 2020)
15. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) & Caribbean Studies and African Studies: Survival and Liberation: Student Politics, Pan-Africanism, and Black Power in Britain (February 3, 2020)
16. Department of Sociology’s Annual Guest Speaker: Biidaaban by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (February 4, 2020)
17. Critical Perspectives on Mental Health/Mad Studies Cluster Event (February 5, 2020)
18. "On Settling (S)Pace" - A Talk by Uahikea Maile (February 6, 2020)
19. MobilizeYU Knowledge Mobilization Course (February 6- April 2, 2020)
20. The Equality Fund and AWID Webinar: How Would You Build a New Feminist Fund? (February 11-13, 2020)
21. York Girls' Studies Research Network Agency In Girls' Studies 3x3x3 Event (February 14, 2020)
22. Canada Caribbean Research Symposium (CCRS) (February 17-19, 2020)
23. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Research Seminar Series: "Whosoever Will, Let Them Come: LGBT Evangelicals In Brazil" (March 4, 2020)
24. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Undergraduate Event: International Women’s Day (March 4, 2020)
25. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Undergraduate Event: Career Panel With WGSI Almuni (March 9, 2020)
26. Institute for Feminist Legal Studies (IFLS) Speaker Series: A Discussion with the Author: Everyday Transgressions: Domestic Workers' Transnational Challenge To International Labor Law (March 20, 2020)
27. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Undergraduate Event: 35th Anniversary Of WGSI Scholarship (March 27, 2020)
28. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Research Seminar Series: Hazel Carby (April 1, 2020)
29. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Research Seminar Series: WGSI Doctoral Research Seminar (April 15, 2020)

 CALLS:
1. Call for Participants: Examining the Effects of Anti-Sexual Violence Education Amongst University Students
2. Call for Panels and Papers: Congress Interdisciplinary Feminist Sessions “Bridging Divides, Building Solidarity for Change: Feminists Confronting Colonialism, Anti-Black Racism and Patriarchy” (January 27, 2020)
3. Call for Proposals: The Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board 2020 Grants Program (January 31, 2020)
4. Call for Papers: Edited Volume Marxism and Migration (February 1, 2020)
5. Call for Papers: Robarts Centre Graduate Conference in Canadian Studies (February 7, 2020)
6. Call for Proposals: Social and Political Thought Strategies of Critique Conference ‘Static: Formations and Disruptions’ (February 23, 2020)
7. Call for Papers: Making Connections: Women's Writing 1918-1939 Conference (February 28, 2020)
8. Call for Abstracts: Transatlantic Memories, Blackness, and Diasporic Identity Formation Conference (March 10, 2020)
9. Call for Papers: Adoptionis Interruptus: Essays in Adoption and Sexuality (April 1, 2020)
10. Call for Submissions: ‘Other Tongues Volume 2: Mixed-Race Women Speak Out... Again!’ (April 21, 2020)

OPPORTUNITIES:

2. Job Opportunity: Dean, School of Social Work at Memorial University in Newfoundland and Labrador (open until filled)
3. Job Opportunity: Tenure-Track Appointment in Gender, Post-Colonialism, and the Islamic World, Department of Politics, York University (January 25, 2020)
4. Job Opportunity: Lecturer or Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track Probationary Position), Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora, the Department of English Literatures, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick (January 31, 2020)
5. Graduate Research Awards for Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation 2019-2020 (February 3, 2020)
6. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track), Graphic Communications Management/Packaging, Faculty of Communications and Design, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada (February 14, 2020)
7. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track), Technology Innovation and Design, Faculty of Communications and Design, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada (February 14, 2020)
8. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor in Social-Cultural Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, York University (February 14, 2020)

CENTRE FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
1. CFR welcomes CFR Visiting Scholar Dr. Maud Perrier to York University
The Centre for Feminist Research is pleased to announce that Dr. Maud Perrier will join us as a Visiting Scholar at the end of the Winter 2020 semester.
Dr. Maud Perrier is a sociologist based at the University of Bristol, UK. She has written from a feminist perspective on motherhood, class, neoliberalism, and critical pedagogy in journals such as Gender and Education, Feminist Formations, Sociology, Sociological Review and Australian Feminist Studies, amongst others. Dr. Perrier has co-edited with Maria Fannin Refiguring The Postmaternal: Feminist Responses to the Forgetting of the Maternal (2018, Routledge). This edited book argues that contemporary feminism has not forgotten motherhood demonstrates how a thriving tradition of interdisciplinary maternal scholars draw on black, queer, ecological and socialist feminisms to contest the co-optation of care and maternity by neoliberalism. She is co-editing (with Elaine Swan and Janet Sayers) a forthcoming special Section of the Journal Gender, Work and Organization entitled ‘FoodWork: Gendered, Classed and Racialized Labours’. The Bourdieusian analysis of class she adapted for her mothering research has shifted towards a feminist critique of capitalism informed both by Dr. Perrier’s reading of social reproduction theory and by her own trade union activism. These overlapping paths have led her to York’s Centre for Feminist Research.
During her time in Toronto, Dr. Perrier will be working on completing her monograph called Politicizing Childcare: Maternal Workers, Class and Contemporary Feminism. This book illustrates that the Women’s Liberation demands about free childcare are persisting today in a context of deepened inequalities between women. The book frames disparate groups of workers around the maternal such as community activists, therapists, nursery workers, nannies and social entrepreneurs as maternal workers and argues that the politicization of this discontented workforce is an important facet of the deepening of the ‘care crisis’ (Fraser, 2016).
This multi sited study tracks how the politicization of childcare stays alive beyond feminist movements, through community politics, labour movements and cultural production in three different countries. In contrast to studies of the feminist politics of childcare that adopt a policy or historical approach, Dr. Perrier foregrounds the voices of contemporary workers in this sector, and suggests the politicization of childcare has classed and racialized effects which twenty first century feminism needs to take more seriously to build a more intersectional movement around childcare. Bourdieusian feminists’ theorization of care as classed femininity and social reproduction’s focus on the impossibility of refusal need to be brought together to theorize maternal work as simultaneously politicizing and class making.
Welcome, Maud!

2. New Book "Inside Killjoy's Kastle" Edited by CFR Research Associate Allyson Mitchell and Cait Mckinney Available for Use in Courses
AVAILABLE FOR
COURSE ADOPTION
Inside Killjoy’s Kastle
Dykey Ghosts, Feminist Monsters, and Other Lesbian Hauntings
Edited by Allyson Mitchell and Cait McKinney
“All the rumours are true: lesbian feminist performance artists are terrifying, titillating, and in-your-face political. This book extends the fright and delight of Killjoy’s Kastle: A Lesbian Haunted House, revamping the genre of the exhibition catalogue to include, in true feminist fashion, all the various heroines, critics, and guides that influenced and contributed to the project. A book for everyone committed to resisting heteropatriarchal violence, and who wants to laugh (and cry) while doing it.”
Heather Davis, editor of Desire Change: Contemporary Feminist Art in Canada
Killjoy invites you into her kastle for a queer exorcism and celebration of the past…
This book explores the making and experience of Killjoy’s Kastle, an immersive walk-through installation and performance artwork (by Allyson Mitchell and Deirdre Logue). Inside Killjoy’s Kastle’s witty and smart essays reframe and reclaim queer feminist histories with humour, provocation, and theoretical sophistication, making it an enlightening read for students of art criticism, performance studies, gender, women’s and sexuality studies, and queer theory.
Inspired by Evangelical Christian hell houses, Killjoy’s Kastle has been staged in three cities so far – Toronto, London, and Los Angeles – engaging thousands in interactive encounters with the spirits that haunt feminist and queer history. Where traditional hell houses set out to scare and convert, Killjoy’s Kastle cheekily aims to provoke and pervert. Inside Killjoy’s Kastle extends and reflects on the theoretical and political legacies of the installation in chapters by queer and feminist scholars and in vignettes by participating artists. The many colourful photos in the book also bring the kastle to life, offering an important visual context.
Allyson Mitchell is an independent artist, an associate professor in the School of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at York University, and she runs FAG Feminist Art Gallery with her partner/collaborator Deirdre Logue.
Cait McKinney is an assistant professor in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University.
Would you like to consider this book for use in a course you’re planning? If so…
Request an exam copy https://www.ubcpress.ca/request-an-examination-or-desk-copy?utm_source=academic_email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=academic
Need more information?
Learn more about this book https://www.ubcpress.ca/inside-killjoys-kastle
Download a sample chapter https://www.ubcpress.ca/asset/29229/1/9780774861588_Excerpt.pdf

3. Julia Pyryeskina’s departure & introducing CFR interim Events and Finance Coordinators
Dear Folks,
As you all know Julia, the CFR Coordinator for the past five years, will be leaving the position at the end of the day on Friday, January 24th 2020 to join the Ryerson University Office of Vice President Research and Innovation.
We are in the process of advertising and hiring a replacement. I am hoping the new permanent Coordinator will be hired by the end of February.
In the meantime, I am pleased to introduce to Alyson Nemeth and Alicia Filipowich, our interim staff.
Aly is the Research Services Assistant with ORS, and she will be the interim Events Coordinator. Aly will be answering email and phone inquires, and organizing CFR events. YCAR Coordinator Alicia Filipowich will be the interim Finance Coordinator supporting research grants. She will be answering email inquiries regarding expenses, invoices, etc.
Please contact both directly through the general CFR inbox at cfr@yorku.ca.
Please bear with us during this transitional period, as we maybe slower than usual in getting back to you.
Regards,
Ena Dua

EVENTS:
1. CFR Presents: Spotlight on Islamophobia Series Event, "Islam, Sexuality and Islamophobia" Panel (January 29, 2020)
REMINDER!
The Centre for Feminist Research is pleased to announce the next event in the
Spotlight on Islamophobia Event Series:
---
Islam, Sexuality and Islamophobia
Date: Wednesday, January 29, 2020
Time: 3-5pm
Location: Ross South 802, York University, 4700 Keele St
Accessibility: Accessible space. Everyone welcome.
Directions to York University https://goo.gl/maps/AdXnDHiZNXpRP77k9
York University campus map https://acmaps.info.yorku.ca/files/2014/10/KEELE-Map-
Colour.pdf
Link to Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/456522578592156/
The ground-breaking work of Puar (2005) has illustrated that the discourse of the homophobic
‘other’ has been central to legitimizing the war on terror and justifying post 9/11 racial politics.
Dominant narratives construct Western societies as accepting of homosexuality, whereas Islam
and Muslim subjects are constructed as homophobic. Contesting such narratives, this panel will
explore the ways in which Muslim communities in Canada and Europe are contesting homophobia.
with panelists:
El-Farouk Khaki, co-founder of the Toronto Unity Mosque
Dr. Naveen Minai, Visiting Scholar in Sexuality Studies at the Centre for Feminist Research
Abdullah Qureshi, CFR Visiting Graduate Student
RSVP to: cfr@yorku.ca

2. Organized Research Units (ORU) Open House (January 29, 2020)
The Organized Research Units (ORU) Open House is approaching quickly, Wednesday, January 29th, 2020 from 10 am to 2 pm in the Scott Library Collaboratory. This is an exciting opportunity to drop by to learn more about the ORUs and the exciting research that they are undertaking. There will also be an opportunity to win one of three exciting door prizes!
10:00 AM – Open & Welcome guests
10:30 AM – Opening remarks from the Vice-President of Research & Innovation, Dean of Libraries and Associate Vice-President of Research & Innovation
10:45 AM – Refreshments
2:00 PM – End
Please pass this information on to others you know who would be interested. We look forward to hosting you!

3. CFR Co-Sponsored Event: Book Launch for Leah F. Vosko ‘Disrupting Deportability: Transnational Workers Organize’ (January 31, 2020)

Another Story bookshop cordially invites you to the launch of Disrupting Deportability: Transnational Workers Organize
When: January 31, 2020
Time: 6-8pm
Location: The Centre for Social Innovation, Annex Garage, 720 Bathurst St
Remarks will be shared by:
Felix Martinez and Santiago Escobar, National Representatives, United Food and Commercial Workers Union Canada
Christina Garbriel, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Carleton University
Peter Nyers, Professor, Department of Political Science, McMaster University
There will be a performance by JUNO nominated singer-songwriter Annabelle Chvostek
Light snacks and refreshments will be served.
For more information or to RSVP, contact Anjula Gogia at anjulagogia@gmail.com
Event is co-sponsored by: York University’s Centre for Feminist Research, the Global Labour Research Centre and the Department of Politics, and United Food and Commercial Workers Union Canada

4. CFR and Sexuality Studies Program present: "QueerEdge: From Gay to Queer Liberation" film screening (February 6, 2020)
The Centre for Feminist Research and the Sexuality Studies Program present:
FILM SCREENING of
QueerEdge: From Gay to Queer Liberation (2019)
Date: Thursday, February 6, 2020
Time: 2.30-4.30pm
Location: Nat Taylor Cinema (Ross North 102), York University
RSVP: cfr@yorku.ca
***
Accessibility: Accessible space. Everyone welcome.
Directions to York University https://goo.gl/maps/AdXnDHiZNXpRP77k9
York University campus map https://acmaps.info.yorku.ca/files/2014/10/KEELE-Map-
Colour.pdf
Facebook Event https://www.facebook.com/events/838735843219428/
***
Introduced by film director Dr. Nick Mulé
This feature documentary links the principles and tenets of gay liberation in the Stonewall era to today’s queer liberation movements. The interviews, spanning historical and contemporary LGBTQ issues, reveal internal politics, provide a critical analysis of the mainstreaming effects of the LGBT equality movements vs. the progressive, sex-positive views of queer liberation movements, and uncover an internal divide between those who are content with equality and those who continue to fight for liberation.
Followed by Q&A with the director
For more information about the film, visit QueerEdge.ca/
View the trailer here: https://vimeo.com/214739677

OPPORTUNITIES:

1. Coordinator, Centre for Feminist Research at York University (open until filled)
Posting Number
100530
Job Title *
Centre Coordinator
Department/Faculty (BU)
ORU-Centre for Feminist Research (CFR)
Affiliation *
YUSA 1
Job Details *
Contract Part Time
Job Start Date
02-04-2020
Job End Date
06-30-2024
Posting Intent
YUSA1 Concurrent: All interested persons may apply. Employees in YUSA1 will be considered as per Article 12.02 (f). If not filled internally, employees in YUSA-2 who have applied within the first 5 days from the date posted will be given preference.
Band/Salary Grade *
11
Compensation *
FTE Annual Salary of: $63,210.00
Job Category
Academic Administration
Total Weekly Hours of Work
27
Hours of Work
As per schedule; to be determined
Job Location
Canada / Ontario / Keele Campus
Posting Start Date/Posting End Date
Ongoing
Date Posted
01-13-2020
Apply online via: http://www.yorku.ca/jobs/
Access Full Position Posting: http://www.yorku.ca/jobsum/952455_Centre_Coordinator_CFR.pdf
Purpose:
The Centre Coordinator supports the Centre Director in planning and coordinating Centre-related activities, promoting feminist research at the Centre and on campus including providing administrative and secretarial support to the Centre Director and projects.
Education:
Completion of university degree in a related field, or an equivalent of 4 years recent experience (defined as within the last five years) working at York University and performing the same or similar tasks. This education equivalency is in addition to the experiential requirements outlined below.
Experience:
1-2 years of related work experience in an academic or related research focused unit or NGO environment. Experience with diverse and marginalized communities, including knowledge of anti-oppressive theory and equity policies is an asset.
Skills:
Strong interpersonal skills, including tact and diplomacy. Excellent communication skills, both oral and written. Ability to produce clear and concise documentation and reports. Financial administration skills for budget monitoring and reconciliation. Project coordination skills to coordinate Centre's operation, multiple research projects and events. Proven ability to work successfully with a wide range of stakeholders including researchers, students, staff, community groups, and private / public-sector organizations. Ability to work effectively under pressure to meet deadlines. Strong organizational and time management skills. Ability to work independently and effectively as a member of a team. Ability to maintain confidentiality. Intermediate skills in MS-Office (Word, Excel PowerPoint) and Web editing applications.
Additional Notes:
This position requires the candidate to produce a verification of degree(s), credentials(s), or equivalencies from accredited institutions and/or international equivalents at the time of interview.
Access Full Position Posting: http://www.yorku.ca/jobsum/952455_Centre_Coordinator_CFR.pdf
Apply online via: http://www.yorku.ca/jobs/
In order to be considered as an internal applicant, York University employees in the YUSA-1 bargaining unit must apply for jobs through the Employee Career Portal - YU Hire.
If you are a current York University employee in the YUSA-1 bargaining unit and/or are using your job posting rights under the collective agreement to apply for jobs, you MUST log into YU Hire to access the York University Employee Career Portal.
As per Article 12.02(f) of the YUSA-1 Collective Agreement, to be considered an internal applicant, employees in the YUSA-1 bargaining unit must submit the application 5 working days following the first day of posting. this is referred to as the 'Posted Date' on the job the posting.   This applies to YUSA-1 internal and YUSA-1 Concurrent postings.  Please refer to the 'Posting Intent' on the job posting.
If not filled by an employee in the YUSA-1 bargaining unit, employees in the YUSA-2 bargaining unit who have applied within the first 5 days from the 'Posted Date' will be given preference.
The University welcomes applications from all qualified individuals, including, but not limited to women, persons with disabilities, visible minorities (racialized), aboriginal (Indigenous) persons and persons of any gender identity and sexual orientation. York University is committed to a positive, supportive and inclusive environment.
York University offers accommodation for applicants with disabilities in its recruitment processes. If you are contacted by York University regarding a job opportunity or testing, please advise if you require accommodation.
We are committed to enhancing our environmentally and socially responsible practices for the benefit of all members of the York community. Our long term perspective recognizes our responsibility to be innovators and to continually work as a community to reduce our ecological impact.
York University employees must apply to jobs through the Employee Career Portal - YU Hire. If you are a current York University employee and/or are using your rights under a collective agreement to view and/or apply to jobs, you MUST log into YU Hire to access the York University Employee Career Portal.
PLEASE NOTE: All applications must be received by 11:55 pm EST on the posted deadline date, if applicable.

COMMUNITY

EVENTS:
1. Institute for Feminist Legal Studies (IFLS) Speaker Series: Workplace Sexual Harassment: Assessing the Effectiveness of Human Rights Law in Canada (January 23, 2020)
Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies presents: Workplace sexual harassment –assessing the effectiveness of human rights law in Canada by Professor Bethany Hastie (Allard school of law, UBC).
With comment from Professor Janet Mosher (Osgoode Hall) and lawyer Fathima Cader (McMurtry Fellow, Osgoode Hall).
Prof. Hastie’s recently published report analyzes substantive decisions on the merits concerning workplace sexual harassment at each of the BC and Ontario Human Rights Tribunals from 2000-2018, with a view to identifying how the law of sexual harassment is understood, interpreted and applied by the Tribunals’ adjudicators. In particular, this report examines whether, and to what extent, gender-based stereotypes and myths known to occur in criminal justice proceedings arise in the human rights context.
Prof. Hastie’s talk will be followed by brief commentary from Professor Janet Mosher and Osgoode McMurtry Fellow Fathima Cader.
Thursday, January 23 2020 from 2:30-4pm
Osgoode Hall Law School IKB 2028
Please RSVP bit.ly/hastie

2. Betinho Project Meeting (January 23, 2020)
Named after a Brazilian human rights and food activist, the Betinho Project aims to discuss & promote food security and participatory, democratic processes.
This event is free, open to the public, and wheelchair accessible.
Thursday, January 23, 2020
Time: 4:30- 6:00 pm
Where: Daphne Cockwell Complex at 288 Church Street. Ryerson University. Room to be confirmed soon.
Food Sovereignty, Democracy and Biodiversity: LabNutrir - A Living Educational Outdoor Laboratory
With Laura Porciuncula
Undergraduate Student, Nutrition, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN) and member of LabNutrir.
Through the Eyes of the Marginalized:  a counter-narrative to the story of marginalization of favela’s territory and people in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
With Jananda Lima
Researcher at OCAD University, Jananda works in social innovation with marginalized communities through co-design.

3. Department of Anthropology Job Talk: Anthropology of Race, Racisms, and Racialization by Matthew Chin (January 24, 2020)
Between Tourism and Pocomania
The politics of race and sex in late colonial Jamaica (1948-1962)
This talk revisits the period immediately preceding Jamaica’s independence from England in 1962 to consider how queerness plays into the transformations in the politics of Black sexuality taking place across the island. In so doing, it uses historical inquiry as a critical intervention into racialized discourses that situate Jamaica in terms of homophobic exceptionalism in the present. Drawing on close readings of mid-twentieth century Jamaican social science texts, news media, and literature, I argue that the archival possibilities of queerness on the island in this era coalesce in the figures of the White male tourist and the practitioner of the Afro- creole religion, Pocomania. Ultimately, I consider the implications of how queerness comes to be inscribed in Jamaican history through different iterations of race, class, gender, and nation, on contemporary discourses of sexual citizenship on the island.
Friday January 24, 2020
11:30am-1:00pm
2043 VARI HALL, Department of Anthropology
Light refreshments will be served

4. HIDDEN Art Exhibition at Tangled Art Gallery (January 24, 2020)
Gloria C Swain, Peter Owusu-Ansah, Tamyka Bullen, Kyisha Williams
Exhibition Opening: January 24, 6:00-8:00 pm
Exhibition Dates: January 17 - February 28, 2020
Tangled Art Gallery
ABOUT THE EXHIBITION
‘Hidden’ explores intergenerational trauma [hauntology], isolation and lived experiences of Black artists with hidden disabilities. What is hidden is kept concealed, and what is concealed is done to hide our uniqueness. As we navigate through unwelcome spaces that create exclusion and anxiety, we recognize how ableism, according to Dustin P. Gibson’s definition, is an “anti-black system that assigns value based on our ability to produce profit, excel and behave, and enforces a false idea of normalcy.” But we find each other in spite of invisibility, concealment and what is hidden. We strengthen each other by centering our communities from the peripheries, celebrating our shared spaces, ideas and experiences with other like-minded individuals.
Through our intersectional approach to disability arts, we reject single narratives of disability. Our collective understanding of disability is one that is political and relational. As we begin to uncover what is hidden, we move towards a rich and vibrant diversity of movements that work to confront our own cultural priorities.
Even though our practices are different, each artist adds to the exhibition in unique ways that results into a powerful show. We are stronger together than separately.
ACCESS INFORMATION
Tangled Art Gallery is in a barrier-free location. Audio description will be available for the exhibit. We will have ASL interpreters and attendant care present during public engagements. Service animals are welcome. We request that you help us to make this a scent-free environment. The exhibition and related events are free to attend.
FB event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1035848113427974/

5. Private Q&A Session with Paul B. Preciado - Night of Ideas (January 25, 2020)
World famous Queer theorist Paul B. Preciado will be in Toronto on Jan 25. He is the curator of Art Museum's exhibition that will be showcased this Winter, and will be the keynote speaker for our Night of ideas (NOI),
A private Q&A session at Hart House, from 8pm to 9pm with Paul B. Preciado will be held after the opening lecture for Night of Idea. This session is for Academics and limited in number. Should you want to attend, You MUST register and fill the form https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwJPA_jvdk7wfqBA7T81XKS0xSxmky4ywZ3119dbBZEINhDA/viewform .
Who is eligible? Academics who have a professional interest in the work of Paul B. Preciado (academics, PhD students, activists – exceptionally, masters students who study Preciado’s body of work) to take part in a 1h private Q&A session after his NOI keynote.
This year, NOI’s theme will be “Being alive”, and will explore the relationship between the body and the norm : exploring definitions of the norm (legal, social, moral, scientific…), and the adaptation of bodies to the norm or the bending of the norm to the new realities of the bodies.
We will, among others, explore notions of the augmented body, the disabled body, the illegal body, the trans body, the sick body, etc. with academics, scientists, artists…
Info & location:
https://artmuseum.utoronto.ca/program/night-of-ideas-2020/
Hart House
Art Museum at the University of Toronto
FREE ADMISSION & ALL AGES!

6. Indo-Canadians for Humanity Present: Rally to save Indian Constitution and Democracy (January 26, 2020)

The millions of Indians in the sub continent has shown us the way to how peacefully and passionately protest against the discriminatory CAA, ill intended NRC/NPR and the Kashmir lock-down. Inspired by them, on 26th Jan 2020, the date to honor the constitution, we shall gather at Queen's Park and peacefully march from there to Consulate General of India. Please spread the word to everyone who believe in equality.
The event will take place at Queen’s Park, 111 Wellesley St. West, with a congregation at 11 am and a peace march at 12 noon. The destination of the march will be the Consulate General of India, 365 Bloor St. E.
Link to Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/850129792073503/

7. WGSI Post-Doctoral Fellows Workshop: Brownbag Lunch with Tatiana Klepikova (January 27, 2020)

On Monday January 27, join us in the WGSI Lounge for a Brown Bag Lunch (12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.) with Tatiana Klepikova, who will provide a sneak peek into the state of affairs for LGBTQ individuals and culture in Russia. We will also discuss the challenges of transitioning from a grad student to Ph.D. and beyond (post-doc fellowship or to opting out of an academic career altogether). We will also identify some strategies that can be effective in shaping your identity as a person, researcher, and teacher within the highly demanding and seemingly constraining academic environment.
Tatiana Klepikova is a WGSI post-Doctoral Fellow (supervised by Dr. Shana Ye), and completed her Ph.D. in Slavic Literary Studies at the University of Passau, Germany. Tatitana describes her work thus: “My work strives to capture and elucidate sites, experiences, and articulations of “marginality” in Russian cultural imagination, especially in literature and the arts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. A meeting point of hegemonic and alternative discourses, “marginality” as a social, political, and cultural construct fascinates me by its potential to reveal the structures of power, control, and difference that have not only to do with political oppression, but also with imaginativeness and agency, which are far less known in connection to (neo)authoritarian settings like contemporary Russia that inform my research. As a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Faculty of Arts & Science, at the WGSI, I explore these questions through the lenses of Slavic, queer and performance studies by working on my monograph that explores representations of queerness in the contemporary Russian theater.”

8. Urgent Call to Action! Support Free Speech on Palestine Against the Alt Right (January 27, 2020)
Urgent Call for Support From the BDS Committee at the GSU
Calling All UofT Graduate Students, Defend Freedom of Speech on Palestine!
Monday / Jan. 27, 2020 / 6pm
5:30pm registration & food / T-cards required for registration
JJR Macleod Auditorium (Rm 2158), Medical Sciences Bldg, 1 King's College Circle, M5S 3K1
Contact: divest@utgsu.ca | RSVP on facebook!
The Boycott, Divestment & Sanctions (BDS) Committee at the UofT Graduate Student Union (UTGSU) is calling on all graduate students to come out on Monday, January 27 to the UTGSU’s Annual Meeting, which was readjourned from last month due to a lack of quorum. At the Jan. 27 Annual Meeting, UofT graduate students will vote on a motion in solidarity with protestors at York U who were physically and verbally assaulted by the hate group, the Jewish Defence League (JDL) on Nov 20. The motion also calls on UofT to take measures to stop the ongoing JDL harassment of students on our campus. With this motion, the UTGSU would join the York University Graduate Students’ Association (Local 84), the York Federation of Students (Local 68) CUPE Local 3902 at UofT, and many others in pushing back against racism, harassment and alt-right violence on our campuses. The use of intimidation and violence to shut down campus debate on Palestine is a serious threat to democracy, and an assault on the most basic principles of equity and freedom of speech. Regardless of your view on Israel-Palestine, the issue here is the right of all to freedom of speech and equity for students and campus communities. Join us on Jan. 27! Casting your vote in support of our motion is an easy, simple way to provide crucial support for freedom of speech and the struggle for justice for Palestine!
The UTGSU Annual Meeting will take place at JJR Macleod Auditorium (Room 2158) in the Medical Sciences Building, 1 King's College Cir, Toronto, ON M5S 3K1. Registration begins at 5:30pm and the meeting is at 6pm. All full-time and part-time graduate students at UofT across all campuses have a right to vote at the meeting. Bring your T-Card! Please note only graduate students are allowed to attend this meeting.
On November 20th, Students Against Israeli Apartheid (SAIA) at York University organized a peaceful protest against an event by Herut Canada featuring Reservists on Duty, an organization of Israeli military veterans. The peaceful protestors were physically and verbally assaulted by members of the JDL, who were acting as ‘security’ for the Herut Canada event. Since then, York U has launched an inquiry into the JDL violence on November 20, while SAIA York has justly called on their administration to ban the JDL from their university. We also urge our University administration to ban the JDL from the University of Toronto, where it has a long history of intimidating and harassing students and members of the University community working in solidarity with Palestine. Of course, the harassment and aggression the Palestine solidarity movement and its supporters deal with in Canada is but a small microcosm of the daily violence and systemic human rights violations that Palestinians face under Israeli apartheid. It is designed to silence all criticism of the Israeli state so it can colonize Palestine and eliminate the native population with impunity.
For more context:
Like all Palestine solidarity organizations, the UTGSU BDS Committee has faced ongoing attack and intimidation since our launch event was disrupted in 2014 by the hate group, the Jewish Defense League (JDL). As the Southern Poverty Law Center documents, the JDL “has orchestrated countless terrorist attacks in the U.S. and abroad, and has engaged in intense harassment of foreign diplomats, Muslims, Jewish scholars and community leaders, and officials.” Since our launch event, the JDL and its allies like Herut Canada have disrupted our events, harassed our organizers and supporters, and publicly slandered us with the usual baseless accusations of antisemitism and terrorism. Herut Canada is the Canadian branch of an Israeli political party. As noted by a recent SAIA statement, “In 1948, shortly after Herut’s founding, Herut was denounced by Albert Einstein, Hannah Arrendt and dozens of Jewish intellectuals as ‘a political party closely akin in its organization, methods, political philosophy and social appeal to the Nazi and Fascist parties.’” Since it’s founding, the Herut movement has aggressively supported the illegal Israeli settlement of Palestinian land and ethnic cleansing of Palestinians, which are war crimes under international law. To continue our work, we implemented safety protocols, marshalling procedures, and equity guidelines, we were able to continue our work and eventually the JDL ceased its attacks for a period. The JDL, with its ally Herut Canada, reemerged this September on campus to harass us and disrupt our activities.
Soon after, at York University on Nov. 20, JDL members were recorded spitting at, punching, verbally assaulting, shoving and choking peaceful protestors who assembled to oppose an event featuring Israeli soldiers organized by Herut Canada. JDL members, acting as ‘security’ for the November 20 event, urinated on a flagpole, threw garbage at protestors, threatened sexual assault and stabbing, and tried to rip off Muslim head scarves. The York U Graduate Students’ Association and York Federation of Students state that, “There is overwhelming evidence of aggression and violence by the Jewish Defense League members inflicted that evening. [...] It is deeply concerning that York’s senior administrators allowed this event to take place, and failed to take the appropriate steps to maintain the safety of all students present at the event.”
We need your vote on January 27th to ban the JDL from campus, stand against racist violence and to express our solidarity with York University!
Links:
[1] https://dimitrilascaris.org/2019/11/23/justin-trudeau-sides-with-pro-israel-thuggery-at-york-university/
[2] https://thevarsity.ca/2014/11/03/divest-petition-launch-disrupted/
[3] https://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/yves-englers-blog/2017/04/toronto-jewish-defence-league-far-right-group-powerful
[4] https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-hate/extremist-files/group/jewish-defense-league
[5] https://thevarsity.ca/tag/jdl/
[6] https://www.facebook.com/SAIA.York/posts/2712026162151523
[7] https://cpt.org/cptnet/2019/11/26/report-regarding-violence-york-university
[8] http://www.yfs.ca/statement?fbclid=IwAR2SVCSR9PERAAlZLgH4lXONzslLoj00-H8IE2F0LQ963QTP51S-X0qbKhQ

9. Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought Presents: “Black Bag Speaker Series” (January 28, 2020)
Social and Political Thought presents: “Black Bag Speaker Series,” an open forum to cultivate discussion on current work in Black Studies. Our objective is to generate a space for the development and exchange of ideas on Black Studies scholarship with students and faculty. Informal conversations about the future directions of the transdisciplinary field are encouraged. Anyone interested in Black Studies and Theories of Race and Racism is welcome to join. Light refreshments will be provided.
The event will take place in Ross South 701 from 12-1pm, and will feature Dr. Leslie Sanders.

10. Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXXXI (January 28, 2020)
Shab-e She’r (Poetry Night) LXXXI
Toronto’s most diverse & brave poetry reading and open mic series
Featured poets: Ghadeer Elghafri & Tyler Pennock
Hosts: Bänoo Zan & Terese Pierre
Time: Tuesday, January 28, 2020
Place: Tranzac Club, 292 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2M7
Main Hall
Doors open               6:15 p.m.
Open-mic sign-up     6:30 p.m.
Show                         7-10 p.m.
Admission:                $7-10
Ghadeer Elghafri Palestinian-Canadian poet, actor, singer from Gaza, new immigrant, warrior, healer, feminist, activist & advocate, chapbook, Poetry ReRooted: Decolonizing our Tongues
Tyler Pennock 2-spirit Cree and Métis adoptee from Northern Alberta, graduand of creative writing MFA at Guelph & before that - University of Toronto, upcoming poetry collection:  Bones
Tranzac Club is an accessible venue with no stairs (aside from the stage) and they have two accessible gender neutral washrooms. Please refrain from wearing perfume.
Twitter: @BanooZan & @ShabeSherTO
Instagram: @banoo.zan
https://www.facebook.com/events/2257301934567024/

11. Department of Anthropology Job Talk: Uprooting Origins: Racial Self-Making and Diasporic Cultural Production in West Africa by Celina de Sá (January 29, 2020)
Department of Anthropology
Job Talk
Celina de Sá
Wednesday, January 29, 2020
12:00-1:30pm
2043 VARI HALL, Department of Anthropology
Light refreshments will be served
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pittsburgh, PA
All faculty and students are welcome
Uprooting Origins: Racial Self-Making and Diasporic Cultural Production in West Africa
This talk will address how contemporary expressive cultural projects in Lomé, Togo, and Dakar, Senegal highlight processes and practices of racial self-making germane to the lives of urban West Africans. By looking at West African capoeira groups—a martial art developed by enslaved Afro-Brazilians in colonial Brazil—we see how young people in the region creatively leverage the historical ties across the black Atlantic as resources for facing the particular challenges of postcolonial precarity, and other legacies of imperialism. Through performance, infrastructure and community-building, these martial artists demonstrate some of the ways in which young West Africans are putting capoeira to “work,” mobilizing the diaspora as a technology to create new narrative and agential possibilities to define their own Africanness.
Wednesday, January 29, 2020
12:00-1:30pm
2043 VARI HALL, Department of Anthropology
Light refreshments will be served

12. Indigenous Environmental Justice Project and Water Allies Present Zoe Todd Speaking on Disrupting the Weaponization of Fossil Kin: Collaborative Scholarship for Rewriting Alberta’s Petrocolonial Chemistry (January 30, 2020)
SAVE THE DATE!
THURSDAY JANUARY 30
10:00am-12:00 noon
INDIGENOUS ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE PROJECT and WATER ALLIES present
Zoe Todd speaking on Disrupting the weaponization of fossil kin: collaborative scholarship for rewriting Alberta’s petrocolonial chemistry
Dr. Todd will examine collective principles of reciprocity, care, kinship, and co-constitution centred in the legal orders of her Métis and nehiyawak ancestors and how they can be disruptive forces that aid in dismantling white supremacist colonial capitalist logics of extraction in the territories Alberta currently occupies and claims. Zoe Todd is a Métis anthropologist and scholar of Indigenous studies, human-animal studies, science and technology studies and the Anthropocene. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University and was a Presidential Visiting Fellow at Yale
University during the 2018-19 academic year.
7th Floor Lounge, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies
Kaneff Tower, York University
Lunch provided. Bring your own mug.

13. 2020 Centre for Refugee Studies Summer Course Early Bird Registration (February 1, 2020)
The Centre for Refugee Studies at York University is offering its annual Summer Course on Refugees and Forced Migration from May 4-8, 2020.
The Summer Course is an internationally acclaimed, non-credit course for academic and field-based practitioners working in the area of forced migration. It provides an interdisciplinary, interactive and experiential approach to the study of forced migration and serves as a hub for researchers, students, practitioners, service providers and policy makers to share information and ideas. The Summer Course is housed within the Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), York University (Toronto, Canada). All participants who complete the full course receive a York University Centre for Refugee Studies Summer Course Certificate.
2020 Summer Course topics will include:
. An introduction to the Canadian framework
. Canadian-settler Colonialism
. Understanding the politics of the global refugee regime
. Gender and forced migration
. Research ethics in forced migration
. Refugee status determination
. Community engagement and sexual orientation-based claims
. Environmental issues and forced migration
With two keynote lectures featuring Professor James C. Hathaway (Director, Program in Refugee and Asylum Law, Faculty of Law, University of Michigan) and Kimahli Powell (Executive Director, Rainbow Railroad)
Dates: May 4-8, 2020
Location: York University, Toronto, Canada
Course Fee: $1075 CAD +13% HST (by February 1st, 2020)
Late Registration Fee: $1500 CAD +13%HST (February 2 until April 1, 2020 – or until full)
For more information, and to apply, please visit our website at http://crs.yorku.ca/summer/

14. Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) & Caribbean Studies and African Studies: Survival and Liberation: Student Politics, Pan-Africanism, and Black Power in Britain (February 3, 2020)
Survival and Liberation: Student Politics, Pan-Africanism, and Black Power in Britain
February, 3rd, 2020
5-7PM
Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2098 (Natalie Zemon Davis Conference Room)
100 St. George Hall
Two Black activists reflect on their struggles and journeys through the social, cultural and political landscapes of the United Kingdom. Zainab Abbas and Ansel Wong were leaders of the Black Liberation Front, a Third World revolutionary organization founded in North London in 1971. The Black Liberation Front combatted fascist violence in Britain, constructed “central communal combative alternatives” to oppressive state institutions, and mobilized support for freedom movements across Africa, the Caribbean and North America.
Zainab Abbas, British born of Egyptian parents, was International Secretary for the Black Liberation Front. A leading protagonist for women’s rights and social change in Britain, Abbas was also a member of the Brixton Black Women’s Group, a foundational Black Feminist organization in Britain.
Ansel Wong, Trinidad & Tobago born, was a leader of the Black Liberation Front, editor of its Grassroots newspaper, and later served as Chair of the Notting Hill Carnival Trust. In the 1960s, Wong was active in radical Caribbean student movements, and co-founded the Black Arts Workshop and the C.L.R. James School for Black Youths at the West Indian Students’ Centre in London.
Co-sponsored by African Studies, Caribbean Studies, and the Women & Gender Studies Institute

15. Institute for Feminist Legal Studies (IFLS) Speaker Series: Debt By Another Name (February 3, 2020)
Monday February 3, 2020 1230-2PM IKB 2027 (Faculty Lounge)
Lunch Served. RSVP bit.ly/DebtFeb3
DEBT BY ANOTHER NAME
ABBYE ATKINSON Berkeley Law, University of California
The US Congress' reliance on "credit" as a tool of liberation and equality following the Civil Rights and Women's Right Movements of the 1960's and 1970's suggests that Congress viewed credit as a reliable and viable social good.
This valorization of credit, however, explicitly excluded any meaningful consideration of the countervailing force of debt.  Given that debt necessarily accompanies credit as extended and then used, in order for credit to be a social good, debt also has to be a reliable and viable social good.
Yet debt has itself functioned as a mechanism of the very subordination in marginalized communities that Congress' invocation of "credit" hoped to address. Credit cannot, in fact, meaningfully function as a social good without due attention to and solution for the work of debt as a social ill.
Abbye Atkinson’s research examines how certain legal institutions—such as consumer bankruptcy—that were created with a purpose of improving economic health do not attend to and may actually exacerbate existing inequalities experienced by economically disenfranchised groups. Her recent work has explored structural inequality in the Bankruptcy Code. At Berkeley, Atkinson teaches Contracts and a seminar on Debt, Discrimination, and Inequality.

16. Department of Sociology’s Annual Guest Speaker: Biidaaban by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (February 4, 2020)
We are very pleased to announce that Leanne Betasamosake Simpson will be the Department of Sociology’s Annual Guest Speaker for the 2019-2020 academic year.  Poster attached.   Please join us on February 4, 2020, from 4:00-5:00 pm in Osgoode Hall 1005, York University.
Betasamosake Simpson’s talk is titled Biidaaban.
This presentation will explore themes of presencing, resurgence, decolonization and Nishnaabeg thought through creative and intellectual practice. It will include a screening of “Biidaaban”, a short film. Accompanied by a 10,000-year-old shapeshifter and friend known as Sabe, Biidaaban sets out on a mission to reclaim the ceremonial harvesting of sap from maple trees in an unwelcoming suburban neighborhood in Ontario. Driven by the words of Anishinaabe writer Leanne Betasamosake Simpson in collaboration with Amanda Strong’s mesmerizing stop-motion animation, Biidaaban intricately weaves together multiple worlds through time and space, calling for a rebellion.
You are no doubt already familiar with Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s work.  Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a renowned Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg scholar, writer and artist, who has been widely recognized as one of the most compelling Indigenous voices of her generation. Her work breaks open the intersections between politics,  story and song—bringing audiences into a rich and layered world of sound, light, and sovereign creativity.
Working for over a decade an independent scholar using Nishnaabeg intellectual practices, Leanne has lectured and taught extensively at universities across Canada and has twenty years experience with Indigenous land based education. She holds a PhD from the University of Manitoba, and teaches at the Dechinta Centre for Research & Learning in Denendeh. Leanne's books are regularly used in courses across Canada and the United States  including Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back, The Gift Is in the Making,  Lighting the Eighth Fire (editor), This Is An Honour Song (editor with Kiera Ladner) and The Winter We Danced (Kino-nda-niimi editorial collective).  Her latest book, As We Have Always Done:  Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance was published by the University of Minnesota Press in the fall of 2017, and was awarded Best Subsequent Book by the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association.
As a writer, Leanne was named the inaugural RBC Charles Taylor Emerging writer by Thomas King in 2014 and in 2017/18 she was a finalist in the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize and the Trillium Book Award. She has published extensive fiction and poetry in both book and magazine form. Her second book of short stories and poetry, This Accident of Being Lost is a follow up to the acclaimed Islands of Decolonial Love and was published by the House of Anansi Press in Spring 2017.
Leanne is also a musician combining poetry, storytelling, song writing and performance in collaboration with musicians to create unique spoken songs and soundscapes. Leanne's second record f(l)light produced by Jonas Bonnetta (Evening Hymns), was released in the fall of 2016.  She was awarded the inaugural Outstanding Indigenous Artist at the Peterborough Arts Awards in 2018.
Leanne is Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg and a member of Alderville First Nation.
For more information, see:
https://www.leannesimpson.ca

17. Critical Perspectives on Mental Health/Mad Studies Cluster Event (February 5, 2020)

Critical Perspectives on Mental Health/ Mad Studies Cluster
The Critical Perspectives on Mental Health/Mad Studies Cluster (CPM) invites you to attend our Inaugural Networking Event. This meeting will bring together researchers and those engaged in arts-based inquiry across York who identify their work as “critical” in the context of mental health/madness/ Mad studies. Formed in 2018 with support from the Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, the CPM aims to mobilize and facilitate scholarship that examines mental health using critical inquiry approaches. Although what constitutes "critical" will be part of our discussion, in general, we understand that critical approaches in mental health/Mad studies might achieve the following possibilities:
- Challenging taken for granted ways of knowing in mental health (e.g., biomedicalism, individualism and frameworks emerging from the ‘psy’ sciences)
- Resisting ideological and material harms resulting from dominant narratives
- Facilitating time and space for non-Western and decolonizing methodologies
- Exploring structural causes of inequities and contributing to projects of social justice
- Bringing a reflexive relationship to scholarship
Dialogue, Research, Inquiry, Action:
EVENT INCLUDES:
- Lunch and refreshments
- Introduction to the Cluster & Discussion of Critical Approaches to Mental Health
- Ten five-minute presentations (Faculty and Graduate students)
- Next steps: Opportunities for Collaboration (grants, brown bag lunches, conferences, ORU)
In an effort to make connections between scholars and get a sense of critical mental health scholarship happening across campus, career stages, and disciplines, we invite participants to submit a short presentation (no longer than 5 minutes, 2 slides) outlining current projects, research questions, or areas of study pertaining to critical perspectives on mental health.
If you are interested in presenting your own research as it aligns with the CPM cluster in a short 5 minute (2 slides) format, please submit the following to Sarah Redikopp (sredikop@yorku.ca) by January 10, 2020:
1.100 word abstract
2. A short bio
10 presentations (5 faculty and 5 graduate students) will be chosen for presentation on February 5th. All presentation descriptions will be compiled and made available.
Wednesday, February 5th, 12-3pm
7th Floor Kaneff Building

18. "On Settling (S)Pace" - A Talk by Uahikea Maile (February 6, 2020)
Join the Indigenous Education Network’s Lecture Series on Thursday February 6 for:
"on unsettling (s)pace”
A talk by Uahikea Maile
Moderated by Kristen Bos
Thursday February 6, 2020
6-8pm
OISE Nexus Lounge, room 12-130
252 Bloor St. W. Toronto
Register through Eventbrite at: https://ienlectureseries.eventbrite.ca
This talk explores how territory, time, and techno-scientific desires for space can be unsettled for cruising a decolonized then and deoccupied there in Hawaiʻi.
Dr. Uahikea Maile is a Kanaka Maoli scholar, activist, and practitioner from Maunawili, Oʻahu. He is an Assistant Professor of Indigenous Politics in the Department of Political Science and Affiliate Faculty in the Centre for Indigenous Studies at the University of Toronto. Maile’s research interests include: history, law, and activism on Hawaiian sovereignty; Indigenous critical theory; settler colonialism; political economy; feminist and queer theories; and decolonization. His book manuscript, Nā Makana Ea: Settler Colonial Capitalism and the Hawaiian Gifts of Sovereignty, examines the development of settler colonial capitalism in Hawai‘i and gifts of sovereignty that seek to overturn it by issuing responsibilities for balancing relationships with ‘āina, the land and that which feeds.

19. MobilizeYU Knowledge Mobilization Course (February 6- April 2, 2020)
The Knowledge Mobilization Unit is pleased to announce a new 8-week course focused on knowledge mobilization called MobilizeYU.
Participants will learn about knowledge mobilization planning, effective ways to share academic research with society and how to measure and communicate the impacts of their research.
Knowledge Mobilization Unit staff, along with guest speakers will be covering topics such as Knowledge Mobilization Planning; Clear Language Writing and Design; Impact and Evaluation and Building Partnerships. See attached for the full topic list.
The course will take place once a week from February 6 to April 2 from 1:00-4:00 on campus and online via Zoom. It is free for all York faculty, graduate students and staff.
To learn more, please visit http://bit.ly/MobilizeYU

20. The Equality Fund and AWID Webinar: How Would You Build a New Feminist Fund? (February 11-13, 2020)
The Equality Fund is an exciting new fund to support feminist change.
It’s still in the early stages, and we want to know how you think it should be designed and built.
The Equality Fund and AWID are co-organizing a series of four webinars taking place February 11-13, 2020 in different languages and time zones to ensure diverse participation from the breadth and depth of feminist movements globally.
Learn more about the webinars, and register to join the date and time that works best for you:
https://equalityfund.ca/section/webinar
We hope to see you there, and we’re excited to hear your thoughts about this new fund!

21. York Girls' Studies Research Network Agency In Girls' Studies 3x3x3 Event (February 14, 2020)

Our last 3x3x3 was so much fun, so we've decided to have another! Please see the attachment for info on our next 3x3x3 happening Friday, February 14, 2020, from 2 - 4 PM in 519 Kaneff Tower, York University.
We invite you to come share a small snapshot of your research with other girls' girls' studies scholars at York and learn about the exciting research happening in the field!
3 POWERPOINT SLIDES, 3 POINTS, 10 MINUTES MAX.
Instead of formal paper presentations, we invite participants to highlight three succinct main points. Our goal is to get a sense of what we are researching, across career stage, department, and discipline! Questions we invite you to consider around girls' studies and agency include:
-  how does girls' studies prompt us to redefine agency?
-  who is speaking about agency in girls' studies?
-  how is agency implicated when we study girls as consumers?
-  is agency still a valid frame for studying girls?
-  who gets to determine who is agentic (and who is not)?
-  what does it mean to lose one's agency as a girl/ girls' studies scholar?
-  what are some broader issues around girls and agency?
If you don't want to present, no problem! Please come join us for the afternoon and enjoy meeting and hearing from other girls' studies scholars.
To present, please provide a brief outline of your proposed presentation and how it relates to agency to Natalie Coulter (ncoulter@yorku.ca) and Morgan Bimm (mbimm@yorku.ca) by February 7, 2020

22. Canada Caribbean Research Symposium (CCRS) (February 17-19, 2020)
We would like to invite you to attend the Canada Caribbean Research Symposium (http://uwi.edu/ccrs/). The CCRS is the inaugural event of the Canada Caribbean Institute. Organized by The University of the West Indies (The UWI) (https://www.uwi.edu/index.asp) and Brock University (https://brocku.ca/), the symposium is aimed at presenting current research and projects being conducted on issues pertinent to Canada and the Caribbean, while also providing researchers and interested stakeholders with an opportunity to connect and consider future collaborations.
For more information visit: http://uwi.edu/ccrs/
WHO SHOULD ATTEND THE CCRS?
Researchers
Tertiary level students
Policy-makers from across Canada and the Caribbean
WHERE: The CCRS is scheduled to be held at the Regional Headquarters of The UWI in Kingston, Jamaica.
WHEN: February 17-19, 2020
Call for Presentations: http://uwi.edu/ccrs/call-for-papers.html
You may want to consider submitting a presentation proposal as presenting at the Canada-Caribbean Research Symposium provides presenters with an excellent opportunity to share their contribution to Canada-Caribbean studies while promoting collaborative engagement with scholars from across Canada and the Caribbean on topics related to:
Caribbean Culture and the Diaspora
Caribbean Economic Growth and Trade with Canada
Social issues and Education in the Caribbean and Canada
Health and the Environment in the Caribbean and Canada

23. Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Research Seminar Series: "Whosoever Will, Let Them Come: LGBT Evangelicals In Brazil" (March 4, 2020)
On Wednesday, March 4, 2020 (4:00-6:00 p.m., JHB100A, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street), we welcome Andrea Allen, Assistant Professor, Anthropology and the Centre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies, University of Toronto: “Whosoever will, let them come: LGBT evangelicals in Brazil” Andrea S. Allen’s research has addressed matters of race, sexuality, gender, violence, and religion in Brazil and the African Diaspora. Through a focus on LGBTQ Brazilians, especially Afro-Brazilian lesbian women, her work explores the effects of marginalization from an embodied perspective. In interrogating the everyday, her research prioritizes lived experiences as an essential locus of inquiry when contemplating the contradictions and dissonances of human existence. Dr. Allen has conducted ethnographic research related to the Afro-Brazilian religion Candomblé, same-sex sexuality, and gender. Her first book, Violence and Desire in Brazilian Lesbian Relationships (Palgrave Macmillan 2015) focused on the experiences of lesbian women in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Dr. Allen is currently working on a second book project about LGBT evangelical Brazilians, race, religious identity, and sexual subjectivity.

24. Institute for Feminist Legal Studies (IFLS) Speaker Series: A Discussion with the Author: Everyday Transgressions: Domestic Workers' Transnational Challenge To International Labor Law (March 20, 2020)
Friday March 20, 2020 1030AM-1230 IKB 2027 (Faculty Lounge)
Refreshments Served. Space is limited, so Registration is required
EVERYDAY TRANSGRESSIONS: DOMESTIC WORKERS' TRANSNATIONAL CHALLENGE TO INTERNATIONAL LABOR LAW (Cornell 2019)
A discussion with the Author Professor ADELLE BLACKETT Canada Research Chair in Transnational Labour Law and Development, McGill Law
Commentary from: Professor Ethel Tungohan, Professor Jenny Nedelsky, Professor Kerry Rittich, Professor Tania Das Gupta ++
Copies of Everyday Transgressions will be available for purchase.
“In this book, Adelle Blackett tells the story behind the International Labour Organization's (ILO) Decent Work for Domestic Workers' Convention No. 189, and its accompanying Recommendation No. 201, which created the first comprehensive international standards to extend protections and rights to domestic workers labouring in homes around the world. As the principal legal architect, Blackett takes us behind the scene to show us how Convention No. 189 transgresses the everyday law of the household workplace to embrace domestic worker's human rights claim to be workers like any other - and like no other. She discusses the importance of historical forms of invisibility, recognizes the influence of the domestic workers themselves and wages in poignant experiences, infusing the discussions of laws and standards with a sense of intimacy and sophistication. Looking to the future, she ponders how international institutions such as the ILO will address labor market informality alongside national and regional law reform. Every Trangression establishes that domestic workers' victory is a victory for the ILO and for all who struggle for an inclusive, transnational vision of labor law.”

27. Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Undergraduate Event: International Women’s Day (March 4, 2020)
ON THE UNDERGRADUATE FRONT, our annual International Women’s Day event takes place on Wednesday March 4th, 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m, BA 1160 (Bahen Centre for Information Technology), 40 St. George Street. We are delighted to welcome Saba Taj, a Southern Muslim artist and activist based in Durham, North Carolina. Heavily inspired by Islamic stories and speculative fiction, Saba uses mixed media practices to illustrate the liminalities of diasporic identity through the creation of hybridized femme-monsters. Taj remixes cultural references from her South Asian, American, Muslim, and queer identities, and explores themes of diaspora, inherited trauma and apocalypse.

28. Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Undergraduate Event: Career Panel With WGSI Almuni (March 9, 2020)
And on Monday, March 9, 2020, join us in the DG Ivey Library from 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. for a A Career Panel with WGSI Alumni. In conjunction with FAS Backpack to Briefcase (b2B) programming, WGSI hosts a networking event for current undergraduates. The evening will begin with a panel featuring WGS alumni who have followed a variety of career paths since graduating from our program; they'll reflect on what happened immediately after graduation and, ultimately, how their undergraduate education informs the work they're currently doing. The panel will be followed by a networking reception that allows undergraduate students to connect with alumni and with each other.

29. Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Undergraduate Event: 35th Anniversary Of WGSI Scholarship (March 27, 2020)
On Friday March 27th from 4-7 p.m. in Wilson Hall, New College, we will be celebrating the 35th anniversary of the establishment of the City of Toronto undergraduate and graduate WGSI scholarship, set up in 1985 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of women being admitted as students to the University of Toronto. We will also be announcing a brand new undergraduate scholarship. Please save the date and look out for more information from us very soon!

30. Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Research Seminar Series: Hazel Carby (April 1, 2020)
We are absolutely thrilled to close out our speaker series on Wednesday, April 1, 2020 with Hazel Carby, Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor Emeritus of African American Studies and Professor Emeritus of American Studies, Yale University, and Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts.
This public lecture will take place at the Isabel Bader Theatre, 93 Charles Street West, 4:00-6:00 p.m. Author of Cultures in Babylon: Black Britain and African America (1999); Race Men (1998); Reconstructing Womanhood: The Emergence of the Afro American Woman Novelist (1987); Hazel Carby is also a co-author of The Empire Strikes Back: Race and Racism in 70s Britain (1982). She is the author of Imperial Intimacies, A Tale of Two Islands (Verso) which was selected as one of the “Books of the Year for 2019,” the Times Literary Supplement. Imperial Intimacies is a history of British empire, told through one woman’s search through generations of family stories. It moves between Jamaican plantations, the countryside of Devon, the port cities of Bristol, Cardiff and Kingston, and the working-class estates of South London. It is an intimate personal history and a sweeping summation of the violent entanglement of two islands. It charts the British empire’s interweaving of capital and bodies, public language and private feeling.

31. Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI) Research Seminar Series: WGSI Doctoral Research Seminar (April 15, 2020)
And to hear more about what our own graduate cohort is up to, join us on Wednesday,
April 15, 2020, 3:00–6:00 p.m., Room 2053, New College, 40 Willcocks Street, where our
PhD degree and PhD collaborative specialization students in Women and Gender Studies
will be presenting their doctoral research.

CALLS:

1. Call for Participants: Examining the Effects of Anti-Sexual Violence Education Amongst University Students
Are you a current student or a recent graduate (within one year) who has taken anti-sexual violence education at your university or college? This could include violence against women awareness, a consent workshop, talk, or course, self-defense class, workshop for your sports team, or something similar. Participants must be between 18 and 30 years of age; interviews last approximately 30-45 minutes and take place in Toronto. Confidentiality is assured and a 10$ honorarium is provided.
This research aims to: examine the relationship between anti-sexual violence education and young people’s sexual practices; provide young adults with a chance to voice their experiences of and strategies in sexual negotiations; be conducted in a non-judgmental, open-style interview; and contribute to the development of sexual violence prevention efforts, and hopefully, better sex!
Research conducted by Dr. Tuulia Law, York University
To participate in an interview or for more information contact: tlaw@yorku.ca or 647-809-9178

2. Call for Panels and Papers: Congress Interdisciplinary Feminist Sessions “Bridging Divides, Building Solidarity for Change: Feminists Confronting Colonialism, Anti-Black Racism and Patriarchy” (January 27, 2020)
(le français suit)
Call for papers for Feminist Interdisciplinary Sessions at Congress 2020
Deadline for abstract submissions: January 27, 2020
Bridging Divides, Building Solidarity for Change: Feminists Confronting Colonialism, Anti-Black
Racism and Patriarchy
Recognising that Congress takes place on the traditional lands of the Anishinaabek, Haudenosaunee, Lūnaapéewak, and Attawandaron (Neutral) peoples implies responsibilities.
This necessarily includes meaningful engagement with Indigenous ways of being, knowing and doing. Likewise, we recognize that what is now called Canada is a site of Black slavery, from the 17th to 19th centuries, and a place where there is ongoing anti-Black racism and white supremacy. Our interdisciplinary feminist committee invites papers that take up the responsibilities that arise in settler colonialism, in contexts marked by the dispossession and ongoing resilience of Indigenous peoples, as well as histories of Black enslavement and Black resistance to ongoing white supremacy. This demands engagement with Indigenous and Black women’s scholarship and knowledges. We encourage contributions about how to bridge divides and challenge inequities, while building solidarities for change, towards more just, ecologically sustainable relationships. Papers may take a disciplinary approach (in conversation with other disciplines), an interdisciplinary or an "undisciplined" perspective. We especially welcome Indigenous women’s perspectives, Indigenous feminisms, Black feminisms, Black Canadian feminisms, Afrocentric and African feminism, and African womanisms. Among possible approaches, contributions may:
• describe and analyse historical and ongoing white supremacy, anti-Black and colonial racisms, as well as Black and Indigenous women’s resilience and resistance;
• describe and analyse the relationships among gender, race, class and colonialism on lands claimed by Canada and around the world;
• challenge inequities inside and outside the university, so moving Black feminist and Indigenous women’s knowledges from “margins to centre” in bell hooks' celebrated formulation;
• explore ways to bridge divides and maintain useful tensions given social, political and epistemological diversity among feminists;
• describe and analyse feminist struggles that help us to move towards more equitable, just and ecologically sustainable futures, especially contributions by Black and Indigenous women.
Submission instructions: The Canadian Sociological Association (CSA) is again allowing us to use its on-line platform for abstract submission – and all abstracts MUST be submitted there. You do not need to be a member of CSA to do so. However, in order to be included in the program and to be allowed to present, all presenters must be of one of the co-sponsoring associations (listed below) and have registered for both Congress and that association by April 15, 2020.
Submit your abstract online using the steps below. Please ensure that you have first reviewed the Abstract submission and Presenter Guidelines at https://www.csa-scs.ca/conference/call forabstracts/.
Then visit the abstract submission system at http://csa-scs.ca/abstract-submissions
1. Create an account.
2. Select ‘Submit an Abstract’ and follow the steps for submission. The session is "Bridging Divides, Building Solidarity for Change: Feminists Confronting Colonialism, Anti-Black Racism and Patriarchy"
3. All (co)-authors must be identified with contact information and institutional affiliation. Maximum abstract length is 300 words.
4. You can revisit your submission (until January 27, when abstract submission closes) to revise or see its status.
5. You will be informed of the decisions about your submission by mid-February 2020. Participating associations include: Canadian Association for Social Work Education/ Association
canadienne pour la formation en travail social (CASWE/ACFTS); Canadian Association for the
Study of Women and Education/ Association canadienne pour l'étude sur les femmes et l'éducation (CASWE/ACEFE); Canadian Committee on Women’s History/ Comité canadien de
l’histoire des femmes (CCWH/CCHF); Canadian Political Science Association/ Association
canadienne de science politique (CPSA-ACSP); Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women/ Institut canadien de recherches sur les femmes (CRIAW/ICREF); Canadian Sociological Association/ Société canadienne de sociologie (CSA/SCS); Society for Socialist Studies/Société pour études socialistes (SSS-SES); and Women's and Gender Studies et
Recherches Féministes (WGSRF).
Appel pour communications pour la session interdisciplinaire et féministe au Congrès 2020
Date limite pour soumission de résumé: le 27 janvier 2020
Vers la solidarité, pour le changement: les féministes font face au colonialisme, au racism anti-Noir et au patriarcat
Nous reconnaissons que le Congrès se déroule sur les terres traditionnelles des peuples
Anishinaabek, Haudenosaunee, Lūnaapéewak, et Attawandaron (Neutral), ce qui implique des
responsabilités. Ceci inclut nécessairement un engagement véritable avec les façons diverses
qu'ont les peuples autochtones d’être, de savoir et d'agir. De même, nous reconnaissons que les terres que nous appelons aujourd’hui le Canada étaient un lieu d’esclavagisme Noir du 17ième au 19ième siècles, et où il y a encore du racisme anti-Noir et du suprémacisme blanc.
Notre comité féministe interdisciplinaire invite à des soumissions de textes qui traitent des
responsabilités qui surviennent dans ce contexte de colonialisme du peuplement («settler
colonialism»), marqué par l’expropriation des peuples autochtones mais également par leur
résistance, ainsi que les histoires de l’esclavagisme Noir et des mouvements Noirs contre le
suprémacisme blanc d’hier et d’aujourd’hui. Cela exige un engagement avec le savoir et les
connaissances des femmes autochtones et Noires. Nous encourageons la soumission de textes
qui explorent les solidarités qui nous mènent vers des relations plus justes et écologiquement
durables. Les textes peuvent prendre une approche disciplinaire (en conversation avec d’autres
disciplines), interdisciplinaire ou « indisciplinée ». Particulièrement bienvenues sont des
perspectives des femmes autochtones, des féministes autochtones, des féminismes Noirs, des
féminismes Noir canadiens, des féminismes Afrocentrique et Africaine, et les femmismes
Africains. Entre autres approches possibles, ces contributions peuvent :
• décrire et analyser le suprémacisme blanc historique et actuel, les racismes anti-Noir et colonial, ainsi que la résistance des femmes Noires et Autochtones ;
• décrire et analyser les relations entre le genre, la race, la classe et le colonialisme sur les terres revendiquées par le Canada et autour du monde ;
• faire face aux inéquités à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de l’université, en remettant les saviors des féministes Noires et des femmes autochtones au centre des analyses ;
• explorer comment créer des solidarités et maintenir des tensions utiles, compte tenu de la diversité sociale, politique et épistémique des féministes ;
• décrire et analyser les mouvements féministes, avec des contributions des femmes Noires et autochtones, qui nous aident à réaliser des avenirs plus justes et plus écologiques
Pour soumettre un résumé: Encore cette année la Société canadienne de sociologie nous permet d’utiliser sa plateforme en ligne pour la soumission des résumés. Tous les résumés DOIVENT y être soumis. Vous pouvez le faire sans être membre de la SCS. Toutefois, afin d’être inclus dans le programme et permis de présenter votre communication, il faut être membre en règle d’une des associations qui co-marrainent la session (voir la liste en bas), et s’être inscrit au Congrès2019 et pour ladite association avant le 15 avril 2020.
Voici les étapes pour soumettre votre résumé en ligne : revoyez d’abord les lignes directrices
relatives à la présentation des résumés et des communications se trouvant à https://www.csascs.
ca/conference/directives-concernant-la-conference/. Ensuite, visiter le site de presentation de résumés à la conférence à http://csa-scs.ca/abstract-submissions. Allez aux écrans en français
en cliquant sur l’onglet ‘FRANÇAIS’ en haut à droit.
1. Créez un compte.
2. Cliquez sur « Soumettre un résumé » et suivez les étapes indiquées. La session est « Vers la
solidarité, pour le changement: les féministes font face au colonialisme, au racisme anti-
Noir et au patriarcat »
3. Tou(te)s les (co)auteur(e)s doivent être identifié(e)s, y compris leurs coordonnées et leur affiliation institutionnelle. Le résumé ne doit pas dépasser 300 mots.
4. Après avoir soumis le résumé, vous pouvez ouvrir une séance pour le modifier (jusque 27
janvier, quand le système de soumission ferme) et vous pouvez vérifier son statut.
5. Par la mi-février 2020, on vous communiquera la décision au sujet de votre résumé.
Les associations participantes: Canadian Association for Social Work Education/ Association
canadienne pour la formation en travail social (CASWE/ACFTS); Canadian Association for the
Study of Women and Education/ Association canadienne pour l'étude sur les femmes et
l'éducation (CASWE/ACEFE); Canadian Committee on Women’s History/ Comité canadien de
l’histoire des femmes (CCWH/CCHF); Canadian Political Science Association/ Association
canadienne de science politique (CPSA-ACSP); Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women/ Institut canadien de recherches sur les femmes (CRIAW/ICREF); Canadian Sociological Association/ Société canadienne de sociologie (CSA/SCS); Society for Socialist Studies/Société pour études socialistes (SSS-SES); and Women's and Gender Studies et
Recherches Féministes (WGSRF).

3. Call for Proposals: The Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board 2020 Grants Program (January 31, 2020)
The Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) is accepting research proposals for its 2020 Grants Program.  A summary is provided below.
Objectives
To enhance workers’ compensation system outcomes by supporting innovative proposals that are aligned with the WSIB’s strategic mandate.
The following research priorities and topic areas have been identified for the current call:
Making Ontario a safer place to work
Priority 1: Strengthen integration, accountability and effectiveness of the occupational health and safety system
Priority 2: Develop people-centric health and safety programs that encourage healthy workplaces
Priority 3: Raise awareness of rights, obligations and best practices to empower proactive health and safety planning
Improve return to work and recovery outcomes
Priority 4: Provide customized return-to-work services to people who need the most support
Priority 5: Improve access and quality of care for people with work-related illnesses, and physical and/or mental stress injuries
Priority 6: Improve sustainable employment outcomes
Meeting the needs and expectations of WSIB’s customers
Priority 7: Make our services more convenient and compassionate through quicker decision-making based on the best available evidence and faster payment
Value
Up to $200K/year for a total maximum budget of $400K
Duration
2 years
Deadlines
Submission to ORS for review – January 31, 2020
Submission to agency – February 14, 2020 by 4:00pm
To obtain the Request for Proposals, instructions and application form, please visit the following link:
https://www.wsib.ca/en/grants-program

4. Call for Papers: Edited Volume Marxism and Migration (February 1, 2020)
Call for Papers for Edited Volume
Marxism and Migration
Proposal Deadline: February 1, 2020
Editors: Genevieve Ritchie, Sara Carpenter, and Shahrzad Mojab
Contact Information: marxism.and.migration@gmail.com
Introduction and Scope:
The present conditions of transnational migration are nothing short of alarming. Best described as a kind of social expulsion, these conditions range from migrant caravans and detained unaccompanied children in the United States to the thousands of migrant deaths at sea to the razing of self-organized refugee camps in Greece and to the massive internal and inter-regional dispersal of populations. At the very same time, technology firms are using refugee camps as testing grounds and migrants are targeted by the financial industry as an ideal investment and workforce. The chaos of migration stretches globally yet differentially impacts countless communities. Migrants are simultaneously described as a dangerous threat, victims of state violence, culturally backward, and resilient workers, while activists talk of undoing border imperialism, decolonizing settler societies, or opening borders. We, therefore, find reason to pose the following questions: What are the historical continuities linking colonial dispossession to the displacements and dispossessions internal to the imperialist stage of capitalism? To what extent do the conditions propelling migration cohere with, and even support, the state practices of managing class interests through the threat of crisis? Lastly, to what extent has the ostensible crisis of migration assisted with the criminalization of activists resisting state violence? Marxism and Migration seeks to theorize these chaotic and uneven conditions by centering the global relations of class struggle.
The social relation of class struggle provides a framework for understanding and retheorizing the chaotic yet orderly conditions of global accumulation, displacement, and dispossession. We understand the capitalist social formation, with the bourgeoisie as its dominant class, as a set of dynamic social forces, relations, and forms of consciousness that privatize profit from socialized production. At the very same time, the bourgeoisie as a social class is internally divided and rivalrous, embedding a chaotic competition within the drive to maximize profit. Under such conditions the majority of people generate wealth for and are subjugated by a very select minority of people. Although the relations of class, determine the exploitation of working people, class struggle, as a social relation, encompasses myriad processes and practices of ideological repression, which include, without being limited to, hetero-patriarchy, racialization, illegalized migration, and white supremacy.
Placing patriarchal capitalism, imperialism, racialization, and fundamentalisms at the center of the analysis Marxism and Migration hopes to build a more coherent and historically informed discussion of the present conditions of migration, resettlement, and resistance.
Call for Papers:
We welcome chapter proposals on a range of themes and topics, including but not limited to:
- Migrant workers, global accumulation, and expropriation
- The relationships among the state, the market, and im/migration
- Genocide, displacement, dispossession, and imperialism
- Global relations of immigration and emigration, particularly taking up questions of settler colonialism and indigenous resistance
- Rethinking of the theoretical, methodological, historical, and/or gendered approaches to studying migration and class struggle
- Migration, militarization and the edifices (walls, prisons, militarized borders, etc) of global class struggle
- The material conditions of non-status or undocumented communities and relations of resistance
- Anti-racist and queer Marxist feminist approaches to im/migration
Submission Instructions:
Please submit a 500-word abstract (including a working title for the proposed chapter), and a short biography (100 words) to marxism.and.migration@gmail.com with the subject line “Edited Volume Submission.”
In addition to outlining the method, empirical or theoretical evidence, and conceptual framing for the chapter, the abstract should also include a discussion of how the proposed chapter relates to key literatures and the central themes of Marxism and migration. Final chapters will be approximately 8,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography. This call for proposals has been developed in consultation with a leading academic publisher. Following the initial selection of proposals, a full book proposal will be sent to the publisher for review. Upon acceptance, chapter authors will be sent detailed guidelines. Chapters must be original and should not be submitted for publication elsewhere.
Deadline for Proposal Submissions: February 1, 2020
Notification of Acceptance: March 1, 2020
Complete Chapters Due: August 31, 2020
Notification of Revisions: October 2020
Final Chapters Due: January 10, 2021

5. Call for Papers: Robarts Centre Graduate Conference in Canadian Studies (February 7, 2020)
Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies 7th Annual Graduate Conference
Changing Conversations: Canada in a Shifting Landscape
Conversations canadiennes 2020: enjeux et directions
Deadline for submissions: Friday, 7 February 2020
Date butoir : 7 février 2020
As Canada moves into the new decade, 2020 sees the country navigating a shifting landscape that is reflected in the changing conversations taking place in both the domestic and global context. So, what are the conversations Canada and Canadians are having? Locally? Nationally? Internationally? How are these conversations changing? Where are they taking place? Who is changing them? What kinds of changes are occurring and/or what changes need to occur? Where is the conversation headed—and where should/could it be going?
L’aube d’une nouvelle décennie nous offre l’opportunité de réfléchir sur les enjeux auxquels font face les Canadiens•nes. Ces enjeux, par nécessité, ouvrent la porte à plusieurs conversations et invitent de nouvelles directions. Est-ce que les conversations changent vraiment ou, tout au moins, changent de direction? Est-ce que ces conversations prennent place à l’échelle locale et/ou nationale? Qui fait partie de ces conversations? Quels changements doivent prendre place afin de refléter un Canada engagé?
Graduate students are invited to submit proposals (max. 250 words) for papers, panels, or roundtables at https://form.jotform.com/RobartsConference/submissions by Friday, 7 February 2020.
Les soumissions sont acceptées en français et en anglais. Elle doivent comprendre un résumé de 250 mots, une biographie de 100 mots et doivent être reçues au plus tard le vendredi 7 février 2020 en remplissant le formulaire en ligne à l’adresse suivante : https://form.jotform.com/RobartsConference/submissions
As Canada moves into the new decade, 2020 sees the country navigating a shifting landscape
that is reflected in the changing conversations taking place in both the domestic and global
context. So, what are the conversations Canada and Canadians are having? Locally? Nationally?
Internationally? How are these conversations changing? Where are they taking place? Who is
changing them? What kinds of changes are occurring and/or what changes need to occur?
Where is the conversation headed—and where should/could it be going?
The Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies welcomes exploration of these topics from multiple and competing perspectives at the Annual Graduate Conference taking place on 16-17 April 2020 at York University in Toronto. Papers that engage with the theme of a changing Canada are encouraged from a myriad of approaches, disciplines, perspectives and lenses, not limited to but including:
• Indigenous studies
• Law and legal practices
• Health, well-being, and mental health
• Canadian politics
• History and Humanities
• Structures of society
• Gender and sexuality
• Religion, beliefs and spirituality
• Identity, culture, race, and ethnicity
• Space, geography, and environmental studies
• Canadian studies
• Technology studies, Internet, and social media
• Art, theatre, film, music (history, performance, theory), and creative practices
• Literature and languages
Graduate students are invited to submit proposals for presentations that examine these themes
considering Canada in a national and global context. The goal of this two-day conference is to
provide a space for discussions surrounding Canada’s changing dynamic broadly defined; we
thus encourage students from a wide variety of disciplines to interpret this theme. Presenters may be invited to submit their work to the Robarts Center for Canadian Studies’ online publication Canada Watch.
Potential topics may include, but are not limited to, the legacies, experiences, or expressions of
Canadians whose social locations vary on the basis of gender, sexuality, race, Indigeneity, ability, socioeconomic situation, region, migration, status and difference. Individual papers, panels and roundtables on other related topics will also be considered.
Reimbursement of some travel costs will be made available for students attending the entire
conference from outside the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area.
Please submit proposals (max. 250 words) for papers, panels, or roundtables at https://
form.jotform.com/RobartsConference/submissions by Friday, 7 February 2020.
Please contact robartsconference@gmail.com should you have any questions.
L’aube d’une nouvelle décennie nous offre l’opportunité de réfléchir sur les enjeux auxquels font
face les Canadiens•nes. Ces enjeux, par nécessité, ouvrent la porte à plusieurs conversations et
invitent de nouvelles directions. Est-ce que les conversations changent vraiment ou, tout au
moins, changent de direction? Est-ce que ces conversations prennent place à l’échelle locale et/
ou nationale? Qui fait partie de ces conversations? Quels changements doivent prendre place
afin de refléter un Canada engagé?
Le Centre Robarts d’études canadiennes tiendra sa conférence annuelle en études canadiennes
les 16 et 17 avril 2020. Les étudiants•es de cycles supérieurs sont invités•es à soumettre des
propositions dans les catégories de communications, séances, ou tables rondes. Le Centre
Robarts d’études canadiennes invite des soumissions diverses et divergentes sur tous sujets relies aux conversations, directions, et enjeux canadiens, et ce, provenant de maintes disciplines don’t celles mentionnées ci-dessous :
• Art, film, musique, théâtre (histoire, performance, pratiques créatives, théorie)
• Culture, histoire, et société
• Droit, monde juridique, et justice sociale
• Études canadiennes
• Études et thématiques autochtones
• Langue et littérature
• Religion, croyances, et spiritualité
• Sciences de la santé
• Sciences de l’univers (espace, géographie, environnement)
• Sciences politiques
• Technologie (informatique, Internet, réseaux sociaux)
• Thématiques reliées à la construction de l’identité (culture, ethnicité, race, sexualité)
Les soumissions sont acceptées en français et en anglais. Elle doivent comprendre un résumé de 250 mots, une biographie de 100 mots et doivent être reçues au plus tard le vendredi 7 février 2020 en remplissant le formulaire en ligne à l’adresse suivante : https://form.jotform.com/
RobartsConference/submissions
Les présentations exceptionnelles seront considérées pour Canada Watch, la publication en ligne du Centre Robarts d’études canadiennes. Pour plus de renseignements, veuillez svp
communiquer avec nous à l’adresse suivante : robartsconference@gmail.com
Un remboursement partiel de frais de transport sera disponible pour les étudiants•es qui habitant à l’extérieur de la grande région de Toronto et Hamilton.

6. Call for Proposals: Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought: Strategies of Critique Conference ‘Static: Formations and Disruptions’ (February 23, 2020)
Call for Proposals
Static: Formations and Disruptions
Social and Political Thought (SPT) Program, York University
May 14-15, 2020
SPT presents its 33rd annual Strategies of Critique conference Static: Formations and Disruptions. Every day we encounter static, perhaps without even realizing it, within and outside of the academy. In this conference, we seek to explore static — as it relates to epistemologies, methodologies, modes of critique, organizing metaphors — and its implications for social and political thought.
Static evokes the crackling and hissing interruptions of aural and visual communications, as well as the shock of electricity when friction between two objects causes an imbalance of electrons. Static or stasis also suggests the stabilization of systems — ecological, physiological, economic, political, and electrical. The static/stasis dialectic sparks new interpretations and perceptions of these interrelated ideas. As a transdisciplinary site, static challenges us to think about stability and disruption, which we believe animate a series of questions around justice, agency, being, and affective understandings of the political past and present. We invite papers that examine productive refusals of business as usual, energetic disturbances of inequality’s equilibrium, and disruptions of aural and visual communications that generate new meanings. Along the same circuit, we also encourage papers that interrogate stasis/static as a passive experience of inheriting traditions and ideas, the inadvertent maintenance of (dis)order and hierarchy, and enclosure that prevents the circulation of life and/or lively ideas.
Submissions may include, but are certainly not limited, and indeed are encouraged to go
beyond any of the following topics:
- media and technology as message and/or movement
- (im)mobilities and (un)reliable transits
- environmental stagnation and/or activism
- (ar)resting neoliberal states and institutions
- sense, nonsense, and the disruption of sensibility and the sensual
- intertextuality of cultural productions (e.g. visual art, theatre/ performance, literature, music)
- (re)framing identity/nationhood/citizenship/sovereignty
- (counter)narratives of resistance, competing discourses and testimonies
- collectives, coalitions, and conspiracies
- feminist, anti-colonial, anti-racist, anti-fascist, and/or anti-capitalist networks
- institutions and counter institutions as (un)stable sites
Submission Requirements:
Submit to: strategiesofcritique@gmail.com
Submission deadline: February 23, 2020
Conference date: May 14-15 2020
Location: York University, Toronto - the territory of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, Wendat Nation, Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, and the Métis Nation of Ontario.
Please specify if your presentation will require special equipment or venue specifications. We strive to make our venue accessible. If further accommodations are needed, please let us know.
Individual proposals: Please submit a 250-word abstract and a 100-word biography. Panel proposals: Please submit a panel rationale of 500 words, as well as individual proposal
abstract and biography for each presenter. In addition to abstract submissions, we encourage proposals for work that engages these themes in activist and aesthetic registers (workshops or performances). Presenters will have the opportunity to submit finished papers for publication. Please direct inquiries to the Strategies Committee at strategiesofcritique@gmail.com .
Please visit our website for more information: https://strategiesofcritique.wordpress.com/

7. Call for Papers: Making Connections: Women's Writing 1918-1939 Conference (February 28, 2020)

Conference CFP Making connections: women's writing 1918-1939
University of Bedfordshire, Bedford campus
6th June 2020
Keynote: Catherine Clay
Nottingham Trent University
The interwar period was a time of experimentation in form, but also a time when networks enabled new writers to form connections with each other and with the publishing community.  This conference will focus on those networks, both formal and informal, between writers and writers, and with publishers, film makers, and literary, political and artistic movements.
Abstracts are invited for papers on women writers from the UK, from Europe and across the world who were writing and publishing between 1918 and 1939.
Please send abstracts (300 words) for a 20 minute paper, together with your name, affiliation and contact information, and a short biography, to the organisers, Professor Alexis Weedon and Dr Nicola Darwood at nicola.darwood@beds.ac.uk<mailto:nicola.darwood@beds.ac.uk> by 28th February 2020.  Notifications of acceptance will be sent by 31st March 2020.

8. Call for Abstracts: Transatlantic Memories, Blackness, and Diasporic Identity Formation Conference (March 10, 2020)
Transatlantic Memories, Blackness, and Diasporic Identity Formation in the 21st Century and Beyond
A Joint Conference organized by the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on Africa and its Diasporas (York University), the Audiovisual Media Lab for the Study of Cultures and Societies (University of Ottawa), and the Institute of Caribbean Studies & Reggae Studies Unit (University of the West Indies)
Location: The University of the West Indies - Mona Campus, Jamaica
Date:  September 2- September 4, 2020
The Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on Africa and its Diasporas (York University), the Audiovisual Media Lab for the Study of Cultures and Societies (University of Ottawa), and the Institute of Caribbean Studies & Reggae Studies Unit (University of the West Indies, Mona Campus) invite you to participate in a joint conference focusing on ‘Transatlantic Memories, Blackness, and Diasporic Identity formation in the 21st Century and Beyond’.
On the 23rd of December 2013, the United Nations’ General Assembly Resolution 68/239 proclaimed 2015-2024 The International Decade for People of Africa Descent. In proclaiming this decade’s theme, the UN General Assembly recognizes the historical distinctiveness and experience of peoples of African descent, whose basic human rights continue to be violated throughout modern human history. It therefore became urgent to work on: (a) Recognizing African descendants’ distinctive experiences, (b) Establishing justice for all, and (c) Developing economic opportunities for more than 200 million Africans who live in the Americas, and many other hundreds of millions outside and inside the African continent. From these subthemes many nations and institutions have marked the decade with different manifestations. For example, Ghana’s president, Nana Akufo-Addo, declared 2019 the “Year of Return”, which symbolically marked the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first known African slave ship on America’s shores.
For this joint interdisciplinary conference, we are looking for papers drawing upon transnational and multidisciplinary perspectives: e.g., history, anthropology, education, performance, media, material culture, economy, development and justice as long as these shed light on the African descendants’ transatlantic memories, blackness, and diasporic identity formation and experiences. Papers mobilizing comparative dimensions that emphasize the link between the Caribbean, Africa and Canada (North America) or that investigate how memories of enslavement and colonization impact diasporic identity formation and the experience of blackness in diaspora (in Canada and the Caribbean, in particular) are more than welcome.
We welcome theoretical and empirical papers focusing on, but not limited to, this non-exhaustive list of sub-themes:
Histories and geographies of blackness;
Space and black bodies (historical, contemporary occupation of);
Blackness and performing arts (Music, Film, Theatre, and Visual Arts);
Diasporic identity formations and the continent;
Perspectives of blackness in the continent;
Migration (African and Caribbean) and blackness in Canada;
Memory/memories (identity, cultural, etc.);
Western justice and economic system and the African Diasporas;
Ethics in a global economic system;
Reparations and the African present;
Moving forward Africa tomorrow - Diasporic/African futures.
Format & Submission Deadline
Please submit an abstract of 200 to 250 words in Times New Roman 12-pt. font along with your official contact information to tubman@yorku.ca
Submission Deadline: March 10, 2020.
Registration fees:
For Faculty and people in the Caribbean region                                  $100 CAD
For Students from the Caribbean region*                                            $20 CAD
For Faculty and people from Outside of the Caribbean region            $150 CAD
For Students from Outside of the Caribbean region:                           $50 CAD
For Students from York and Ottawa University                                  $40 CAD
*Students from the Caribbean region can pay the equivalent in Jamaican dollars (approx. JA $2,000).

9. Call for Papers: Adoptionis Interruptus: Essays in Adoption and Sexuality (April 1, 2020)

doption & Culture publishes essays on any aspect of adoption’s intersection with culture, including but not limited to scholarly examinations of adoption practice, law, art, literature, ethics, science, life experiences, film, or any other popular or academic representation of adoption. Adoption & Culture accepts submissions of previously unpublished essays for review.
Adoption & Culture is the journal of The Alliance for the Study of Adoption and Culture (ASAC). ASAC promotes understanding of the experience, institution, and cultural representation of domestic and transnational adoption and related practices such as fostering, assisted reproduction, LGBTQ+ families, and innovative kinship formations. ASAC considers adoptive kinship to include adoptees, first families, and adoptive kin. In its conferences, other gatherings, and publications ASAC provides a forum for discussion and knowledge creation about adoption and related topics through interdisciplinary, culture-based scholarly study and creative practice that consider many ways of perceiving, interpreting, and understanding adoption.
Adoption interrupts meanings of family as biology and/or monoraciality (i.e., because meanings of biology and race so often coalesce) that are circumscribed by sexuality. It does so, because adoption undercuts bio-heteronormativivity and the emphasis bio- heteronormativity places on sexuality as the ideal means through which the family is and should be reproduced. As biological and/or racial interruption, adoption frequently is and has been associated with negative connotations. Indeed, families “touched by adoption” in any form (i.e., be it a result of relinquishment, surrender, transracial or transnational adoption, step-parenting, foster-parenting, parenting by adoptees, LGBTQ2S parenting and/or even parenting via new reproductive technologies) are often made out derogatively to be queer, unintelligible, affectively suspect, and/or motley assemblages. Of course, adoption is not merely a biological, bio-racial, or bio-genealogical interruption – it is also a sexual interruption, although it remains largely unexamined as such. In this light, adoption studies and sexuality studies have important things to offer each other as critical lenses that can be brought to bear on each other.
This special volume of Adoption & Culture invites new and original essays that expressly examine adoption and sexuality in order to interrupt and elucidate the effects of bio- heteronormative and/or monoracial paradigms of family. Essays or proposals may address a range of critical questions that are elicited at the crossroads of adoption and sexuality, and should speak to the volume’s main theme, Adoptionis Interruptus: Essays in Adoption and Sexuality, as it may relate to the following topics:
Sexual cultures within/without family
Bio-racial, transracial and/or transnational interruptions
(A)sexual representations, narratives or discourses of adoption
Adoption, (a)sexual identities, (a)sexual outsiders and/or outlaws.
Adopted vs sexual genealogies
Adopted desires, affects, or assemblages
Bio-families as sexual colonies or colonization
Adoption as (a)sexual attachment and grief
Adoption as (a)sexual subjectivity
(A)sexual pathologies or defects as adoption.
Bio-genetic and/or monoracial family romances or fantasies
Monoracial and/or bio-centric techno-families and reproductive ideals
Family as incest, adoption as outcest/outcast
The sexual exceptionalism(s) of biological and/or monoracial bonds
Proposals or abstracts that vary on, or interrelate, these themes are welcome.
Proposals or abstracts about other topics that speak directly and creatively to the volume’s theme of adoption and sexuality are also welcome.
Completed manuscripts must be submitted by or before: April 1, 2020
Submit all essays or direct questions to Frances J. Latchford: flatch@yorku.ca
Adoption and Culture is a peer reviewed journal in the U.S. and the source of cutting edge critical theory and research on adoption.

10. Call for Submissions: ‘Other Tongues Volume 2: Mixed-Race Women Speak Out... Again!’ (April 21, 2020)
The purpose of this anthology is to explore the question of how mixed-race women in North America identify in the 21st Century. The anthology will also serve as a place to learn about the social experiences, attitudes, and feelings of others, while investigating more general questions around what racial identity has come to mean today. We are inviting previously unpublished submissions that engage, document, and/or explore the experiences of being mixed-race.
Please send one (1) submission of up to 2000 words of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, spoken word (or a combination of these genres) as a SINGLE attachment to othertongues2@gmail.com
Black and white images and artwork should be 300 dpi and sent as attachments in .jpg of .tiff format. Artwork and photography limited to three (3) per applicant.
Please include your contact information, including your name, address, phone number, e-mail, title(s) of work submitted, type of submission, and a short artist bio (50 words max, including your racial mix) in the body of the email, with your name and the type of submission in the subject line (e.g. “Jazmine – Poetry Submission”). All submissions are due APRIL 21, 2020. Incomplete submissions will not be considered.
While we ask you identify your racial mix in the short bio accompanying your submission, the actual text/artwork you are submitting does not need to locate/delineate/define your mix. If you prefer that your contribution remain anonymous, please include this preference at the top of your submission. All personal information you provide will be kept strictly confidential.
For the story behind this project, detailed submission guidelines, and the Editors' bios, please see below.
If you have any questions about this project, please contact the Editors, Adebe DeRango-Adem and Andrea Thompson, at othertongues2@gmail.com
More Info and Guidelines at:
www.adebederangoadem.com
www.andreathompson.ca
www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=276479812662
www.twitter.com/other_tongues
We look forward to reviewing your submission!
Adebe & Andrea
~~~~READ BELOW FOR MORE INFO ON OTHER TONGUES & THE EDITORS ~~~~
WHAT IS OTHER TONGUES?
The first edition of Other Tongues: Mixed Race Women Speak Out was born from a desire to see a new and refreshing literature that could be at the forefront of mixed-race discourse and women’s studies, while providing a space for the creative expression of mixed-race women. Through an inspirational and provocative mix of visual art, literature, orature, creative non-fiction and academic analysis, Other Tongues chronicled the changes in social attitudes towards race, mixed-race, gender and identity, and the each of the contributors’ particular reactions to those attitudes. The diversity of each woman’s story demonstrated the breadth and depth of the lived reality of the mixed experience for women in North America at that particular moment in time. In this way, the book became a snapshot of the North American racial terrain in the afterglow of the inauguration of the first mixed-race/Black American President—a pivotal point in history that many mistakenly labeled the dawning of a “post-racial” age.
WHY OTHER TONGUES 2?
Just under a decade after the publication of our first book, the political landscape has shifted dramatically. We have been led far from the shores of our utopian illusions towards a diametrically polarized social climate, where the gains of not only the last decade but the last century are seemingly at risk. In the wake of an American election that left many shaking with fear and disbelief, issues of equality, civil rights and social justice have moved to the forefront of conversations across North America. Artists, activists and academics have found their passion for social evolution reignited by a sense of urgency. The people are speaking out. The people are getting busy. There is a call to do.
With this second volume of Other Tongues, we hope to continue the conversation started a decade ago by creating a follow-up book that will continue to provide a platform for the voices and visions of mixed-race women, while delving further into issues of intersectionality—exploring perspectives of women from diverse backgrounds, ideologies, racial mixes, ages, social classes, sexual orientations and geographical locations. Given our view of gender as—much like race—variable in its spectrum, we encourage submissions from all woman-identifying and gender non-binary/gender non-conforming folx.
The ten-year anniversary edition of Other Tongues will seek to find unity through the sharing of stories and visions that not only express the intersection of race and feminism, but highlight the insights and lived experiences of those with a knowledge of what it is to embody the (still largely) liminal space(s) of being mixed-race. We hope to unpack these life narratives to ultimately dismantle the oppressive systems that keep us feeling limited in places where we should feel vast.
Thankfully, and in spite of these “othering” and polarizing times, we have storytelling to empower us. Moving forward necessitates a willingness to understand the healing space of storytelling as social alchemy. The lived experience of mixed-race women, and as such, our stories—expressed in words and images that explore the conundrum of race in all its complexity—can become lighthouses guiding us towards the shore of a new future… one fueled by a collective passion to hold space for one another, so we may develop the courage required to stand up, and, for the second time, speak out and be heard.
ABOUT THE EDITORS
Adebe DeRango-Adem is a writer and former attendee of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics (Naropa University), where she mentored with poets Anne Waldman and Amiri Baraka. Her debut book of poems, Ex Nihilo (2010) became a finalist for the Dylan Thomas Prize, while her second collection, Terra Incognita (2015) was nominated for the Pat Lowther Memorial Award. Her newest poetry collection, The Unmooring, was published in 2018 by Mansfield Press. A poem from the collection was featured in the 2019 Poem-In-Your-Pocket anthology, co-created by the League of Canadian Poets and the Academy of American Poets. www.adebederangoadem.com
Andrea Thompson has been publishing and performing her work for over twenty-five years. In 1995 she was featured in the documentary, Slamnation and in 2005 her spoken word CD, One, was nominated for a Canadian Urban Music Award. She was the 2009 Canadian Festival of Spoken Word’s Poet of Honour, was host of the television series, Heart of a Poet, and is author of the novel Over Our Heads. Thompson has written numerous critical essays on spoken word and is currently teaching through the University of Toronto’s continuing studies. In 2019, she released her CD, Soulorations and later that year won the League of Canadian Poets’ Sheri-D Wilson Golden Beret Award for Excellence. www.andreathompson.ca
PRAISE FOR OTHER TONGUES VOL. 1
In a fresh approach to the quest for understanding mixed-race identity in the Americas, the multiple genres that find their way into the Other Tongues anthology— from poetry to photography, fiction to scholarship—perfectly mirror the prodigious spectrum of their authors’ positions toward the topic. This collection speaks boldly and poignantly to who we are, and by "we" I mean not only women of mixed-race ancestry, but all citizens of 21st-century North America.
-- Lise Funderburg
Author of the bestselling Black, White, Other: Biracial Americans Talk About Race and Identity
Passionate, courageous and insightful, Other Tongues speaks affectingly about the pleasures and paradoxes of living between the conventional categories of race. It is a significant anthology, one that I've been waiting for.
-- Dr. Karina Vernon
Black Canadian Literature and Diaspora Studies, University of Toronto

OPPORTUNITIES:

2. Job Opportunity: Dean, School of Social Work at Memorial University in Newfoundland and Labrador
The position profile for this opportunity is available here https://www.mun.ca/vpacademic/Recruitment/searches/Dean_SW_Profile_Nov_2019.pdf.
We acknowledge that the lands on which Memorial University’s campuses are situated are in the traditional territories of diverse Indigenous groups, and we acknowledge with respect the diverse histories and cultures of the Beothuk, Mi’kmaq, Innu, and Inuit of this province.
Memorial University seeks a visionary and dynamic leader to serve as Dean of the School of Social Work. The successful candidate will work closely with all members of the school and its communities to further develop its existing academic strengths, facilitate its internal and external relationships, and enhance its visibility in Atlantic Canada and beyond.
At Memorial University, fostering a culture of inclusion is an institutional imperative. The university’s Employment Equity and Diversity Plan, available here, includes special measures to address the underrepresentation of equity-seeking groups. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our faculty and staff and its scholarship including, women, racialized people, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity.
Social Work programs were first offered at Memorial in the 1960s. An MSW program was established in 1983 and a PhD program in 1994. The BSW and MSW programs are accredited by the Canadian Association for Social Work Education (CASWE), and the school was recently granted an eight-year unconditional Accredited Standard. Memorial’s School of Social Work is among the most racially and ethnically diverse social work schools in Canada. The school offers programs through a combination of on-campus and distance delivery to approximately 300 students. Faculty and students are engaged in critical theories and socially-engaged community-based practice, research and scholarship. Examples include community service learning, critical social policy, 2SLGBTQIA+ studies, critical gerontology, policing and forensic social work, mad studies, settlement and integration, anti-colonialism, anti-Black racism and decolonization. In 2019, the school established the Visiting Elders Program in partnership with Memorial’s Aboriginal Resource Office. Through this unique program, an elder on campus helps foster racially and culturally affirming learning environments for Indigenous and non-Indigenous students, faculty and all members of the university community — thus providing a significant contribution towards the Indigenization of Memorial University. To learn more about the school’s faculty and research, visit https://www.mun.ca/socialwork/.
The School of Social Work is one of 14 faculties and schools at Memorial. Founded in 1925, Memorial University is one of the largest universities in Atlantic Canada and the only university in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It is a public, multi-campus, comprehensive university with teaching and research programs of international distinction. Significantly, Memorial University was recently selected by the Nunavut Artic College to partner in the further development of post-secondary education that reflects Inuit culture, values and language. Memorial’s community includes more than 18,000 students across four campuses, and 5,200 faculty and staff. For more information about this dynamic institution, visit https://www.mun.ca.
Reporting to the Provost and Vice-President (Academic), and as a senior member of Memorial’s leadership team, the next Dean of the School of Social Work will provide visionary leadership to a team of faculty and staff who are passionate about the work they do to support, mentor and engage their students, alumni, and local, national and international communities. The successful candidate will provide leadership for the maintenance of existing and creation of new innovative, sustainable programs; foster the development of relationships in the school, as well as between the school and other faculties; and build external links to the school. The successful candidate will have an established record as a scholar, teacher and member of the social work profession; relevant administrative experience, including experience in collaborative teams, and demonstrated effectiveness as a leader; a collegial and open management style; and the capacity to be a strong and visible advocate for the school inside the university and externally. For more information about the school, visit https://www.mun.ca/socialwork/.
Memorial University is committed to employment equity and diversity and encourages applications from all qualified candidates, including women; people of any sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression; Indigenous peoples; racialized people; and people with disabilities.
Memorial University respects people’s different needs and, therefore, will take all reasonable steps to ensure accommodation for applicants where appropriate. If you require an accommodation to participate in the recruitment process, please notify Tina Hickey at hickeyt@mun.ca or 709-864-2548. For more information, see http://www.mun.ca/main//accessibility.php.
Consideration of candidates will begin in January 2020. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled.
Written nominations, applications, or expressions of interest for the position should be submitted in confidence via email to vpaswrk@mun.ca or
The Office of the Provost and Vice-President (Academic)
Memorial University of Newfoundland
St. John’s, NL
A1C 5S7
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

3. Job Opportunity: Tenure-Track Appointment in Gender, Post-Colonialism, and the Islamic World, Department of Politics, York University (January 25, 2020)
Department of Politics, York University
Gender, Post-Colonialism, and the Islamic World
The Department of Politics, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, York University invites applications for a tenure-track Professorial Stream position at the Assistant Professor level in Gender, Post-Colonialism, and the Islamic World to commence July 1st, 2020. Candidates must demonstrate excellence or promise of excellence in teaching, service and in scholarly research, and have produced original scholarly research appropriate to their stage of career. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.
A PhD by the start of the appointment in Political Science or an appropriate related field is required. The Department of Politics is internationally recognized as one of the leading sites for the study of gender and politics informed by a diverse range of critical intellectual approaches. We seek candidates with exceptional promise of scholarly achievement exploring the complex gendered processes of colonialism/postcolonialism and the Islamic world; teaching success and pedagogical innovation at both the undergraduate and graduate levels; strong prospects for external research funding; and demonstrated commitment to multidisciplinary scholarship. The successful candidate’s research should complement the present scholarly profile of the Department of Politics in the study of gender, post-colonialism, anti-imperialism, and the Islamic World, conceived to encompass not only "Islamic countries" but in a diasporic sense, and to develop the conception in new and innovative ways. This research may be located within one, or span across two or more, of the Department’s five fields: Gender and Politics, Comparative Politics, Canadian Politics, International Politics, and Political Theory.
The successful candidate must be suitable for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The position will involve graduate teaching and supervision, as well as undergraduate teaching. Pedagogical innovation in high priority areas such as experiential education and technology enhanced learning is preferred.
York University has a policy on Accommodation in Employment for Persons with Disabilities (https://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/policies/accommodation-in-employment-for-persons-with-disabilities/) and is committed to working towards a barrier-free workplace and to expanding the accessibility of the workplace to persons with disabilities. Candidates who require accommodation during the selection process are invited to contact David Mutimer, Chair of the Search Committee at polschr@yorku.ca.
York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA Program, which applies to women, members of visible minorities (racialized groups), Aboriginal (Indigenous) people and persons with disabilities, can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/ or by calling the AA line at 416‐736‐5713. Applicants wishing to self‐identify as part of York University’s Affirmative Action Program can do so by downloading, completing and submitting the form found at: http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/self-identification-form/. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens, Permanent Residents and Indigenous peoples in Canada will be given priority. No application will be considered without a completed mandatory Work Status Declaration form which can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/work-authorization-form.
The deadline for receipt of completed applications is January 25, 2020. Applicants should submit a signed letter of application, a curriculum vitae, a teaching dossier, a sample of their scholarly writing (no longer than 20 pages), a completed Work Status Declaration form (mandatory), a completed Self-Identification form (optional) and arrange for three confidential letters of recommendation to be sent directly to Prof. David Mutimer, Chair, Department of Politics, by email to polsjobs@yorku.ca (subject line: “Gender, Post-Colonialism, and the Islamic World”).
Posting End Date: January 25, 2020

4. Job Opportunity: Lecturer or Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track Probationary Position), Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora, the Department of English Literatures, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick (January 31, 2020)
The Department of English Literatures at Mount Allison University is seeking candidates for a tenure-track probationary position at the rank of Lecturer or Assistant Professor (subject to budgetary approval) in the subject area of Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora. This subject area can include literatures of continental Africa, the Caribbean and island nations, and of the African diaspora in North America, Europe, and around the world. This area of expertise should be situated within the larger fields of post-colonial, global, and world literature in English. Candidates are sought with one or more intersecting areas of secondary expertise(parenthetical lists are examples only, and no single candidate is expected to engage every example):
•Contemporary literary forms (for example: digital literature, graphic novels, zines, multimedia texts, spoken word, rap/hip-hop)
•Literary approaches to contemporary popular culture (for example: gaming, film, television, and video, digital cultural platforms, social media studies, popular music, performance art) •Interdisciplinary literary studies (for example: literature and science studies, feminist literary analysis, digital humanities, literature and environmental studies)
In their cover letters candidates should describe their specific expertise profile in relation to their research and teaching backgrounds. The successful candidate will be expected to maintain a balance between research and teaching, as Mount Allison University places a high value on both research and teaching and providing research opportunities for undergraduate students. Mount Allison University is a top-ranked undergraduate university in Canada that prioritizes engaged and creative undergraduate teaching. Candidates are asked to include a Teaching Proposal of up to 1000 words that describes their plan to develop courses and course materials within the Mount Allison Department of English Literatures. Candidates are encouraged to look at the current offerings in the list of Department Courses link, but to also reimagine new courses and approaches to teaching that will support the ongoing decolonization and diversification of our current program. Faculty in the department are expected to teach first-and second-year introductory courses in literature, as well as third-and fourth-year courses on specific subjects in English literature. Candidates should describe how their teaching will engage multiple levels of university teaching, with details concerning specific themes, texts, and pedagogical methods. Candidates should connect their teaching proposal to one or more of the following teaching approaches or pedagogical theories:
•Inter disciplinary teaching practice
•Indigenous/ decolonized/ anti-racist teaching and learning
•Experiential learning
•Learning competencies and skill development
•Creative practice/ research-creation pedagogies
Please do not send Teaching Portfolios or Statements of Teaching Philosophy.
Qualified candidates will have a complete PhD in English Literature or another field directly related to the described position. The Department of English Literatures seeks to reverse the historic under-representation of equity-seeking groups among our faculty. We thus encourage applications from those who would contribute to the diversification of our staff and faculty including, but not limited to, individuals willing to self-identify as being of African heritage or African Descent, including people from the Caribbean and the Americas. Applicants are invited to write a statement that identifies them as a person of African Descent or other racial or cultural minority group, as expressed by their current connection to their community, or their personal or family narrative that describes their past connection to such a community. Candidates should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, and 1000-word Teaching Proposal as one PDF document directly to: english@mta.ca. Further materials may be requested later in the search process. Three letters of reference from academic referees should be sent directly from the referee to: english@mta.ca. Application materials should be addressed to: Professor Janine Rogers Chair of the Search Committee, Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora Department of English Literatures Mount Allison University Sackville, New Brunswick Canada Mount Allison acknowledges, honours, and respects that the land named Sackville, NB is part of the  unceded  territory  of  the  Mi’kmaq  People  who  are  the  historic  inhabitants,  custodians,  and dwellers on the land where our University is built and confirms its commitment to strengthening relationships with all Indigenous people. Mount Allison is committed to diversity and inclusiveness. We encourage applications from members of racialized communities, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, and persons of all sexual and gender identities. We seek candidates with qualifications and knowledge to contribute specifically to the further diversification of our campus community. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents are given priority. Canadians and permanent residents should indicate their citizenship status in their application.

5. Graduate Research Awards for Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation 2019-2020 (February 3, 2020)

REMINDER and UPDATE
- deadline for applications is 3 FEBRUARY 2020
GRADUATE RESEARCH AWARDS
for Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation 2019-2020
CAD $5,000
A total of four awards of CAD $5,000 are available to Canadian Master’s and/or Doctoral candidates to support the independent research and writing of an academic paper responding to a specific Non-Proliferation, Arms Control and Disarmament (NACD) topic.  Awards also include domestic travel support to Ottawa where successful candidates will present their completed papers during a special event at Global Affairs Canada Headquarters on March 25, 2020.
Deadline for applications:                                                        3 February 2020
Selection of four award recipients:                                        17 February 2020
Presentations at GAC in Ottawa:                                            25 March 2020
CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO APPLY http://www.thesimonsfoundation.ca/graduate-research-awards-disarmament-arms-control-and-non-proliferation-2019-2020
Graduate Research Awards for Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-Proliferation (http://www.thesimonsfoundation.ca/projects/graduate-research-awards-disarmament-arms-control-and-non-proliferation) are offered by The Simons Foundation Canada (http://www.thesimonsfoundation.ca/)  and the International Security Research and Outreach Programme (ISROP) of Global Affairs Canada (GAC) (https://www.international.gc.ca/isrop-prisi/index.aspx?lang=eng) with a primary objective to enhance Canadian graduate level scholarship on disarmament, arms control and non-proliferation issues.

6. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track), Graphic Communications Management/Packaging, Faculty of Communications and Design, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada (February 14, 2020)
Tenure Track Position in Graphic Communications Management – Packaging Located in downtown Toronto, the largest and most culturally diverse city in Canada, Ryerson University, is on the territory of the Anishinaabeg, Haudenosauneeand the Wendat Peoples and is known for innovative programs built on the integration of theoretical and practical learning. Ourundergraduate and graduate programs are distinguished by a professionally focused curriculum with a strong emphasis on excellence in teaching, scholarlyresearch and creative activities. Ryerson is known for its culture of entrepreneurship and innovation and is recognized as a city builder, as it continues its growth through award-winning architecture and expansion of its campus. Dedicated to a people first culture, Ryerson is proud to have been selected as one of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers and a Greater Toronto’s Top Employer for every year since 2015. To learn more about our work environment, please visit us on Twitter: @RyersonU, @RyersonHR and @RyersonECI and our LinkedIn company page. We invite you toexplore employment at Ryerson. Aboriginal candidates who would like to learn more about working at Ryerson University are welcome to contact Tracey King, Indigenous Human Resources Lead at t26king@ryerson.ca.
The Opportunity
The School of Graphics Communications Management (GCM) in the Faculty of Communications & Design (FCAD) at Ryerson University invites applications for a full-time tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of packaging, with a preferred focus on packaging materials, processes, and procedures relating to areas such as food, pharmaceutical or other complementary topics. We especially welcome applicants who bring complementary strengths in fields of emerging or underrepresented areas of scholarship. We welcome applications from those who would contribute to the further diversification of our faculty and its scholarship. The position will commence July 1, 2020, subject to final budgetary approval. FCAD comprises of programs in communication, design and the performing arts. The School of GCM is internationally recognized as a leader in graphic communications education and research. Our Faculty members deliver exception al hands-on, forward-thinking programming. We value student engagement and student choice by offering concentrations in packaging, publishing, leadership and digital output. In addition to our successful undergraduate degree, the School is developing graduate-level programming with a focus on packaging. To learn more about the School of Graphic Communications Management, visit www.ryerson.ca/gcm
This position falls under the jurisdiction of the Ryerson Faculty Association (RFA) (www.rfanet.ca).The RFA collective agreement can be viewed here (https://www.ryerson.ca/hr/employee-resources/rfa/full-time-LTF/collective-agreement/)  and a summary of RFA benefits can be found here (https://www.ryerson.ca/hr/employee-resources/rfa/full-time-LTF/benefits/) .
Responsibilities
The successful candidate will engage in a combination of teaching, research and service duties, maintaining an inclusive, equitable, and collegial work environment across all activities. The candidate will: pursue an innovative and independent research program that is externally funded and produces cutting-edge, high quality research output; contribute to our undergraduate programs through teaching, mentoring and supervision of students to facilitate junior scholars and diversify the field; and engage in service activities within the School, Faculty and University. The candidate will be expected to participate in the University’s shared governance model (committee participation, departmental planning and programming), develop co-curricular activities, and remain connected to a network of scholars and professionals that will benefit students intending to enter the field.
Qualifications
Candidates must hold an earned doctoral degree in a field related to packaging (for example, package printing, package engineering or package design). In addition, the successful candidate must present evidence of:
●an active, well-defined research agenda, including publications in high-quality peer-reviewed academic journals, preferably indexed;
●a commitment to securing internal and external research funding;
●capacity for teaching or training excellence, preferably at a post-secondary level;
●excellent written and oral communication skills;
●A desire and ability to support and develop academic programming in these topics;
●commitment to our values of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion as it pertains to service, teaching, and scholarly research or creative activities, including a demonstrated ability to make learning accessible and inclusive for a diverse student population; and
●an ability to contribute to the life of the School, Faculty and the University through collegial service.
Equity at Ryerson
At the intersection of mind and action, Ryerson is on a transformative path to become Canada’s leading comprehensive innovation university. Integral to this path is the placement of equity, diversity and inclusion as fundamental to our institutional culture. Our current academic plan outlines each as core values and we work to embed them in all that we do. Ryerson University welcomes those who have demonstrated a commitment to upholding the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion and will assist us to expand our capacity for diversity in the broadest sense. In addition, to correct the conditions of disadvantage in employment in Canada, we encourage applications from members of groups that have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized, including First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, Indigenous peoples of North America, racialized persons, persons with disabilities, and those who identify as women and/or 2SLGBTQ+. How to Apply
Applicants must submit their application online via the Faculty Recruitment Portal (click on “Start Application Process” to begin). The review of applications will begin February 14, 2020, and will continue until the position is filled.The application must contain the following:
●a letter of application;
●a curriculum vitae;
●two to three recent peer-reviewed scholarly research publications (academic journal articles, textbook chapters, whitepapers, technical reports);
●any results of teaching evaluations (or equivalent evidence, such as a teaching dossier);
●names of three individuals who may be contacted for references.
Please note that all qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, applications from Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.Candidates must therefore indicate in their application if they are a permanent resident or citizen of Canada. Any confidential inquiries can be directed to the DHC Chair Dr. Martin Habekost at mhabekos@ryerson.ca.
Ryerson is committed toaccessibility for persons with disabilities. For any confidential accommodation needs in order to participate in the recruitment and selection process and/ or inquiries regarding accessing the Faculty Recruitment Portal, please contactSumentha D’Souza, HR Advisor, at sumentha@ryerson.ca

7. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track), Technology Innovation and Design, Faculty of Communications and Design, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada (February 14, 2020)

School of Graphics Communications Management, Faculty of Communications & Design [FCAD]Tenure Track Position in Technology Innovation and Design Located in downtown Toronto, the largest and most culturally diverse city in Canada, Ryerson University, is on the territory of the Anishinaabeg, Haudenosauneeand the Wendat Peoples and is known for innovative programs built on the integration of theoretical and practical learning. Ourundergraduate and graduate programs are distinguished by a professionally focused curriculum with a strong emphasis on excellence in teaching, scholarlyresearch and creative activities. Ryerson is known for its culture of entrepreneurship and innovation and is recognized as a city builder, as it continues its growth through award-winning architecture and expansion of its campus. Dedicated to a people first culture, Ryerson is proud to have been selected as one of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers and a Greater Toronto’s Top Employer for every year since 2015. To learn more about our work environment, please visit us on Twitter: @RyersonU, @RyersonHR and @RyersonECI and our LinkedIn company page. We invite you to explore employment at Ryerson. Aboriginal candidates who would like to learn more about working at Ryerson University are welcome to contact Tracey King, Indigenous Human Resources Lead at t26king@ryerson.ca.
The Opportunity
The School ofGraphics Communications Management (GCM) in the Faculty of Communications & Design (FCAD) at Ryerson University invites applications for a full-time tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of technology innovation and design, with a focus on graphic communications processes. We welcome applications from those who would contribute to the further diversification of our faculty and its scholarship. The position will commence July1, 2020, subject to final budgetary  approval. FCAD comprises of programs in communication, design and the performing arts. The School of GCM is internationally recognized as a leader in graphic communications education and research. Our Faculty members deliver exceptional hands-on, forward-thinking programming. We value student engagement and student choice by offering concentrations in packaging, publishing, leadership and digital output. In addition to our successful under graduate degree, the School is developing graduate-level programming with a focus on packaging. To learn more about the School of Graphic Communications Management, visit www.ryerson.ca/gcm. This position falls under the jurisdiction of the Ryerson Faculty Association (RFA) (www.rfanet.ca).The RFA collective agreement can be viewed here (https://www.ryerson.ca/hr/employee-resources/rfa/full-time-LTF/collective-agreement/)  and a summary of RFA benefits can be found here (https://www.ryerson.ca/hr/employee-resources/rfa/full-time-LTF/benefits/).
Responsibilities
The successful candidate will engage in a combination of teaching, research and service duties, maintaining an inclusive, equitable, and collegial work environment across all activities. The candidate will: pursue an innovative and independent research program that is externally funded and produces cutting-edge, high quality research output; contribute to our undergraduate programs through teaching, mentoring and supervision of students to facilitate junior scholars and diversify the field; and engage in service activities within the School, Faculty and University. The candidate will be expected to participate in the University’s shared governance model (committee participation, departmental planning and programming), develop co-curricular activities, and remain connected to a network of scholars and professionals that will benefit students in tending to enter the field.
Qualifications
Candidates must hold a graduate degree (PhD preferred) in a field related to technology innovation, design thinking, creative thinking, traditional or digital fabrication (CNC laser, additive manufacturing). In addition, the successful candidate must present evidence of:
●either a research or commercial experience as follows: an active research agenda (ability to establish and maintain an independent, externally funded research program) including publications in academic peer-reviewed journals, orcommercial experience with at least 5 years experience in a middle-level management position at a medium to large size printing/ packaging/ design company. Typically this may be a Director, Manager, Engineer of areas such as, but not limited to Prepress, Press, Crossmedia, Finishing, eCommerce & Workflow Development, R&D, Operations, etc.;
●capacity for teaching or training excellence, preferably at a post-secondary level;
●excellent written and oral communication skills;
●a desire and ability to support and develop academic programming in these topics;
●capacity to be a team player and ability to promote and cultivate a respectful and inclusive working and learning environment;
●commitment to our values of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion as it pertains to service, teaching, and scholarly research or creative activities, including a demonstrated ability to make learning accessible and inclusive for a diverse student population; and
●an ability to contribute to the life of the School, Faculty and the University through collegial service.
Equity at Ryerson
At the intersection of mind and action, Ryerson is on a transformative path to become Canada’s leading comprehensive innovation university. Integral to this path is the placement of equity, diversity and inclusion as fundamental to our institutional culture. Our currentacademic plan outlines each as core values and we work to embed them in all that we do. Ryerson University welcomes those who have demonstrated a commitment to upholding the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion and will assist us to expand our capacity for diversity in the broadest sense. In addition, to correct the conditions of disadvantage in employment in Canada, we encourage applications from members of groups that have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized, including First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, Indigenous peoples of North America, racialized persons, persons with disabilities, and those who identify as women and/or 2SLGBTQ+. How to Apply
Applicants must submit their application online via the Faculty Recruitment Portal (click on “Start Application Process” to begin). The review of applications will begin February 14, 2020, and will continue until the position is filled.The application must contain the following:
●a letter of application;
●a curriculum vitae;
●two to three recent peer-reviewed scholarly research publications (academic journal articles, textbook chapters, whitepapers, technical reports);
●any results of teaching evaluations (or equivalent evidence, such as a teaching dossier);
●names of three individuals who may be contacted for references.

8. Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor in Social-Cultural Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, York University (February 14, 2020)

Position Information
Position Rank: Full Time Teaching Stream - Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
Discipline/Field: Social-Cultural Anthropology
Home Faculty: Liberal Arts & Professional Studies
Home Department/Area/Division: Anthropology
Affiliation/Union: YUFA
Position Start Date: July 1, 2020
The Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies invites applications for a teaching stream tenure-track appointment in Social-Cultural Anthropology at the Assistant Professor level to commence July 1, 2020. The position is for an expert in first year experience and teaching within the undergraduate program in the Department.The successful candidate will be expected to teach and develop courses at all undergraduate levels, with a particular focus on the first-year experience. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.
Applicants must have scholarly training and teaching experience in Social-Cultural Anthropology. A PhD in Anthropology by the start of the appointment or shortly thereafter is required. The successful candidate will demonstrate excellence or the promise of excellence in teaching university-level courses with an emphasis on critical skills, strong commitment to pedagogy, student success and cultural diversity. We are interested in candidates who have a substantial record of incorporating experiential education and technology-enhanced learning in the classroom. Leadership in pedagogical innovation that enhances Department’s focus on engaged anthropology and furthers community-oriented and advocacy courses would be an asset. We particularly value experience and innovation in first-year course design and working with diverse student populations. The successful candidate is also expected to provide evidence of service or potential to contribute to service in administrative and committee work.
York University has a policy on Accommodation in Employment for Persons with Disabilities and is committed to working towards a barrier-free workplace and to expanding the accessibility of the workplace to persons with disabilities. Candidates who require accommodation during the selection process are invited to contact Professor Shubhra Gururani by email at chranth@yorku.ca.
York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA Program, which applies to women, members of visible minorities (racialized groups), Aboriginal (Indigenous) people and persons with disabilities, can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/ or by calling the AA line at 416.736.5713. Applicants wishing to self-identify as part of York University's Affirmative Action Program can do so by downloading, completing and submitting the form found at: http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/self-identification-form/. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens, Permanent Residents and Indigenous peoples in Canada will be given priority. No application will be considered without a completed mandatory Work Status Declaration form which can be found at http://acadjobs.info.yorku.ca/affirmative-action/work-authorization-form.
Applicants should submit their application package, including a signed letter of application outlining their scholarly training and teaching experience, an up-to-date curriculum vitae, a teaching dossier and three confidential letters of reference, through the online application system at apply.laps.yorku.ca beginning on Friday January 17, 2020.
Referees should provide strong letters of reference and be advised to address the candidate’s qualifications and experience in relation to the position.
Applicants may direct questions to Professor Shubhra Gururani, Chair of the Department of Anthropology, Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, by email at chranth@yorku.ca.
The deadline for receipt of completed applications is February 14, 2020.